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Sample records for accelerated crack growth

  1. Acceleration of Fatigue Crack Growth after Overload in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, A.; Miyahara, H.; Makabe, C.; Miyazaki, T.

    The effects of an overload on fatigue crack growth behavior have been investigated by using carbon steel. Delayed retardation and acceleration of crack growth were both observed. These phenomena depended not only on overload conditions but also on the baseline stress conditions. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the materials affected the crack growth rate after overload. It was found that crack growth accelerated when tensile residual stress was distributed in front of the crack tip. The residual stress distribution is related to the crack opening geometry at the overload stage.

  2. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  3. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  4. Accelerated Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Effect-Powder Metallurgy Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low (Delta) K, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = K(sub min)/K(sub max)). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of K(sub max) (K(sub max) = 0.4 K(sub IC)). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and K(sub max) influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  5. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  6. Acceleration and localization of subcritical crack growth in a natural composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Graham, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic failure of natural and engineered materials is often preceded by an acceleration and localization of damage that can be observed indirectly from acoustic emissions (AE) generated by the nucleation and growth of microcracks. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of the statistical properties and spatiotemporal characteristics of AE signals generated during triaxial compression of a sandstone sample. We demonstrate that the AE event amplitudes and interevent times are characterized by scaling distributions with shapes that remain invariant during most of the loading sequence. Localization of the AE activity on an incipient fault plane is associated with growth in AE rate in the form of a time-reversed Omori law with an exponent near 1. The experimental findings are interpreted using a model that assumes scale-invariant growth of the dominating crack or fault zone, consistent with the Dugdale-Barenblatt "process zone" model. We determine formal relationships between fault size, fault growth rate, and AE event rate, which are found to be consistent with the experimental observations. From these relations, we conclude that relatively slow growth of a subcritical fault may be associated with a significantly more rapid increase of the AE rate and that monitoring AE rate may therefore provide more reliable predictors of incipient failure than direct monitoring of the growing fault.

  7. Acceleration and localization of subcritical crack growth in a natural composite material.

    PubMed

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S; Main, I G; Zaiser, M; Graham, C C

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic failure of natural and engineered materials is often preceded by an acceleration and localization of damage that can be observed indirectly from acoustic emissions (AE) generated by the nucleation and growth of microcracks. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of the statistical properties and spatiotemporal characteristics of AE signals generated during triaxial compression of a sandstone sample. We demonstrate that the AE event amplitudes and interevent times are characterized by scaling distributions with shapes that remain invariant during most of the loading sequence. Localization of the AE activity on an incipient fault plane is associated with growth in AE rate in the form of a time-reversed Omori law with an exponent near 1. The experimental findings are interpreted using a model that assumes scale-invariant growth of the dominating crack or fault zone, consistent with the Dugdale-Barenblatt "process zone" model. We determine formal relationships between fault size, fault growth rate, and AE event rate, which are found to be consistent with the experimental observations. From these relations, we conclude that relatively slow growth of a subcritical fault may be associated with a significantly more rapid increase of the AE rate and that monitoring AE rate may therefore provide more reliable predictors of incipient failure than direct monitoring of the growing fault.

  8. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  9. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy and its dependence on the deformation mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  10. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  11. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  12. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  13. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  14. A Crack Growth Evaluation Method for Interacting Multiple Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e. g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks.

  15. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  16. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  17. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  18. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  19. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  20. Description of crack growth using the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening loads, crack tip stretch, and strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, A.U. de; Hoeve, H.J. ten; Henriksen, T.K.

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays, application of the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening load levels is well known. In this paper the incremental formulation of a fatigue crack growth law is used to demonstrate the role of the crack opening load level in time-independent fatigue crack growth. Less known is the ability of the strip-yield model to define the strain rate at the crack tip. A threshold level {dot {var{underscore}epsilon}}{sub th} of this strain rate is introduced and used to formulate a criterion for initiation of time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth. This process is called corrosion fatigue. To account for effects of environment and frequency on the crack growth rate a time-dependent part is added to the incremental fatigue crack growth law. The resulting incremental crack growth equation is integrated to obtain the crack growth rate for a load cycle. The model discussed in this paper is a mechanical model. Physical aspects other than strain rate, loading frequency and load wave shape are not modeled in an explicit way. Hence, the model is valid for specific environment/base metal combinations. However, in consideration of the effects of small variations of environment, temperature, and other variables on the crack growth rates, it can be used as a reference solution. The fatigue crack growth model has been implemented in the NASGRO (ESACRACK) software. The time-dependent part is still subject to further evaluation.

  1. Crack growth resistance in nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouagne, Pierre; Neighbour, Gareth B.; McEnaney, Brian

    2002-05-01

    Crack growth resistance curves for the non-linear fracture parameters KR, JR and R were measured for unirradiated PGA and IM1-24 graphites that are used as moderators in British Magnox and AGR nuclear reactors respectively. All the curves show an initial rising part, followed by a plateau region where the measured parameter is independent of crack length. JR and R decreased at large crack lengths. The initial rising curves were attributed to development of crack bridges in the wake of the crack front, while, in the plateau region, the crack bridging zone and the frontal process zone, ahead of the crack tip, reached steady state values. The decreases at large crack lengths were attributed to interaction of the frontal zone with the specimen end face. Microscopical evidence for graphite fragments acting as crack bridges showed that they were much smaller than filler particles, indicating that the graphite fragments are broken down during crack propagation. There was also evidence for friction points in the crack wake zone and shear cracking of some larger fragments. Inspection of KR curves showed that crack bridging contributed ~0.4 MPa m0.5 to the fracture toughness of the graphites. An analysis of JR and R curves showed that the development of the crack bridging zone in the rising part of the curves contributed ~20% to the total work of fracture. Energies absorbed during development of crack bridges and steady state crack propagation were greater for PGA than for IM1-24 graphite. These differences reflect the greater extent of irreversible processes occurring during cracking in the coarser microtexture of PGA graphite.

  2. Fracture toughness and crack growth of Zerodur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture toughness and crack growth parameters of Zerodur, a low expansion glass ceramic material, were determined. The fracture toughness was determined using indentation techniques and was found to be 0.9 MPa x m(sup 1/2). The crack growth parameters were determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading in an aqueous environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) were found to be 30.7 and -6.837, respectively. The crack growth parameters were also determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to dynamic loading in an ambient 50 percent relative humidity environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) at 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 59.3 and -17.51, respectively.

  3. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  4. Subcritical crack growth in two titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of subcritical crack growth during static loading of precracked titanium alloys in salt water using samples too thin for plane strain loading to predominate was examined as a method for determining the critical stress intensity for crack propagation in salt water. Significant internal crack growth followed by arrest was found at quite low stress intensities, but crack growth rates were relatively low. Assuming these techniques provided a reliable measurement of the critical stress intensity, the value for annealed Ti-4Al-1.5Mo-0.5V alloy was apparently about 35 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, while that for annealed Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V was below 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power. Crack growth was also observed in tests conducted in both alloys in an air environment. At 65 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, the extent of crack growth was greater in air than in salt water. Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V showed arrested crack growth in air at a stress intensity of 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power.

  5. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  6. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  7. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  8. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  9. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  11. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  12. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  13. Load interaction effects on fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoychev, Stoyan Ivanov

    The fatigue crack propagation rate can be either increased or decreased by the previous load history (overload, block loading, different load ratio, etc.). Currently, these load sequence effects can be explained either by using crack closure or internal stress concepts. They are studied in Part I and II of the dissertation accordingly. In Part I, the last 35 years of research in the crack closure area were carefully reviewed. A new Quadrature (Q) method for crack closure estimation, based on integration rather than differentiation of the load-displacement data, was developed and compared to the 'best' methods from the literature. The new method was able to reduce the scatter in the opening load estimations to a negligible level, but does not collapse the results for different load ratios (0.1 and 0.9). In Part II a general relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the two-parameter (DeltaKtip and tipKmax) crack driving force was derived using fundamental fatigue (ε-N curve) properties. Based on this analysis, a new way of representing the da/dN data by means of the crack propagation (CP) table was proposed. In order to make the CP table sensitive to the load history effects, it was scaled using the applied and internal stresses and the corresponding stress intensity factors, characteristic for the crack tip. Two methods for calculating the internal stress intensity factors were developed, adopting the weight function and the new clamping force concepts accordingly. Finally, the CP table at the crack tip was successfully used together with the two-parameter crack driving force equation to predict da/dN for different load ratios, block loading and a single overload. Calculation of the crack closure was not needed in order to predict the experimental data accurately.

  14. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  15. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  16. Thermally activated processes of fatigue crack growth in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaki; Fujii, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates in steels at high and low temperatures have been investigated using Paris curves. The fatigue crack growth rates at high temperatures are quite different from those at low temperatures. Arrhenius plots between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and test temperatures at constant stress intensity factor range (ΔKI) indicate a difference of the rate-controlling process for fatigue crack growth with temperature. Slip deformation at the crack tip governs fatigue crack growth at high temperatures, while hydrogen diffusion is associated with crack growth at low temperatures.

  17. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  18. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  19. Crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade 2 steel in hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic-load crack growth measurements were performed on ASME SA-105 Grade 2 steel specimens exposed to 10,000- and 15,000-psi hydrogen and to 5000-psi helium, all at ambient temperatures. The cyclic-load crack growth rate was found to be faster in high-pressure hydrogen than in helium. Cyclic-load crack growth rates in this steel were not reduced by preloading in air to a stress intensity of 1.5 times the cyclic K sub max in hydrogen. There are indications that holding under load in hydrogen, and loading and unloading in helium retards hydrogen-accelerated cyclic-load crack growth. Cyclic frequency and R (ratio of K sub min/k sub max) were important variables determining crack growth rate. The crack growth rate increased as a logarithm of the cycle duration and decreased with increasing R.

  20. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  1. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  2. Surface crack growth in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, J.; Mandell, J. F.; Wang, S. S.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of damage extension and failure in glass and graphite/epoxy laminates containing partially through-thickness surface cracks are presented. The laminates studied are divided between those containing four plies, 90/0/0/90, 15/-15/-15/15, and 45/-45/-45/45, and those containing 12-16 plies of the general configurations 0/90, + or - 45, and 0/+ or - 60. Most of the results are for surface cracks of various lengths and several depths. Stable damage extension in laminates containing surface cracks is predominantly delamination between plies, and tends to be much more extensive prior to failure than is the case with through-thickness cracks, resulting in approximately notch-insensitive behavior in most cases. A greater tendency for notch-sensitive behavior is found for 0/90 graphite/epoxy laminates for which stable damage extension is more limited. The rate of damage extension with increasing applied stress depends upon the composite system and ply configuration as well as the crack length and depth. An approximate semiempirical method is presented for estimating the growth rate of large damage-regions.

  3. A crack-closure model for predicting fatigue-crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The development and application of an analytical model of cycle crack growth is presented that includes the effects of crack closure. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading and to predict crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. The ratio of predicted to experimental lives ranged from 0.66 to 1.48. These predictions were made using data from an ASTM E24.06.01 Round Robin.

  4. Crack growth in high temperature materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stoloff, N.S.

    1998-12-31

    Many intermetallic compounds are brittle at low temperatures. Some compounds, including NiAl and MoSi, seem to be intrinsically brittle. Other compounds, including Ni{sub 3}Al, FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al, are reasonably ductile when tested in inert environments. Water and water vapor can severely embrittle these and other compounds because they contain an active element such as aluminum or silicon. The release of atomic hydrogen from water leads, at room temperature, to hydrogen embrittlement. Another source of embrittlement, at elevated temperatures, is oxygen from the atmosphere. The effects of aggressive environments on the crack growth behavior of several intermetallics under monotonic or cyclic loading are described. Alleviation of embrittlement by means of alloying, the use of coatings or by prestrain are described, although no single method is effective for all intermetallics. A brief survey of environmentally induced crack growth in superalloys is included.

  5. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  6. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Models for Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dag, Serkan; Yildirim, Bora; Sabuncuoglu, Baris

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this study is to develop crack growth analysis methods for functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to mode I cyclic loading. The study presents finite elements based computational procedures for both two and three dimensional problems to examine fatigue crack growth in functionally graded materials. Developed methods allow the computation of crack length and generation of crack front profile for a graded medium subjected to fluctuating stresses. The results presented for an elliptical crack embedded in a functionally graded medium, illustrate the competing effects of ellipse aspect ratio and material property gradation on the fatigue crack growth behavior.

  7. Short-crack growth behaviour in various aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. R. (Compiler); Newman, James C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the first phase of an AGARD Cooperative Test Program on the behavior and growth of short fatigue cracks are reviewed. The establishment of a common test method, means of data collection/analysis and crack growth modeling in an aircraft alloy AA 2024-T3 are described. The second phase allowed testing of various materials and loading conditions. The results of this second phase are described. All materials exhibited a short-crack effect to some extent. The effect was much less evident in 4340 steel than in the other materials. For the aluminum, aluminum-lithium, and titanium alloys, short cracks grew at stress-intensity factor ranges lower, in some cases much lower, than the thresholds obtained from long crack tests. Several laboratories used the same crack growth model to analyze the growth of short cracks. Reasonable agreement was found between measured and predicted short-crack growth rates and fatigue lives.

  8. Fatigue crack growth in nodular cast iron - Influences of graphite spherical size and variable amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottitschka, T.; Pusch, G.; Biermann, H.; Zybell, L.; Kuna, M.

    2010-07-01

    Investigations of constant and variable amplitude loading, including a variety of overloads, were carried out experimentally as well as numerically in order to characterize the fatigue crack growth behaviour of nodular cast iron with a ferritic matrix. Under constant cyclic loading the crack growth rate, which depends on the graphite size can be described well by the NASGRO equation. The mean distance between the graphite particles and the shape factor also influence the fracture behaviour. The experimental investigations show that overloads yield to acceleration effects in fatigue crack growth. The calculation of the a-N curves based on different usual life prediction models yields non-conservative results. Therefore, a modified strip yield model is presented which allows the prediction of the crack growth acceleration after overloads in nodular cast iron.

  9. Crack growth direction in unidirectional off-axis graphite epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Gregory, M. A.; Beuth, J. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An anisotropic elasticity crack tip stress analysis is implemented using three crack extension direction criteria (the normal stress ratio, the tensor polynominal and the strain energy density) to predict the direction of crack extension in unidirectional off axis graphite-epoxy. The theoretical predictions of crack extension direction are then compared with experimental results for 15 deg off axis tensile coupons with center cracks. Specimens of various aspect ratios and crack orientations are analyzed. It is shown that only the normal stress ratio criterion predicts the correct direction of crack growth.

  10. Crack growth behavior of AISI-4340 steel during environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Giannuzzi, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    AISI-4340 is observed to undergo stress corrosion cracking when subjected to a constant load during exposure to a 3.5% NaCl solution. Crack initiation, nucleation, and growth has been monitored as a function of time. Stepped regions consisting of fast and slow crack growth periods are shown to correspond to microstructural changes observed in the fracture surface of the steel. These regions of fast and slow crack rate variations with time show that the crack growth rates do not increase continuously with an increase in the stress intensity.

  11. Slow crack growth in single-crystal silicon.

    PubMed

    Connally, J A; Brown, S B

    1992-06-12

    Time-dependent crack growth has been measured on a precracked, single-crystal silicon cantilever beam 75 micrometers long that was excited at resonance. Growth of the precrack changes the resonant frequency of the beam, which is correlated to crack length. The measured steady-state crack growth rate was as slow as 2.9 x 10(-13) meter per second, although the apparatus can measure crack growth rates as low as 10(-15) meter per second. It is postulated that static fatigue of the native surface silica layer is the mechanism for crack growth. These experiments demonstrate the possibility of rate-dependent failure of silicon devices and the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics to small-scale micromechanical devices. The results indicate that slow crack growth must therefore be considered when evaluating the reliability of thin-film silicon structures.

  12. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  13. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  14. Nonclassical nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, W.

    1989-07-01

    We analyze the nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks using a field-theoretic formulation in which the free energy is written as a functional of the crack separation (offset field). Our results indicate that for certain materials, crack nucleation and growth proceed through the formation and extension of a diffuse ``halo'' surrounding the classical portion of the crack. This is similar to nonclassical nucleation in magnetic systems. Theoretical considerations and numerical calculations strongly suggest that the diffuse halo can be identified with the fracture ``process zone'' seen in laboratory studies of advancing cracks.

  15. Stress ratio contributes to fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Zheng, W; Sundaram, N; Rouland, J A

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study of fatigue crack growth in dentin was conducted, and the influence of stress ratio (R) on the crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension were examined. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) fatigue specimens were sectioned from bovine molars and then subjected to high cycle fatigue loading (10(5) < N < 10(6)) under hydrated conditions. The evaluation consisted of Mode I loads with stress ratios that ranged from -0.5 to 0.5. The fatigue crack growth rates were measured and used to estimate the crack growth exponent (m) and coefficient (C) according to the Paris Law model. The fatigue crack growth rates for steady-state extension (Region II) ranged from 1E-7 to 1E-4 mm/cycle. It was found that the rate of cyclic extension increased significantly with increasing R, and that the highest average crack growth rate occurred at a stress ratio of 0.5. However, the crack growth exponent decreased with increasing R from an average of 4.6 (R = 0.10) to 2.7 (R = 0.50). The stress intensity threshold for crack growth decreased with increasing R as well. Results from this study suggest that an increase in the cyclic stress ratio facilitates fatigue crack growth in dentin and increases the rate of cyclic extension, both of which are critical concerns in minimizing tooth fractures and maintaining lifelong oral health.

  16. Data base for crack growth properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Lawrence, Victor B.; Nguy, Henry L.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized data base of crack growth properties of materials was developed for use in fracture control analysis of rocket engine components and other NASA space hardware. The software system has files of basic crack growth rate data, other fracture mechanics material properties such as fracture toughness and environmental crack growth threshold values, and plotting and fitting routines for deriving material properties for use in fracture control analysis. An extensive amount of data was collected and entered, and work is continuing on compiling additional data. The data base and software codes are useful both for fracture control analysis and for evaluation or development of improved crack growth theories.

  17. Transient Crack Growth Behavior Under Cycle/Time-Dependent Step Loading for Pb-Containing and Pb-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakpan, Kittichai; Otsuka, Yuichi; Miyashita, Yukio; Mutoh, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Kohsoku

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, fatigue crack growth tests of Pb-containing [Sn-37Pb (wt.%)] and Pb-free [Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%)] solders were performed under cycle/time-dependent step loading at a constant J-integral range (Δ J). The C * parameter was also estimated for discussing time-dependent crack growth behavior. The experimental results indicated that acceleration of the crack growth rate at the beginning of the second loading step was induced when the C * value for the first loading step was high, regardless of time- or cycle-dependent crack growth and for both Sn-37Pb and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solders. The length of the acceleration region of the crack growth rate for both solders was in good agreement with the creep damage zone size estimated by the creep zone model proposed by Riedel and Rice.

  18. Crack-closure and crack-growth measurements in surface-flawed titanium alloy Ti6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1975-01-01

    The crack-closure and crack-growth characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were determined experimentally on surface-flawed plate specimens. Under cyclic loading from zero to tension, cracks deeper than 1 mm opened at approximately 50 percent of the maximum load. Cracks shallower than 1 mm opened at higher loads. The correlation between crack-growth rate and the total stress-intensity range showed a lower threshold behavior. This behavior was attributed to the high crack-opening loads at short cracks because the lower threshold was much less evident in correlations between the crack-growth rates and the effective stress-intensity range.

  19. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  20. Aircraft fatigue and crack growth considering loads by structural component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The indisputable 1968 C-130 fatigue/crack growth data is reviewed to obtain additional useful information on fatigue and crack growth. The proven Load Environment Model concept derived empirically from F-105D multichannel recorder data is refined to a simpler method by going from 8 to 5 variables in the spectra without a decrease in accuracy. This approach provides the true fatigue/crack growth and load environment by structural component for both fatigue and strength design. Methods are presented for defining fatigue scatter and damage at crack initiation. These design tools and criteria may be used for both metal and composite aircraft structure.

  1. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  2. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  3. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted comulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  4. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  5. A damage mechanics approach to high temperature fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Z.; Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1995-12-31

    A nonlocal damage constitutive model is developed for elasto-visco-plastic materials and is used to analyze fatigue crack growth at high temperature. In this model, no kinematic hardening rule is needed to account for the subsequent yielding and strain hardening behavior of the materials. A calculation method for nonlocal damage is introduced. The fatigue crack growth tests and the cyclic strain controlled fatigue tests are carried out at 723 K (450 C) on pure titanium. By means of FEM, the stress distribution near the crack tip, and the relationships between the crack growth rate dl/dN and some mechanical parameters, such as the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the range of viscoplastic strain {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup vp} at the crack tip, are investigated. The mesh size dependence of these mechanical parameters in finite element analysis is discussed. The numerical results are given and compared with the experimental ones.

  6. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modelling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically non-linear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology, and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures, is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  7. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1994-09-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modeling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  8. Environmental Crack Growth Behavior Affected by Thickness/Geometry Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawski, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    This article gives a short review on the effects of thickness/constraint and environment on crack growth behavior under cyclic and static loadings. Fatigue crack growth data taken from the literature, corresponding to different environments, ranging from vacuum to air and NaCl solution for a number of alloys and different specimens geometries are presented and analyzed. Reported results indicate that for relatively inert material/environment systems, there is a weak thickness/constraint effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. On the other hand, for corrosive material/environment systems, there is a significant thickness/constraint effect on crack growth rate behavior under both cyclic and static loadings. Some implications related to crack growth modeling are suggested.

  9. Anomalous mechanical behavior and crack growth of oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Jared Hilliard

    This thesis is concerned with analytically describing anomalous mechanical behaviors of glass. A new slow crack growth model is presented that considers a semi-elliptical crack in a cylindrical glass rod subjected to 4-point bending that is both loaded statically and under a time-dependent load. This model is used to explain a suppression of the loading-rate dependency of ion-exchanged strengthened glass. The stress relaxation behavior of an ion-exchanged strengthened glass is then analyzed in view of a newly observed water-assisted surface stress relaxation mechanism. By making refinements to a time-dependent Maxwell material model for stress buildup and relaxation, the anomalous subsurface compressive stress peak in ion-exchanged strengthened glass is explained. The notion of water-assisted stress relaxation is extended to the crack tip, where high tensile stresses exist. A toughening effect has historically been observed for cracks aged at subcritical stress intensity factors, where crack tip stress relaxation is hypothesized. A simple fracture mechanics model is developed that estimates a shielding stress intensity factor that is then superimposed with the far-field stress intensity factor. The model is used to estimate anomalous "restart" times for aged cracks. The same model predicts a non-linear crack growth rate for cracks loaded near the static fatigue limit. Double cantilever beam slow crack growth experiments were performed and new slow crack growth data for soda-lime silicate glass was collected. Interpretation of this new experimental slow crack growth data suggests that the origin of the static fatigue limit in glass is due to water-assisted stress relaxation. This thesis combines a number of studies that offer a new unified understanding of historical anomalous mechanical behaviors of glass. These anomalies are interpreted as simply the consequence of slow crack growth and water-assisted surface stress relaxation.

  10. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  11. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  12. Test method for the determination of crack-growth rates and crack growth resistance under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, S.Ya.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes the test method for the determination of crack growth rates and crack growth resistance under cyclic loading conditions. The text of the article is limited to two appendices with the following subjects: (1) general requirements for specimens for testing with a constant cycle of the stress intensity factor, and (2) descriptions of the loading fixtures.

  13. Nonclassical Nucleation and Growth of Cohesive Tensile Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Joseph; Rundle, John; Klein, William

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks using a Hamiltonian which is written as a functional of the crack separation (offset field). We simulate the nucleation events on a square lattice using a Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm. Several modes of crack propagation are seen in the simulations. Our results indicate that for certain materials, crack nucleation and growth proceed through the formation and extension of a diffuse ``halo'' surrounding the classical portion of the crack. This is similar to nonclassical nucleation near the spinodal in magnetic systems. Theoretical considerations and numerical calculations strongly suggest that the diffuse halo can be identified with the fracture ``process zone'' seen in laboratory studies of advancing cracks. We are investigating scaling exponents associated with this apparent phase transition.

  14. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  15. The effect of potential upon the high-temperature fatigue crack growth response of low-alloy steels. Part 1: Crack growth results

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Moshier, W.C.

    1997-04-01

    Corrosion-fatigue crack propagation experiments were conducted on several low-alloy steels in elevated temperature aqueous environments, and experimental parameters included temperature, sulfur content of the steel, applied potential level, and dissolved hydrogen (and in one case, dissolved oxygen) concentration in the water. Specimen potentials were controlled potentiostatically, and the observation (or non-observation) of accelerated fatigue crack growth rates was a complex function of the above parameters. Electrochemical results and the postulated explanation for the complex behavior are given in Part II.

  16. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  17. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  18. Fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic-loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    In low cycle fatigue, cracks are initiated and propagated under general yielding cyclic loading. For general yielding cyclic loading, Dowling and Begley have shown that fatigue crack growth rate correlates well with the measured delta J. The correlation of da/dN with delta J was also studied by a number of other investigators. However, none of thse studies have correlated da/dN with delta J calculated specifically for the test specimens. Solomon measured fatigue crack growth in specimens in general yielding cyclic loading. The crack tips fields for Solomon's specimens are calculated using the finite element method and the J values of Solomon's tests are evaluated. The measured crack growth rate in Solomon's specimens correlates very well with the calculated delta J.

  19. Environmentally enhanced crack growth in nickle-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifan Frank

    This dissertation research was designed to develop a better understand the role of niobium and other strengthening elements in enhancing crack growth by oxygen in nickel-based superalloys at high temperatures. It included modeling of diffusion controlled crack growth coupled with oxidation ahead of the crack tip, and an examination of the relationship between crack growth under sustained and fatigue loading. Three gamma' strengthened powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys (having about 53 vol. pct of gamma' precipitates), with 0, 2.5 and 5 wt pct niobium and with the formation of gamma″ precipitates suppressed, were specially designed for this study. Crack growth and supporting microstructural studies were conducted on the alloys. They were complemented by a separate surface chemistry study of the alloys, key precipitates, fracture surfaces of interrupted crack growth specimens by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that sustained load and fatigue crack growth are directly related. Crack growth rates were significantly enhanced by oxygen, increasing by about 104 and 103 over those in argon (at 973 K) in the Nb containing and Nb free alloys, respectively. Crack growth was thermally activated, with an average apparent activation energy of about 250 kJ/mol; the actual values depended upon K and the alloys. The observed K dependence suggested oxygen diffusion control of crack growth, and was confirmed by results from the proposed model. Microstructural analyses of grain boundaries demonstrated that the Nb-containing phases were oxidized. The presence of zone of an oxygen affected region (OAR), or embrittled zone, ahead of the growing crack was established mechanically, and confirmed by XPS analyses. The XPS analyses showed preferential oxidization of Nb along with Al and Ti (principally of Nb-rich carbides, Ni3Al and Ni3Ti), but not Ni within the OAR. The results taken in toto show that embrittlement resulted from the formation and rupture of a brittle

  20. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Pinion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ural, Ani; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffe, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    This project investigates computational modeling of fatigue crack growth in spiral bevel gears. Current work is a continuation of the previous efforts made to use the Boundary Element Method (BEM) to simulate tooth-bending fatigue failure in spiral bevel gears. This report summarizes new results predicting crack trajectory and fatigue life for a spiral bevel pinion using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Predicting crack trajectories is important in determining the failure mode of a gear. Cracks propagating through the rim may result in catastrophic failure, whereas the gear may remain intact if one tooth fails and this may allow for early detection of failure. Being able to predict crack trajectories is insightful for the designer. However, predicting growth of three-dimensional arbitrary cracks is complicated due to the difficulty of creating three-dimensional models, the computing power required, and absence of closed- form solutions of the problem. Another focus of this project was performing three-dimensional contact analysis of a spiral bevel gear set incorporating cracks. These analyses were significant in determining the influence of change of tooth flexibility due to crack growth on the magnitude and location of contact loads. This is an important concern since change in contact loads might lead to differences in SIFs and therefore result in alteration of the crack trajectory. Contact analyses performed in this report showed the expected trend of decreasing tooth loads carried by the cracked tooth with increasing crack length. Decrease in tooth loads lead to differences between SIFs extracted from finite element contact analysis and finite element analysis with Hertz contact loads. This effect became more pronounced as the crack grew.

  1. Age, dehydration and fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Sundaram, Naryana; Nazari, Ahmad; Arola, D

    2006-04-01

    A preliminary study of the effects from age and dehydration on fatigue crack growth in human dentin was conducted. Compact tension (CT) fatigue specimens of coronal dentin were prepared from extracted molars and subjected to high cycle fatigue (10(5)crack growth rates were quantified according to the Paris Law in terms of the crack growth exponent (m) and coefficient (C). The average fatigue crack growth exponent for the young hydrated dentin (m=13.3+/-1.1) was significantly less than that for the hydrated old (m=21.6+/-5.2; p<0.003) and dehydrated young dentin (m=18.8+/-2.8; p<0.01). Fatigue cracks in the old dentin underwent initiation at a lower stress intensity range than in young dentin and propagated at as significantly faster rate (over 100x). Differences in the microscopic features of the fracture surfaces from the old and young dentin suggested that particular mechanisms contributing to energy dissipation and crack growth resistance in the young hydrated dentin were not present in the old dentin. Based on results of this study, the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin decreases with both age of the tissue and dehydration.

  2. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  3. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-08-01

    This thesis summarizes the major technical achievements obtained as a part of a collaborative research and development project between Ecole Polytechnique and Pratt & Whitney Canada. These achievements include: (1) a thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress; (2) an advanced alternative current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions; (3) fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data for the titanium specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs; (4) thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth data for two titanium alloys being used in PWC engine components, which explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing; (5) a complete fractographic analysis for the tested specimens which enhanced the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helped to establish an analytical crack growth model; and (6) application of the ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique to single tooth firtree specimen (STFT) LCF testing of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy. Finally, a comprehensive discussion concerning the results pertaining to this research project is presented.

  4. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-05-01

    A thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig was built which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine engine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress. An advance alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system was also developed which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions. Fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data were obtained for titanium alloy specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs. TMF data were also obtained for two titanium alloys used in aircraft engine components. Those data explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing. A complete fractographic analysis was performed on the tested specimens enhancing the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helping to formulate an analytical crack growth model. The ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique was applied to the low cycle fatigue testing of Pratt & Whitney 1480 monocrystalline nickel alloy. A completely automated, computer controlled test procedure was developed which could obtain crack initiation and growth data with greater speed, precision, and reliability than previous methods.

  5. Sensitivity studies on sensor selection for crack growth investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sunilkumar; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2010-10-01

    This work focuses on an unsupervised, data driven, modified k-nearest neighborhood technique to detect and monitor fatigue crack growth in lug joint samples using a surface mounted piezoelectric sensor network. A lug joint is an important structural hotspot in which damage initiates and progresses under fatigue loading. Early detection of fatigue cracks in a lug joint can help in taking preventive measures, thus avoiding any possible structural failure. The lug joint samples used in this study are prepared from an Al 6061 T6 plate with 0.25 inch thickness and are instrumented with a surface mounted piezoelectric actuator/sensor network. Experiments are conducted on lug samples with a single notch and multiple notches that are symmetrically placed. For early initiation of cracks, samples are notched at the shoulders. Under the influence of fatigue loading, the crack growth rate is different even when the notches are symmetrically placed. It is found that although cracks propagate from both the notches, the sample fails from one of the shoulders once the critical crack length is reached. For the given sensor architecture, which is symmetric, the objective of this study is to detect, isolate and monitor fatigue crack growth in each zone. The methodology presented helps in identifying sensors that are most sensitive to the presence of single and multiple cracks. Thus, the computational expense for damage localization studies can be reduced by not making use of redundant sensors.

  6. Stable Crack Growth During Thermal Actuation of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    A finite element analysis of crack growth is carried out in shape memory alloys subjected to thermal variations under plane strain, mode I, constant applied loading. The crack is assumed to propagate at a critical level of the crack-tip energy release rate which is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique. The load level, applied at a high temperature at which the austenite phase is stable, is assumed sufficiently low so that the resulting crack-tip energy release rate is smaller than the critical value but sufficiently high so that the critical value is reached during cooling, initiating crack growth (Baxevanis and Lagoudas in Int J Fract 191:191-213, 2015). Stable crack growth is observed, mainly associated with the shielding effect of the transformed material left in the wake of the advancing crack. Results pertaining to the near-tip mechanical fields and fracture toughness are presented and their sensitivity to phase transformation metrics and bias load levels is investigated.

  7. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2000-01-01

    The majority of helicopter transmission systems utilize spiral bevel gears to convert the horizontal power from the engine into vertical power for the rotor. Due to the cyclical loading on a gear's tooth, fatigue crack propagation can occur. In rotorcraft applications, a crack's trajectory determines whether the gear failure will be benign or catastrophic for the aircraft. As a result, the capability to predict crack growth in gears is significant. A spiral bevel gear's complex shape requires a three dimensional model of the geometry and cracks. The boundary element method in conjunction with linear elastic fracture mechanics theories is used to predict arbitrarily shaped three dimensional fatigue crack trajectories in a spiral bevel pinion under moving load conditions. The predictions are validated by comparison to experimental results. The sensitivity of the predictions to variations in loading conditions and crack growth rate model parameters is explored. Critical areas that must be understood in greater detail prior to predicting more accurate crack trajectories and crack growth rates in three dimensions are identified.

  8. Subcritical crack growth at bimaterial interfaces. Part 3: Shear-enhanced fatigue crack growth resistance at polymer/metal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Shang, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth along an Al/epoxy interface was examined under different combinations of mode-I and mode-II loadings using the flexural peel technique. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained as a function of the total strain energy rate for G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratios of 0.3 to 1.4, achieved by varying the relative thickness of the outerlayers for the flexural peel specimen. Fatigue crack growth resistance of the interface was found to increase with increasing G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Such a shear-enhanced crack growth resistance of the interface resulted in a gradual transition of crack growth mechanism from interfacial at the low G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio to cohesive at the high G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Under predominantly mode-I loading, the damage in the polymer took the form of crazing and cavitation. In contrast, laminar shear occurred under highly shear loading, resulting in a larger amount of plastic dissipation at the crack tip and improved fatigue crack growth resistance.

  9. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth (TMFCG) was studied in a gamma-gamma' nickel base superalloy Inconel X-750 under controlled load amplitude in the temperature range from 300 to 650 C. In-phase (T sub max at sigma sub max), out-of-phase (T sub min at sigma sub max), and isothermal tests at 650 C were performed on single-edge notch bars under fully reversed cyclic conditions. A dc electrical potential method was used to measure crack length. The electrical potential response obtained for each cycle of a given wave form and R value yields information on crack closure and crack extension per cycle. The macroscopic crack growth rates are reported as a function of delta k and the relative magnitude of the TMFCG are discussed in the light of the potential drop information and of the fractographic observations.

  10. Experimental Study of the Effect of Disorder on Subcritical Crack Growth Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, O.; Cortet, P.-P.; Ciliberto, S.; Vanel, L.

    2013-04-01

    The growth dynamics of a single crack in a heterogeneous material under subcritical loading is an intermittent process, and many features of this dynamics have been shown to agree with simple models of thermally activated rupture. In order to better understand the role of material heterogeneities in this process, we study the subcritical propagation of a crack in a sheet of paper in the presence of a distribution of small defects such as holes. The experimental data obtained for two different distributions of holes are discussed in the light of models that predict the slowing down of crack growth when the disorder in the material is increased; however, in contradiction with these theoretical predictions, the experiments result in longer lasting cracks in a more ordered scenario. We argue that this effect is specific to subcritical crack dynamics and that the weakest zones between holes at close distance to each other are responsible for both the acceleration of the crack dynamics and the slightly different roughness of the crack path.

  11. Effects of a Hydrogen Gas Environment on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Kyohei; Oda, Yasuji; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    In order to clarify the effects of a hydrogen gas environment on the fatigue crack growth characteristics of stable austenitic stainless steels, bending fatigue tests were carried out in a hydrogen gas, in a nitrogen gas at 1.0 MPa and in air on a SUS316L using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 316L). Also, in order to discuss the difference in the hydrogen sensitivity between austenitic stainless steels, the fatigue tests were also carried out on a SUS304 using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 304) metastable austenitic stainless steel as a material for comparison. The main results obtained are as follows. Hydrogen gas accelerates the fatigue crack growth rate of type 316L. The degree of the fatigue crack growth acceleration is low compared to that in type 304. The fracture surfaces of both the materials practically consist of two parts; the faceted area seemed to be brittle and the remaining area occupying a greater part of the fracture surface and seemed to be ductile. The faceted area does not significantly contribute to the fatigue crack growth rate in both austenitic stainless steels. The slip-off mechanism seems to be valid not only in air and in nitrogen, but also in hydrogen. Also, the main cause of the fatigue crack growth acceleration of both materials occurs by variation of the slip behaviour. The difference in the degree of the acceleration, which in type 316L is lower than in type 304, seems to be caused by the difference in the stability of the γ phase.

  12. Advanced Finite Element Modeling of Low Cycle Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne; McGill, Preston; Swanson, Greg; Wells, Doug; Throckmorton, D. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document (a viewgraph presentation) assumes a crack-like defect of a size which may be missed in inspection will exist in most critical location of any critical structure or component. Flaw existence assumption is usually, but not always, conservative based on past experiences in NASA and knowledge of manufacturing processes. Cyclic, environmental, and sustained loads used to generate stresses on models. Fracture Mechanics analysis used to predict crack growth and residual strength. Must show that defective structure will still provide four times required mission lifetime. Special exemptions cover redundant structures, low risk parts, etc. Assessments require specialized software tools, experienced analysts, and reliable material crack growth rate test database.

  13. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  14. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Alloy 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Methods to improve the high temperature, dwell crack growth resistance of Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, were studied. Two approaches, heat treat variations and composition modifications, were investigated. Under the heat treat approach, solution temperature, cooling rates, and stabilization, were studied. It was found that higher solution temperatures, which promote coarser grain sizes, coupled with a 1550 F stabilization treatment were found to significantly reduce dwell crack growth rates at 1300 F Changes in the niobium and tantalum content were found to have a much smaller impact on crack growth behavior. Lowering the niobium:tantalum ratio did improve crack growth resistance and this effect was most pronounced for coarse grain microstructures. Based on these findings, a coarse grain microstructure for Alloy 10 appears to be the best option for improving dwell crack growth resistance, especially in the rim of a disk where temperatures can reach or exceed 1300 T. Further, the use of advanced processing technologies, which can produce a coarse grain rim and fine grain bore, would be the preferred option for Alloy 10 to obtain the optimal balance between tensile, creep, and crack growth requirements for small gas turbine engines.

  15. Near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafinegrained copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzaghi, M.; Fintová, S.; Sarrazin-Baudoux, C.; Kunz, L.; Petit, J.

    2014-08-01

    The near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafine-grained (UFG) copper at room temperature was studied in comparison to conventional coarse-grained (CG) copper. The fatigue crack growth rates da/dN in UFG copper were enhanced at ΔK <= 7 MPa√m compared to the CG material. The crack closure shielding, as evaluated using the compliance variation technique, was shown to explain these differences. The effective stress intensity factor amplitude AKeff appears to be the same driving force in both materials. Tests performed in high vacuum on UFG copper demonstrate the existence of a huge effect of environment with growth rates higher of about two orders of magnitude in air compared to high vacuum. This environmental effect on the crack path and the related microstructure is discussed on the basis of fractography observations performed using scanning electron microscope and completed with field emission scanning electron microscope combined with the focused ion beam technique.

  16. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  17. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Structural flaws and cracks may grow under fatigue inducing loads and, upon reaching a critical size, cause structural failure to occur. The growth of these flaws and cracks may occur at load levels well below the ultimate load bearing capability of the structure. The Fatigue Crack Growth Computer Program, NASA/FLAGRO, was developed as an aid in predicting the growth of pre-existing flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. The earlier version of the program, FLAGRO4, was the primary analysis tool used by Rockwell International and the Shuttle subcontractors for fracture control analysis on the Space Shuttle. NASA/FLAGRO is an enhanced version of the program and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. NASA/FLAGRO provides the fracture mechanics analyst with a computerized method of evaluating the "safe crack growth life" capabilities of structural components. NASA/FLAGRO could also be used to evaluate the damage tolerance aspects of a given structural design. The propagation of an existing crack is governed by the stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. The stress intensity factor is defined in terms of the relationship between the stress field magnitude and the crack size. The propagation of the crack becomes catastrophic when the local stress intensity factor reaches the fracture toughness of the material. NASA/FLAGRO predicts crack growth using a two-dimensional model which predicts growth independently in two directions based on the calculation of stress intensity factors. The analyst can choose to use either a crack growth rate equation or a nonlinear interpolation routine based on tabular data. The growth rate equation is a modified Forman equation which can be converted to a Paris or Walker equation by substituting different values into the exponent. This equation provides accuracy and versatility and can be fit to data using standard least squares methods. Stress

  18. A numerical analysis of crack growth in brittle microcracking composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Stress-Intensity Factor Corrections for Out-of-Plane Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Herman, Dave J.; James, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate testing is performed by automated data collection systems that assume straight crack growth in the plane of symmetry and use standard polynomial solutions to compute crack length and stress-intensity factors from compliance or potential drop measurements. Visual measurements used to correct the collected data typically include only the horizontal crack length, which for cracks that propagate out-of-plane, under-estimates the crack growth rates and over-estimates the stress-intensity factors. The authors have devised an approach for correcting both the crack growth rates and stress-intensity factors based on two-dimensional mixed mode-I/II finite element analysis (FEA). The approach is used to correct out-of-plane data for 7050-T7451 and 2025-T6 aluminum alloys. Results indicate the correction process works well for high DeltaK levels but fails to capture the mixed-mode effects at DeltaK levels approaching threshold (da/dN approximately 10(exp -10) meter/cycle).

  20. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  1. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  2. The effect of fatigue cracks on fastener flexibility, load distribution, and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Zachary Layne

    Fatigue cracks typically occur at stress risers such as geometry changes and holes. This type of failure has serious safety and economic repercussions affecting structures such as aircraft. The need to prevent catastrophic failure due to fatigue cracks and other discontinuities has led to durability and damage tolerant methodologies influencing the design of aircraft structures. Holes in a plate or sheet filled with a fastener are common fatigue critical locations in aircraft structure requiring damage tolerance analysis (DTA). Often, the fastener is transferring load which leads to a loading condition involving both far-field stresses such as tension and bending, and localized bearing at the hole. The difference between the bearing stress and the tensile field at the hole is known as load transfer. The ratio of load transfer as well as the magnitude of the stresses plays a significant part in how quickly a crack will progress to failure. Unfortunately, the determination of load transfer in a complex joint is far from trivial. Many methods exist in the open literature regarding the analysis of splices, doublers and attachment joints to determine individual fastener loads. These methods work well for static analyses but greater refinement is needed for crack growth analysis. The first fastener in a splice or joint is typically the most critical but different fastener flexibility equations will all give different results. The constraint of the fastener head and shop end, along with the type of fastener, affects the stiffness or flexibility of the fastener. This in turn will determine the load that the fastener will transfer within a given fastener pattern. However, current methods do not account for the change in flexibility at a fastener as the crack develops. It is put forth that a crack does indeed reduce the stiffness of a fastener by changing its constraint, thus lessening the load transfer. A crack growth analysis utilizing reduced load transfer will result in

  3. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of Al-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, R.; Ramakrishna, K. S.; Kanna, B. Avinash

    2013-06-01

    Al-Li alloys are being used in aircraft structures due to its low density and inherent mechanical properties. Fatigue Crack Growth (FCG) resistance is usually high compared to conventional Al-alloys attributed to increased modulus and crack closure. Extensive investigations concern about the FCG resistance and crack closure in Al-Li alloys. The present work reviews the FCG resistance in Al-Li alloys and the mechanisms associated with it. The alloy 8090 is taken for the consideration and sometimes compared with 2024.

  4. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  5. A ``Hydrogen partitioning'' model for hydrogen assisted crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, M.; Wei, R. P.

    1985-11-01

    A “hydrogen partitioning” model has been developed to account for the pressure and temperature dependence for hydrogen-assisted crack growth. The model gives explicit recognition to the role of hydr en-microstructure interactions in determining the distribution (or partitioning) of hydrogen among the various microstructural elements (principally between the prior-austenite grain boundaries and the matrix) and the rate of crack growth along the elements. It also takes into account the role of various rate controlling processes in determining the rate that hydrogen is being supplied to the fracture process (or embrittlement) zone. Quantitative assessment of the model indicates very good agreements between the model predictions and the observed crack growth responses for AISI 4340 and 4130 steels tested in hydrogen and for AISI 4340 steel tested in hydrogen sulfide. This model accurately characterizes the reduction in crack growth rate and the concomitant change in fracture mode at “high” temperatures. Through its integration with the earlier models, based on rate controlling processes, the model predicts the pressure and temperature dependence for K-independent crack growth over the entire range of environmental conditions.

  6. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  8. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  9. Experimental and Finite Element Modeling of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth for the K-Decreasing Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; Newman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental methods to determine near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate data are prescribed in ASTM standard E647. To produce near-threshold data at a constant stress ratio (R), the applied stress-intensity factor (K) is decreased as the crack grows based on a specified K-gradient. Consequently, as the fatigue crack growth rate threshold is approached and the crack tip opening displacement decreases, remote crack wake contact may occur due to the plastically deformed crack wake surfaces and shield the growing crack tip resulting in a reduced crack tip driving force and non-representative crack growth rate data. If such data are used to life a component, the evaluation could yield highly non-conservative predictions. Although this anomalous behavior has been shown to be affected by K-gradient, starting K level, residual stresses, environmental assisted cracking, specimen geometry, and material type, the specifications within the standard to avoid this effect are limited to a maximum fatigue crack growth rate and a suggestion for the K-gradient value. This paper provides parallel experimental and computational simulations for the K-decreasing method for two materials (an aluminum alloy, AA 2024-T3 and a titanium alloy, Ti 6-2-2-2-2) to aid in establishing clear understanding of appropriate testing requirements. These simulations investigate the effect of K-gradient, the maximum value of stress-intensity factor applied, and material type. A material independent term is developed to guide in the selection of appropriate test conditions for most engineering alloys. With the use of such a term, near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate tests can be performed at accelerated rates, near-threshold data can be acquired in days instead of weeks without having to establish testing criteria through trial and error, and these data can be acquired for most engineering materials, even those that are produced in relatively small product forms.

  10. Fatigue Crack Growth and Crack Bridging in SCS-6/Ti-24-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial damage induced by relative fiber/matrix sliding was found to occur in the bridged zone of unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb intermetallic matrix composite specimens subjected to fatigue crack growth conditions. The degree of interfacial damage was not uniform along the bridged crack wake. Higher damage zones were observed near the machined notch in comparison to the crack tip. The interfacial friction shear strength tau(sub f) measured in the crack wake using pushout testing revealed lower values than the as-received interface. Interfacial wear also reduced the strength of the bridging fibers. The reduction in fiber strength is thought to be a function of the magnitude of relative fiber/matrix displacements ind the degree of interfacial damage. Furthermore, two different fiber bridging models were used to predict the influence of bridging on the fatigue crack driving force. The shear lag model required a variable tau(sub f) in the crack wake (reflecting the degradation of the interface) before its predictions agreed with trends exhibited by the experimental data. The fiber pressure model did an excellent job in predicting both the FCG data and the DeltaCOD in the bridged zone even though it does not require a knowledge of tau(sub f).

  11. Transient Elastodynamic Crack Growth in Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chalivendra, Vijaya B.

    2008-02-15

    A generalized elastic solution for an arbitrarily propagating transient crack in Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) is obtained through an asymptotic analysis. The shear modulus and mass density of the FGM are assumed to vary exponentially along the gradation direction. The mode-mixity due to the inclination of property gradient with respect to the propagating crack tip is accommodated in the analysis through superposition of the opening and shear modes. First three terms of out of plane displacement field and its gradients about the crack tip are obtained in powers of radial coordinates, with the coefficients depending on the time rate of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factors. Using these displacement fields, the effect of transient stress intensity factors and acceleration on synthetic contours of constant out of plane displacement under both opening and mixed mode loading conditions has been studied. These contours show that the transient terms cause significant spatial variation on out of plane displacements around the crack tip. Therefore, in studying dynamic fracture of FGMs, it is appropriate to include the transient terms in the field equations for the situations of sudden variation of stress intensity factor or crack tip velocity.

  12. Deformation and crack growth response under cyclic creep conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    To increase energy efficiency, new plants must operate at higher and higher temperatures. Moreover, power generation equipment continues to age and is being used far beyond its intended original design life. Some recent failures which unfortunately occurred with serious consequences have clearly illustrated that current methods for insuring safety and reliability of high temperature equipment is inadequate. Because of these concerns, an understanding of the high-temperature crack growth process is very important and has led to the following studies of the high temperature failure process. This effort summarizes the results of some recent studies which investigate the phenomenon of high temperature creep fatigue crack growth. Experimental results which detail the process of creep fatigue, analytical studies which investigate why current methods are ineffective, and finally, a new approach which is based on the T{sup *}-integral and its ability to characterize the creep-fatigue crack growth process are discussed. The potential validity of this new predictive methodology is illustrated.

  13. Magma-driven subcritical crack growth and implications for dike initiation from a magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuan; Jin, Z.-H.

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore a viscoelastic energy dissipation theory for subcritical dike growth from a magma chamber. The theoretical relationship between the dike growth velocity and dike length is established using the viscoelastic subcritical crack growth theory proposed by the first author and the solutions of stress intensity factor at the crack tip derived by a perturbation method. Effects of magma chamber over-pressure, buoyancy and viscoelastic properties of the host rock on the subcritical growth rate are included in the model. The numerical results indicate that the viscous energy dissipation of the host rock could allow a short dike to slowly grow on the order of 10-7-10-5 m/s under modest over-pressure and to accelerate when the stress intensity factor increases close to the fracture toughness, followed by the unstable dike propagation. The proposed theory provides a reasonable understanding of dike initiation process from a magma chamber.

  14. Slow crack growth measurement using an electrical grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. J.; Davido, K. W.; Scott, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    Photolithography was used to produce a resistance grid on the surface of a DCB fracture specimen. The grid line spacings were 10 microns over a distance of 2 cm. Slow crack growth was measured on soda-lime-silica glass. At low values of K(I) (0.3 to 0.4 MPa.sq r + m, increased. Equations are given for the design of grids. The grid technique could be used to measure very slow crack growth at high temperature with appropriate compatible metal-ceramic materials.

  15. R-Curve Instability Calculations Of Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses use of instability method of calculation and R-curve mathematical models to analyze growth of cracks in fracture-mechanics specimens. In case of single material and structure, such analysis sometimes simple enough to be done on pocket calculator. Where microcomputer or larger computer available, comprehensive program includes libraries of driving-force equations for various configurations and R-curve mathematical models for different materials. Author concludes instability method simple and effective and model equations studied all viable in sense at lease one of them should fit almost any applicable set of crack-growth data. Method and models constitute powerful mathematical tools for analysis of fractures.

  16. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 1; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive slow-crack-growth (SCG) analysis was made using a primary exponential crack-velocity formulation under three widely used load configurations: constant stress rate, constant stress, and cyclic stress. Although the use of the exponential formulation in determining SCG parameters of a material requires somewhat inconvenient numerical procedures, the resulting solutions presented gave almost the same degree of simplicity in both data analysis and experiments as did the power-law formulation. However, the fact that the inert strength of a material should be known in advance to determine the corresponding SCG parameters was a major drawback of the exponential formulation as compared with the power-law formulation.

  17. Probabilistic Prognosis of Non-Planar Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Warner, James E.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the uncertainty in model parameters for the purpose of damage prognosis can be accomplished utilizing Bayesian inference and damage diagnosis data from sources such as non-destructive evaluation or structural health monitoring. The number of samples required to solve the Bayesian inverse problem through common sampling techniques (e.g., Markov chain Monte Carlo) renders high-fidelity finite element-based damage growth models unusable due to prohibitive computation times. However, these types of models are often the only option when attempting to model complex damage growth in real-world structures. Here, a recently developed high-fidelity crack growth model is used which, when compared to finite element-based modeling, has demonstrated reductions in computation times of three orders of magnitude through the use of surrogate models and machine learning. The model is flexible in that only the expensive computation of the crack driving forces is replaced by the surrogate models, leaving the remaining parameters accessible for uncertainty quantification. A probabilistic prognosis framework incorporating this model is developed and demonstrated for non-planar crack growth in a modified, edge-notched, aluminum tensile specimen. Predictions of remaining useful life are made over time for five updates of the damage diagnosis data, and prognostic metrics are utilized to evaluate the performance of the prognostic framework. Challenges specific to the probabilistic prognosis of non-planar fatigue crack growth are highlighted and discussed in the context of the experimental results.

  18. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  19. Highly transient elastodynamic crack growth in a bimaterial interface: Higher order asymptotic analysis and optical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Lambros, John; Rosakis, Ares J.

    1993-12-01

    A HIGHER ORDER asymptotic analysis of the transient deformation field surrounding the tip of a crack running dynamically along a bimaterial interface is presented. An asymptotic methodology is used to reduce the problem to one of the Riemann-Hilbert type. Its solution furnishes displacement potentials which are used to evaluate explicitly the near-tip transient stress field. Crack-tip fields corresponding to crack speeds up to the lower of the two shear wave speeds are investigated. An experimental study of dynamic crack growth in PMMA steel interfaces using the optical method of CGS and high speed photography, is also described. Transonic terminal speeds (up to 1.4 cPMMAS) and initial accelerations ( $˜10 8 ms 2) are reported and discussed. Transient effects are found to be severe and more important than in homogeneous dynamic fracture. For subsonic crack growth, these experiments arc used to demonstrate the necessity of employing a fully transient expression in the analysis of optical data to predict accurately the complex dynamic stress intensity factor history.

  20. Nanometer voids prevent crack growth in polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hideaki; Dutriez, Cedric; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2007-03-01

    Macroscopic voids initiate cracks and cause catastrophic failure in brittle materials. The effect of micrometer voids in the mechanical properties of polymeric materials was studied in 1980's and 90's with the expectation that such small voids may initiate crazing, the toughening mechanism in polymer solids, similar to dispersed rubber particles widely used in industry. However, the micrometer voids showed only limited resistance against crack growth, and it was concluded that much smaller voids are necessary for the drastic change in mechanical properties. We have recently succeeded the nondestructive introduction of nanometer voids (30--70 nm) in polymeric materials using block copolymer template and carbon dioxide (CO2) by partitioning CO2 in CO2-philic nanodomains of block copolymers. The reduction of Young's modulus with such nanometer voids was minimal (2 to 1 GPa) due to the (short-range) ordered spherical voids. While the unprocessed copolymer films failed in brittle manner at around 2 % of tensile strain, the processed copolymer films with nanometer voids did not break up to at least 60 %. A microscopic observation under strain of the crack tip revealed that the nanometer voids were deformed under strain and directly converted into the networked fibrils near the crack tip similar to crazing and thus prevented the crack growth.

  1. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  2. Subcritical crack growth behavior of dispersion oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Armin; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Telle, Rainer; Fischer, Horst

    2010-10-01

    Zirconia (Y-TZP) is used as material for components of implants and prostheses because of its high short-term strength. The mechanical long-term reliability, however, is limited for Y-TZP because of hydrothermal aging effects and a pronounced tendency for subcritical crack growth. The hypothesis of this study was that a substantial amount of alumina in a zirconia matrix can help to significantly suppress subcritical crack growth and thereby improve the mechanical long-term reliability. The Weibull parameters as well as the parameters of the subcritical crack growth were determined for Alumina, Y-TZP, and two dispersion ceramics, that is Alumina Toughened Zirconia (ATZ, 20% alumina/80% Y-TZP), and Zirconia Toughened Alumina (ZTA, 75% alumina/25% Y-TZP). The long-term failure probability as a function of service time was predicted for the four ceramics. The parameter n of the subcritical crack growth was approx. 80% higher for ATZ compared to Y-TZP. In consequence, the estimated lifetime revealed a significant better mechanical long-term reliability for ATZ. It can be concluded that tailored dispersion oxide ceramics can address the aging problem of monolithic zirconia. This makes ATZ very interesting for components of joint replacement as well as for dental prostheses and implants.

  3. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  4. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chou, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that environment-assisted subcritical crack growth in high-strength steels and other high-strength alloys (particularly in hydrogen and in hydrogenous environments) is an important technological problem of long standing. This problem is directly related to issues of structural integrity, durability, and reliability. The terms 'hydrogen embrittlement' and 'stress corrosion cracking' have been employed to describe the considered phenomenon. This paper provides a summary of contributions made during the past ten years toward the understanding of environmentally assisted crack growth. The processes involved in crack growth are examined, and details regarding crack growth and chemical reactions are discussed, taking into account crack growth in steels exposed to water/water vapor, the effect of hydrogen, reactions involving hydrogen sulfide, and aspects of fracture surface morphology and composition. Attention is also given to the modeling of crack growth response, crack growth in gas mixtures, and the interaction of solute atoms with the crack-tip stress field.

  5. Nanoscale void nucleation and growth and crack tip stress evolution ahead of a growing crack in a single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaowen; Deng, Xiaomin

    2008-03-01

    A constrained three-dimensional atomistic model of a cracked aluminum single crystal has been employed to investigate the growth behavior of a nanoscale crack in a single crystal using molecular dynamics simulations with the EAM potential. This study is focused on the stress field around the crack tip and its evolution during fast crack growth. Simulation results of the observed nanoscale fracture behavior are presented in terms of atomistic stresses. Major findings from the simulation results are the following: (a) crack growth is in the form of void nucleation, growth and coalescence ahead of the crack tip, thus resembling that of ductile fracture at the continuum scale; (b) void nucleation occurs at a certain distance ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void ahead of the crack tip; (c) just before void nucleation the mean atomic stress (or equivalently its ratio to the von Mises effective stress, which is called the stress constraint or triaxiality) has a high concentration at the site of void nucleation; and (d) the stress field ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void is more or less self-similar (so that the forward edge of the leading void can be viewed as the effective crack tip).

  6. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  7. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impeded hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.

  8. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  9. Crack growth measured on flat and curved surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Multiple element continuity gage measures plane stress crack growth plus surface crack growth under plane strain conditions. The gage measures flat and curved surfaces and operates at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  11. On the use of marker loads and replicas for measuring growth rates for small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, M. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The initiation and growth of small cracks (5-500 microns) from edge notches in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets were studied under constant-amplitude loading. Two methods were used to measure crack shape and size. In the first method, striation marker bands were periodically formed along the crack front by interrupting the constant-amplitude loading by either an elevated R-ratio load sequence, or by an overload sequence. In each case the marker loading was selected so as to have minimal influence on the growth rate under the primary loading. In the second method, the surface crack length was monitored by taking surface replicas at regular intervals. The marker band techniques did not provide reliable crack length and crack shape information for cracks smaller than 2 mm. The replica technique provided accurate information for surface crack length at all crack lengths, and fracture tests on specimens with small cracks provided crack-shape information.

  12. A method for the analysis of the growth of short fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    McEvily, A.J.; Shin, Y.S.

    1995-10-01

    A method for the analysis of the fatigue crack growth rate for short cracks has been developed and is applied to the case of fatigue crack growth of short surface cracks in a 1045 carbon steel. The method entails three modifications to standard LEFM procedures. These modifications include the use of a material constant to bridge between smooth and cracked specimen behavior, consideration of the plastic zone size to crack length ratio, and incorporation of the development of crack closure. Comparisons are made between calculations based upon this approach and experimental data.

  13. On the use of marker loads and replicas for measuring growth rates for small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, M. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The initiation and growth of small cracks (5-500 microns m) from edge notches in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets were studied under constant amplitude loading. Two methods were used to measure crack shape and size. In the first method, striation marker bands were periodically formed along the crack front by interrupting the constant amplitude loading by either an elevated R-ratio load sequence, or by an overload sequence. In the second method, the surface crack length was monitored by taking surface replicas at regular intervals. The marker band techniques did not provide reliable crack length and crack shape information for cracks smaller than 2 mm. The replica technique provided accurate information for surface crack length at all crack lengths, and fracture tests on specimens with small cracks provided crack-shape information. Crack growth rates were plotted against the stress intensity factor ranges. The results exhibited the small crack effect, in that the small cracks grew faster than large cracks at the same stress-intensity factor range. A crack closure model was also used to analyze the growth of small cracks from small (inclusion) defects at the notch surface.

  14. A nonlinear fracture mechanics approach to the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model of crack closure is used to study the crack growth and closure behavior of small cracks in plates and at notches. The calculated crack opening stresses for small and large cracks, together with elastic and elastic plastic fracture mechanics analyses, are used to correlate crack growth rate data. At equivalent elastic stress intensity factor levels, calculations predict that small cracks in plates and at notches should grow faster than large cracks because the applied stress needed to open a small crack is less than that needed to open a large crack. These predictions agree with observed trends in test data. The calculations from the model also imply that many of the stress intensity factor thresholds that are developed in tests with large cracks and with load reduction schemes do not apply to the growth of small cracks. The current calculations are based upon continuum mechanics principles and, thus, some crack size and grain structure exist where the underlying fracture mechanics assumptions become invalid because of material inhomogeneity (grains, inclusions, etc.). Admittedly, much more effort is needed to develop the mechanics of a noncontinuum. Nevertheless, these results indicate the importance of crack closure in predicting the growth of small cracks from large crack data.

  15. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  16. Effects of Crack Closure and Cyclic Deformation on Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of a Near α Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Kumar, Vikas; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, closure corrected in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) thermomechanical fatigue crack growth rates at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) of Timetal 834 near α titanium alloy are presented. It is found that closure mechanisms significantly influence the stage I crack growth behavior. Surface roughness-induced crack closure (RICC) predominantly modifies the crack growth rate of near-threshold region at 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) test conditions. However, oxide-induced crack closure further strengthens RICC at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) TMF loading. In stage II crack growth behavior, the alloy shows higher crack growth rates at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) OP-TMF loading which is attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening occurring at the crack tip and weakening of interlamellar regions due to oxidation.

  17. Modeling and analysis of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juliang; Wang, Wenyi; Man, Zhihong; Khoo, Suiyang

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reveal the pattern of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading. To this end, a nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to describe the gear tooth crack growth. The state variables of the model are crack length and crack opening stress. The dynamics of crack growth is modeled as a modified Paris equation based on the concept of crack closure. A nonlinear second-order autoregressive equation is developed to model the dynamic behavior of the crack opening stresses. The model parameters are estimated by means of a two-step estimation method because of relatively small sample size of crack length data for G6 gear tests. The model is also validated with the crack growth data of the G6 gear.

  18. Microscopic image analysis of slow crack growth in vitreous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.

    1986-04-01

    Automated computer control, advanced video techniques, and digital image processing have been integrated into a servo-hydraulic testing system to produce a state-of-the-art testing environment. This system, in combination with an ultra high vacuum controlled environmental chamber, is used to produce high accuracy, subcritical slow crack growth data in vitreous materials. This video presentation is a review of the technologies used to extract data from the double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) sample geometry.

  19. The effects of tubule orientation on fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, Dwayne D; Rouland, Joseph A

    2003-10-01

    The fracture of restored teeth is a significant obstacle to lifelong oral health. Recent studies suggest that fatigue cracks originate at flaws introduced during cavity preparation and that fatigue crack growth is a principle cause of restored tooth fractures. In this study, the rate of fatigue crack growth in bovine dentin was estimated under mode I cyclic loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were obtained from bovine molars and subjected to high cycle fatigue loading (10(5) < N < 10(6)). The fatigue crack growth rates were measured and used to estimate the crack growth exponent and coefficient according to the Paris Law. The average fatigue crack growth exponent was 4.7 +/- 0.6 for crack growth parallel to the dentin tubules, which was significantly larger than 4.3 +/- 0.5 for crack growth perpendicular to the tubules (t-test, CI > 80%). Although the crack growth rates varied considerably, there was no significant dependence on tubule orientation or tubule density. However, specific features of the fracture surfaces and tendencies for crack curving away from the tubules suggested preferential fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the dentin tubules. Results from this study are being used to guide an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in human dentin.

  20. Fatigue crack growth in fiber-metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, YuE; Xia, ZhongChun; Xiong, XiaoFeng

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs) consist of three layers of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and two layers of glass/epoxy prepreg, and it (it means FMLs) is laminated by Al alloy and fiber alternatively. Fatigue crack growth rates in notched fiber-metal laminates under constant amplitude fatigue loading were studied experimentally and numerically and were compared with them in monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. It is shown that the fatigue life of FMLs is about 17 times longer than monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plate; and crack growth rates in FMLs panels remain constant mostly even when the crack is long, unlike in the monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. The formula to calculate bridge stress profiles of FMLs was derived based on the fracture theory. A program by Matlab was developed to calculate the distribution of bridge stress in FMLs, and then fatigue growth lives were obtained. Finite element models of FMLs were built and meshed finely to analyze the stress distributions. Both results were compared with the experimental results. They agree well with each other.

  1. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  2. Subcritical crack growth of selected aerospace pressure vessel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Bixler, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of combined cyclic/sustained loads, stress level, and crack shape on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of cracks subjected to plane strain conditions. Material/environment combinations tested included: 2219-T87 aluminum plate in gaseous helium, room air, and 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen; 5Al-2.5 Sn (ELI) titanium plate in liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen and 6AL-4V (ELI) STA titanium plate in gaseous helium and methanol at room temperature. Most testing was accomplished using surface flawed specimens instrumented with a clip gage to continuously monitor crack opening displacements at the specimen surface. Tapered double cantilever beam specimens were also tested. Static fracture and ten hour sustained load tests were conducted to determine fracture toughness and apparent threshold stress intensity values. Cyclic tests were performed using sinusoidal loading profiles at 333 MHz (20 cpm) and trapezoidal loading profiles at both 8.3 MHz (0.5 cpm) and 3.3 MHz (0.2 cpm). Data were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  3. Crack growth sparse pursuit for wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Zhang, Han; Du, Zhaohui; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    One critical challenge to achieving reliable wind turbine blade structural health monitoring (SHM) is mainly caused by composite laminates with an anisotropy nature and a hard-to-access property. The typical pitch-catch PZTs approach generally detects structural damage with both measured and baseline signals. However, the accuracy of imaging or tomography by delay-and-sum approaches based on these signals requires improvement in practice. Via the model of Lamb wave propagation and the establishment of a dictionary that corresponds to scatters, a robust sparse reconstruction approach for structural health monitoring comes into view for its promising performance. This paper proposes a neighbor dictionary that identifies the first crack location through sparse reconstruction and then presents a growth sparse pursuit algorithm that can precisely pursue the extension of the crack. An experiment with the goal of diagnosing a composite wind turbine blade with an artificial crack is performed, and it validates the proposed approach. The results give competitively accurate crack detection with the correct locations and extension length.

  4. Finite-element analysis of crack growth under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic-plastic (incremental) finite-element analysis, in conjunction with a crack-growth criterion, was used to study crack-growth behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading. The crack-growth criterion was based on crack-tip strain. Whenever the crack-tip strain equals or exceeds a critical strain value, the crack grows. The effects of element-mesh size, critical strain, strain hardening, and specimen type (tension or bending) on crack growth under monotonic loading were investigated. Crack growth under cyclic loading (constant amplitude and simple variable amplitude) were also studied. A combined hardening theory, which incorporates features of both isotropic and kinematic hardening under cyclic loading, was also developed for smooth yield surfaces and was used in the analysis.

  5. Use of Marker Bands for Determination of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates and Crack Front Shapes in Pre-Corroded Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willard, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Groups of striations called marker bands generated on a fatigue fracture surface can be used to mark the position of an advancing fatigue crack at known intervals. A technique has been developed that uses the distance between multiple sets of marker bands to obtain a vs. N, crack front shape, and fatigue crack growth rate data for small cracks. This technique is particularly usefull for specimens that require crack length measurements during testing that cannot be obtained because corrosion obscures the surface of the specimen. It is also useful for specimens with unusual or non-symmetric shapes where it is difficult to obtain accurate crack lengths using traditional methods such as compliance or electric potential difference in the early stages of testing.

  6. The Small Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an AM60 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Shyam, Amit; Huang, Jack; Decker, Ray F.; LeBeau, Steve E.; Boehlert, Carl J.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment on the small fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of an AM60 (Mg-6.29Al-0.28Mn wt pct) alloy were evaluated. The effects of mechanical loading parameters, such as maximum stress and load-ratio, on the small FCG behavior were also determined. Maximum stress did not appear to affect the crack propagation rate of small cracks in the stress and crack size ranges considered. Materials with different microstructures and yield stresses, introduced by different processing conditions, showed similar crack growth rates at equivalent stress intensity factor ranges. The effect of load ratio on small crack growth rates was recorded. Fracture surface characterization suggested that the fatigue crack propagation mechanism was a mixture of transgranular and intergranular cracking. Porosity and other material defects played respective important roles in determining the fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior.

  7. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-02-22

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  8. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  9. Recent advances in the modelling of crack growth under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekoning, A. U.; Tenhoeve, H. J.; Henriksen, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth associated with cyclic (secondary) plastic flow near a crack front is modelled using an incremental formulation. A new description of threshold behaviour under small load cycles is included. Quasi-static crack extension under high load excursions is described using an incremental formulation of the R-(crack growth resistance)- curve concept. The integration of the equations is discussed. For constant amplitude load cycles the results will be compared with existing crack growth laws. It will be shown that the model also properly describes interaction effects of fatigue crack growth and quasi-static crack extension. To evaluate the more general applicability the model is included in the NASGRO computer code for damage tolerance analysis. For this purpose the NASGRO program was provided with the CORPUS and the STRIP-YIELD models for computation of the crack opening load levels. The implementation is discussed and recent results of the verification are presented.

  10. Fatigue crack growth at elevated temperature 316 stainless steel and H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C.; Liu, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    Crack growths were measured at elevated temperatures under four types of loading: pp, pc, cp, and cc. In H-13 steel, all these four types of loading gave nearly the same crack growth rates, and the length of hold time had negligible effects. In AISI 316 stainless steel, the hold time effects on crack growth rate were negligible if the loading was tension-tension type; however, these effects were significant in reversed bending load, and the crack growth rates under these four types of loading varied considerably. Both tensile and compressive hold times caused increased crack growth rate, but the compressive hold period was more deleterious than the tensile one. Metallographic examination showed that all the crack paths under different types of loading were largely transgranular for both CTS tension-tension specimens and SEN reversed cantilever bending specimens. In addition, an electric potential technique was used to monitor crack growth at elevated temperature.

  11. Stable crack growth in polycrystalline magnesia under monotonic and cyclic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takeshi . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Llorca, J. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1994-04-01

    The quasi-static, stable growth of cracks in polycrystalline magnesia under various loading conditions (cyclic compression, monotonic tension, and tension-compression fatigue) was studied. Crack length was monitored continuously through a conductive film attached to the specimen surface. The fracture surfaces and the crack path were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The different fracture mechanisms responsible for the observed stable crack growth in each loading conditions are discussed.

  12. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  13. Nucleation and growth of cracks in vitreous-bonded aluminum oxide at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jakus, K.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.

    1986-10-01

    The nucleation and growth of cracks was studied at elevated temperatures on a grade of vitreous-bonded aluminium oxide that contained approx. =8 vol% glass at the grain boundaries. Cracks were observed to nucleate within the vitreous phase, close to the tensile surface of the flexural test specimens used in these experiments. Crack nucleation occurred at a strain of approx. =0.08% to 0.12% which corresponded to a crack nucleation time of approx. =35% of the time to failure by creep rupture. Once nucleated, cracks propagated along grain boundaries, as long as the stress for crack propagation was maintained. The crack velocity for cracks that were nucleated by the creep process was found to be linearly proportional to the apparent stress intensity factor, whereas for cracks that were nucleated by indentation, the crack velocity was proportional to the fourth power of the apparent stress intensity factor.

  14. Role of prism decussation on fatigue crack growth and fracture of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne

    2009-10-01

    The role of prism decussation on the crack growth resistance of human enamel is evaluated. Miniature inset compact tension (CT) specimens embodying a section of cuspal enamel were subjected to Mode I cyclic or monotonic loads. Cracks were grown in either the forward (from outer enamel inwards) or reverse (from inner enamel outwards) direction and the responses were compared quantitatively. Results showed that the outer enamel exhibits lower resistance to the inception and growth of cracks. Regardless of the growth direction, the near-threshold region of cyclic extension was typical of "short crack" behavior (i.e. deceleration of growth with an increase in crack length). Cyclic crack growth was more stable in the forward direction and occurred over twice the spatial distance achieved in the reverse direction. In response to the monotonic loads, a rising R-curve response was exhibited by growth in the forward direction only. The total energy absorbed in fracture for the forward direction was more than three times that in the reverse. The rise in crack growth resistance was largely attributed to a combination of mechanisms that included crack bridging, crack bifurcation and crack curving, which were induced by decussation in the inner enamel. An analysis of the responses distinguished that the microstructure of enamel appears optimized for resisting crack growth initiating from damage at the tooth's surface.

  15. Short-Crack Growth Behaviour in an Aluminum Alloy: An AGARD Cooperative Test Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Edwards, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    An AGARD test program on the growth of short fatigue cracks was conducted to define the significance of the short-crack effect, to compare test results from various laboratories and to evaluate an existing analytical model to predict the growth of such cracks. The first phase of this program, the Core Program was aimed at test procedure and specimen standardization and calibration of the various laboratories. A detailed working document has been prepared and is included in this report. It describes the testing fundamentals and procedures and includes the analysis procedures used for handling the test data. The results from the test program showed good agreement among the participants on short-crack growth rates, on fatigue life to various crack sizes and breakthrough (surface- or corner-crack became a through crack), and on crack shapes.

  16. MSFC crack growth analysis computer program, version 2 (users manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creager, M.

    1976-01-01

    An updated version of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Crack Growth Analysis Program is described. The updated computer program has significantly expanded capabilities over the original one. This increased capability includes an extensive expansion of the library of stress intensity factors, plotting capability, increased design iteration capability, and the capability of performing proof test logic analysis. The technical approaches used within the computer program are presented, and the input and output formats and options are described. Details of the stress intensity equations, example data, and example problems are presented.

  17. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  18. Contributions of Aging to the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2±1.5 to 24.1±5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4±3.03 to 22.9±5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  19. Contributions of aging to the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2 ± 1.5 to 24.1 ± 5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in-plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4 ± 3.03 to 22.9 ± 5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy.

  20. Short-crack growth behaviour in an aluminum alloy: An AGARD cooperative test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Edwards, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    An AGARD Cooperative Test Program on the growth of short fatigue cracks was conducted to define the significance of the short-crack effect, to compare test results from various laboratories, and to evaluate an existing analytical crack-growth prediction model. The initiation and growth of short fatigue cracks (5 micrometer to 2 mm) from the surface of a semi-circular notch in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet material were monitored under various load histories. The cracks initiated from inclusion particle clusters or voids on the notch surface and generally grew as surface cracks. Tests were conducted under several constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -2, -1, 0, and 0.5) and spectrum (FALSTAFF and Gaussian) loading conditions at 3 stress levels each. Short crack growth was recorded using a plastic-replica technique. Over 250 edge-notched specimens were fatigue tested and nearly 950 cracks monitored by 12 participants from 9 countries. Long crack-growth rate data for cracks greater than 2 mm in length were obtained over a wide range in rates (10 to the -8 to 10 to the -1 mm/cycle) for all constant-amplitude loading conditions. Long crack-growth rate data for the FALSTAFF and Gaussian load sequences were also obtained.

  1. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    The fatigue process consists, from the engineering point of view, of three stages: crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and the final failure. It is also known that the fatigue process near notches and cracks is governed by local strains and stresses in the regions of maximum stress and strain concentrations. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth can be considered as a process of successive crack increments, and the fatigue crack initiation and subsequent growth can be modeled as one repetitive process. The assumptions mentioned above were used to derive a fatigue crack growth model based, called later as the UniGrow model, on the analysis of cyclic elastic-plastic stresses-strains near the crack tip. The fatigue crack growth rate was determined by simulating the cyclic stress-strain response in the material volume adjacent to the crack tip and calculating the accumulated fatigue damage in a manner similar to fatigue analysis of stationary notches. The fatigue crack growth driving force was derived on the basis of the stress and strain history at the crack tip and the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) fatigue damage parameter, D = σmaxΔɛ/2. It was subsequently found that the fatigue crack growth was controlled by a two-parameter driving force in the form of a weighted product of the stress intensity range and the maximum stress intensity factor, Δ K p K {max/1- p }. The effect of the internal (residual) stress induced by the reversed cyclic plasticity has been accounted for and therefore the two-parameter driving force made it possible to predict the effect of the mean stress including the influence of the applied compressive stress, tensile overloads, and variable amplitude spectrum loading. It allows estimating the fatigue life under variable amplitude loading without using crack closure concepts. Several experimental fatigue crack growth datasets obtained for the Al 7075 aluminum alloy were used for the verification of the proposed unified fatigue crack growth

  3. Vibration-Based Method Developed to Detect Cracks in Rotors During Acceleration Through Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in developing rotating machinery shaft crack-detection methodologies and online techniques. Shaft crack problems present a significant safety and loss hazard in nearly every application of modern turbomachinery. In many cases, the rotors of modern machines are rapidly accelerated from rest to operating speed, to reduce the excessive vibrations at the critical speeds. The vibration monitoring during startup or shutdown has been receiving growing attention (ref. 1), especially for machines such as aircraft engines, which are subjected to frequent starts and stops, as well as high speeds and acceleration rates. It has been recognized that the presence of angular acceleration strongly affects the rotor's maximum response to unbalance and the speed at which it occurs. Unfortunately, conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have unacceptable limits in terms of their application for online crack detection. Some of these techniques are time consuming and inconvenient for turbomachinery service testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage be known in advance, and they can provide only local information, with no indication of the structural strength at a component or system level. In addition, the effectiveness of these experimental techniques is affected by the high measurement noise levels existing in complex turbomachine structures. Therefore, the use of vibration monitoring along with vibration analysis has been receiving increasing attention.

  4. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  5. A Comparison of Fatigue Crack Growth in Human Enamel and Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Nazari, Ahmad; Eidelman, Naomi; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-01-01

    Cracks and craze lines are often observed in the enamel of human teeth, but they rarely cause tooth fracture. The present study evaluates fatigue crack growth in human enamel, and compares that to the fatigue response of sintered hydroxyapatite (HAp) with similar crystallinity, chemistry and density. Miniature inset compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared that embodied a small piece of enamel (N=8) or HAp (N=6). The specimens were subjected to mode I cyclic loads and the steady state crack growth responses were modeled using the Paris Law. Results showed that the fatigue crack growth exponent (m) for enamel (m = 7.7±1.0) was similar to that for HAp (m = 7.9±1.4), whereas the crack growth coefficient (C) for enamel (C=8.7E-04 (mm/cycle)·(MPa·m0.5)-m) was significantly lower (p<0.0001) than that for HAp (C = 2.0E+00 (mm/cycle)·(MPa·m0.5)-m). Micrographs of the fracture surfaces showed that crack growth in the enamel occurred primarily along the prism boundaries. In regions of decussation, the microstructure promoted microcracking, crack bridging, crack deflection and crack bifurcation. Working in concert, these mechanisms increased the crack growth resistance and resulted in a sensitivity to crack growth (m) similar to bone and lower than that of human dentin. These mechanisms of toughening were not observed in the crack growth response of the sintered HAp. While enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue of the human body, the microstructural arrangement of the prisms promotes exceptional resistance to crack growth. PMID:18804277

  6. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  7. Effects of Different R ratios on Fatigue Crack Growth in Laser Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Forth, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The influence of laser peening on the fatigue crack growth behavior of friction stir welded (FSW) Aluminum Alloy (AA) 7075-T7351 sheets was investigated. The surface modification resulting from the peening process on the fatigue crack growth of FSW was assessed for two different R ratios. The investigation indicated a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth rates resulting from using laser shock peening compared with unpeened, welded and unwelded specimens. The slower fatigue crack growth rate was attributed to the compressive residual stresses induced by the peening.

  8. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    DOE PAGES

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impededmore » hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.« less

  9. The Role of Cracks in Accelerating the Rate of Landslide Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, F. H.; Blesius, L.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for deep seated landslides often involve the complex interplay of a number of factors that contribute to the initiation, accelerated rates of movement, and often catastrophic failures associated with these types of mass movement processes. One of the challenges associated with the study of such events is the determination of the trigger mechanism that tips the scale in favor of movement, accelerated movement, or catastrophic failure. Much research has been directed at the role of a number of factors such as: basic geology, failure zones, preferential slide planes,vegetative root strength, rainfall amounts, rates and basic infiltration dynamics that may contribute to movement or failure, or at times even serve as the primary forcing mechanism leading to failure or accelerated movement. However, the role of surface cracks in impacting the hydrologic balance of a hillslope and ultimately the stability of a hillside has received relatively little attention. In an effort to better understand the potential role of surface cracks in altering the hydrologic balance and ultimately the stability and rate of movement of deep seated slope failures, an evaluation of a relatively large scale landslide in Los Flores Canyon, Malibu, CA was undertaken. The Los Flores Canyon slide area encompasses an area in excess of 50 acres (+ 200,000 m2), with an overall slide volume in excess of 25 M cubic meters. Over the years, it has undergone wide and often relatively rapid variation in movement rates with toe movement rates ranging from under 0.3 m/yr up to rates exceeding 2.5 m/yr. Local rates on major portions of the slide surface have exceeded 25 m/yr at times. Combining basic geologic, rainfall, urban runoff, fire, and landslide movement data with a careful GIS based evaluation of the initiation and development of crack systems on the slide mass it was determined that in some instances, once the initial movement of the slide had begun, some of the subsequent

  10. Mixed mode fatigue crack growth in the commercial Al-Li alloys, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1994-05-15

    Crystallographic fatigue crack propagation along planar slip bands has been recognized to occur over a particularly wide range of conditions in Al-Li alloys due to the presence of coherent, shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates, in conjunction with the strong underlying crystallographic texture often developed in these materials during secondary processing. Such Stage 1 propagation typically produces a highly tortuous crack path during conventional mode 1 fatigue testing. While the net crack growth direction remains parallel to the nominal mode 1 direction, crack tortuosity has been generally recognized as beneficial to fatigue resistance, as both local mixed mode crack-tip loading conditions and roughness induced closure may significantly reduce the driving force for crack extension (i.e. crack shielding'' occurs). Recent investigations of commercial Al-Li plate in the damage tolerant condition have however shown that co-planar Stage 1 crack propagation along preferred [111]-plane orientations may give rise to sustained macroscopic crack deviation from the nominal mode 1 growth direction. Such crack growth raises a number of important questions with regard to conventional, nominally mode 1 based structure lifting and fatigue testing methods when applied to these materials. Work has therefore been carried out to characterized fatigue crack growth during sustained co-planar Stage 1 propagation in a commercial Al-Li alloy, with particular reference to mixed mode loading conditions.

  11. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  12. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  13. Test Method Variability in Slow Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, J. A.; Tandon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured by using constant stress rate testing in 2 and 95 percent RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and crack velocities for dry environments are 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitive to small changes in RH at low RH. Biaxial and uniaxial stress states produced similar parameters. Confidence intervals on crack growth parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors solutions were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation. Use of scratch-like and indentation flaws produced similar crack growth parameters when residual stresses were considered.

  14. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  15. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K{sub ISCC}, crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  16. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K[sub ISCC], crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  17. Effects of chemical environments on slow crack growth in glasses and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, S. W.

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents a review of our current understanding of environmentally induced slow crack growth in glasses, single crystals, and polycrystalline ceramics. It is shown that the rate of crack growth is controlled by the chemical activity of the active species in the environment as well as by the stress intensity at the crack tip. A recently developed molecular model of stress-induced chemical reaction between vitreous silica and water is described. The implications of this model for the effects of other chemical species on crack growth are discussed. Finally, the complications introduced by the presence of grain boundaries in polycrystalline ceramics are pointed out.

  18. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  19. The effect of aging on crack-growth resistance and toughening mechanisms in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Koester, Kurt J; Ager, Joel W; Ritchie, Robert O

    2008-04-01

    Crack-growth experiments in human dentin have been performed in situ in an environmental scanning electron microscope to measure, for the first time, the crack-growth resistance curve (R-curve) for clinically relevant (<250 microm) crack extensions and to simultaneously identify the salient toughening mechanisms. "Young" dentin from donors 19-30 years in age and "aged" dentin from donors 40-70 years in age were evaluated. The "young" group had 0-4% of its tubules filled with apatite; the "aged" group was subdivided into "opaque" with 12-32% filled tubules and "transparent" with 65-100% filled tubules. Although crack-initiation toughnesses were similar, the crack-growth resistance of "young" dentin was higher by about 40% compared to "aged" dentin. Mechanistically, this behavior is interpreted in terms of three phenomena: (i) gross crack deflection of the growing crack, (ii) microcracks which initiated at unfilled tubules in the high stress region in the vicinity of a propagating crack (no microcracks formed at filled tubules), and (iii) crack propagation which followed a local trajectory through unfilled tubules and deflected around filled tubules. The higher toughness of the "young" dentin was related to enhanced microcracking (at unfilled tubules) ahead of the growing crack, which (i) shields the crack by activating multiple crack tips and by reducing the local stress intensity through crack deflection and (ii) leads to the formation of crack bridges from "uncracked ligaments" due to the incomplete coalescence of these microcracks with the main crack tip. With age, the role of these toughening mechanisms was diminished primarily to the lower fraction of unfilled, and hence microcracked, tubules.

  20. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  1. Analyses of Fatigue and Fatigue-Crack Growth under Constant- and Variable-Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Studies on the growth of small cracks have led to the observation that fatigue life of many engineering materials is primarily crack growth from micro-structural features, such as inclusion particles, voids, slip-bands or from manufacturing defects. This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using small-crack theory under various loading conditions. Constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective stress-intensity factor range (delta K(sub eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Modifications to the delta K(sub eff)-rate relations in the near-threshold regime were needed to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were predicted using crack-growth relations and micro-structural features like those that initiated cracks in the fatigue specimens for most of the materials analyzed. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  2. Morphological study of near threshold fatigue crack growth in a coarse grain aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, Gerhard; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in the near-threshold region has been studied in coarse grain Al 7029 alloy. Over eighty percent of the crack surfaces are planar areas parallel to either 100-oriented or 111-oriented planes. The 100-plane crack surfaces show 'pine tree' morphological features formed by slip on two sets of intersecting planes. The 111-plane crack surfaces were planar and shiny. They were formed primarily by slip on a single dominant 111-oriented slip plane with sparse and very light secondary slip markings. Crack growth rates were measured and correlated with Delta-K.

  3. Cracking and delamination behaviors of photovoltaic backsheet after accelerated laboratory weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiao-Chi; Lyu, Yadong; Hunston, Donald L.; Kim, Jae Hyun; Wan, Kai-Tak; Stanley, Deborah L.; Gu, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The channel crack and delamination phenomena that occurred during tensile tests were utilized to study surface cracking and delamination properties of a multilayered backsheet. A model sample of commercial PPE (polyethylene terephthalate (PET)/PET/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)) backsheet was studied. Fragmentation testing was performed after accelerated aging with and without ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in two relative humidity (RH) levels (5 % RH and 60 % RH) at elevated temperature (85 °C) conditions for 11 days and 22 days. Results suggest that the embrittled surface layer resulting from the UV photo-degradation is responsible for surface cracking when the strain applied on the sample is far below the yielding strain (2.2 %) of the PPE sample. There was no surface cracking observed on the un-aged sample and samples aged without UV irradiation. According to the fragmentation testing results, the calculated fracture toughness (KIC) values of the embrittled surface layer are as low as 0.027 MPa·m1/2 to 0.104 MPa·m1/2, depending on the humidity levels and aging times. Surface analysis using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared and atomic force microscopy shows the degradation mechanism of the embrittled surface layer is a combination of the photodegradation within a certain degradation depth and the moisture erosion effect depending on the moisture levels. Specifically, UV irradiation provides a chemical degradation effect while moisture plays a synergistic effect on surface erosion, which influences surface roughness after aging. Finally, there was no delamination observed during tensile testing in this study, suggesting the surface cracking problem is more significant than the delamination for the PPE backsheet material and conditions tested here.

  4. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  5. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  6. Small fatigue crack growth in metallic materials: A model and its application to engineering alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks is important for materials used in structurally demanding applications such as aircraft turbine discs and some automotive engine components. Here, we present a general, dislocation-based fracture mechanics approach to predict the growth rate of small fatigue cracks in metallic materials. The applicability of the model to the small fatigue crack growth behavior of four engineering alloys was examined. Small fatigue cracks were initiated and propagated, in a controlled manner, from micronotches fabricated by femtosecond pulsed laser micromachining. The results suggest that a methodology consisting of crack-tip damage accumulation and fracture provides a common framework to estimate the fatigue crack propagation lifetime of structural materials.

  7. Creep crack growth predictions in INCO 718 using a continuum damage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Wilson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Creep crack growth tests have been carried out in compact type specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). Theoretical creep crack growth predictions have been carried out by incorporating a unified viscoplastic constitutive model and a continuum damage model into the ARAQUS nonlinear finite element program. Material constants for both the viscoplastic model and the creep continuum damage model were determined from tests carried out on uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). A comparison of the theoretical creep crack growth rates obtained from the finite element predictions with the experimentally observed creep crack growth rates indicates that the viscoplastic/continuum damage model can be used to successfully predict creep crack growth in compact type specimens using material constants obtained from uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C).

  8. A three-dimensional quantitative understanding of short fatigue crack growth in high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei

    The behaviors of short fatigue crack (SFC) propagation through grain boundaries (GBs) were monitored during high cycle fatigue in an Al-Li alloy AA8090. The growth behaviors of SFCs were found to be mainly controlled by the twist components (alpha) of crack plane deflection across each of up to first 20 GBs along the crack path. The crack plane twist at the GB can result in a resistance against SFC growth; therefore SFC propagation preferred to follow a path with minimum alpha at each GB. In addition to the grain orientation, the tilting of GB could also affect alpha. An experiment focusing on quantifying GB-resistance was conducted on an Al-Cu alloy AA2024-T351. With a focused ion beam (FIB) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the micro-notches were made in front of the selected GBs which had a wide range of alpha, followed by monitoring the interaction of crack propagation from the notches with the GBs during fatigue. The crack growth rate was observed to decrease at each GB it had passed; and such growth-rate decrease was proportional to alpha. The resistance of the GB was determined to vary as a Weibull-type function of alpha. Based on these discoveries, a microstructure-based 3-D model was developed to quantify the SFC growth in high-strength Al alloys, allowing the prediction of crack front advancement in 3-D and the quantification of growth rate along the crack front. The simulation results yielded a good agreement with the experimental results about the SFC growth rate on the surface of the AA8090 Al alloy. The model was also used to predict the life of SFC growth statistically in different textures, showing potential application to texture design of alloys. Fatigue crack initiation at constituent particles (beta-phase) was preliminarily studied in the AA2024-T351 Al alloy. Cross-sectioning with the FIB revealed that the 3-D geometry, especially the thickness, of fractured constituent particles (beta-phase) was the key factor controlling the

  9. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  10. The characterization of small fatigue crack growth in PH13-8 molybdenum stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ohchang

    The rotor hubs of Navy CH-46 helicopters have been made of 4340 steel and had extensive corrosion fatigue problems. Since these helicopters have to be used until the year 2020, the Navy decided to replace 4340 steel with PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel. Because the rotors are exposed to high frequency high cycle fatigue, small fatigue cracks are important in estimating remaining lifetime of the components. The objective of this study was to characterize the small crack growth behavior in the PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel under various loading conditions. Constant amplitude loading was conducted at the stress ratios, R, 0.1 and 0.4. The crack growth rate was affected by the microstructures in early stage of the growth, mainly by the size of the martensite packets and oscillated up to the crack length of 200 mum. It was found that the crack growth rate was little influenced by the stress amplitudes and stress ratios. In addition, the small crack growth rate was found to be similar to the long crack growth rate at R = 0.1 and 0.4. Overload tests and simple block loading were performed to understand load interaction effects on the small crack growth rate. The overload tests indicated that the crack growth rate was little affected by the overload. This might result from the fact that the overload ratio used in this study was low (<1.3). However, the results of the simple block loading showed overall crack growth retardation. The compressive residual stress present at the notch root of the specimen tested at R = 0.1 may lower the effective stress ratio, Reff, from 0.1 to negative R, and may result in the crack growth retardation. The small crack growth behavior was also examined under the saltwater. There was no difference in the crack growth rate between under air and under saltwater. In addition, the crack growth rate of the specimens tested under the saltwater was not affected by the test frequencies of 10, 1 and 0.1 Hz. It was shown that under the saltwater the PH 13-8 Mo

  11. Small, short and long fatigue crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride ceramic material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Edwards, L.

    1996-05-15

    In metallic materials, a number of workers have reported that the growth rates of small fatigue cracks cannot be correlated with the stress intensity factor range, {Delta}K. Small cracks normally exhibit faster growth rates than long cracks and often show growth rate minima. This anomalous behavior has been attributed to the failure of the linear elastic fracture mechanics parameter {Delta}K to characterize small, or short fatigue crack growth. Ceramic materials combine a lack of dislocation deformation and a very small grain size and thus the reasons for any observed anomalous small or short crack growth effect are less clear. Previous work on small or short fatigue crack growth in ceramics is limited, and work on silicon nitride which is one of the most promising structural ceramics is particularly sparse. As the majority of the fatigue lifetime of any silicon nitride component will be controlled by the propagation of a preexisting small flaw to a critical size, the presence of any short or small crack effect in this material is of engineering importance. Thus, the objective of the work presented here is to investigate the small, short and long crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride material.

  12. The structure of the near-tip field during transient elastodynamic crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.; Rosakis, A. J.

    T HE PROCESS of dynamic crack growth in a nominally elastic malerial under conditions of plane strain or plane stress is considered. Of particular concern is the influence of the transient nature of the process on the stress field in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip during nonsteady growth. Asymptotically, the crack tip stress field is square root singular at the crack tip, with the angular variation of the singular field depending weakly on the instantaneous crack tip speed and with the instantaneous stress intensity factor being a scalar multiplier of the singular field. However, for a material particle at a small distance from the moving crack, the local stress field depends not only on instantaneous values of crack speed and stress intensity factor, but also on the past history of these lime-dependent quantities. A representation of the crack tip field is obtained in the form of an expansion about the crack up in powers of radial coordinate, with the coefficients depending on the time rates of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factor. This representation is used to interpret some experimental observations, with the conclusion that the higher-order expansion provides an accurate description of crack tip fields under fairly severe transient conditions. In addition, some estimates are made of the practical limits of using a stress intensity factor field alone to characterize the local fields.

  13. Numerical simulation of out-of-plane distortion fatigue crack growth in bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Paula A.

    Aging of the United States infrastructure systems has resulted in the degradation of many operational bridge structures throughout the country. Structural deficiencies can result from material fatigue caused by cyclical loadings leading to localized structural damage. While fatigue crack growth is viewed as a serviceability problem, unstable crack growth can compromise the integrity of the structure. Multi-girder bridges designed with transverse cross bracing systems can be prone to distortion fatigue at unstiffened web gaps. Cracking is exhibited within this fatigue prone region from the application of cyclical multi-mode loadings. Focus of fatigue analysis has largely been directed at pure Mode I loading through the development of AASHTO fatigue classifications for crack initiation and the Paris Law for crack propagation. Numerical modeling approaches through the ABAQUS Extended Finite Element Method offers a unique avenue in which this detail can be assessed. Finite element simulations were developed to first evaluate the applicability of the Paris Law crack propagation under multi-mode loading against experimental data. Following the validation, fatigue crack growth in plate girders with various web gap sizes was assessed due to mixed-mode loadings. Modeling results showed enlargement of horizontal initial crack lengths within stiffer web gap regions arrested crack development. Crack directionality was also seen to change as initial crack lengths were increased. From this research it is hypothesized that deterioration of the transverse stiffener connection can be minimized by increasing the horizontal length of initial fatigue cracks. Enlargement of the crack plane away from regions of localized stress concentrations within the web gap may result in arrestment of the out-of-plane distortion induced cracking.

  14. Crack shielding in Ce-TZP/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites: Comparison of fatigue and sustained crack growth specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Jingfong Tsai; Belnap, J.D.; Shetty, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Crack shielding stress intensities in in situ loaded compact tension specimens of two types of ceria-partially-stabilized zirconia/alumina (Ce-TZP-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composites with prior histories of subcritical crack growth in sustained and tension-tension fatigue loading were directly assessed using laser Raman spectroscopy. Crack-tip stress fields within the transformation zones were measured by measuring a stress-induced frequency shift of a peak corresponding to the tetragonal phase. The peak shift as a function of the applied stress was separately calibrated using a ball-on ring flexure test. Total crack shielding stress intensity was estimated from the far-field applied stress intensity and the local crack-tip stress intensity assessed from the measured near-crack-tip stresses. The shielding stress intensities were consistently lower in the fatigue specimens than in the sustained load crack growth specimens. The reduced crack shielding developed in the fatigue specimens was independently confirmed by measurements of larger crack-opening displacement under far-field applied load as compared to the sustained load crack growth specimens. Thus, diminished crack shielding was a major factor contributing to the higher subcritical crack growth rates exhibited by the Ce-TZPAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites in tension-tension cyclic fatigue.

  15. Subcritical crack growth in glasses under cyclic loads: Effect of hydrodynamic pressure in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, K.S.; Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic pressure developed in the wake of a crack growing in a brittle material under cyclic loads in an aqueous environment is considered. The pressure acts in opposition to the movement of the crack faces, thus shielding the crack up from the applied loads. A general hydrodynamic fluid pressure relation based on a one-dimensional Reynolds equation, which applicable to a crack with an arbitrary crack opening profile, is developed. The model is modified to account for side flow through the thickness of the sample and cavitation near the crack tip. Both effects significantly modify the hydrodynamic pressure distribution. Finally, the resulting hydrodynamic pressure relations are combined with a fracture mechanics model to account for the change in the near-tip stress intensity. Resulting predictions of the cyclic crack-growth rate are found to be in good agreement with measured values for a borosilicate glass tested at various frequencies in a water environment.

  16. The Reduction in Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Dentin with Depth

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Neerchal, N.K.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2011-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔKth ≈ 0.8 MPa•m0.5) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin. PMID:21628640

  17. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  18. Crack-growth behavior in thick welded plates of Inconel 718 at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Results of mechanical-properties and axial-load fatigue and fracture tests performed on thick welded plates of Inconel 718 superalloy are presented. The test objectives were to determine the tensile strength properties and the crack-growth behavior in electron-beam, plasma-arc, and gas tungsten are welds for plates 1.90 cm (0.75 in) thick. Base-metal specimens were also tested to determine the flaw-growth behavior. The tests were performed in room-temperature-air and liquid nitrogen environments. The experimental crack-growth-rate data are correlated with theoretical crack-growth-rate predictions for semielliptical surface flaws.

  19. Selective Reinforcement to Improve Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance in Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations of the fatigue crack growth and fracture response of aluminum selectively reinforced compact tension specimens were performed. It was shown that selective reinforcement significantly improved these responses primarily through load sharing by the reinforcement. With the appropriate combination of reinforcement architecture and mechanical properties, as well as reinforcement to base aluminum interface properties, fatigue cracks can be arrested using selective reinforcement. Maximum load associated with fracture increased up to 20 percent for the cases investigated and crack growth at maximum load increased as much as 150 percent. For both fatigue crack growth and fracture, the three most influential properties identified within the bounds of this investigation that influence this response are reinforcement width, reinforcement stiffness and interface stiffness. Considerable coupling occurs between the different fiber architecture and material properties and how they influence fatigue crack growth and fracture responses.

  20. Subcritical Crack Growth in Ceramic Composites at High Temperature Measured Using Digital Image Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, D.R.; Morris, W.L.; Dadkhah, M.S.; Cox, B.N.

    1996-01-11

    An in situ experimental technique is described that allows high resolution, high sensitivity determination of displacements and full-field strains during high temperature mechanical testing. The technique is used to investigate elevated temperature crack growth in SiC/Nicalon sub f composites. At 1150 degrees C, the reinforcing fibers have a higher creep susceptibility than the matrix. Fiber creep leads to relaxation of crack bridging tractions, resulting in subcritical crack growth. Differential image analysis is used to measure the crack opening displacement profile u(x) of an advancing, bridged crack. With appropriate modeling, such data can be used to determine the traction law, from which the mechanics of cracking and failure may be determined.

  1. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T.

    1997-04-01

    The modification of a computer code for leak before break analysis is very briefly described. The CASTEM2000 code was developed for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading. The modification extends the capabilities of the cracked pipe element to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions (C*, {phi}c and {Delta}c). The model has the advantage of evaluating significant secondary effects, such as those from thermal loading.

  2. On the interaction of ultrasound with cracks: Applications to fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, O.; Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Partial contact of two rough fatigue crack surfaces leads to transmission and diffraction of an acoustic signal at those contacts. Recent experimental and theoretical efforts to understand and quantify such contact in greater detail are discussed. The objective is to develop an understanding of the closure phenomenon and its application to the interpretation of fatigue data, in particular the R-ratio, spike overload/underload and threshold effects on crack propagation.

  3. Effect of aluminide particle distribution on the high temperature crack growth characteristics of a Co-Ni-Fe superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.S.; Reynolds, A.P.; Clawson, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    Inconel 783{reg_sign} is an oxidant-resistant, controlled coefficient of thermal expansion, cobalt-nickel-iron-based superalloy. The matrix ({gamma}) is FCC and can be strengthened by coherent strengthening precipitates ({gamma}{prime}). It has been shown that an aluminum content greater than 5 wt% leads to the formation of body-centered aluminide ({beta}) particles and improved resistance to stress accelerated grain boundary oxygen (SAGBO) embrittlement relative to other low-expansion superalloys. The study described below was undertaken to determine the role of the {beta} phase during creep crack growth, and how its distribution affects the alloy`s SAGBO resistance. Aging of alloy 783 to produce a continuous grain boundary film of {beta} phase results in reduced creep crack growth rates at 538 C compared to heat treatments which do not result in a continuous film. Oxidation studies indicate that the {beta} phase is oxidation resistant and hence may cause increased resistance to SAGBO.

  4. Monitoring of fatigue crack growth at fastener holes using guided Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.; Sayir, M. B.

    2002-05-01

    An experimental method for the detection of fatigue cracks at holes in aluminum specimens is investigated. The first anti-symmetric Lamb wave mode A0 is excited. Using a heterodyne laser interferometer, the scattered field close to the hole during crack growth is monitored. The fatigue crack is initiated and propagated by cyclic tensile loading of the test specimen in a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The measurements are compared to finite difference calculations. Good qualitative agreement is found.

  5. Creep life prediction based on stochastic model of microstructurally short crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1988-01-01

    A nondimensional model of microstructurally short crack growth in creep is developed based on a detailed observation of the creep fracture process of 304 stainless steel. In order to deal with the scatter of small crack growth rate data caused by microstructural inhomogeneity, a random variable technique is used in the model. A cumulative probability of the crack length at an arbitary time, G(bar a, bar t), and that of the time when a crack reaches an arbitary length, F(bar t, bar a), are obtained numerically by means of a Monte Carlo method. G(bar a, bar t), and F(bar t, bar a) are the probabilities for a single crack. However, multiple cracks generally initiate on the surface of a smooth specimen from the early stage of creep life to the final stage. TAking into account the multiple crack initiations, the actual crack length distribution observed on the surface of a specimen is predicted by the combination of probabilities for a single crack. The prediction shows a fairly good agreement with the experimental result for creep of 304 stainless steel at 923 K. The probability of creep life is obtained from an assumption that creep fracture takes place when the longest crack reaches a critical length. The observed and predicted scatter of the life is fairly small for the specimens tested.

  6. Creep life prediction based on stochastic model of microstructurally short crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A nondimensional model of microstructurally short crack growth in creep is developed based on a detailed observation of the creep fracture process of 304 stainless steel. In order to deal with the scatter of small crack growth rate data caused by microstructural inhomogeneity, a random variable technique is used in the model. A cumulative probability of the crack length at an arbitrary time, G(bar a, bar t), and that of the time when a crack reaches an arbitrary length, F(bar t, bar a), are obtained numerically by means of a Monte Carlo method. G(bar a, bar t), and F(bar t, bar a) are the probabilities for a single crack. However, multiple cracks generally initiate on the surface of a smooth specimen from the early stage of creep life to the final stage. Taking into account the multiple crack initiations, the actual crack length distribution observed on the surface of a specimen is predicted by the combination of probabilities for a single crack. The prediction shows a fairly good agreement with the experimental result for creep of 304 stainless steel at 923 K. The probability of creep life is obtained from an assumption that creep fracture takes place when the longest crack reaches a critical length. The observed and predicted scatter of the life is fairly small for the specimens tested.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth in Bodies with Thermally Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovářík, O.; Haušild, P.; Medřický, J.; Tomek, L.; Siegl, J.; Mušálek, R.; Curry, N.; Björklund, S.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications of thermally sprayed coatings call for increased fatigue resistance of coated parts. Despite the intensive research in this area, the influence of coating on fatigue is still not completely understood. In this paper, the localization of crack initiation sites and the dynamics of crack propagation are studied. The resonance bending fatigue test was employed to test flat specimens with both sides coated. Hastelloy-X substrates coated with classical thermal barrier coating consisting of yttria stabilized zirconia and NiCoCrAlY layers. The strain distribution on the coating surface was evaluated by the Digital Image Correlation method through the whole duration of the fatigue test. Localization of crack initiation sites and the mode of crack propagation in the coated specimen are related to the observed resonance frequency. The individual phases of specimen degradation, i.e., the changes of material properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation, were identified. The tested coatings strongly influenced the first two phases, and the influence on the crack propagation was less significant. In general, the presented crack detection method can be used as a sensitive nondestructive testing method well suited for coated parts.

  8. Mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in Ti-48Al at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O.; Mercer, C.; Aswath, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides are of practical interest due to their potential to replace nickel- and cobalt-based alloys in aeroengines. The results of a study of crack-tip deformation on the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in a model powder metallurgy (P/M) gamma-based titanium aluminide intermetallic (Ti-48Al) are presented in this paper. Note that compositions are quoted in atomic % unless stated otherwise. Crack-tip deformation is shown to occur by a combination of deformation-induced twinning and conventional slip at room temperature, and conventional reversed plasticity/slip only at elevated temperature (700 C). Differences between crack-tip deformation mechanisms at room- and elevated-temperature are explained by crack-tip transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The potential effects of twin toughening are also quantified using optical interference measurements of twin process zones and micromechanical models. The implications of the different crack-tip deformation mechanisms for cyclic irreversibility are discussed for crack growth at room- and elevated-temperature. The results suggest that slower fatigue crack growth rates at elevated-temperature are due to differences in crack-tip deformation and closure mechanisms.

  9. In situ measurements of stress-corrosion crack growth using laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacmar, Chris; Blackshire, James L.

    2003-07-01

    A detailed microscopic characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) processes has been conducted for electro-chemically pitted AA 2024-T3 aluminum dogbone specimens in a high-cycle fatigue environment. The measurements were done in-situ using scanning laser ultrasonic detection of Rayleigh waves propagating along the material surface. Detailed microscopic NDE evaluations of crack extent and position, crack growth rates, and local crack depth were made based on near-field ultrasonic scattering signatures. A variety of electro-chemically generated corrosion pits were studied, where variations of pit depth, pitting surface area, and pit volume loss were correlated to fatigue life, crack initiation, and crack growth rates. The measurement technique provided an advanced crack 'imaging' capability that proved to be a very useful NDE tool for the micro-characterization of crack growth processes, and provided a wealth of information regarding the micro-features of the cracks whcih are currently not available with any other advanced NDE technique.

  10. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  11. Effects of Hydrogen on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Gyu, Lee; Changheui, Jang; In Sup, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate of low alloy steels in air and oxygen-controlled water, from room temperature to 288 deg C, were measured and the results were analyzed. In high dissolved oxygen water, the loading frequency effect was observed; on the other hand, the effect of loading frequency was not clearly seen in low dissolved oxygen water. Moreover, crystallographic features, especially the formation of highly localized strained zone, that is related to the hydrogen assisted cracking was observed on the fracture surface of the sample tested in the water environments. To confirm this mechanism, some samples were hydrogen charged and fatigue tested in air and in argon gas, at RT and at 288 deg. C, respectively. The fatigue crack growth rate increased in the hydrogen charged samples. The fracture surface of the hydrogen charged samples showed brittle cracking at 288 deg C as well as at room temperature, which resulted in the fast crack growth rate. (authors)

  12. On the Growth of Fatigue Cracks from Material and Manufacturing Discontinuities Under Variable Amplitude Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Rhys; Peng, Daren; Singh Raman, R. K.; Huang, Pu; Tamboli, Dinaz; Matthews, Neil

    2015-06-01

    This paper focuses on problems associated with aircraft sustainment-related issues and illustrates how cracks, that grow from small naturally occurring material and manufacturing discontinuities in operational aircraft, behave. It also explains how, in accordance with the US Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, the size of the initiating flaw is mandated, e.g. a 1.27-mm-deep semi-circular surface crack for a crack emanating from a cut out in a thick structure, a 3.175-mm-deep semi-circular surface crack in thick structure, etc. It is subsequently shown that, for cracks in (two) full-scale aircraft tests that arose from either small manufacturing defects or etch pits, the use of d a/d N versus ∆ K data obtained from ASTM E647 tests on long cracks to determine the number of cycles to failure from the mandated initial crack size can lead to the life being significantly under-estimated and therefore to an unnecessarily significant increase in the number of inspections, and, hence, a significant cost burden and an unnecessary reduction in aircraft availability. In contrast it is shown that, for the examples analysed, the use of the Hartman-Schijve crack growth equation representation of the small crack d a/d N versus ∆ K data results in computed crack depth versus flight loads histories that are in good agreement with measured data. It is also shown that, for the examples considered, crack growth from corrosion pits and the associated scatter can also be captured by the Hartman-Schijve crack growth equation.

  13. 7075-T6 and 2024-T351 Aluminum Alloy Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Wright, Christopher W.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental test procedures for the development of fatigue crack growth rate data has been standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Over the past 30 years several gradual changes have been made to the standard without rigorous assessment of the affect these changes have on the precision or variability of the data generated. Therefore, the ASTM committee on fatigue crack growth has initiated an international round robin test program to assess the precision and variability of test results generated using the standard E647-00. Crack growth rate data presented in this report, in support of the ASTM roundrobin, shows excellent precision and repeatability.

  14. The effect of texture on the crack growth resistance of alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Shannon, John L., Jr.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of a textured, extruded alumina body was compared with that of an isotropic, isopressed body of similar grain size, density, and chemistry. R-curve levels reflected the preferred orientation; however, R-curve slopes (dK sub IR/d Delta a) were the same in all instances, implying a similar crack growth resistive mechanism. Three orthogonal orientations of crack growth in the two structures exhibited similar forms of K sub IR versus Delta-a curves, for which a schematic diagram for polycrystalline ceramics is proposed.

  15. Application of fiber bridging models to fatigue crack growth in unidirectional titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several fiber bridging models were reviewed and applied to study the matrix fatigue crack growth behavior in center notched (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and (0)(sub 4) SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V laminates. Observations revealed that fatigue damage consisted primarily of matrix cracks and fiber matrix interfacial failure in the (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates. Fiber-matrix interface failure included fracture of the brittle reaction zone and cracking between the two carbon rich fiber coatings. Intact fibers in the wake of the matrix cracks reduce the stress intensity factor range. Thus, an applied stress intensity factor range is inappropriate to characterize matrix crack growth behavior. Fiber bridging models were used to determine the matrix stress intensity factor range in titanium metal matrix composites. In these models, the fibers in the wake of the crack are idealized as a closure pressure. An unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond or slip length of the bridging fibers. The frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to available data (crack growth data, crack opening displacement data, and debond length data). Large variations in the frictional shear stress required to fit the experimental data indicate that the fiber bridging models in their present form lack predictive capabilities. However, these models provide an efficient and relatively simple engineering method for conducting parametric studies of the matrix growth behavior based on constituent properties.

  16. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Donghai; Chen, Kai; Yu, Lun; lu, Hui; Zhang, Lefu; Shi, Xiuqiang; Xu, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration.

  17. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  18. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. . Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  19. Surface-crack growth: Models, experiments, and structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Walter G. (Editor); Underwood, John H. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on surface-crack growth modeling, experimental methods, and structures, discusses elastoplastic behavior, the fracture analysis of three-dimensional bodies with surface cracks, optical measurements of free-surface effects on natural surfaces and through cracks, an optical and finite-element investigation of a plastically deformed surface flaw under tension, fracture behavior prediction for rapidly loaded surface-cracked specimens, and surface cracks in thick laminated fiber composite plates. Also discussed are a novel study procedure for crack initiation and growth in thermal fatigue testing, the growth of surface cracks under fatigue and monotonically increasing load, the subcritical growth of a surface flaw, surface crack propagation in notched and unnotched rods, and theoretical and experimental analyses of surface cracks in weldments.

  20. Growth behavior of surface cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the growth behavior of surface fatigue cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders. In the solid cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to have a circular arc crack front with specific upper and lower limits to the arc radius. In the hollow cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to agree accurately with the shape of a transformed semiellipse. A modification to the usual nondimensionalization expression used for surface flaws in flat plates was found to give correct trends for the hollow cylinder problem.

  1. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T.

    1997-04-01

    Modifications to a computer code for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading are very briefly described. The modifications extend the capabilities of the CASTEM2000 code to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions. The main advantage of the approach is that thermal loads can be evaluated as secondary stresses. The code is applicable to piping systems for which crack propagation predictions differ significantly depending on whether thermal stresses are considered as primary or secondary stresses.

  2. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  3. Crack healing during molecular-beam-epitaxy growth of GaP/GaAs thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Weatherly, G.C.; Niewczas, M.

    2005-07-01

    A crack-healing phenomenon occurring during epitaxial growth of GaP films on a GaAs substrate was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The process is driven by a decrease in the surface energy of the cracked film. The results indicate that the fundamental mechanism operating during healing is the deposition and diffusion of Ga and P atoms onto the crack surface in the GaP lattice, combined with self-diffusion of GaAs within the crack tip in the GaAs substrate. This process is not fully completed in the GaP/GaAs system; unhealed crack tips located in the GaAs substrate always remain in the structure. Development of cracks and subsequent crack healing during film growth lead to a decrease in residual stress in the film. New cracks are formed at an equilibrium spacing which increases with increasing film thickness. A modified expression for predicting the relation between crack spacing and film thickness in epitaxial films is proposed.

  4. Edge crack growth of thermally aged graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Laminates of Celion 6000/LARC-160 and Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite materials were aged in air at temperatures of 202, 232, 260 and 288 C for various times up to 15,000 hours. Three unidirectional specimen types were studied: short beam shear (SBS), flexure, and 153 mm square panels. The interior region of the square panels exhibited little or no property degradation, whereas both laminate materials degraded and cracked preferentially at the specimen edge perpendicular to the fibers. Using a dye penetrant, the specimens were X-rayed and the crack depth measured as a function of time and temperature. A time temperature superposition of the crack data was successfully performed using an Arrhenius form for the shift factor. A direct correlation was found for edge crack depth and SBS strength for the LARC-160 laminates but the correlation for PMR-15 laminates was more complex.

  5. The Effect of the Laboratory Specimen on Fatigue Crack Growth Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, S. C.; Johnston, W. M.; Seshadri, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, laboratory experiments have been devised to develop fatigue crack growth rate data that is representative of the material response. The crack growth rate data generated in the laboratory is then used to predict the safe operating envelope of a structure. The ability to interrelate laboratory data and structural response is called similitude. In essence, a nondimensional term, called the stress intensity factor, was developed that includes the applied stresses, crack size and geometric configuration. The stress intensity factor is then directly related to the rate at which cracks propagate in a material, resulting in the material property of fatigue crack growth response. Standardized specimen configurations and experimental procedures have been developed for laboratory testing to generate crack growth rate data that supports similitude of the stress intensity factor solution. In this paper, the authors present laboratory fatigue crack growth rate test data and finite element analyses that show similitude between standard specimen configurations tested using the constant stress ratio test method is unobtainable.

  6. Rotary plant growth accelerating apparatus. [weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dedolph, R. D. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Rotary plant growth accelerating apparatus for increasing plant yields by effectively removing the growing plants from the constraints of gravity and increasing the plant yield per unit of space is described. The apparatus is comprised of cylindrical plant beds supported radially removed from a primary axis of rotation, with each plant bed being driven about its own secondary axis of rotation and simultaneously moved in a planetary path about the primary axis of rotation. Each plant bed is formed by an apertured outer cylinder, a perforated inner cylinder positioned coaxially, and rooting media disposed in the space between. A rotatable manifold distributes liquid nutrients and water to the rooting media through the perforations in the inner cylinders as the plant beds are continuously rotated by suitable drive means.

  7. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A.K.; Raizenne, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} K{sub op}) fails to correlate the test data and the modified {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} {chi}K{sub op}, where {chi} is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this ally. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material`s short-transverse grain size.

  8. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A. K.; Raizenne, M. D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional Δ K eff (= K max — K op) fails to correlate the test data and the modified Δ K eff (= K max - χKop, where χ is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this alloy. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of a microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material’s short-transverse grain size.

  9. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth properties at elevated temperature for 1Cr-1Mo-0.25V steel and 12Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Saburo; Takeuchi, Etsuo; Nishijima, Satoshi; McEvily, Arthur J.

    1989-04-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth properties were investigated for a low-alloy steel 1Cr-1Mo-0.25V and a stainless steel SUS403 (13Cr) in the temperature range from 25 to 550°C. Fatigue tests were conducted at frequencies of 0.5, 5, and 50 Hz, in a manner designed to avoid crack closure. The effective value of threshold stress intensity range increased with increasing temperature and with decreasing frequency for the Cr-Mo-V steel, whereas the effective threshold stress intensity range was independent of temperature and frequency in the case of the SUS403 steel. At a given Δ K value, the fatigue crack growth rates accelerated with increasing temperature and with decreasing frequency for the Cr-Mo-V steel. However, although the rate of fatigue crack growth was independent of frequency at a given temperature for the SUS403 steel, the rate did increase with temperature. The observed threshold levels and crack growth behavior were closely related to the oxidation process of the bare surface formed at the crack tip during each load cycle.

  10. Prediction of PWSCC in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    The Ford/Andresen slip-dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material conditions. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip-dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip-dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  11. Plate Thickness Variation Effects on Crack Growth Rates in 7050-T7451 Alloy Thick Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubbe, Joel J.

    2011-02-01

    A study has been accomplished to characterize the fatigue crack growth rates and mechanisms in thick plate (16.51 cm) commercial grade 7050-T7451 aluminum plate in the L-S orientation. Examination of the effects of potential property gradients in the plate material was accomplished through hardness measurements along the short transverse direction and with compact tension tests. Tests exhibited a distinct trend of reduced center plane hardness in the plates. Compact tension specimens and the compliance method were used to determine crack growth rates for specimens machined from the t/4 and t/2 planar locations and oriented for L-S crack growth. Crack growth rate data (long crack) from the tests highlighted significant growth rate differences between the t/4 and t/2 locations. No significant effect of R-ratio was observed in the 0.05-0.3 range tested. Additionally, crack front splitting was noted in all specimens to differing degrees with data showing significant retardation of growth rate curves for the L-S orientation above 13 MPa √m in the center plane, and 10 MPa √m at quarter plane, where branching and splitting parallel to the load axis are dominant growth mechanisms.

  12. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  13. Evaluation of fatigue-crack growth rates by polynomial curve fitting. [Ti alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K. B.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Fundamental characterization of the constant-amplitude fatigue crack propagation is achieved by an analysis of the rate of change of crack length with change in number of applied loading cycles, defining the rate values such that they are consistent with the basic assumption of smoothness and continuity in the fatigue crack growth process. The technique used to satisfy the analytical conditions and minimize the effects of local material anomalies and experimental errors is that of fitting a smooth curve to the entire set of basic data by least square regression. This yields a well-behaved function relating the number of cycles to the crack length. By taking the first derivative of the function, the crack growth rate is obtained for each point. The class of curve fitting functions used in the analysis is the polynomial of degree n.

  14. Effect of band-overload on fatigue crack growth rate of HSLA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhinay, S. V.; Tenduwe, Om Prakash; Kumar, Ajit; Dutta, K.; Verma, B. B.; Ray, P. K.

    2015-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth behavior is important parameter of structural materials. This parameters can be used to predict their life, service reliability and operational safety in different conditions. The material used in this investigation is an HSLA steel. In this investigation effect of single overload and band-overload on fatigue crack growth of same steel are studied using compact tension (CT) specimens under mode-I condition and R=0.3. It is observed that overload and band-overload applications resulted retardation on the fatigue crack growth rate in most of the cases. It is also noticed that maximum retardation took place on application of seven successive overload cycles. Application of ten and more overload cycles caused no crack growth retardation.

  15. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  16. Aspects of in vitro fatigue in human cortical bone: time and cycle dependent crack growth.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2005-05-01

    Although fatigue damage in bone induced by cyclic loading has been recognized as a problem of clinical significance, few fracture mechanics based studies have investigated how incipient cracks grow by fatigue in this material. In the present study, in vitro cyclic fatigue experiments were performed in order to quantify fatigue-crack growth behavior in human cortical bone. Crack-growth rates spanning five orders of magnitude were obtained for the extension of macroscopic cracks in the proximal-distal direction; growth-rate data could be well characterized by the linear-elastic stress-intensity range, using a simple (Paris) power law with exponents ranging from 4.4 to 9.5. Mechanistically, to discern whether such behavior results from "true" cyclic fatigue damage or is simply associated with a succession of quasi-static fracture events, cyclic crack-growth rates were compared to those measured under sustained (non-cyclic) loading. Measured fatigue-crack growth rates were found to exceed those "predicted" from the sustained load data at low growth rates ( approximately 3 x 10(-10) to 5 x 10(-7) m/cycle), suggesting that a "true" cyclic fatigue mechanism, such as alternating blunting and re-sharpening of the crack tip, is active in bone. Conversely, at higher growth rates ( approximately 5 x 10(-7) to 3 x 10(-5) m/cycle), the crack-growth data under sustained loads integrated over the loading cycle reasonably predicts the cyclic fatigue data, indicating that quasi-static fracture mechanisms predominate. The results are discussed in light of the occurrence of fatigue-related stress fractures in cortical bone.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Inconel 718 Sheet at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas; Wright, Jonathan; Hastings, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Inconel 718 sheet material was tested to determine fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) at cryogenic conditions representative of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) environment at -423 degree F. Tests utilized M(T) and ESE(T) specimen geometries and environments were either cold gaseous helium or submersion in LH2. The test results support a significant improvement in the fatigue crack growth threshold at -423 degree F compared to -320 degree F or 70 degree F.

  18. The Effect of O2, H2O, and N2 on the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Alpha + Beta Titanium Alloy at 24 C and 177 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    To study the effects of atmospheric species on the fatigue crack growth behavior of an a+B titanium alloy (Ti 6-2-2-2-2) at room temperature and 177 C, fatigue tests were performed in laboratory air, ultrahigh vacuum, and high purity water vapor, oxygen, nitrogen and helium at various partial pressures. Accelerated fatigue crack growth rates in laboratory air compared to ultrahigh vacuum are linked to the damaging effects of both water vapor and oxygen. Observations of the fatigue crack growth behavior in ultrahigh purity environments, along with surface film analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), suggest that multiple crack-tip processes govern the damaging effects of air. Three possible mechanisms are proposed: 1) at low pressure (less than 10(exp -1) Pa), accelerated da/dN is likely due to monolayer adsorption on crack-tip surfaces presumably resulting in decreased bond strengths at the fatigue crack tip, 2) for pressures greater than 10(exp -1) Pa, accelerated da/dN in oxygen may result from oxidation at the crack tip limiting reversible slip, and 3) in water vapor, absorption of atomic hydrogen at the reactive crack tip resulting in process zone embrittlement.

  19. Fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-6Al-4V considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Jiewei

    2015-03-01

    Fatigue fracture is one of the main failure modes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fracture toughness and crack closure have strong effects on the fatigue crack growth(FCG) rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The FCG rate of Ti-6Al-4V is investigated by using experimental and analytical methods. The effects of stress ratio, crack closure and fracture toughness on the FCG rate are studied and discussed. A modified prediction model of the FCG rate is proposed, and the relationship between the fracture toughness and the stress intensity factor(SIF) range is redefined by introducing a correcting coefficient. Notched plate fatigue tests (including the fracture toughness test and the FCG rate test) are conducted to investigate the influence of affecting factors on the FCG rate. Comparisons between the predicted results of the proposed model, the Paris model, the Walker model, the Sadananda model, and the experimental data show that the proposed model gives the best agreement with the test data particularly in the near-threshold region and the Paris region, and the corresponding calculated fatigue life is also accurate in the same regions. By considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure, the novel FCG rate prediction model not only improves the estimating accuracy, but also extends the adaptability of the FCG rate prediction model in engineering.

  20. Statistical modeling of crack growth and reliability assessment of high-density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, F.S.; Sheikh, A.K.; Khan, Z.; Ahmad, M.

    1999-06-01

    In this work, a statistical evaluation of the crack-growth process in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was carried out. The specimens were compression molded from virgin, molding-grade HDPE. Edge-notched specimens for replicate fatigue testing were prepared from compression-molded sheets. Fatigue test results were then analyzed, and it is shown that if the crack-growth process can be characterized as a random process following a power-law-type behavior, then the time to reach a critical crack length will be distributed according to an inverted lognormal model.

  1. The failure of amalgam dental restorations due to cyclic fatigue crack growth.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Huang, M P; Sultan, M B

    1999-06-01

    In this study a restored mandibular molar with different Class II amalgam preparations was examined to analyze the potential for restoration failure attributed to cyclic fatigue crack growth. A finite element analysis was used to determine the stress distribution along the cavo-surface margin which results from occlusal loading of each restoration. The cyclic crack growth rate of sub-surface flaws located along the dentinal cavo-surface margin were determined utilizing the Paris law. Based on similarities in material properties and lack of fatigue property data for dental biomaterials, the cyclic fatigue crack growth parameters for engineering ceramics were used to approximate the crack growth behavior. It was found that flaws located within the dentine along the buccal and lingual margins can significantly reduce the fatigue life of restored teeth. Sub-surface cracks as short as 25 microm were found capable of promoting tooth fracture well within 25 years from the time of restoration. Furthermore, cracks longer than 100 microm reduced the fatigue life to less than 5 years. Consequently, sub-surface cracks introduced during cavity preparation with conventional dental burrs may serve as a principal source for premature restoration failure.

  2. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water.

  3. Influence of chemical liquids on the fatigue crack growth of the AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhang-Zhong; He, Xian-Cong; Bai, Yun-Qiang; Ba, Zhi-Xin; Dai, Yu-Ming; Zhou, Heng-Zhi

    2012-03-01

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of an AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by comparing the effect of zirconate and phosphate chemical liquids. The morphology, components, and phase compositions of the chemical depositions at the fatigue crack tip were analyzed by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. For samples with and without the chemical liquids, their stress-intensity factor values at the fatigue crack tip were compared by using a stress-strain gauge. The results demonstrated that a zirconate film (Zr x O y ·Zn x O y ) and a phosphate film (Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O and MgZnP2O7) could be formed on the fatigue crack-surface at the fatigue crack tip. The stress distribution was changed because of the chemical depositions and the causticity of the chemical liquids. This could decrease the stress-intensity factor value and thus effectively cause fatigue crack closure, which reduces the fatigue crack growth rate. Moreover, it was found that the fatigue crack closure effect of zirconates was more positive than that of phosphates.

  4. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  5. Effect of Microstructure on Time Dependent Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior In a P/M Turbine Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Ignacy J.; Gabb, T. P.; Bonacuse, P.; Gayda, J.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the processes which govern hold time crack growth behavior in the LSHR disk P/M superalloy. Nineteen different heat treatments of this alloy were evaluated by systematically controlling the cooling rate from the supersolvus solutioning step and applying various single and double step aging treatments. The resulting hold time crack growth rates varied by more than two orders of magnitude. It was shown that the associated stress relaxation behavior for these heat treatments was closely correlated with the crack growth behavior. As stress relaxation increased, the hold time crack growth resistance was also increased. The size of the tertiary gamma' in the general microstructure was found to be the key microstructural variable controlling both the hold time crack growth behavior and stress relaxation. No relationship between the presence of grain boundary M23C6 carbides and hold time crack growth was identified which further brings into question the importance of the grain boundary phases in determining hold time crack growth behavior. The linear elastic fracture mechanics parameter, Kmax, is unable to account for visco-plastic redistribution of the crack tip stress field during hold times and thus is inadequate for correlating time dependent crack growth data. A novel methodology was developed which captures the intrinsic crack driving force and was able to collapse hold time crack growth data onto a single curve.

  6. Fatigue crack growth study of SCS6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantzos, P.; Telesman, J.

    1990-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior and the associated fatigue damage processes in a (0)8- and (90)8-oriented SCS6/Ti-15-3 composite. Companion testing was also done on identically processed Ti-15-3 unreinforced material. The active fatigue crack growth failure processes were very similar for both composite orientations tested. For both orientations, fatigue crack growth was along the fiber direction. It was found that the composite constituent most susceptible to fatigue damage was the interface region and, in particular, the carbon coating surrounding the fiber. The failure of the interface region led to crack initiation and also strongly influenced the FCG behavior in this composite. The failure of the interface region was apparently driven by normal stresses perpendicular to the fiber direction. The FCG rates were considerably higher for the (90)8-oriented CT specimens in comparison to the unreinforced material.

  7. Fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth characteristics of two Al-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Bhaskar; Lisagor, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    The dependence of strength, fracture resistance, and fatigue crack growth rate on the aging conditions of two alloy compositions based on Al-3.7Cu-1.85Mg-0.2Mn is investigated. Mechanical properties were evaluated in two heat treatment conditions and in two orientations (longitudinal and transverse). Compact tension specimens were used to determine fatigue crack growth characteristics and fracture resistance. The aging response was monitored on coupons using hardness measurements determined with a standard Rockwell hardness tester. Fracture resistance is found to increase with increasing yield strength during artificial aging of age-hardenable 2124-Zr alloys processed by powder metallurgy techniques. Fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing strength. It is argued that these changes are related to deformation modes of the alloys; a homogeneous deformation mode tends to increase fracture resistance and to decrease the resistance to the fatigue crack propagation rate.

  8. Intrinsic fatigue crack growth rates for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D. C.; Blankenship, C. P., Jr.; Starke, E. A., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    The influences of microstructure and deformation mode on inert environment intrinsic fatigue crack propagation were investigated for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys AA2090, AA8090, and X2095 compared to AA2024. The amount of coherent shearable delta-prime (Al3Li) precipitates and extent of localized planar slip deformation were reduced by composition (increased Cu/Li in X2095) and heat treatment (double aging of AA8090). Intrinsic growth rates, obtained at high constant K(max) to minimize crack closure and in vacuum to eliminate any environmental effect, were alloy dependent; da/dN varied up to tenfold based on applied Delta-K or Delta-K/E. When compared based on a crack tip cyclic strain or opening displacement parameter, growth rates were equivalent for all alloys except X2095-T8, which exhibited unique fatigue crack growth resistance. Tortuous fatigue crack profiles and large fracture surface facets were observed for each Al-Li alloy independent of the precipitates present, particularly delta-prime, and the localized slip deformation structure. Reduced fatigue crack propagation rates for X2095 in vacuum are not explained by either residual crack closure or slip reversibility arguments; the origin of apparent slip band facets in a homogeneous slip alloy is unclear.

  9. A model for the formation of fatigue striations and its relationship with small fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth process involves damage accumulation and crack extension. The two sub-processes that lead to fatigue crack extension were quantified separately in a recent model for small fatigue crack growth applicable to engineering alloys. Here, we report the results of an experimental investigation to assess the assumptions of that model. The fatigue striation formation in an aluminum alloy is modeled and it is verified that the number of cycles required for striation formation is related to the cyclic crack tip opening displacement and that the striation spacing is related to the monotonic crack tip displacement. It is demonstrated that extensive cyclic crack tip plasticity in the aluminum alloy causes a reduction in the magnitude of the slope of the fatigue crack propagation curves. The implications of these results on the fatigue crack propagation lifetime calculations are identified.

  10. Crack growth through the thickness of thin-sheet Hydrided Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.

    In recent years, the limits on fuel burnup have been increased to allow an increase in the amount of energy produced by a nuclear fuel assembly thus reducing waste volume and allowing greater capacity factors. As a result, it is paramount to ensure safety after longer reactor exposure times in the case of design-basis accidents, such as reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA). Previously proposed failure criteria do not directly address the particular cladding failure mechanism during a RIA, in which crack initiation in brittle outer-layers is immediately followed by crack growth through the thickness of the thin-wall tubing. In such a case, the fracture toughness of hydrided thin-wall cladding material must be known for the conditions of through-thickness crack growth in order to predict the failure of high-burnup cladding. The fracture toughness of hydrided Zircaloy-4 in the form of thin-sheet has been examined for the condition of through-thickness crack growth as a function of hydride content and distribution at 25°C, 300°C, and 375°C. To achieve this goal, an experimental procedure was developed in which a linear hydride blister formed across the width of a four-point bend specimen was used to inject a sharp crack that was subsequently extended by fatigue pre-cracking. The electrical potential drop method was used to monitor the crack length during fracture toughness testing, thus allowing for correlation of the load-displacement record with the crack length. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were used to interpret the experimental test results in terms of fracture toughness, and J-R crack growth resistance curves were generated. Finite element modeling was performed to adapt the classic theories of fracture mechanics applicable to thick-plate specimens to the case of through-thickness crack growth in thin-sheet materials, and to account for non-uniform crack fronts. Finally, the hydride microstructure was characterized in the vicinity of the crack tip by

  11. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Nickel-base Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, K. A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Hawk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at temperatures of 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 Hz and 0.25 Hz. Increasing the temperature from 550 to 750 °C caused the fatigue crack growth rates to increase from ~20 to 60% depending upon the applied stress intensity level. The effect of reducing the applied loading frequency increased the fatigue crack growth rates from ~20 to 70%, also depending upon the applied stress intensity range. The crack path was observed to be transgranular for the temperatures and frequencies used during fatigue crack growth rate testing. At 750 °C, there were some indications of limited intergranular cracking excursions at both loading frequencies; however, the extent of intergranular crack growth was limited and the cause is not understood at this time.

  12. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597791

  13. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  14. Analysis of the Influence of Laser Welding on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Newly Developed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckson, R. A.; Ojo, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of laser welding on fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a newly developed nickel-base superalloy, Haynes 282 was studied. Laser welding resulted in cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the alloy during welding and FCG test results show that this produces deleterious effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Haynes 282. However, two post weld heat treatments, including a new thermal treatment schedule developed in this work, are used to significantly improve the resistance of the Haynes 282 fatigue crack growth after laser welding. The effects of laser welding and thermal treatments are discussed in terms of HAZ cracking and heterogeneity of slip, respectively.

  15. Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-05-31

    In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

  16. Modeling crack growth during Li insertion in storage particles using a fracture phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinsmann, Markus; Rosato, Daniele; Kamlah, Marc; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture of storage particles is considered to be one of the major reasons for capacity fade and increasing power loss in many commercial lithium ion batteries. The appearance of fracture and cracks in the particles is commonly ascribed to mechanical stress, which evolves from inhomogeneous swelling and shrinkage of the material when lithium is inserted or extracted. Here, a coupled model of lithium diffusion, mechanical stress and crack growth using a phase field method is applied to investigate how the formation of cracks depends on the size of the particle and the presence or absence of an initial crack, as well as the applied flux at the boundary. The model shows great versatility in that it is free of constraints with respect to particle geometry, dimension or crack path and allows simultaneous observation of the evolution of lithium diffusion and crack growth. In this work, we focus on the insertion process. In particular, we demonstrate the presence of intricate fracture phenomena, such as, crack branching or complete breakage of storage particles within just a single half cycle of lithium insertion, a phenomenon that was only speculated about before.

  17. Fatigue crack growth rate does not depend on mantle thickness: an idealized cemented stem construct under torsional loading.

    PubMed

    Hertzler, Justin; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2002-07-01

    Retrieval studies indicate that cemented stem loosening in femoral components of total hip replacement can initiate at the stem-cement interface. The etiology of the crack propagation process from the stem-cement interface is not well understood, but cracks are typically associated with thin cement mantles. In this study, a combination of experimental and computational methods was used to investigate the fatigue crack propagation process from the stem-PMMA cement interface using a novel torsional loading model. Constructs with thin (1 mm), medium (3 mm) or thick (7 mm) cement mantles were evaluated. Crack growth was stable for all cases and the rate of crack growth diminished with increasing crack length. Crack growth rate did not depend on mantle thickness (p > 0.05) over the first 1 mm of crack length, but cracks in thin mantles reached the full thickness of the mantle in the fewest number of loading cycles. The fracture mechanics-based finite element models indicated decreased stress intensity factors with increasing crack length and were consistent with the experimental findings. When combined with a fatigue crack growth Paris-law for PMMA cement, the finite element models provided reasonable predictions of the crack growth process.

  18. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  19. Influence of environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steel.

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, Bernd M; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of different environments on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steam turbine blade steel is investigated. Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) in the near threshold regime are measured with ultrasonic fatigue testing technique. Fatigue tests are performed in vacuum, air and different aqueous environments with defined chloride and oxygen content. Furthermore, the influence of different stress ratios is investigated. It is found that crack propagation is not necessarily enhanced with increasing corrosiveness. In the aqueous environments, the FCGRs below 10⁻⁸ m/cycle are lower than in air. The threshold stress intensity factor ranges are higher or equal. Observation of the fracture surfaces shows oxide formation and partly intergranular fracture for specimens tested in aqueous environments. Crack closure effects seem to be responsible for this unexpected behaviour. PMID:23490013

  20. Influence of environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steel.

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, Bernd M; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of different environments on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steam turbine blade steel is investigated. Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) in the near threshold regime are measured with ultrasonic fatigue testing technique. Fatigue tests are performed in vacuum, air and different aqueous environments with defined chloride and oxygen content. Furthermore, the influence of different stress ratios is investigated. It is found that crack propagation is not necessarily enhanced with increasing corrosiveness. In the aqueous environments, the FCGRs below 10⁻⁸ m/cycle are lower than in air. The threshold stress intensity factor ranges are higher or equal. Observation of the fracture surfaces shows oxide formation and partly intergranular fracture for specimens tested in aqueous environments. Crack closure effects seem to be responsible for this unexpected behaviour.

  1. Fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate in hard vacuum and water vapor. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Compact specimens of 25 mm thick aluminum alloy plate were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Crack growth rates were determined at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz in hard vacuum and laboratory air, and in mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. A significant effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth rates was observed at the lowest water vapor pressure tested. Crack rates changed little for pressures up to 1.03 kPa, but abruptly accelerated at higher pressures. At low stress intensity factor ranges, cracking rates at the lowest and highest water vapor pressure tested were, respectively, two and five times higher than rates in vacuum. Although a frequency was observed in laboratory air, cracking rates in water vapor and vacuum are insensitive to a ten-fold change in frequency. Surfaces of specimens tested in water vapor and vacuum exhibited different amounts of residual deformation. Reduced deformation on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in water vapor suggests embrittlement of the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip as a result of environmental interaction.

  2. Prediction of Crack Growth under Variable-Amplitude Loading in Thin-Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of a "plasticity-induced" crack closure model to study fatigue crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on the Dugdale model but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant-amplitude loading and then used to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude and spectrum loading on thin-sheet 2024- T3 aluminum alloys. Predicted crack-opening stresses agreed well with test data from the literature. The crack-growth lives agreed within a factor of two for single and repeated spike overloads/underloads and within 20 percent for spectrum loading. Differences were attributed to fretting-product-debris-induced closure and three-dimensional affects not included in the model.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  4. Stress-corrosion fatigue-crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphousmetal

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-09-21

    Electrochemical and mechanical experiments were conducted to analyze the environmentally-influenced cracking behavior of a bulk amorphous metal, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. This study was motivated by a scientific interest in mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in an amorphous metal, and by a practical interest in the use of this amorphous metal in applications that take advantage of its unique properties, including high specific strength, large elastic strains and low damping. The objective of the work was to determine the rate and mechanisms of subcritical crack growth in this metallic glass in an aggressive environment. Specifically, fatigue-crack propagation behavior was investigated at a range of stress intensities in air and aqueous salt solutions by examining the effects of loading cycle, stress-intensity range, solution concentration, anion identity, solution de-aeration, and bulk electrochemical potential. Results indicate that crack growth in aqueous solution in this alloy is driven by a stress-assisted anodic reaction at the crack tip. Rate-determining steps for such behavior are reasoned to be electrochemical, stress-dependent reaction at near-threshold levels, and mass transport at higher (steady-state) growth rates.

  5. Effects of hydrogen on electropotential monitoring of stress corrosion crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Carey, D.M.; Perazzo, N.L.

    1997-08-01

    Electropotential monitoring (EPM) has a crack growth measurement resolution that is an order of magnitude greater than methods that rely on crack mouth opening displacement. However, two phenomena have been identified that compromise the accuracy of the EPM technique. Coolant hydrogen concentrations above those needed to chemically reduce nickel oxide to metallic nickel cause EPM to underestimate the true crack length. The metallic nickel provides an electrical conduction path at contact points across the irregular crack surface thereby lowering the EPM potential. The coolant hydrogen concentration at which this reduction occurs is temperature dependent and correlates with an abrupt decrease in the rate of SCC crack growth. It was also found that EPM can indicate large crack growth when none actually exists. At temperatures > 315 C (600 F) the electrical resistivity of mill annealed Alloy 600 increased by as much as 5% in a period of weeks or months. Each 1% increase in resistivity results in a bias in the EPM indicated cracklength of about 0.2 mm (0.008 inches). Smaller changes in the electrical resistivity of other alloys have been measured which rank as EN52> X-750> 304SS> nickel. It has been shown that these resistivity changes occur during exposure to high temperature water or inert gas. Strategies to minimize the effects of these two phenomena on EPM measurement are discussed.

  6. Modeling crack growth during Li extraction and insertion within the second half cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinsmann, Markus; Rosato, Daniele; Kamlah, Marc; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    During operation of a lithium ion cell electrode storage particles experience an inhomogeneous volume change due to local differences in the internal lithium concentration. The resulting mechanical stress can become large enough to provoke particle fracture, an aging mechanism considered to have a severe detrimental impact on the life time of lithium ion cells. In this work, we use a coupled model of mechanical stress, lithium diffusion and crack growth to study the problem of fracture in storage particles. The model was successfully applied to study crack growth during a single half cycle of lithium insertion or extraction in earlier investigations. It was demonstrated that, under specific circumstances, particle breakage may occur in a single half cycle. Here, we consider the second half cycle and examine under which conditions cracks that either remained stable or underwent growth in the first half cycle, can lead to particle fragmentation during the subsequent half cycle. From both numerical results and supportive analytic solutions, we find that growth of a through crack during Li insertion is a strong indicator for particle breakage, either in one or two half cycles. Such a relationship is not found for growth of a surface crack during Li extraction.

  7. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganehgheshlaghi, Mohannad

    2014-01-01

    The research results described in this paper presents a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. It is believed by some crack growth experts that the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce true or valid threshold properties. The concern involves the observed fanning of threshold region da/dN data plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out or away from the high R-ratio data. This data fanning or elevation of threshold values is obviously caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tested specimens. This increase in crack closure is assumed by some investigators to be caused by a plastic wake on the crack surfaces that was created during the load shedding test phase. This study shows that the increase in crack closure is the result of an extensive occurrence of crack bifurcation behavior in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the particular fanning behavior in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the materials and that the fanned data represents valid material properties. However, for corrosion sensitive steel alloys used in this study the fanning was caused by a build-up of iron oxide at the crack tip from fretting corrosion.

  8. Sustained load crack growth design data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Kenny, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Sustained load crack growth data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy in hydrazine per MIL-P-26536 and refined hydrazine are presented. Fracture mechanics data on crack growth thresholds for heat-treated forgings, aged and unaged welds, and aged and unaged heat-affected zones are reported. Fracture mechanics design curves of crack growth threshold stress intensity versus temperature are generated from 40 to 71 C.

  9. Effect of Load Range on Probabilistic Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance in Flux Cored Arc Welded Api 2w GR. Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Jin; Sohn, Sang-Hoon; Sohn, Hye-Jeong

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the load range on the spatial variation of fatigue crack growth resistance in three different zones, WM, HAZ and BM for flux cored arc welded API 2W Gr. 50 steel using the stochastic model based on reliability theory. Experimental fatigue crack growth tests were performed on ASTM standard CT specimens. The results indicates that the load range has strong dependency on probabilistic fatigue crack growth for the three different zones WM, HAZ and BM, and also the spatial variation of fatigue crack growth resistance.

  10. An investigation of the effects of stress ratio on the micromechanisms of long and short fatigue crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, V.; Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent study of the effects of positive stress ratios on the propagation of long and short fatigue cracks in mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Differences between the long fatigue crack growth rates at positive stress ratios (R = K{sub min}/K{sub max} = 0.02--0.8) are attributed largely to the effects of crack closure. Microstructurally short fatigue cracks are shown to grow at stress intensity factor ranges below the long crack fatigue threshold. Anomalously high fatigue crack growth rates and crack retardation are also shown to occur in the short crack regime until the short crack data merge with the long crack growth rate data in the Paris regime. Differences between the long and the short crack behavior are associated with differences in fatigue crack growth mechanisms.

  11. The influence of temperature on fatigue-crack growth in a mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Ritter, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    To understand the influence of temperature on the rate of fatigue crack growth in high strength metal alloys, constant load amplitude fatigue crack growth experiments were carried out using a 1/4 inch thick (6.35 mm) mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy plate as a model material. The rates of fatigue crack growth were determined as a function of temperature, ranging from room temperature to about 290 C and as a function of the crack tip, stress intensity factor K, in dehumidified high purity argon environment. The dependence of the rate of fatigue crack growth on K appears to be separable into two regions. The transition correlates with changes in both the microscopic and macroscopic appearances of the fracture surfaces, and suggests a change in the mechanism and the influence of microstructure on fatigue crack growth.

  12. 77 K Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Modified CF8M Stainless Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Nelson, B. E.

    2006-03-31

    The National Compact Stellerator Experiment (NCSX) is the first of a new class of stellarators. The modular superconducting coils in the NCSX have complex geometry that are manufactured on cast stainless steel (modified CF8M) winding forms. Although CF8M castings have been used before at cryogenic temperature there is limited data available for their mechanical properties at low temperatures. The fatigue life behavior of the cast material is vital thus a test program to generate data on representative material has been conducted. Fatigue test specimens have been obtained from key locations within prototype winding forms to determine the 77 K fatigue crack growth rate. The testing has successfully developed a representative database that ensures confident design. The measured crack growth rates are analyzed in terms of the Paris law parameters and the crack growth properties are related to the materials microstructure.

  13. Moisture-heat effects on unidirectional composite laminates fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fusheng; Pzinz, R.; Zichy, J. H.

    1993-04-01

    The heat-moisture effect on interlaminar fracture toughness of T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite laminates is investigated under mode I opening loading witb DCB specimen. The fracture toughness in moisture-heat conditioning increases, and the glass transition temperature decreases. SEM fractographs revealed no discernible difference in the fracture surface morphology of moisture-heat and dry conditioned specimens. No fiber bridging occurs in the testing. Delamination fatigue crack growth experiments are carried out on T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional laminates. It is found that the mode I cyclic crack growth rate yields a power low relationship between da/dN and the maximum cyclic strain energy release rate. The crack growth rate of the moisture-heat conditioned specimen is lower than that of the dry conditioned. The environmental effects are explained on the basis of fractography and fracture mechanisms and fracture mechanics.

  14. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.

  15. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequenciesmore » relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  16. SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method for Analyzing 3D Non-Planar Cracks and Their Growth in Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikishkov, G. P.; Park, J. H.; Atluri, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    The highly accurate and efficient Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method (SGBEM), a Finite Element Method (FEM)-based alternating method, is proposed for analyzing three-dimensional non-planar cracks and their growth. The cracks are modeled using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method as a distribution of displacement discontinuities, simulating an infinite medium. The finite element method only analyzes the stress for the uncracked body. The solution for the cracked structural component is determined by an iteration procedure. This process alternates between an FEM solution for the uncracked body and the SGBEM solution for a crack in an infinite body. Numerical analysis, and the Java code used, evaluate stress intensity factors and model fatigue crack growth. Examples of non-planar cracks in infinite media and planar cracks in finite bodies, as well as growth under fatigue, show the accuracy of the method.

  17. Observations of fatigue crack initiation and damage growth in notched titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize damage initiation and growth in notched titanium matrix composites at room temperature. Double edge notched or center open hole SCS-6/Ti-15-3 specimens containing 0 deg plies or containing both 0 and 90 deg plies were fatigued. The specimens were tested in the as-fabricated (ASF) and in heat-treated conditions. A local strain criterion using unnotched specimen fatigue data was successful in predicting fatigue damage initiation. The initiation stress level was accurately predicted for both a double edge notched unidirectional specimen and a cross-plied center hole specimen. The fatigue produced long multiple cracks growing from the notches. These fatigue cracks were only in the matrix material and did not break the fibers in their path. The combination of matrix cracking and fiber/matrix debonding appears to greatly reduce the stress concentration around the notches. The laminates that were heat treated showed a different crack growth pattern. In the ASF specimens, matrix cracks had a more tortuous path and showed considerable more crack branching. For the same specimen geometry and cyclic stress, the (0/90/0) laminate with a hole had far superior fatigue resistance than the matrix only specimen with a hole.

  18. Some remarks on the engineering application of the fatigue crack growth approach under nonzero mean loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Jorge Alberto Rodriguez; Boloy, Ronney Mancebo; Leoni, Rafael Raider

    2015-09-01

    The well-known fatigue crack growth (FCG) curves are two-parameter dependents. The range of the stress intensity factor Δ K and the load ratio R are the parameters normally used for describing these curves. For engineering purposes, the mathematical representation of these curves should be integrated between the initial and final crack sizes in order to obtain the safety factors for stresses and life. First of all, it is necessary to reduce the dependence of the FCG curves to only one parameter. Δ K is almost always selected and, in these conditions, considered as the crack driving force. Using experimental data from literature, the present paper shows how to perform multiple regression analyses using the traditional Walker approach and the more recent unified approach. The correlations so obtained are graphically analyzed in three dimensions. Numerical examples of crack growth analysis for cracks growing under nominal stresses of constant amplitude in smooth and notched geometries are performed, assuming an identical material component as that of the available experimental data. The resulting curves of crack size versus number of cycles ( a vs. N) are then compared. The two models give approximately the same ( a vs. N) curves in both geometries. Differences between the behaviors of the ( a vs. N) curves in smooth and notched geometries are highlighted, and the reasons for these particular behaviors are discussed.

  19. Fatigue crack growth measurements in TMF testing of titanium alloys using an ACPD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Marchand, N.J.; Hongoh, M.

    1995-04-01

    A thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing system has been developed which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains (or stresses). Furthermore, an advanced alternating current potential difference (ACPD) measurement technique has been developed successfully to perform on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimens tested under isothermal and TMF conditions. In this paper, the basic principles of the ACPD technique as well as all the relevant experimental procedures for performing ACPD measurements, including probe setup, choice of alternating currents (AC) and frequencies, noise rejection, data acquisition, and signal processing, are described. The linear relationship between ACPD signals and crack lengths, as well as the effects of thermal cycling on the ACPD signal, are presented and discussed. The capabilities of the TMF and ACPD systems are well illustrated by fatigue crack initiation and growth test results under isothermal and TMF conditions. These tests were performed on two titanium forgings, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-6Al-2Sn-6Mo (Ti6246), respectively. Alloy Ti64 was TMF cycled between 150 and 400`C, while Ti6246 was cycled between 200 and 482 C. The resolution for detecting crack initiation at the root of notches was found to be 50 {mu}m with 95% confidence while the resolution for crack growth was 2 {mu}m per mV change of ACPD. An environmental assisted cracking model applied to TMF crack growth is proposed for rationalizing the data.

  20. Power Law Versus Exponential Form of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Dynamic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the strength versus In (stress rate) relation was found to be very reasonable for most of the materials. It was also found that preloading technique was equally applicable for the case of slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n > 30. The major limitation in the exponential crack velocity formulation, however, was that an inert strength of a material must be known priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared to the conventional power-law crack velocity formulation.

  1. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Figert, J.; Beek, J.; Ventura, J.; Martinez, J.; Samonski, F.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes results obtained from a research project conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that was jointly supported by the FAA Technical Center and JSC. The JSC effort was part of a multi-task FAA program involving several U.S. laboratories and initiated for the purpose of developing enhanced analysis tools to assess damage tolerance of rotorcraft and aircraft propeller systems. The research results to be covered in this presentation include a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. This behavior is important for structural life analysis of aircraft propeller systems and certain rotorcraft structural components (e.g., the mast). These components are often designed to not allow fatigue crack propagation to exceed an experimentally determined fatigue crack growth threshold value. During the FAA review meetings for the program, disagreements occurred between the researchers regarding the observed fanning (spread between the da/dN curves of constant R) in the threshold region at low stress ratios, R. Some participants believed that the fanning was a result of the ASTM load shedding test method for threshold testing, and thus did not represent the true characteristics of the material. If the fanning portion of the threshold value is deleted or not included in a life analysis, a significant penalty in the calculated life and design of the component would occur. The crack growth threshold behavior was previously studied and reported by several research investigators in the time period: 1970-1980. Those investigators used electron microscopes to view the crack morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces. Their results showed that just before reaching threshold, the crack morphology often changed from a striated to a faceted or cleavage-like morphology. This change was reported to have been caused by particular dislocation properties of the material. Based on the results of these early investigations, a

  2. Analysis of Delamination Growth from Matrix Cracks in Laminates Subjected to Bending Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, G. B.; Guynn, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    A major source of delamination damage in laminated composite materials is from low-velocity impact. In thin composite laminates under point loads, matrix cracks develop first in the plies, and delaminations then grow from these cracks at the ply interfaces. The purpose of this study was to quantify the combined effects of bending and transverse shear loads on delamination initiation from matrix cracks. Graphite-epoxy laminates with 90 deg. plies on the outside were used to provide a two-dimensional simulation of the damage due to low-velocity impact. Three plate bending problems were considered: a 4-point bending, 3-point bending, and an end-clamped center-loaded plate. Under bending, a matrix crack will form on the tension side of the laminate, through the outer 90 deg. plies and parallel to the fibers. Delaminations will then grow in the interface between the cracked 90 deg. ply and the next adjacent ply. Laminate plate theory was used to derive simple equations relating the total strain energy release rate, G, associated with the delamination growth from a 90 deg. ply crack to the applied bending load and laminate stiffness properties. Three different lay-ups were tested and results compared. Test results verified that the delamination always formed at the interface between the cracked 90 deg. ply and the next adjacent ply. Calculated values for total G sub c from the analysis showed good agreement for all configurations. The analysis was able to predict the delamination onset load for the cases considered. The result indicated that the opening mode component (Mode I) for delamination growth from a matrix crack may be much larger than the component due to interlaminar shear (Mode II).

  3. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  4. Effects of Aqueous Solutions on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth (SCG) parameters of soda-lime-silicate were measured in distilled and saltwater of various concentrations in order to determine if the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film affects stress corrosion susceptibility. Past research indicates that solvents affect the rate of crack growth; however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the SCG parameters A and n at high concentrations; however, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  5. Characterization of Mode I fatigue crack growth in GFRP woven laminates at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Yasuhide . E-mail: shindo@material.tohoku.ac.jp; Inamoto, Akihiro; Narita, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental and analytical study on the cryogenic fatigue behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer woven laminates under Mode I loading. Fatigue crack growth rate tests were performed using compact tension specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and liquid helium temperature (4 K). The fracture surfaces were also examined by scanning electron microscopy to correlate with the fatigue properties. A finite element method coupled with fatigue damage was adopted for the extensional analysis. The effects of temperature and loading condition on the fatigue crack growth rates are examined.

  6. Ductile-phase toughening and fatigue crack growth in Nb{sub 3}Al base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanamoorthy, R.; Hanada, S.; Kamata, K.

    1996-03-15

    Niobium aluminide (Nb{sub 3}Al) base intermetallic compounds exhibit good high-temperature strength and creep properties and potential for applications above 1,200 C provided their inadequately low room-temperature ductility, fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior are improved. Addition of tantalum to Nb{sub 3}Al base materials improves the high-temperature strength significantly and seems to be a potential alloying element. In the present study, room temperature fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of tantalum alloyed Nb{sub 3}Al base alloy prepared by ingot metallurgy are investigated.

  7. Designing of a Testing Machine for Shear-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, A.; Okazaki, S.; Endo, M.; Yanase, K.

    As recognized, flaking-type failure is one of the serious problems for railroad tracks and bearings. In essence, flaking-type failure is closely related to the growth of the shear-mode (Mode-II and Mode-III) fatigue crack. In our research group, it is demonstrated that a shear-mode fatigue crack can be reproduced for cylindrical specimens by applying the cyclic torsion in the presence of the static axial compressive stress. However, a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine is quite expensive to purchase and costly to maintain. The low testing speed (about 10Hz) of the testing machine further aggravates the situation. As a result, study on shear-mode fatigue crack growth is still in the nascent stage. To overcome the difficulties mentioned above, in this research activity, we developed a high-performance and cost-effective testing machine to reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack growth by improving the available resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine. The primary advantage of using the resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine is cost-efficiency. In addition, the testing speed effectively can be improved, in comparison with that of a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine. By utilizing the newly-designed testing machine, we have demonstrated that we can successfully reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack.

  8. High Frequency Monitoring Reveals Aftershocks in Subcritical Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanova, M.; Santucci, S.; Vanel, L.; Ramos, O.

    2014-03-01

    By combining direct imaging and acoustic emission measurements, the subcritical propagation of a crack in a heterogeneous material is analyzed. Both methods show that the fracture proceeds through a succession of discrete events. However, the macroscopic opening of the fracture captured by the images results from the accumulation of more-elementary events detected by the acoustics. When the acoustic energy is cumulated over large time scales corresponding to the image acquisition rate, a similar statistics is recovered. High frequency acoustic monitoring reveals aftershocks responsible for a time scale dependent exponent of the power law energy distributions. On the contrary, direct imaging, which is unable to resolve these aftershocks, delivers a misleading exponent value.

  9. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  10. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  11. Fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue of two nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.; Duquette, D. J.; Choe, S. J.; Golwalkar, S.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue behavior of two P/M superalloys, Rene 95 and Astroloy, in the hot isostatically pressed (HIP) condition, was determined. Test variables included frequency, temperature, environment, and hold times at peak tensile loads (or strains). Crack initiation sites were identified in both alloys. Crack growth rates were shown to increase in argon with decreasing frequency or with the imposition of hold times. This behavior was attributed to the effect of oxygen in the argon. Auger analyses were performed on oxide films formed in argon. Low cycle fatigue lives also were degraded by tensile hold, contrary to previous reports in the literature. The role of environment in low cycle fatigue behavior is discussed.

  12. Stress intensity, stress concentration and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.P.; Underwood, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    The geometry analyzed consists of a thick-walled cylinder having a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. The loading involves pressure acting on the ID of the tube and all or part of this pressure acting on the evacuator hole. In addition the tube may be fully or partially autofrettaged. Total hoop stress concentrations are determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator, as are stress intensity factors along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates, and hence crack profiles, are predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube it is located approximately half way through the wall thickness. Taking account of the influence of stress ratio, minimum value of direct stress/maximum value of direct stress has a significantly influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, but a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect upon fatigue lifetime of axial residual stresses due to the autofrettage process is described and it is demonstrated that an insignificant reduction in lifetime results from the presence of such stresses. Finally the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue cracked evacuators and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Agreement is considered good.

  13. Stress concentration, stress intensity, and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. P.; Underwood, J. H.

    1994-12-01

    A stress analysis has been conducted on a pressurized, fully or partially autofrettaged cylinder with a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. Pressure was applied on the inside diameter (ID) of the tube, and all or part of this pressure was applied on the evacuator hole surfaces. Total hoop stress concentrations have been determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator and stress intensity factors have been determined along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates. and hence crack profiles, were predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID, whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube, it is located approximately halfway through the wall thickness. Stress ratio has a significant influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, however, it has a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect of axial residual stresses upon fatigue lifetime due to the autofrettage process has been described and an insignificant reduction in lifetime was a result of such stresses. Finally, the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue crack evacuators, and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Good agreement has been observed in both comparisons.

  14. The effect of fluid composition, salinity, and acidity on subcritical crack growth in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne Schad; Røyne, Anja; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Aubry, Jérôme; Renard, François

    2016-03-01

    Chemically activated processes of subcritical cracking in calcite control the time-dependent strength of this mineral, which is a major constituent of the Earth's brittle upper crust. Here experimental data on subcritical crack growth are acquired with a double torsion apparatus to characterize the influence of fluid pH (range 5-7.5) and ionic strength and species (Na2SO4, NaCl, MgSO4, and MgCl2) on the propagation of microcracks in calcite single crystals. The effect of different ions on crack healing has also been investigated by decreasing the load on the crack for durations up to 30 min and allowing it to relax and close. All solutions were saturated with CaCO3. The crack velocities reached during the experiments are in the range 10-9-10-2 m/s and cover the range of subcritical to close to dynamic rupture propagation velocities. Results show that for calcite saturated solutions, the energy necessary to fracture calcite is independent of pH. As a consequence, the effects of fluid salinity, measured through its ionic strength, or the variation of water activity have stronger effects on subcritical crack propagation in calcite than pH. Consequently, when considering the geological sequestration of CO2 into carbonate reservoirs, the decrease of pH within the range of 5-7.5 due to CO2 dissolution into water should not significantly alter the rate of fracturing of calcite. Increase in salinity caused by drying may lead to further reduction in cracking and consequently a decrease in brittle creep. The healing of cracks is found to vary with the specific ions present.

  15. An investigation on the crack growth resistance of human tooth enamel: Anisotropy, microstructure and toughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin

    The enamel of human teeth is generally regarded as a brittle material with low fracture toughness. Consequently, the contributions of this tissue in resisting tooth fracture and the importance of its complex microstructure have been largely overlooked. The primary objective of this dissertation is to characterize the role of enamel's microstructure and degree of decussation on the fracture behavior of human enamel. The importance of the protein content and aging on the fracture toughness of enamel were also explored. Incremental crack growth in sections of human enamel was achieved using a special inset Compact Tension (CT) specimen configuration. Crack extension was achieved in two orthogonal directions, i.e. longitudinal and transverse to the prism axes. Fracture surfaces and the path of crack growth path were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the fundamental mechanisms of crack growth extension. Furthermore, a hybrid approach was adopted to quantify the contribution of toughening mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results of this investigations showed that human enamel exhibits rising R-curve for both directions of crack extension. Cracks extending transverse to the rods in the outer enamel achieved lower rise in toughness with crack extension, and significantly lower toughness (1.23 +/- 0.20 MPa·m 0.5) than in the inner enamel (1.96 +/- 0.28 MPa· 0.5) and in the longitudinal direction (2.01 +/- 0.21 MPa· 0.5). The crack growth resistance exhibited both anisotropy and inhomogeneity, which arise from the complex hierarchical microstructure and the decussated prism structure. Decussation causes deflection of cracks extending from the enamel surface inwards, and facilitates a continuation of transverse crack extension within the outer enamel. This process dissipates fracture energy and averts cracks from extending toward the dentin and vital pulp. This study is the first to investigate the importance of proteins and the effect of

  16. Impact of hydraulic suction history on crack growth mechanics in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hallett, P. D.

    2008-05-01

    The mechanics of crack formation and the influence of soil stress history were described using the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) measured with fractography. Two soils were studied: a model soil consisting of 40% Ca-bentonite and 60% fine silica sand and a remolded paddy soil with similar clay content and mineralogy. Fracture testing used deep-notch bend specimens formed by molding soils at the liquid limit into rectangular bars, equilibrating to soil water suction ranging from 5 kPa to 50 kPa (with some 50 kPa specimens wetted to 5 kPa), and inserting a crack 0.4× specimen thickness. Bend tests at a constant displacement rate of 1 mm min-1 provided data on applied force and load point displacement. The growth and geometry of the cracks were quantified from a series of images to determine the CTOA. Modulus of rupture, evaluated from the peak force, increased as water suction increased. However, rewetting did not alter the peak stress from the 50 kPa value, indicating that shrinkage-induced consolidation was more important than the soil water suction at the onset of testing. CTOA measured during stable crack growth decreased with drying. CTOA decreased even further when specimens equilibrated initially to 50 kPa were rewetted to 5 kPa. These results suggested that CTOA was primarily governed by the stiffness, although rewetting probably altered the capillary stresses in advance of the crack tip. Our future work will combine CTOA with a model that couples hydrological and mechanical processes to take into account the dependency of CTOA on the soil water regime so that crack propagation in soil can be predicted.

  17. Numerical evaluation of crack growth in polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes based on plastically dissipated energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoliang; Santare, Michael H.; Karlsson, Anette M.; Kusoglu, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of growth of defects in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is essential for improving cell longevity. Characterizing the crack growth in PEM fuel cell membrane under relative humidity (RH) cycling is an important step towards establishing strategies essential for developing more durable membrane electrode assemblies (MEA). In this study, a crack propagation criterion based on plastically dissipated energy is investigated numerically. The accumulation of plastically dissipated energy under cyclical RH loading ahead of the crack tip is calculated and compared to a critical value, presumed to be a material parameter. Once the accumulation reaches the critical value, the crack propagates via a node release algorithm. From the literature, it is well established experimentally that membranes reinforced with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) reinforced perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) have better durability than unreinforced membranes, and through-thickness cracks are generally found under the flow channel regions but not land regions in unreinforced PFSA membranes. We show that the proposed plastically dissipated energy criterion captures these experimental observations and provides a framework for investigating failure mechanisms in ionomer membranes subjected to similar environmental loads.

  18. Creep-Environment Interactions in Dwell-Fatigue Crack Growth of Nickel Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly; Dahal, Jinesh; Sun, Yaofeng; Ghonem, Hamouda

    2014-05-01

    A multi-scale, mechanistic model is developed to describe and predict the dwell-fatigue crack growth rate in the P/M disk superalloy, ME3, as a function of creep-environment interactions. In this model, the time-dependent cracking mechanisms involve grain boundary sliding and dynamic embrittlement, which are identified by the grain boundary activation energy, as well as, the slip/grain boundary interactions in both air and vacuum. Modeling of the damage events is achieved by adapting a cohesive zone (CZ) approach which considers the deformation behavior of the grain boundary element at the crack tip. The deformation response of this element is controlled by the surrounding continuum in both far field (internal state variable model) and near field (crystal plasticity model) regions and the intrinsic grain boundary viscosity which defines the mobility of the element by scaling up the motion of dislocations into a mesoscopic scale. This intergranular cracking process is characterized by the rate at which the grain boundary sliding reaches a critical displacement. A damage criterion is introduced by considering the grain boundary mobility limit in the tangential direction leading to strain incompatibility and failure. Results of simulated intergranular crack growth rate using the CZ model are generated for temperatures ranging from 923 K to 1073 K (650 °C to 800 °C), in both air and vacuum. These results are compared with those experimentally obtained and analysis of the model sensitivity to loading conditions, particularly temperature and oxygen partial pressure, are presented.

  19. The orientation dependence of fatigue-crack growth in 8090 Al-Li plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.J.; Wallace, W.; Raizenne, M.D.; Koul, A.K. . Structures, Materials and Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    A series of fatigue-crack growth rate (FCGR) tests was carried out on 8090 Al-Li plate to examine the effects of specimen orientation on fatigue-crack growth. The directionality of fatigue fracture behavior is found to be related to the strong [l brace]110[r brace]<112> texture in this alloy. Based on a previously developed transgranular FCGR model using restricted slip reversibility (RSR) concepts, a mechanistic model is developed for transgranular fatigue-crack growth in highly textured materials. The model takes the form of the Paris relationship with a power law exponent of 3, and the material texture is shown to strongly influence the proportional factor. The effect of texture on FCGR is related through a geometric factor cos[sup 2] [phi], where [phi] defines the angle between the load axis and the normal of the favorable slip plane. The effect of specimen orientation on FCGR in 8090 Al-Li alloy is shown to be related to a combination of its anisotropic mechanical properties and the variation of angle [phi] with specimen orientation. The model further predicts that fatigue-crack growth rates will be slower in many textured materials than texture-free materials because [phi] > 0 and cos[sup 2] [phi] < 1.

  20. Estimation and Simulation of Slow Crack Growth Parameters from Constant Stress Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Weaver, Aaron S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed form, approximate functions for estimating the variances and degrees-of-freedom associated with the slow crack growth parameters n, D, B, and A(sup *) as measured using constant stress rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing were derived by using propagation of errors. Estimates made with the resulting functions and slow crack growth data for a sapphire window were compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The functions for estimation of the variances of the parameters were derived both with and without logarithmic transformation of the initial slow crack growth equations. The transformation was performed to make the functions both more linear and more normal. Comparison of the Monte Carlo results and the closed form expressions derived with propagation of errors indicated that linearization is not required for good estimates of the variances of parameters n and D by the propagation of errors method. However, good estimates variances of the parameters B and A(sup *) could only be made when the starting slow crack growth equation was transformed and the coefficients of variation of the input parameters were not too large. This was partially a result of the skewered distributions of B and A(sup *). Parametric variation of the input parameters was used to determine an acceptable range for using closed form approximate equations derived from propagation of errors.

  1. Investigations on the influence of internal nitridation on creep crack growth in alloy 800 H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, M.; Rahmel, A.; Schütze, M.

    1989-08-01

    For two batches of Alloy 800 H with Al contents of 0.02 and 0.34 pct, creep crack growth was investigated at 1000 °C in air and in an Ar-5 pct H2 atmosphere. The K concept, the net-section stress concept, and the C * concept of creep fracture mechanics were applied when plotting the experimental results. The C * concept proved to give the best correlation between load parameter and crack growth rate. A good agreement was observed between the experimental results and the model calculations for crack extension by constrained diffusive cavity growth. Strong internal nitridation, which occurred in the air tests and which had been shown to increase the creep strength in creep rupture tests, did not show any significant influence on the creep crack growth rate in comparison with tests in an Ar-5 pct H2 atmosphere, in which no internal nitridation was observed. Also, the differences in the Al contents of the two batches did not play a role. This behavior is explained by the fact that neither the nitride particles nor the particle matrix interface is a particularly weak site in the material. It also becomes obvious that the C * concept can be rather insensitive to precipitation strengthening effects, if these only affect the parameter B in Norton's creep law.

  2. The orientation dependence of fatigue-crack growth in 8090 Al-Li plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. J.; Wallace, W.; Raizenne, M. D.; Koul, A. K.

    1994-03-01

    A series of fatigue-crack growth rate (FCGR) tests was carried out on 8090 Al-Li plate to examine the effects of specimen orientation on fatigue-crack growth. The directionality of fatigue fracture behavior is found to be related to the strong {110}<112> texture in this alloy. Based on a previously developed transgranular FCGR model using restricted slip reversibility (RSR) concepts, [1] a mechanistic model is developed for transgranular fatigue-crack growth in highly textured materials. The model takes the form of the Paris relationship with a power law exponent of 3, and the material texture is shown to strongly influence the proportional factor. The effect of texture on FCGR is related through a geometric factor cos2 ϕ, where ϕ defines the angle between the load axis and the normal of the favorable slip plane. The effect of specimen orientation on FCGR in 8090 Al-Li alloy is shown to be related to a combination of its anisotropic mechanical properties and the variation of angle ϕ with specimen orientation. The model further predicts that fatigue-crack growth rates will be slower in many textured materials than texturefree materials because ϕ > 0 and cos2 ϕ < 1.

  3. Hydrogen Isotope Effect on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate in Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. It is expected that diffusion rates play an important role on fatigue crack growth rates. We report the measurement of the fatigue crack growth rate in a high strength pipeline steel in a gaseous deuterium (D2) environment, in an effort to determine the role of diffusion rate on FCGR, because D2 is chemically identical to H2, but with twice the mass. We found that the D2 fatigue crack growth rate was not enhanced compared to air as is seen in an H2 environment; in fact our D2 rate measurement was slightly slower than in air, a result which is not expected to be due to diffusion rates alone. NIST Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  4. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  5. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  6. Fatigue crack growth characteristics of laser-hardened 4130 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M.Y.; Chen, C. . Inst. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-15

    Laser surface hardening of steels is one of many successful applications in laser material processing. The effect of the microstructure on the da/dN of various steels has been reported by several investigators who concluded that tempered martensite has a higher resistance to da/dN than does as-quenched (AQ) martensite. In addition to the microstructure, the residual stress also has a significant influence on da/dN. Importantly, the distribution of residual stresses is not uniform through the depth of the hardened zone and may change as crack propagating takes place in the test. Owing to the complicated nature of residual stresses, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze such an influence on the da/dN of laser-hardened steels. The present study was to investigate the characteristics of da/dN in laser-hardened AISI 4130 steels. Residual stress measurements was performed on distinct laser-treated specimens in the evaluation process.

  7. Influences of gaseous environment on low growth-rate fatigue crack propagation in steels. Annual report No. 1, January 1980. Report No. FPL/R/80/1030

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; Suresh, S.; Toplosky, J.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of gaseous environment is examined on fatigue crack propagation behavior in steels. Specifically, a fully martensitic 300-M ultrahigh strength steel and a fully bainitic 2-1/4Cr-1Mo lower strength steel are investigated in environments of ambient temperature moist air and low pressure dehumidified hydrogen and argon gases over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, with particular emphasis given to behavior near the crack propagation threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/. It is found that two distinct growth rate regimes exist where hydrogen can markedly accelerate crack propagation rates compared to air, (1) at near-threshold levels below (5 x 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle) and (2) at higher growth rates, typically around 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle above a critical maximum stress intensity K/sub max//sup T/. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at higher growth rates is attributed to a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, with K/sub max//sup T/ nominally equal to K/sub Iscc/ (the sustained load stress corrosion threshold) in high strength steels, and far below K/sub Iscc/ in the strain-rate sensitive lower strength steels. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at near-threshold levels is attributed to a new mechanism involving fretting-oxide-induced crack closure generated in moist (or oxygenated) environments. The absence of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms at near-threshold levels is supported by tests showing that ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in dry gaseous argon are similar to ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in hydrogen. The potential ramifications of these results are examined in detail.

  8. Test Standard Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1998-01-01

    The service life of structural ceramic components is often limited by the process of slow crack growth. Therefore, it is important to develop an appropriate testing methodology for accurately determining the slow crack growth design parameters necessary for component life prediction. In addition, an appropriate test methodology can be used to determine the influences of component processing variables and composition on the slow crack growth and strength behavior of newly developed materials, thus allowing the component process to be tailored and optimized to specific needs. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, work to develop a standard test method to determine the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics was initiated by the authors in early 1994 in the C 28 (Advanced Ceramics) committee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). After about 2 years of required balloting, the draft written by the authors was approved and established as a new ASTM test standard: ASTM C 1368-97, Standard Test Method for Determination of Slow Crack Growth Parameters of Advanced Ceramics by Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing at Ambient Temperature. Briefly, the test method uses constant stress-rate testing to determine strengths as a function of stress rate at ambient temperature. Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying constant displacement or loading rates. The slow crack growth parameters required for design are then estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. This new standard will be published in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 15.01, in 1998. Currently, a companion draft ASTM standard for determination of the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures is being prepared by the authors and will be presented to the committee by the middle of 1998. Consequently, Lewis will maintain an active leadership role in advanced ceramics standardization within ASTM

  9. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasagara Nagarajan, Varun

    Many metallic structural components come into contact with hydrogen during manufacturing processes or forming operations such as hot stamping of auto body frames and while in service. This interaction of metallic parts with hydrogen can occur due to various reasons such as water molecule dissociation during plating operations, interaction with atmospheric hydrogen due to the moisture present in air during stamping operations or due to prevailing conditions in service (e.g.: acidic or marine environments). Hydrogen, being much smaller in size compared to other metallic elements such as Iron in steels, can enter the material and become dissolved in the matrix. It can lodge itself in interstitials locations of the metal atoms, at vacancies or dislocations in the metallic matrix or at grain boundaries or inclusions (impurities) in the alloy. This dissolved hydrogen can affect the functional life of these structural components leading to catastrophic failures in mission critical applications resulting in loss of lives and structural component. Therefore, it is very important to understand the influence of the dissolved hydrogen on the failure of these structural materials due to cyclic loading (fatigue). For the next generation of hydrogen based fuel cell vehicles and energy systems, it is very crucial to develop structural materials for hydrogen storage and containment which are highly resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. These materials should also be able to provide good long term life in cyclic loading, without undergoing degradation, even when exposed to hydrogen rich environments for extended periods of time. The primary focus of this investigation was to examine the influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of a commercially available high strength medium carbon low alloy (AISI 4140) steel. The secondary objective was to examine the influence of microstructure on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of this material and to determine the

  10. Velocity transition in the crack growth dynamics of filled elastomers: Contributions of nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Katsuhiko; Urayama, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    The crack growth dynamics of the carbon-black (CB) filled elastomers is studied experimentally and analyzed while focusing on both kinetics and crack tip profiles. The CB amounts are varied to change the mechanical properties of the elastomers. Static crack growth measurements simultaneously reveal the discontinuous-like transition of the crack growth rate v between the "slow mode" (v ≈10-5-10-3 m/s) and "fast mode" (v ≈10-1-102 m/s) in a narrow range of the input tearing energy Γ and the accompanying changes in the crack tip profiles from blunt to sharp shapes. The crack tip profiles are characterized by two specific parameters, i.e., the deviation δ from the parabolic profile and the opening displacement a in the loading direction. The analysis based on the linear and weakly nonlinear elasticity theories of fracture dynamics demonstrates that the Γ dependence of δ and a is simply classified into three groups depending on the mode (slow or fast) and the magnitudes of δ , independent of CB volume fractions. The theories well explain the results in the slow and fast modes with small magnitudes of δ , while they fail to describe the data in the fast mode with large magnitudes of δ , where the contributions of the strong nonlinearity and/or energy dissipation become significant. The correlation between a power-law relationship Γ ˜vα observed in the fast mode and the linear viscoelasticity spectrum is also discussed. The correlation in elastomers with low CB volume fractions is quantitatively explained by the theory of Persson and Brener [Phys. Rev. E 71, 036123 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.71.036123], whereas the deviation from the theory becomes appreciable for elastomers with higher CB volume fractions which exhibit strong nonlinear viscoelasticity.

  11. Effect of Oxygen on the Crack Growth Behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti at 600C

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Richard J.

    2000-09-01

    Exploratory experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of oxygen on the crack growth response of V-4Cr-4Ti at 600C under constant load. Tests were run in gettered argon, argon containing 2000 ppm oxygen, and laboratory air using fatigue pre-cracked compact tension specimens. Crack growth was measured primarily by post-test fracture surface examination, but also by in-test compliance measurements. Crack growth rates measured in air and gettered argon were about 2-3x10-3 mm/h at a stress intensity factor of about 40 MPavm. The crack growth rate in argon with 2000 ppm oxygen was about 7x10-2 mm/h at the same stress intensity level. The crack growth rates were very sensitive to the stress intensity factor. Over a limited range of stress intensity values the crack growth rate in argon plus 2000 ppm oxygen appears to be power-law dependent on stress intensity with an exponent of about 8.9. The fracture mode in air and gettered argon was transgranular cleavage with 20 to 30% intergranular fracture. In the oxygenated argon environment crack growth occurred predominantly by transgranular cleavage.

  12. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27

    The subsection ASME NH high temperature design procedure does not admit crack-like defects into the structural components. The US NRC identified the lack of treatment of crack growth within NH as a limitation of the code and thus this effort was undertaken. This effort is broken into two parts. Part 1, summarized here, involved examining all high temperature creep-fatigue crack growth codes being used today and from these, the task objective was to choose a methodology that is appropriate for possible implementation within NH. The second part of this task, which has just started, is to develop design rules for possible implementation within NH. This second part is a challenge since all codes require step-by-step analysis procedures to be undertaken in order to assess the crack growth and life of the component. Simple rules for design do not exist in any code at present. The codes examined in this effort included R5, RCC-MR (A16), BS 7910, API 579, and ATK (and some lesser known codes). There are several reasons that the capability for assessing cracks in high temperature nuclear components is desirable. These include: (1) Some components that are part of GEN IV reactors may have geometries that have sharp corners - which are essentially cracks. Design of these components within the traditional ASME NH procedure is quite challenging. It is natural to ensure adequate life design by modeling these features as cracks within a creep-fatigue crack growth procedure. (2) Workmanship flaws in welds sometimes occur and are accepted in some ASME code sections. It can be convenient to consider these as flaws when making a design life assessment. (3) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and inspection methods after fabrication are limited in the size of the crack or flaw that can be detected. It is often convenient to perform a life assessment using a flaw of a size that represents the maximum size that can elude detection. (4) Flaws that are observed using in-service detection

  13. Direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Slavik, Donald C.; Piascik, Robert S.; Van Stone, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The analytical and experimental aspects of the direct-current electrical potential difference (dcEPD) method for continuous monitoring of the growth kinetics of short (50 to 500 microns) fatigue cracks are reviewed, and successful applications of the deEPD method to study fatigue crack propagation in a variety of metallic alloys exposed to various environments are described. Particular attention is given to the principle of the dcEPD method, the analytical electrical potential calibration relationships, and the experimental procedures and equipment.

  14. Cohesive Modeling of Dynamic Crack Growth in Homogeneous and Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhengyu; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Celes, Waldemar

    2008-02-15

    This paper presents a Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) approach for investigating dynamic crack propagation in homogeneous and Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs). The failure criterion is incorporated in the CZM using both a finite cohesive strength and work to fracture in the material description. A novel CZM for FGMs is explored and incorporated into a finite element framework. The material gradation is approximated at the element level using a graded element formulation. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the CZM approach, in which the influence of the material gradation on the crack growth pattern is studied.

  15. Moving singularity creep crack growth analysis with the /Delta T/c and C/asterisk/ integrals. [path-independent vector and energy rate line integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, R. B.; Atluri, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    The physical meaning of (Delta T)c and its applicability to creep crack growth are reviewed. Numerical evaluation of (Delta T)c and C(asterisk) is discussed with results being given for compact specimen and strip geometries. A moving crack-tip singularity, creep crack growth simulation procedure is described and demonstrated. The results of several crack growth simulation analyses indicate that creep crack growth in 304 stainless steel occurs under essentially steady-state conditions. Based on this result, a simple methodology for predicting creep crack growth behavior is summarized.

  16. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation and Characterization of Crack Growth in the Weld Region of a Friction Stir Welded Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) fabrication technology is being adopted in aerospace applications. The use of this technology can reduce production cost, lead-times, reduce structural weight and need for fasteners and lap joints, which are typically the primary locations of crack initiation and multi-site fatigue damage in aerospace structures. FSW is a solid state welding process that is well-suited for joining aluminum alloy components; however, the process introduces residual stresses (both tensile and compressive) in joined components. The propagation of fatigue cracks in a residual stress field and the resulting redistribution of the residual stress field and its effect on crack closure have to be estimated. To insure the safe insertion of complex integral structures, an accurate understanding of the fatigue crack growth behavior and the complex crack path process must be understood. A life prediction methodology for fatigue crack growth through the weld under the influence of residual stresses in aluminum alloy structures fabricated using FSW will be detailed. The effects and significance of the magnitude of residual stress at a crack tip on the estimated crack tip driving force are highlighted. The location of the crack tip relative to the FSW and the effect of microstructure on fatigue crack growth are considered. A damage tolerant life prediction methodology accounting for microstructural variation in the weld zone and residual stress field will lead to the design of lighter and more reliable aerospace structures

  17. Analysis of crack initiation and growth in the high level vibration test at Tadotsu

    SciTech Connect

    Kassir, M.K.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1993-08-01

    The High Level Vibration Test data are used to assess the accuracy and usefulness of current engineering methodologies for predicting crack initiation and growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow under complex, large amplitude loading. The data were obtained by testing at room temperature a large scale modified model of one loop of a PWR primary coolant system at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. Fatigue crack initiation time is reasonably predicted by applying a modified local strain approach (Coffin-Mason-Goodman equation) in conjunction with Miner`s rule of cumulative damage. Three fracture mechanics methodologies are applied to investigate the crack growth behavior observed in the hot leg of the model. These are: the {Delta}K methodology (Paris law), {Delta}J concepts and a recently developed limit load stress-range criterion. The report includes a discussion on the pros and cons of the analysis involved in each of the methods, the role played by the key parameters influencing the formulation and a comparison of the results with the actual crack growth behavior observed in the vibration test program. Some conclusions and recommendations for improvement of the methodologies are also provided.

  18. Effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  19. The effect of water vapor on fatigue crack Growth in 7475-t651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  20. Growth of surface and corner cracks in beta-processed and mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    Empirical stress-intensity expressions were developed to relate the growth of cracks from corner flaws to the growth of cracks from surface flaws. An experimental program using beta-processed Ti-6Al-4V verified these expressions for stress ratios, R greater than or equal to 0. An empirical crack growth-rate expression which included stress-ratio and stress-level effects was also developed. Cracks grew approximately 10 percent faster in transverse-grain material than in longitudinal-grain material and at approximately the same rate in longitudinal-grain mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Specimens having surface and corner cracks and made of longitudinal-grain, beta-processed material were tested with block loads, and increasing the stresses in a block did not significantly change the crack growth rates. Truncation of the basic ascending stress sequence within a block caused more rapid crack growth, whereas both the descending and low-to-high stress sequences slowed crack growth.

  1. Crack Growth Mechanisms under Anti-Plane Shear in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Allison Lynne

    The research conducted for this dissertation focuses on determining the mechanisms associated with crack growth in polymer matrix composite laminates subjected to anti-plane shear (mode III) loading. For mode III split-beam test methods were proposed, and initial evaluations were conducted. A single test method was selected for further evaluation. Using this test method, it was determined that the apparent mode III delamination toughness, GIIIc , depended on geometry, which indicated a true material property was not being measured. Transverse sectioning and optical microscopy revealed an array of transverse matrix cracks, or echelon cracks, oriented at approximately 45° and intersecting the plane of the delamination. Subsequent investigations found the echelon array formed prior to the onset of planar delamination advance and that growth of the planar delamination is always coupled to echelon array formation in these specimens. The evolution of the fracture surfaces formed by the echelon array and planar delamination were studied, and it was found that the development was similar to crack growth in homogenous materials subjected to mode III or mixed mode I-III loading, although the composite laminate architecture constrained the fracture surface development differently than homogenous materials. It was also found that, for split-beam specimens such as those used herein, applying an anti-plane shear load results in twisting of the specimen's uncracked region which gives rise to a mixed-mode I-III load condition. This twisting has been related to the apparent mode III toughness as well as the orientation of the transverse matrix cracks. A finite element model was then developed to study the mechanisms of initial echelon array formation. From this, it is shown that an echelon array will develop, but will become self-limiting prior to the onset of planar delamination growth.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Characteristics of Thin Sheet Titanium Alloy Ti 6-2-2-2-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 as a function of stress ratio, temperature (24 or 177 C), tensile orientation and environment (laboratory air or ultrahigh vacuum) are presented. Fatigue crack growth rates of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 are also compared with two more widely used titanium alloys (Timetal 21S and Ti 6Al-4V). The fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 in laboratory air is dependent upon stress ratio (R), particularly in the near-threshold and lower-Paris regimes. For low R (less than approximately 0.5), da/dN is influenced by crack closure behavior. At higher R (> 0.5), a maximum stress-intensity factor (K(sub max)) dependence is observed. Fatigue crack growth behavior is affected by test temperature between 24 and 177 C. For moderate to high applied cyclic-stress-intensity factors (delta-K), the slope of the log da/dN versus log delta-K curve is lower in 177 C laboratory air than 24 C laboratory air. The difference in slope results in lower values of da/dN for exposure to 177 C laboratory air compared to room temperature laboratory air. The onset of this temperature effect is dependent upon the applied R. This temperature effect has not been observed in ultrahigh vacuum. Specimen orientation has been shown to affect the slope of the log da/dN versus log delta-K curve in the Paris regime.

  3. Accelerated protein crystal growth by protein thin film template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Nicolini, Claudio

    2001-11-01

    A new method based on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology is presented for the template stimulation of protein crystal growth. The new approach allows the acceleration of the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystal growth rate in comparison with such a classical vapour diffusion method as hanging drop. Protein thin films were coated on the cover slide of the common crystallization plates. Lysozyme crystal growth was observed on the LB thin films of HEWL.

  4. Multiscale approach to micro/macro fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    When two contacting solid surfaces are tightly closed and invisible to the naked eye, the discontinuity is said to be microscopic regardless of whether its length is short or long. By this definition, it is not sufficient to distinguish the difference between a micro- and macro-crack by using the length parameter. Microcracks in high strength metal alloys have been known to be several centimeters or longer. Considered in this work is a dual scale fatigue crack growth model where the main crack can be micro or macro but there prevails an inherent microscopic tip region that is damaged depending on the irregularities of the microstructure. This region is referred to as the "micro-tip" and can be simulated by a sharp wedge with different angles in addition to mixed boundary conditions. The combination is sufficient to model microscopic entities in the form of voids, inclusions, precipitations, interfaces, in addition to subgrain imperfections, or cluster of dislocations. This is accomplished by using the method of "singularity representation" such that closed form asymptotic solutions can be obtained for the development of fatigue crack growth rate relations with three parameters. They include: (1) the crack surface tightness σ* represented by σ o/ σ ∞ = 0.3-0.5 for short cracks in region I, and 0.1-0.2 for long cracks in region II, (2) the micro/macro material properties reflected by the shear modulus ratio µ* (=µmicro/µmacro varying between 2 and 5) and (3) the most sensitive parameter d* being the micro-tip characteristic length d* (= d/ d o) whose magnitude decreases in the direction of region I→II. The existing fatigue crack growth data for 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum sheets are used to reinterpret the two-parameter d a/d N= C(Δ K) n relation where Δ K has now been re-derived for a microcrack with surfaces tightly in contact. The contact force will depend on the mean stress σm or mean stress ratio R as the primary parameter and on the stress

  5. Is Frost Cracking By Segregation Ice Growth One of the Mechanisms That Erode Bedrock River Margins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, L. L.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers cut vertically and laterally into bedrock. However, control on the width of bedrock rivers is an unsolved problem. In alpine settings, frost cracking is one of the mechanisms that break down bedrock. Segregation ice drives growth of ice lenses within rock masses. When the temperature of the rock is within the "frost cracking window" of -3 to -8 °C, ice lenses can attract liquid water. Expanding ice lenses can exert sufficient pressure to fracture the rock. We hypothesize that alpine rivers may promote segregation ice growth at the river margin by supplying water, but also may inhibit frost cracking by supplying heat. We find support for this hypothesis in data collected along the Tuolumne and Mokelumne rivers in the Sierra Nevada, California. A 1D heat flow model predicts that frost cracking should occur above 2325 masl in this area. To test for a river effect, we measured fracture density along the Tuolumne River at ~2600 masl, finding that density at the river margin is significantly greater than on adjacent hillslopes in the Cathedral Peak granodiorite. We then deployed data loggers on the Mokelumne River (at 2486 masl) over the winter of 2013/2014 to record water, surface and subsurface rock temperatures at varying depths and distances from the river. Temperatures within the frost cracking window were only recorded at a distance of ~5 m from the river, suggesting an insulating effect from the river and snow cover. Rock temperatures 1 m deep equilibrated at ~ 2 °C, significantly colder than predicted by the 1D model. Ongoing work includes terrestrial LIDAR scans to detect erosion of the river bank at the Mokelumne site, and development of a 2D heat flow model to predict subsurface rock temperatures for varying surface boundary conditions and channel morphology. We expect that further analysis will reveal systematic relationships between the surface boundary conditions and rock temperature at depth, enabling predictive modeling of frost cracking

  6. Effect of Microstructure and Environment on Static Crack Growth Resistance in Alloy 706

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Duquette, David J.; Schwant, Robin C.

    2009-06-01

    The relationship between thermo-mechanical processing, resultant microstructure, and mechanical properties has been of interest in the field of metallurgy for centuries. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and key mechanical properties important for turbine rotor design has been investigated. Specifically, the tensile yield strength and crack growth resistance for a nickel-iron based superalloy 706 has been examined. Through a systematic study, a correlation was found between the processing parameters and the microstructure. Specifically, differences in grain boundary and grain interior precipitates were identified and correlated with processing conditions. Further, a strong relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties was identified. The type and orientation of grain boundary precipitates affect time-dependent crack propagation resistance, and the size and volume fraction of grain interior precipitates were correlated with tensile yield strength. It was also found that there is a strong environmental effect on time-dependent crack propagation resistance, and the sensitivity to environmental damage is microstructure dependent. Microstructures with η decorated grain boundaries were more resistant to environmental damage through oxygen embrittlement than microstructures with no η phase on the grain boundaries. An effort was made to explore the mechanisms of improving the time-dependent crack propagation resistance through thermo-mechanical processing, and several mechanisms were identified in both the environment-dependent and the environment-independent category. These mechanisms were ranked based on their contributions to crack propagation resistance.

  7. Hydrogen-assisted stable crack growth in iron-3 wt% silicon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Marrow, T.J.; Prangnell, P.; Aindow, M.; Strangwood, M.; Knott, J.F.

    1996-08-01

    Observations of internal hydrogen cleavage in Fe-3Si are reported. Hydrogen-assisted stable crack growth (H-SCG) is associated with cleavage striations of a 300 nm spacing, observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). High resolution SEM revealed finer striations, previously undetected, with a spacing of approximately 30 nm. These were parallel to the coarser striations. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) also showed the fine striation spacing, and gave a striation height of approximately 15 nm. The crack front was not parallel to the striations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of crack tip plastic zones showed {l_brace}112{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} slip, with a high dislocation density (around 10{sup 14}m{sup {minus}2}). The slip plane spacing was approximately 15--30 nm. Parallel arrays of high dislocation density were observed in the wake of the hydrogen cleavage crack. It is concluded that H-ScG in Fe-3Si occurs by periodic brittle cleavage on the {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes. This is preceded by dislocation emission. The coarse striations are produced by crack tip blunting and the fine striations by dislocations attracted by image forces to the fracture surface after cleavage. The effects of temperature, pressure and yield strength on the kinetics of H-SCG can be predicted using a model for diffusion of hydrogen through the plastic zone.

  8. Model Predictions of Chemically Controlled Slow Crack Growth with Application to Mechanical Effects in Geothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    2001-04-11

    Representative, simplified geothermal rock-fluid systems are investigated with a modeling approach to estimate how rock water interactions affect coupled properties related to mechanical stability and permeability improvement through fracturing. First, geochemical modeling is used to determine the evolution of fluid chemistry at temperatures up to 300 C when fluids are in contact with representative rocks of continental origin. Then, a kinetic crack growth model for quartz is used to predict growth rate for subcritical cracks in acidic and basic environments. The predicted growth rate is highly sensitive to temperature and pH in the ranges tested. At present, the model is limited to situations in which quartz controls the mechanical process of interest, such as well bore stability in silica cemented rocks and the opening of quartz filled veins to enhance permeability.

  9. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature. Final project report, July 1, 1986--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C{sub t} or C{sup *}. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C{sub t}. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C{sub t} is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C{sub t}. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C{sub t}){sub avg} was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  10. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y. -D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, delta J(sub eff) as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and delta J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  11. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y.-D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, (Delta)J(sub eff), as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and (Delta)J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  12. Prediction of fatique crack growth under flight-simulation loading with the modified CORPUS model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmadinata, U. H.; Schijve, J.

    1994-01-01

    The CORPUS (Computation Of Retarded Propagation Under Spectrum loading) crack growth prediction model for variable-amplitude loading, as introduced by De Koning, was based on crack closure. It includes a multiple-overload effect and a transition from plane strain to plane stress. In the modified CORPUS model an underload affected zone (ULZ) is introduced, which is significant for flight-simulation loading in view of the once per flight compressive ground load. The ULZ is associated with reversed plastic deformation induced by the underloads after crack closure has already occurred. Predictions of the crack growth fatigue life are presented for a large variety of flight-simulation test series on 2024-T3 sheet specimens in order to reveal the effects of a number of variables: the design stress level, the gust spectrum severity, the truncation level (clipping), omission of small cycles, and the ground stress level. Tests with different load sequences are also included. The trends of the effects induced by the variables are correctly predicted. The quantitative agreement between the predictions and the test results is also satisfactory.

  13. Specific Features of the Nucleation and Growth of Fatigue Cracks in Steel under Cyclic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Popelyukh, P. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of the fracture of 40Kh and U8 steels under cyclic dynamic compression are studied. It has been found that the main cause for the fracture of the cyclically compressed specimens is the propagation of cracks due to the effect of residual tensile stresses, which arise near the tips of the cracks at the stage of the unloading of the specimens. The growth rate of a crack has the maximum value at the initial stage of its propagation in the vicinity of the stress concentrator. As the crack propagates deep into the specimen, its growth rate decreases and depends only slightly on the real cross section of the specimen. The model of the process of the fatigue fracture of the steels under dynamic loading by a cyclically varied compressive force is proposed. It has been found that the high fatigue endurance is provided by tempering at 200°C for the 40Kh steel and at 300°C for the U8 steel.

  14. Crack growth behavior of encapsulation processed SiC-PMMA particulate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, C.H.

    1990-05-01

    The effect of processing on the fatigue crack propagation and fracture toughness of ceramic-polymer composites was investigated. A new process for composite production was developed with homogeneous particle distribution and low residual stress levels in mind. PMMA was uniformly distributed by encapsulating the SiC substrate by means of precipitation polymerization. The encapsulation processed powders were then compacted at temperatures above T{sub g} to form the composite. The encapsulation process was optimized by varying the initial concentrations of the reactants until homogeneous nucleation was suppressed. The coatings were found to be continuous at the SiC-PMMA interface, with particle agglomeration occurring between coated particles. Polymer loadings equivalent to 30 vol % SiC were achieved. Composites of several particle size ranges were tested under cyclic fatigue and static loading conditions. Fatigue growth rates and fracture toughness data display a trend of increasing crack growth resistance with increasing particle size, with encapsulation processed composites outperforming conventionally cast composites in both cyclic fatigue and fracture resistance. The largest K{sub Ic} value was found to be 2.95 MPa(m){sup 1/2}, a factor of 3 increase over un-reinforced PMMA. The roles of crack deflection, shielding, bridging, and pinning in enhancing toughness were discussed in light of crack profile fracture surface details. 65 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The influence of laser glazing on fatigue crack growth in Ti-24Al-11Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Malakondaiah, G.; Nicholas, T. )

    1994-01-01

    The influence of laser glazing on fatigue crack growth (FCG) in a titanium aluminide (Ti[sub 3]Al) alloy Ti-24Al-11Nb has been studied. Glazing leads to retention of beta phase in the melt zone and is accompanied by a significant increase in hardness as compared to that of the base microstructure. Laser glazing strongly influences the FCG behavior. Crack growth rates (CGRs) at a given stress intensity are reduced by up to three orders of magnitude. Maximum retardation in the CGR is observe when the crack front is around 4.0 mm ahead of the laser track. The observed slowing of CGR can be understood on the basis of the superposition principle that accounts for the influence of residual stresses on FCG. The equilibrating compressive stresses resulting from the tensile thermal residual stresses reduce the local effective stress intensity and, thereby, lead to reduced CGRs. In the absence of residual stresses, when subjected to a thermal treatment (650[degree]C/100 h), no observable variation in CGR is noticed over the entire crack length that encompassed two laser tracks.

  16. An observation-based model for a vapor-driven crack growth leading up to the phreatic eruption of Mt. Ontake in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Kato, A.; Terakawa, T.; Yamanaka, Y.; Horikawa, S.; Matsuhiro, K.; Okuda, T.

    2015-12-01

    At Mt. Ontake, central Japan, a phreatic eruption took place on 27 September 2014. The eruption was preceded for 25 s by a very long period (VLP) seismic event and for 450 s by an accelerated tilt change showing summit uplift. To deepen our understanding of the initiation of the phreatic eruption, we conducted waveform inversion and time series analyses of these preceding events. Our waveform inversion of the VLP event pointed to an SSE-NNW strike subvertical tensile crack at around 600 m beneath the eruptive vent region. This crack orientation was subparallel to alignments of volcano-tectonic earthquake hypocenters (Kato et al., 2015) and eruptive vents (Geospatial Information Authority of Japan, 2014) as well as one of the maximum shear directions of the regional stress field (Terakawa et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the VLP source crack was one of the preexisting faults along the maximum shear direction that opened due to passage of ascending gas from depth to the surface. Our waveform inversion of the tilt change pointed to an E-W to SE-NW strike subvertical tensile crack at around 1000 m below the surface. To investigate a background physics of the tilt change, we calculated the first and second order integrals of the tilt waveforms (I1(t) and I2(t), respectively, where t is time). The ratio I2(t)/I1(t) initially increased linearly with time and then reached an almost constant value. This time evolution is well modeled by a linear increase of the source crack volume V(t)=V0t/t0 (tgrowth V(t)=V0exp{(t-t0)/τ} (t>t0), where V0 is constant, τ≈84 s, and t0/τ≈2. The initial linear growth of the crack volume may be explained by inflation of water vapor in the vertical crack under constant pressure and heat supply conditions. The latter exponential crack growth may be modeled by a force balance between an overpressure of 104-105 Pa and a viscous resistance of the water vapor near the crack tip (Lister and Kerr

  17. Prediction of fatigue crack growth kinetics in the plane structural elements of aircraft in the biaxial stress state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyavskij, A. A.; Karaev, K. Z.; Grigor'ev, V. M.; Koronov, M. Z.; Orlov, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    The kinetics of fatigue crack growth in the case of a complex stress state is investigated with particular reference to D16T aluminum alloy. By using simulation models in the form of plane cruciform specimens, the characteristics of fatigue crack growth are investigated under conditions of uniaxial and biaxial tension-compression, with the ratio of the main stresses varying from -1 to 1.5. An algorithm is developed which makes it possible to predict the kinetics of fatigue crack growth and the equivalent stress level under conditions of multiparametric loading.

  18. Effect of fast neutron irradiation on fatigue-crack growth behavior of three nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Nickel-base alloys are often employed in reactor structural applications where high strength, resistance to corrosion, or swelling resistance are important considerations. In this study, fatigue-crack growth rate tests were conducted at 427/degree/C on Inconel 600, Inconel X-750, and Incoloy 800 irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II to total fluences ranging between 2.5 and 6.0*10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/. Following irradiation, minor increases were noted in the crack growth rates of Inconel 600, minor decreases in the growth rates of Inconel X-750, and no irradiation effect in the cracking behavior of Incoloy 800. 14 refs.

  19. Dynamic fatigue testing of candidate ceramic materials for turbine engines to determine slow-crack-growth parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, N.R.; Graves, G.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength and slow-crack-growth parameter values for two commercially available silicon nitrides, SN-88 and NT164, at three high-temperature conditions. Weibull analysis and dynamic fatigue slow-crack-growth parameters were used to characterize the material strength and resistance to slow crack growth at high temperatures for use in life prediction models. Although both materials are commercially available Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, their high-temperature behavior was found to be significantly different.

  20. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    DOE PAGES

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loadingmore » conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.« less

  1. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loading conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.

  2. Periodic Overload and Transport Spectrum Fatigue Crack Growth Tests of Ti62222STA and Al2024T3 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    Variable amplitude loading crack growth tests have been conducted to provide data that can be used to evaluate crack growth prediction codes. Tests with periodic overloads or overloads followed by underloads were conducted on titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr solution treated and aged (Ti62222STA) material at room temperature and at 350 F. Spectrum fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on two materials (Ti62222STA and aluminum alloy 2024-T3) using two transport lower-wing test spectra at two temperatures (room temperature and 350 F (Ti only)). Test lives (growth from an initial crack half-length of 0.15 in. to failure) were recorded in all tests and the crack length against cycles (or flights) data were recorded in many of the tests. The following observations were made regarding the test results: (1) in tests of the Ti62222STA material, the tests at 350 F had longer lives than those at room temperature, (2) in tests to the MiniTwist spectrum, the Al2024T3 material showed much greater crack growth retardations due to the highest stresses in the spectrum than did the Ti62222STA material, and (3) comparisons of material crack growth performances on an "equal weight" basis were spectrum dependent.

  3. A quantitatively accurate theory of stable crack growth in single phase ductile metal alloys under the influence of cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Peter oel

    Although fatigue has been a well studied phenomenon over the past century and a half, there has yet to be found a quantitative link between fatigue crack growth rates and materials properties. This work serves to establish that link, in the case of well behaved, single phase, ductile metals. The primary mechanisms of fatigue crack growth are identified in general terms, followed by a description of the dependence of the stress intensity factor range on those mechanisms. A method is presented for calculating the crack growth rate for an ideal, linear elastic, non-brittle material, which is assumed to be similar to the crack growth rate for a real material at very small crack growth rate values. The threshold stress intensity factor is discussed as a consequence of "crack tip healing". Residual stresses are accounted for in the form of an approximated residual stress intensity factor. The results of these calculations are compared to data available in the literature. It is concluded that this work presents a new way to consider crack growth with respect to cyclic loading which is quantitatively accurate, and introduces a new way to consider fracture mechanics with respect to the relatively small, cyclic loads, normally associated with fatigue.

  4. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  5. The Effects of Shot and Laser Peening on Fatigue Life and Crack Growth in 2024 Aluminum Alloy and 4340 Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Matthews, W. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dubberly, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue and crack growth tests have been conducted on 4340 steel and 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, respectively, to assess the effects of shot peening on fatigue life and the effects of shot and laser peening on crack growth. Two current programs involving fixed and rotary-wing aircraft will not be using shot peened structures. Since the shot peening compressive residual stress depth is usually less than the 0.05-inch initial damage tolerance crack size, it is believed by some that shot peening should have no beneficial effects toward retarding crack growth. In this study cracks were initiated from an electronic-discharged machining flaw which was cycled to produce a fatigue crack of approximately 0.05-inches in length and then the specimens were peened. Test results showed that after peening the crack growth rates were noticeably slower when the cracks were fairly short for both the shot and laser peened specimens resulting in a crack growth life that was a factor of 2 to 4 times greater than the results of the average unpeened test. Once the cracks reached a length of approximately 0.1-inches the growth rates were about the same for the peened and unpeened specimens. Fatigue tests on 4340 steel showed that the endurance limit of a test specimen with a 0.002-inch-deep machining-like scratch was reduced by approximately 40 percent. However, if the "scratched" specimen was shot peened after inserting the scratch, the fatigue life returned to almost 100 percent of the unflawed specimens original fatigue life.

  6. A Review of Fatigue Crack Growth for Pipeline Steels Exposed to Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Nanninga, N.; Slifka, A.; Levy, Y.; White, C.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen pipeline systems offer an economical means of storing and transporting energy in the form of hydrogen gas. Pipelines can be used to transport hydrogen that has been generated at solar and wind farms to and from salt cavern storage locations. In addition, pipeline transportation systems will be essential before widespread hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology becomes a reality. Since hydrogen pipeline use is expected to grow, the mechanical integrity of these pipelines will need to be validated under the presence of pressurized hydrogen. This paper focuses on a review of the fatigue crack growth response of pipeline steels when exposed to gaseous hydrogen environments. Because of defect-tolerant design principles in pipeline structures, it is essential that designers consider hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth behavior in these applications. PMID:27134796

  7. A root-mean-square approach for predicting fatigue crack growth under random loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    A method for predicting fatigue crack growth under random loading which employs the concept of Barsom (1976) is presented. In accordance with this method, the loading history for each specimen is analyzed to determine the root-mean-square maximum and minimum stresses, and the predictions are made by assuming the tests have been conducted under constant-amplitude loading at the root-mean-square maximum and minimum levels. The procedure requires a simple computer program and a desk-top computer. For the eleven predictions made, the ratios of the predicted lives to the test lives ranged from 2.13 to 0.82, which is a good result, considering that the normal scatter in the fatigue-crack-growth rates may range from a factor of two to four under identical loading conditions.

  8. Fatigue crack growth in damage tolerant Al-Li sheet alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanhill, R. J. H.

    1990-03-01

    The fatigue crack growth properties of two candidate damage tolerant Al-Li sheet alloys, 2091 and 8090 are compared with those of the conventional and widely used 2024 alloy. There were three load histories: constant amplitude, gust spectrum, and constant amplitude with occasional peak loads. The results are interpreted with the aid of fractographic observations and measurements of fracture surface roughness. The practical significance of the results is assessed, and recommendations are made for further evaluations.

  9. Fatigue and crack growth: Environmental effects, modeling studies, and design considerations. PVP-Volume 306

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, S.; Jones, D.P.; Mehta, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    The papers in this volume are divided into two sections. Section one papers focus on recent test and evaluation results pertaining to the effect of light-water reactor (LWR)-type water environments on fatigue and crack growth properties of pressure boundary materials. Section two papers include consideration of other aspects of fatigue behavior and the characterization and the determination of the effects of aging and degradation in materials. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the individual papers.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels. PMID:26601024

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels.

  12. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior of nicalon/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Miriyala, N.; Liaw, P.K.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth phenomenon in Nicalon/SiC composites. Ultrasonic measurements were continued on the Nicalon/SiC composite specimens to correlate elastic moduli with percentage porosity in the in-plane as well as through-thickness directions. A micromechanics model based on periodic microstructure was developed to predict the elastic stiffness constants of the Nicalon/SiC composites. The predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Elevated Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Nitride Under Dynamic, Static and Cyclic Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Nemeth, Noel; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of a hot-pressed silicon nitride were determined at 1200 and 1300 C in air by statically, dynamically and cyclicly loading bend specimens. The fatigue parameters were estimated using the recently developed CARES/Life computer code. Good agreement exists between the flexural results. However, fatigue susceptibility under static uniaxial tensile loading, reported elsewhere, was greater than in flexure. Cyclic flexural loading resulted in the lowest apparent flexural fatigue susceptibility.

  14. Influence of Microstructure on the Fatigue Crack Growth of A516 in Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachob, Harry F.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1980-01-01

    Some day hydrogen may be used as a viable energy storage and transport medium within the United States. Hydrogen gas may be used to dilute and extend our present methane supply as a blend or may even be used in its pure elemental form as a primary fuel. Independent of the methods of production, storage, and distribution, the interaction of hydrogen with its containment material will play an integral role in the success of a hydrogen energy program. Presently, the selection of hydrogen containment materials can be made such that the material will remain reasonably free from environmental degradation; however, costly alloying additions are required. Unfortunately, high alloy steels are economically prohibitive when large-scale hydrogen energy storage, transmission, and conversion systems are desired. Therefore, in order to implement such hydrogen energy systems in the future, existing low-cost materials must be improved via mechanical, thermal, or thermo-mechanical processing methods or new low-cost materials which are compatible with hydrogen must be developed. Originally, low strength, low alloy steels at room temperature were thought to be immune to hydrogen gas embrittlement, since no sustained load crack growth is observed. However, results of Clark in HY8O and Nelson in SAE 1020 have shown that the fatigue crack growth rate can be greatly accelerated in the presence of hydrogen gas. In recent results reported by Louthan and Mucci, the smooth bar fatigue life of an A1068 pipeline steel was reduced up to a factor of ten when the tests were performed in a 13.8 MPa hydrogen environment. These results suggest that the selection of material for structures designed to operate in hydrogen under cyclic loads must include consideration of hydrogen/metal fatigue interaction. Although the hydrogen/metal fatigue interaction can be severe in low strength low alloy steels, the degree of degradation may be altered by the underlying ferrous microstructure. At present, no

  15. Creep crack growth in boiler and steam pipe steels: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Han, J.; Banerji, K.

    1988-01-01

    One of the important ingredients in remaining creep crack growth life assessment of heavy section elevated temperature power plant components is the material creep crack growth rate data. This report summarizes the currently available data on Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steels most commonly used in steam pipes and boilers. All data are correlated with the crack tip parameter, C/sub t/. The accompanying creep deformation data and tensile properties are also included. The influence of in-service degradation, test temperature and the welding parameters such as impurity level and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep growth behavior were examined. It was shown that the influence of nominal material chemistry, service degradation and test temperature can be normalized into a single da/dt versus C/cub t/ trend for the base materials. It was also shown that the level of impurities and the PWHT can significantly influence the da/dt versus C/sub t/ behavior in weldments. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  17. Numerical Simulation of 3D Thermo-Elastic Fatigue Crack Growth Problems Using Coupled FE-EFG Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Himanshu; Singh, Akhilendra; Singh, Indra Vir

    2016-06-01

    In this work, finite element method (FEM) and element free Galerkin method (EFGM) are coupled for solving 3D crack domains subjected to cyclic thermal load of constant amplitude. Crack growth contours and fatigue life have been obtained for each of the considered numerical examples. Thermo-elastic problems are decoupled into thermal and elastic problems . Firstly, the unknown temperature field is obtained by solving heat conduction equation, then, it is used as the input load in the elastic problem to calculate the displacement and stress fields. The geometrical discontinuity across crack surface is modelled by extrinsically enriched EFGM and the remaining part of the domain is approximated by standard finite element method. At the crack interface, a ramp function based interpolation scheme has been implemented. This coupled approach combines the advantages of both EFGM and FEM. A linear successive crack increment approach is used to model crack growth. The growing crack surface is traced by level set function. Standard Paris law is used for life estimation of the three-dimensional crack models. Different cases of planar and non-planar crack problems have been solved and their results are compared with the results obtained using extended finite element method to check accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the coupled FE-EFG approach implemented in this study.

  18. Fracture and crack growth resistance studies of 304 stainless steel weldments relating to retesting of cryogenic vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Fracture and crack growth resistance characteristics of 304 stainless steel alloy weldments as relating to retesting of cryogenic vessels were examined. Welding procedures were typical of those used in full scale vessel fabrication. Fracture resistance survey tests were conducted in room temperature air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. In air, both surface-flawed and center-cracked panels containing cracks in weld metal, fusion line, heat-affected zone, or parent metal were tested. In liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, tests were conducted using center-cracked panels containing weld centerline cracks. Load-unload, sustained load, and cyclic load tests were performed in air or hydrogen gas, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen using surface-flawed specimens containing weld centerline cracks. Results were used to evaluate the effectiveness of periodic proof overloads in assuring safe and reliable operation of over-the-road cryogenic dewars.

  19. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Zanganeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program conducted to improve the understanding of fatigue crack growth rate behavior in the threshold growth rate region and to answer a question on the validity of threshold region test data. The validity question relates to the view held by some experimentalists that using the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce valid threshold test results and material properties. The question involves the fanning behavior observed in threshold region of da/dN plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out from the high R-ratio data. This fanning behavior or elevation of threshold values in the low R-ratio tests is generally assumed to be caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tests. Also, the increase in crack closure is assumed by some experimentalists to result from using the ASTM load shedding test procedure. The belief is that this procedure induces load history effects which cause remote closure from plasticity and/or roughness changes in the surface morphology. However, experimental studies performed by the authors have shown that the increase in crack closure is a result of extensive crack tip bifurcations that can occur in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the fanning behavior which occurs in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the alloy, and therefore, the fanned data does represent the true threshold properties of the material. However, for the corrosion sensitive steel alloys tested in laboratory air, the occurrence of fanning results from fretting corrosion at the crack tips, and these results should not be considered to be representative of valid threshold properties because the fanning is

  20. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  1. Education and Technology Accelerate Economic Growth for Newly Emerging Economies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Technology provides a new and effective tool for accelerating economic growth, and developing countries are embracing technology and education as the means toward attaining economic parity with the United States and other developed nations. Evidence suggests that this strategy is paying off. Developing countries are building a technology…

  2. Effects of Processing Residual Stresses on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Structural Materials: Experimental Approaches and Microstructural Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Lados, Diana A.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth mechanisms of long cracks through fields with low and high residual stresses were investigated for a common structural aluminum alloy, 6061-T61. Bulk processing residual stresses were introduced in the material by quenching during heat treatment. Compact tension (CT) specimens were fatigue crack growth (FCG) tested at varying stress ratios to capture the closure and K max effects. The changes in fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale are correlated to closure, stress ratio, and plasticity, which are all dependent on residual stress. A dual-parameter Δ K- K max approach, which includes corrections for crack closure and residual stresses, is used uniquely to connect fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale with changes in crack growth rates at various stress ratios for low- and high-residual-stress conditions. The methods and tools proposed in this study can be used to optimize existing materials and processes as well as to develop new materials and processes for FCG limited structural applications.

  3. Three-dimensional effects of microstructures on short fatigue crack growth in an Al-Li 8090 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Zhai, Tongguang

    2011-09-01

    Al-Li 8090 alloy specimens were fatigued using a self-aligning four-point bend rig at R = 0.1 and room temperature, in air, under constant maximum stress control. The crystallographic characteristics of fatigue crack initiation and early growth were studied using EBSD. It was found that the growth behaviour of a short crack were controlled by the twist (α) and tilt (β) components of crack plane deflection across each of the first 20 grain boundaries along the crack path, and that the α angle at the first grain boundary encountered by a micro-crack was critical in determining whether the crack could become propagating or non-propagating. In addition to the orientations of the two neighbouring grains, the tilt of their boundary could also affect α across the boundary. A minimum α-map for a vertical micro-crack was calculated to evaluate the resistance to crack growth into a neighbouring grain with a random orientation. Such an α-map is of value in alloy design against fatigue damage by optimising texture components in the alloys.

  4. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  5. Effect of strontium modification on near-threshold fatigue crack growth in an Al-Si-Cu die cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, M.; Fournelle, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of strontium modification on microstructure and fatigue properties in a die cast commercial aluminum-silicon alloy are demonstrated. Strontium additions of 0.010 and 0.018 wt pct drastically change the morphology of the eutectic silicon. The influence of these microstructural changes on fatigue properties is evaluated through fatigue crack growth testing. Examination of the fracture surfaces and the crack path establish distinct fatigue fracture modes for the modified and unmodified eutectic structures. Changes in fracture mode and crack path are correlated to the microstructure changes. A higher energy fracture mode and increased crack path tortuosity explain the observed improvement in fatigue properties for the modified alloys. Strontium modified alloys exhibit a 10 to 20 pct higher fatigue crack growth threshold compared to an unmodified alloy for testing at a load ratio of 0.5. No difference was observed for testing at a load ratio of 0.1.

  6. Secondary Crystal Growth on a Cracked Hydrotalcite-Based Film Synthesized by the Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooyoung; Lee, Chan Hyun; Lee, Ki Bong

    2016-05-01

    The sol-gel synthesis method is an attractive technology for the fabrication of ceramic films due to its preparation simplicity and ease of varying the metal composition. However, this technique presents some limitations in relation to the film thickness. Notably, when the film thickness exceeds the critical limit, large tensile stresses occur, resulting in a cracked morphology. In this study, a secondary crystal growth method was introduced as a post-treatment process for Mg/Al hydrotalcite-based films synthesized by the sol-gel method, which typically present a cracked morphology. The cracked hydrotalcite-based film was hydrothermally treated for the secondary growth of hydrotalcite crystals. In the resulting film, hydrotalcite grew with a vertical orientation, and the gaps formed during the sol-gel synthesis were filled with hydrotalcite after the crystal growth. The secondary crystal growth method provides a new solution for cracked ceramic films synthesized by the sol-gel method.

  7. A film-rupture model of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in alpha-beta titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The appearance of the terrace like fracture morphology of gaseous hydrogen induced crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium alloys is discussed as a function of specimen configuration, magnitude of applied stress intensity, test temperature, and hydrogen pressure. Although the overall appearance of the terrace structure remained essentially unchanged, a distinguishable variation is found in the size of the individual terrace steps, and step size is found to be inversely dependent upon the rate of hydrogen induced slow crack growth. Additionally, this inverse relationship is independent of all the variables investigated. These observations are quantitatively discussed in terms of the formation and growth of a thin hydride film along the alpha-beta boundaries and a qualitative model for hydrogen induced slow crack growth is presented, based on the film-rupture model of stress corrosion cracking.

  8. A film-rupture model of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    A study has been conducted of the terrace-like fracture morphology of gaseous hydrogen-induced crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium alloys in terms of specimen configuration, magnitude of applied stress intensity, test temperature, and hydrogen pressure. Although the overall appearance of the terrace structure remained essentially unchanged, a distinguishable variation is found in the size of the individual terrace steps, and step size is found to be inversely dependent upon the rate of hydrogen-induced slow crack growth. This inverse relationship is independent of all the variables investigated. These observations are quantitatively discussed in terms of the formation and growth of a thin hydride film along the alpha-beta boundaries and a qualitative model for hydrogen-induced slow crack growth is presented, based on the film-rupture model of stress corrosion cracking.

  9. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  10. Carbon- and crack-free growth of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets and their uncommon stacking order.

    PubMed

    Khan, Majharul Haque; Casillas, Gilberto; Mitchell, David R G; Liu, Hua Kun; Jiang, Lei; Huang, Zhenguo

    2016-09-21

    The quality of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNS) is often associated with the most visible aspects such as lateral size and thickness. Less obvious factors such as sheet stacking order could also have a dramatic impact on the properties of BNNS and therefore its applications. The stacking order can be affected by contamination, cracks, and growth temperatures. In view of the significance of chemical-vapour-decomposition (CVD) assisted growth of BNNS, this paper reports on strategies to grow carbon- and crack-free BNNS by CVD and describes the stacking order of the resultant BNNS. Pretreatment of the most commonly used precursor, ammonia borane, is necessary to remove carbon contamination caused by residual hydrocarbons. Flattening the Cu and W substrates prior to growth and slow cooling around the Cu melting point effectively facilitate the uniform growth of h-BNNS, as a result of a minimal temperature gradient across the Cu substrate. Confining the growth inside alumina boats effectively minimizes etching of the nanosheet by silica nanoparticles originating from the commonly used quartz reactor tube. h-BNNS grown on solid Cu surfaces using this method adopt AB, ABA, AC', and AC'B stacking orders, which are known to have higher energies than the most stable AA' configuration. These findings identify a pathway for the fabrication of high-quality h-BNNS via CVD and should spur studies on stacking order-dependent properties of h-BNNS. PMID:27455464

  11. Carbon- and crack-free growth of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets and their uncommon stacking order.

    PubMed

    Khan, Majharul Haque; Casillas, Gilberto; Mitchell, David R G; Liu, Hua Kun; Jiang, Lei; Huang, Zhenguo

    2016-09-21

    The quality of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNS) is often associated with the most visible aspects such as lateral size and thickness. Less obvious factors such as sheet stacking order could also have a dramatic impact on the properties of BNNS and therefore its applications. The stacking order can be affected by contamination, cracks, and growth temperatures. In view of the significance of chemical-vapour-decomposition (CVD) assisted growth of BNNS, this paper reports on strategies to grow carbon- and crack-free BNNS by CVD and describes the stacking order of the resultant BNNS. Pretreatment of the most commonly used precursor, ammonia borane, is necessary to remove carbon contamination caused by residual hydrocarbons. Flattening the Cu and W substrates prior to growth and slow cooling around the Cu melting point effectively facilitate the uniform growth of h-BNNS, as a result of a minimal temperature gradient across the Cu substrate. Confining the growth inside alumina boats effectively minimizes etching of the nanosheet by silica nanoparticles originating from the commonly used quartz reactor tube. h-BNNS grown on solid Cu surfaces using this method adopt AB, ABA, AC', and AC'B stacking orders, which are known to have higher energies than the most stable AA' configuration. These findings identify a pathway for the fabrication of high-quality h-BNNS via CVD and should spur studies on stacking order-dependent properties of h-BNNS.

  12. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  13. Monitoring of hidden fatigue crack growth in multi-layer aircraft structures using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H.; Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Varying loading conditions of aircraft structures result in stress concentration at fastener holes, where multi-layered components are connected, potentially leading to the development of hidden fatigue cracks in inaccessible layers. High frequency guided waves propagating along the structure allow for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of such components, e.g., aircraft wings. Experimentally the required guided wave modes can be easily excited using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers. However, the sensitivity for the detection of small, potentially hidden, fatigue cracks has to be ascertained. The type of multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two adhesively bonded aluminum plate-strips with a sealant layer. Fatigue experiments were carried out and the growth of fatigue cracks at the fastener hole in one of the metallic layers was monitored optically during cyclic loading. The influence of the fatigue cracks of increasing size on the scattered guided wave field was evaluated. The sensitivity and repeatability of the high frequency guided wave modes to detect and monitor the fatigue crack growth was investigated, using both standard pulse-echo equipment and a laser interferometer. The potential for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring at critical and difficult to access fastener locations from a stand-off distance was ascertained. The robustness of the methodology for practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  14. Biaxial Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in Aluminum Alloy 5083-H116 Under Ambient Laboratory and Saltwater Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perel, V. Y.; Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-04-01

    Crack growth of aluminum alloy 5083 was investigated when subjected to the in-plane biaxial tension-tension fatigue with stress ratio of 0.5 under ambient laboratory and saltwater environments. Cruciform specimens with a center hole, containing a notch and precrack at 45° to the specimen's arms, were tested in a biaxial fatigue test machine. Two biaxiality ratios, λ = 1 and λ = 1.5, were studied. For λ = 1, crack propagated along a straight line collinearly with the precrack, while for λ = 1.5 case, the crack path was curved and non-collinear with the precrack. Uniaxial fatigue tests were also conducted. Crack growth rates were faster under the biaxiality fatigue in comparison to uniaxial fatigue at a given crack driving force (Δ K I or Δ G) in both environments. Further, an increase in biaxiality ratio increased the crack growth rate, i.e., faster for λ = 1.5 case than λ = 1 case. Both biaxial fatigue and saltwater environment showed detrimental effects on the fatigue crack growth resistance of 5083, and its combination is highly detrimental when compared to uniaxial fatigue.

  15. Growth of Matrix Cracks During Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a SiC/SiC Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2000-01-01

    The crack density of woven Hi-Nicalon(sup TM) (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites was determined for specimens subjected to tensile stress rupture at 815 C. A significant amount of matrix cracking occurs due to the growth of fiber-bridged microcracks even at stresses below the run-out condition. This increased cracking corresponded to time dependent strain accumulation and acoustic emission activity during the constant load test. However, the portion of the rupture specimens subjected to cooler temperatures (< 600 C than the hot section had significantly lower crack densities compared to the hotter regions. From the acoustic emission and time dependent strain data it can be inferred that most of the matrix crack growth occurred within the first few hours of the tensile rupture experiment. The crack growth was attributed to an interphase recession mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of a thin carbon layer between the fiber and the matrix as a result of the composite fabrication process. One important consequence of matrix crack growth at the lower stresses is poor retained strength at room temperature for specimens that did not fail.

  16. Creep-assisted slow crack growth in bio-inspired dental multilayers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Niu, Xinrui; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-06-01

    Ceramic crown structures under occlusal contact are often idealized as flat multilayered structures that are deformed under Hertzian contact loading. Previous models treated each layer as linear elastic materials and resulted in differences between the measured and predicted critical loads. This paper examines the combined effects of creep (in the adhesive and substrate layers) and creep-assisted slow crack growth (in the ceramic layer) on the contact-induced deformation of bio-inspired, functionally graded multilayer (FGM) structures and the conventional tri-layers. The time-dependent moduli of each of the layers were determined from constant load creep tests. The resulting modulus-time characteristics were modeled using Prony series. These were then incorporated into a finite element model for the computation of stress distributions in the sub-surface regions of the top ceramic layer, in which sub-surface radial cracks, are observed as the clinical failure mode. The time-dependent stresses are incorporated into a slow crack growth (SCG) model that is used to predict the critical loads of the dental multilayers under Hertzian contact loading. The predicted loading rate dependence of the critical loads is shown to be consistent with experimental results. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust dental multilayers.

  17. The role of organic proteins on the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-06-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance.

  18. Single crystal growth of large, crack-free CdGeAs 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunemann, P. G.; Pollak, T. M.

    1997-04-01

    Cadmium germanium arsenide, CdGeAs 2, is a ternary chalcopyrite semiconductor known for having one of the highest nonlinear optical coefficients of any inorganic compound (236 pm/V), making it attractive for CO 2-doubling as well as other mid- to far-IR laser frequency conversion applications. Historically, CdGeAs 2 crystal growth efforts have almost exclusively yielded severely-cracked, polycrystalline boules due to the presence of a persistently concave solid-liquid interface as well as a severe anisotropy in its thermal expansion coefficients. Using the horizontal gradient freeze technique, however, we have reproducibly grown crack-free single crystals measuring 19 mm in diameter and up to 100 mm in length. The key elements of this approach are the use of low thermal gradients to minimize cracking, seeded growth to avoid super-cooling and to control the orientation, and the use of a transparent furnace. In addition, feed purification and stoichiometry control have lowered defect-related absorption losses below those of the best samples reported in the literature.

  19. The Role of Organic Proteins on the Crack Growth Resistance of Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. PMID:25805107

  20. Fatigue-crack growth properties of thin-walled superelastic austenitic Nitinol tube for endovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J M; Robertson, S W; Ritchie, R O

    2007-06-01

    Over the past 10 years, the supereleastic nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol has found widespread application in the manufacture of small-scale biomedical devices, such as self-expanding endovascular stents. Although conventional stress/strain-life (S/N) analyses are invariably used as the primary method for design against fatigue loading and for predicting safe lifetimes, fracture mechanics-based methodologies provide a vital means of assessing the quantitative effect of defects on such lifetimes. Unfortunately, fracture mechanics studies on fatigue in Nitinol are scarce, and most results do not pertain to the (thin-walled tube) product forms that are typically used in the manufacture of endovascular stents. In the current work, we document the basic fatigue-crack growth properties of flattened thin-walled ( approximately 400 microm thick) Nitinol tubing in a 37 degrees C air environment. Crack-growth behavior is characterized over a wide range of growth rates ( approximately 6 orders of magnitude) and load ratios, that is, as a function of the alternating and maximum stress intensities, at 50 Hz. Limited experiments at both 5 and 50 Hz were also performed in 37 degrees C air and simulated body fluid to determine whether the cyclic frequency affects the fatigue behavior. Fatigue-crack growth-rate properties in such thin-walled Nitinol tube are found to be quite distinct from limited published data on other (mainly bulk) product forms of Nitinol, for example, bar and strip, both in terms of the relative fatigue thresholds and the variation in steady-state growth rates.

  1. Modeling Nonlinear Change via Latent Change and Latent Acceleration Frameworks: Examining Velocity and Acceleration of Growth Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Mazzocco, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of the latent change and latent acceleration frameworks for modeling nonlinear growth in structural equation models. Moving to these frameworks allows for the direct identification of "rates of change" and "acceleration" in latent growth curves--information available indirectly through traditional growth curve models when change…

  2. Microstructure-based approach for predicting crack initiation and early growth in metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Puskar, Joseph David; Bartel, Timothy James; Dingreville, Remi P. M.; Foulk, James W., III; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2009-09-01

    Fatigue cracking in metals has been and is an area of great importance to the science and technology of structural materials for quite some time. The earliest stages of fatigue crack nucleation and growth are dominated by the microstructure and yet few models are able to predict the fatigue behavior during these stages because of a lack of microstructural physics in the models. This program has developed several new simulation tools to increase the microstructural physics available for fatigue prediction. In addition, this program has extended and developed microscale experimental methods to allow the validation of new microstructural models for deformation in metals. We have applied these developments to fatigue experiments in metals where the microstructure has been intentionally varied.

  3. Modeling of the variability of fatigue crack growth using cohesive zone elements

    PubMed Central

    Beaurepaire, P.; Schuëller, G.I.

    2011-01-01

    By its nature, metal fatigue has random characteristics, leading to extensive scatter in the results. Both initiation and propagation of a fatigue crack can be seen as random processes. This manuscript develops a numerical analysis using cohesive zone elements allowing the use of one single model in the finite element simulation of the complete fatigue life. The present formulation includes a damage evolution mechanism that reflects gradual degradation of the cohesive strength under cyclic loading. The uncertainties inherent to the fatigue process are assumed to be caused by the variability of the material properties, which are modeled using random fields. An extrapolation scheme is proposed to reduce the computational time. First, the accuracy of the proposed formulation is assessed considering a deterministic crack growth problem. Second, the effect of randomness in the material properties on the total fatigue life of a structure is then analyzed. PMID:22049246

  4. Crack initiation and growth characteristics in SiC/SiC under indentation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Hinoki, T.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Noda, T.; Muroga, T.; Yu, J.

    1998-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) is known to be strongly influenced by fiber-matrix interfacial properties and there have been many efforts to clarify the interfacial characteristics. To understand the fracture mechanism of the materials it is necessary to clarify how the cracks initiate and propagate among fibers, interphase (coating) and matrix. The objective of this study is to investigate crack initiation and growth characteristics in SiC/SiC composites with variations in coating thickness and coating methods by means of micro-indentation technique. Micro-indentation tests and hardness tests were carried out on SiC/SiC composites produced by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process. The intrinsic catastrophic mode of failure of the brittle composite was prevented by application of single carbon and multiple coatings on fibers. Thinner coatings are sensitive to make fibers debonded and may improve the toughness of the composites.

  5. The role of microcracking on the crack growth resistance of brittle solids and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1994-10-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was preformed to elucidate the influence of microcracking on the fracture behavior of microcracking brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete nucleating microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results obtained from the finite element analysis are compared with the continuum description of the microcracking. Although continuum description can provide a reasonable estimation of shielding, it fails to resolve the details of micromechanism of toughening resulting from microcracking, since not every shielding event during the course of crack extension corresponds to an increase in the R-curve. Moreover, as seen in the composite cases, the local events leading to toughening behavior may not be associated with the microcracking even in the presence of a large population of microcracks.

  6. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  7. Computer modeling the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of metals in corrosive environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Edward, III; Wilson, Allen W.; Pope, Jonathan M.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a method to digitize FCP (fatigue crack propagation) kinetics data, generally presented in terms of extensive da/dN-Delta K pairs, to produce a file for subsequent linear superposition or curve-fitting analysis. The method that was developed is specific to the Numonics 2400 Digitablet and is comparable to commercially available software products as Digimatic(sup TM 4). Experiments demonstrated that the errors introduced by the photocopying of literature data, and digitization, are small compared to those inherent in laboratory methods to characterize FCP in benign and aggressive environments. The digitizing procedure was employed to obtain fifteen crack growth rate data sets for several aerospace alloys in aggressive environments.

  8. Modeling of crack initiation, intensity, and growth rates from flaws in welded steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaxton, Eric Alan

    2000-10-01

    The intent of this dissertation is to develop a method to model the effects of pitting corrosion or mechanical damage on the strength and fatigue life of a welded structure. The problem was first examined when pitting corrosion was discovered in a 5,200 gallon capacity pressure vessel at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Other similar corrosion and mechanical damage is often encountered in service and a general method to model internal defects and crack-like flaws in welded structures is needed. The severity of the defect was modeled by finite element methods. Defect intensity and crack growth rate are both modeled using the finite element method developed here. Existing published solutions and fracture mechanics testing was performed to verify the modeling method. Welded structures such as pressure vessels have a metallurgical discontinuity between the parent metal and the heat affected zone and also between the heat-affected zone and the weld filler material. An added complexity is the fact that, in general, the mechanical and fracture mechanics properties of these three zones are different. The welded area also will have some level of residual stress resulting from the differential cooling and solidification after welding. The residual stresses created by solidification and cooling will be incorporated into the finite element model. The results will be checked by measuring the actual stresses on the test specimen. The unique contribution of this research is a finite element based tool, which provides a numerically efficient method to evaluate strength, resistance to fracture, and remaining life of a welded structure with surface damage. The new method is based on the theoretical square root displacement field, fitted to the local nodal point displacements, in the vicinity of the crack front. A linear finite element formulation is utilized, along with relatively coarse meshes, to accurately predict stress intensities. This new method is accurate for both two and

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms for Nickel-based Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, Kyle A.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Sears, John S.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 and 0.25 Hz. The crack path was observed to be primarily transgranular for all temperatures, and the observed effect of increasing temperature was to increase the fatigue crack growth rates. The activation energy associated with the increasing crack growth rates over these three temperatures was calculated less than 60 kJ/mol, which is significantly lower than typical creep or oxidation mechanisms; therefore, creep and oxidation cannot explain the increase in fatigue crack growth rates. Transmission electron microscopy was done on selected samples removed from the cyclic plastic zone, and a trend of decreasing dislocation density was observed with increasing temperature. Accordingly, the trend of increasing crack growth rates with increasing temperature was attributed to softening associated with thermally assisted cross slip and dislocation annihilation.

  10. An Experimental Study of Fatigue Crack Growth in Aluminum Sheet Subjected to Combined Bending and Membrane Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of combined bending and membrane cyclic stresses on the fatigue crack growth behavior of aluminum sheet material. The materials used in the tests were 0.040-in.- thick 2024-T3 alclad and 0.090-in.-thick 2024-T3 bare sheet. In the tests, the membrane stresses were applied as a constant amplitude loading at a stress ratio (minimum to maximum stress) of 0.02, and the bending stresses were applied as a constant amplitude deflection in phase with the membrane stresses. Tests were conducted at ratios of bending to membrane stresses (B/M) of 0, 0.75, and 1.50. The general trends of the results were for larger effects of bending for the higher B/M ratios, the lower membrane stresses, and the thicker material. The addition of cyclic bending stresses to a test with cyclic membrane stresses had only a small effect on the growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thin material, but had a significant effect on the crack growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thick material. Adding bending stresses to a test had the most effect on the initiation and early growth of cracks and had less effect on the growth of long through-thickness cracks.

  11. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  12. Effect of additional heat treatment of 2024-T3 on the growth of fatigue crack in air and in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louwaard, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of ductility on the fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloys, fatigue tests were carried out on central notched specimens of 2024-T3 and 2024-T8 sheet material. The 2024-T8 material was obtained by an additional heat treatment applied on 2024-T3 (18 hours at 192 C), which increased the static yield strength from 43.6 to 48.9 kgf/sq mm. A change in the ultimate strength was not observed. Fatigue tests were carried out on both materials in humid air and in high vacuum. According to a new crack propagation model, crack extension is supported to be caused by a slip-related process and debonding triggered by the environment. This model predicts an effect of the ductility on the crack growth rate which should be smaller in vacuum than in humid air; however, this was not confirmed. In humid air the crack-growth rate in 2024-T8 was about 2 times faster than in 2024-T3, while in vacuum the ratio was about 2.5. Crack closure measurements gave no indications that crack closure played a significant role in both materials. Some speculative explanations are briefly discussed.

  13. Application of cyclic J-integral to low cycle fatigue crack growth of Japanese carbon steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, N.; Fujioka, T.; Kashima, K.

    1997-04-01

    Piping for LWR power plants is required to satisfy the LBB concept for postulated (not actual) defects. With this in mind, research has so far been conducted on the fatigue crack growth under cyclic loading, and on the ductile crack growth under excessive loading. It is important, however, for the evaluation of the piping structural integrity under seismic loading condition, to understand the fracture behavior under dynamic and cyclic loading conditions, that accompanies large-scale yielding. CRIEPI together with Hitachi have started a collaborative research program on dynamic and/or cyclic fracture of Japanese carbon steel (STS410) pipes in 1991. Fundamental tensile property tests were conducted to examine the effect of strain rate on tensile properties. Cracked pipe fracture tests under some loading conditions were also performed to investigate the effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on fracture behavior. Based on the analytical considerations for the above tests, the method to evaluate the failure life for a cracked pipe under cyclic loading was developed and verified. Cyclic J-integral was introduced to predict cyclic crack growth up to failure. This report presents the results of tensile property tests, cracked pipe fracture tests, and failure life analysis. The proposed method was applied to the cracked pipe fracture tests. The effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on pipe fracture was also investigated.

  14. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping.

  15. Mixed-mode fatigue-crack growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V at high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-22

    Multiaxial loading conditions exist at fatigue-critical locations within turbine engine components, particularly in association with fretting fatigue in the blade dovetail/disk contact section. For fatigue-crack growth in such situations, the resultant crack-driving force is a combination of the influence of a mode I (tensile opening) stress-intensity range, {Delta}K{sub I}, as well as mode II (in-plane shear) and/or mode III (anti-plane shear) stress-intensity ranges, {Delta}K{sub II} and {Delta}K{sub III}, respectively. For the case of the high-cycle fatigue of turbine-engine alloys, it is critical to quantify such behavior, as the extremely high cyclic loading frequencies ({approximately}1--2 kHz) and correspondingly short times to failure may necessitate a design approached based on the fatigue-crack growth threshold. Moreover, knowledge of such thresholds is required for accurate prediction of fretting fatigue failures. Accordingly, this paper presents the mixed-mode fatigue crack growth thresholds for mode I + II loading (phase angles from 0{degree} to 82{degree}) in a Ti-6Al-4V blade alloy. These results indicate that when fatigue-crack growth in this alloy is characterized in terms of the crack-driving force {Delta}G, which incorporates both the applied tensile and shear loading, the mode 1 fatigue-crack growth threshold is a lower bound (worst case) with respect to mixed-mode (I + II) crack-growth behavior.

  16. Impact of accelerated plant growth on seed variety development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophersen, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The commercial lives of agricultural seed products have steadily declined in recent years. The introduction of genetically engineered crop seeds in 1966 has accentuated that trend. Widespread grower demand for genetically engineered seed requires competitive response by industry followers in order to avert market share losses to the industry leaders. Limitations on plant transformation technology, regulatory requirements and patent impediments require companies to rapidly convert transformed lines into elite commercial products. Massive multigenerational backcrossing efforts are required to distribute genetically engineered traits into a broad product mix. Significant incidents of expression failures, or ``gene silencing,'' have occurred unexpectedly, requiring product substitution strategies. First-to-market strategies, competitive response, broad germplasm conversion and rescue of product failures all share the element of urgency. Technologies which reliably accelerate product development rates can expect favorable reception by commercial seed developers. A growth chamber which dramatically accelerates the rate of plant growth is described.

  17. Acoustic emission studies for characterization of fatigue crack growth behavior in HSLA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Ahmad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are a group of low carbon steels and used in oil and gas pipelines, automotive components, offshore structures and shipbuilding. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) characteristics of a HSLA steel have been studied at two different stress ratios (R = 0.3 and 0.5). Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during the FCG tests have been used to understand the FCG processes. The AE signals were captured by mounting two piezoelectric sensors on compact tension specimens in liner location configuration. The AE generated in stage II of the linear Paris region of FCG has been attributed to the presence of two sub-stages with two different slopes. The AE generated at higher values of stress intensity factor is found to be useful to identify the transition from stage II to stage III of the FCG. AE location analysis has provided support for increased damage at the crack tip for higher stress ratio. The peak stress intensity (Kmax) values at the crack tip have shown good correlation with the transitions from stage IIa to stage IIb and stage II to stage III of the FCG for the two stress ratios.

  18. Adaptation of Crack Growth Detection Techniques to US Material Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Joy L. Rempe; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter

    2014-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some materials testing reactors (MTRs) outside the U.S., such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have deployed a technique to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. This technique incorporates a compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation. A crack in the specimen is monitored using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. A project is underway to develop and demonstrate the performance of a similar type of test rig for use in U.S. MTRs. The first year of this three year project was devoted to designing, analyzing, fabricating, and bench top testing a mechanism capable of applying a controlled stress to specimens while they are irradiated in a pressurized water loop (simulating PWR reactor conditions). During the second year, the mechanism will be tested in autoclaves containing high pressure, high temperature water with representative water chemistries. In addition, necessary documentation and safety reviews for testing in a reactor environment will be completed. In the third year, the assembly will be tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) and Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) will be performed.

  19. The mobility of the amorphous phase in polyethylene as a determining factor for slow crack growth.

    PubMed

    Men, Y F; Rieger, J; Enderle, H-F; Lilge, D

    2004-12-01

    Polyethylene (PE) pipes generally exhibit a limited lifetime, which is considerably shorter than their chemical degradation period. Slow crack growth failure occurs when pipes are used in long-distance water or gas distribution though being exposed to a pressure lower than the corresponding yield stress. This slow crack growth failure is characterized by localized craze growth and craze fibril rupture. In the literature, the lifetime of PE pipes is often considered as being determined by the density of tie chains connecting adjacent crystalline lamellae. But this consideration cannot explain the excellent durability of the recent bimodal grade PE for pipe application. We show in this paper the importance of the craze fibril length as the determining factor for the pipe lifetime. The conclusions are drawn from stress analysis. It is found that longer craze fibrils sustain lower stress and are deformed to a lesser degree. The mobility of the amorphous phase is found to control the amount of material that can be "sucked" in by the craze fibrils and thus the length of the craze fibrils. The mobility of the amorphous phase can be monitored by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Excellent agreement between the mobility thus derived and lifetimes of PE materials as derived from FNCT (full notch creep test) is given, thus providing an effective means to estimate the lifetime of PE pipes by considering well-defined physical properties.

  20. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  1. Subcritical crack growth of Ti-6Al-4V at room temperature under high stress-ratio loading

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.P.

    1998-11-13

    Ti-6Al-4V is a two phase {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloy commonly used for turbine fan and compressor components. The crack growth behavior of Ti-6Al-4V and the role played by various material, mechanical, and environmental factors has been thoroughly investigated. This alloy is also susceptible to crack growth under sustained loading in air (SLC), and both hydrogen assisted cracking and low temperature creep mechanisms have been used to explain this susceptibility. Very little information is available on high R-ratio fatigue crack growth of Ti-6Al-4V and the role played by SLC on the fatigue process. In order to gain better understanding of the cracking behavior of this alloy under ripple loading conditions, room temperature, high stress-ratio (R {ge} 0.9) fatigue and SLC experiments have been conducted on a Ti-6Al-4V plate forging material in the duplex-annealed (DA) condition. The results of this investigation,namely, fatigue crack growth rates (CGR) as a function of stress intensity; SLC data; and scanning electron microscopy of the fatigue and SLC fracture surfaces are reported below.

  2. Environmental crack-growth behavior of high strength pressure vessel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of sustained-load environmental crack growth threshold tests performed on six spacecraft pressure vessel alloys are presented. The alloys were Inconel 718, 6Al-4V titanium, A-286 steel, AM-350 stainless steel, cryoformed AISI 301 stainless steel; and cryoformed AISI 304L steel. The test environments for the program were air, pressurized gases of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, and liquid environments of distilled water, sea water, nitrogen tetroxide, hydrazine, aerozine 50, monomethyl hydrazine, and hydrogen peroxide. Surface flaw type specimens were used with flaws located in both base metal and weld metal.

  3. Fatigue crack growth spectrum simplification: Facilitation of on-board damage prognosis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Matthew Adam

    2009-12-01

    Better lifetime predictions of systems subjected to fatigue loading are needed in support of the optimization of the costs of life-cycle engineering. In particular, the climate is especially encouraging for the development of safer aircraft. One issue is that aircraft experience complex fatigue loading and current methods for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation rely on intensive computational tools that are not currently carried onboard during flight. These tools rely on complex models that are made more difficult by the complicated load spectra themselves. This presents an overhead burden as offline analysis must be performed at an offsite facility. This architecture is thus unable to provide online, timely information for on-board use. The direct objective of this research was to facilitate the real-time fatigue damage assessments of on-board systems with a particular emphasis on aging aircraft. To achieve the objective, the goal of this research was to simplify flight spectra. Variable-amplitude spectra, in which the load changes on a cycle-by-cycle basis, cannot readily be supported by an onboard system because the models required to predict fatigue crack growth during variable-amplitude loading are too complicated. They are too complicated because variable-amplitude fatigue crack growth analysis must be performed on a cycle-by-cycle basis as no closed-form solution exists. This makes these calculations too time-consuming and requires impractical, heavy onboard systems or offsite facilities. The hypothesis is to replace a variable-amplitude spectrum with an equivalent constant-amplitude spectrum. The advantage is a dramatic reduction in the complexity of the problem so that damage predictions can be made onboard by simple, fast calculations in real-time without the need to add additional weight to the aircraft. The intent is to reduce the computational burden and facilitate on-board projection of damage evolution and prediction for the accurate

  4. Characterization of Interlaminar Crack Growth in Composites with the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    A project to examine the double cantilever beam specimen as a quantitative test method to assess the resistance of various composite materials to interlaminar crack growth is discussed. A second objective is to investigate the micromechanics of failure for composites with tough matrix resins from certain generic types of polymeric systems: brittle thermosets, toughened thermosets, and thermoplastics. Emphasis is given to a discussion of preliminary results in two areas: the effects of temperature and loading rate for woven composites, and the effects of matrix toughening in woven and unidirectional composites.

  5. Mechanical properties and fatigue crack growth rate of laser-welded 4130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, L. W.; Li, Y. M.; Chen, C.; Cheng, S. W.

    1992-07-01

    The effect of the type of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical and fatigue properties of AISI 4130 laser-welded steel were investigated using results of tensile, impact, and fatigue-crack-growth tests and SEM observations. The results show that necking of a tensile specimen is concentrated in the overtempered zone, resulting in an overall reduction in elongation of the weld. It was found that a 1-hr PWHT at 525 C or a laser multiple-tempering process can greatly improve the impact toughness of laser-welded steel.

  6. Fatigue crack growth behavior of a single crystal alloy as observed through an in situ fatigue loading stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1988-01-01

    An in situ fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the fatigue crack growth behavior of a PWA 1480 single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The loading stage permits real-time viewing of the fatigue damage processes at high magnification. The PWA 1480 single-crystal, single-edge notch specimens were tested with the load axis parallel to the (100) orientation. Two distinct fatigue failure mechanisms were identified. The crack growth rate differed substantially when the failure occurred on a single slip system in comparison to multislip system failure. Two processes by which crack branching is produced were identified and are discussed. Also discussed are the observed crack closure mechanisms.

  7. Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Crack-propagation tests on a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10, were conducted either in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions or in high-purity water under sinusoidal cyclic loading or sustained loading. Although the crack growth rate in high-purity water was almost identical to that in air, the rate in the NaCl solution was much higher than that in air, even in a very low concentration of NaCl such as 0.01 mass pct. In a 3.5 mass pct NaCl solution, the time-based crack growth rate during cyclic loading, da/ dt, was determined by the maximum stress-intensity factor, K max, but was almost independent of the loading frequency and the stress ratio, and the rate was close to that of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a sustained loading.

  8. Fatique crack growth behavior of a single crystal alloy as observed through an in situ fatigue loading stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1988-01-01

    An in situ fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the fatigue crack growth behavior of a PWA 1480 single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The loading stage permits real-time viewing of the fatigue damage processes at high magnification. The PWA 1480 single-crystal, single-edge notch specimens were tested with the load axis parallel to the (100) orientation. Two distinct fatigue failure mechanisms were identified. The crack growth rate differed substantially when the failure occurred on a single slip system in comparison to multislip system failure. Two processes by which crack branching is produced were identified and are discussed. Also discussed are the observed crack closure mechanisms.

  9. An Application of a New Electromagnetic Sensor to Real-Time Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth in Thin Metal Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; Clendenin, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    A major part of fracture mechanics is concerned with studying the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. This typically requires constant monitoring of crack growth during fatigue cycles which necessitates automation of the whole process. If the rate of crack growth can be determined the experimenter can vary externally controlled parameters such as load level, load cycle frequency and so on. Hence, knowledge of the precise location of the crack tip at any given time is very valuable. One technique currently available for measuring fatigue crack length is the DC potential drop method. The method, however, may be inaccurate if the direction of crack growth deviates considerably from what was assumed initially or the curvature of the crack becomes significant. Another approach is to digitize an optical image of the test specimen surface and then apply a pattern recognition technique to locate the crack tip, but this method is still under development. The present work is an initial study on applying eddy current-type probes to monitoring fatigue crack growth. The performance of two types of electromagnetic probes, a conventional eddy current probe and a newly developed self-nulling probe, was evaluated for the detection characteristics at and near the tips of fatigue cracks. The scan results show that the latter probe provides a very well defined local maximum in its output in the crack tip region suggesting the definite possibility of precisely locating the tip, while the former provides a somewhat ambiguous distribution of the sensor output in the same region. The paper is organized as follows: We start by reviewing the design and performance characteristics of the self-nulling probe and then describe the scan results which demonstrate the basic properties of the self-nulling probe. Next, we provide a brief description of the software developed for tracing a simulated crack and give a brief discussion of the main results of the test. The final section

  10. Crack size effects on the chemical driving force for aqueous corrosion fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, R. P.

    1985-05-01

    Small crack size accelerates corrosion fatigue propagation through high strength 4130 steel in aqueous 3 pct NaCl. The size effect is attributed to crack geometry dependent mass transport and electrochemical reaction processes which govern embrittlement. For vacuum or moist air, growth rates are defined by stress intensity range independent of crack size (0.1 to 40 mm) and applied maximum stress (0.10 to 0.95 Φys). In contrast small (0.1 to 2 mm) surface elliptical and edge cracks in saltwater grow up to 500 times faster than long (15 to 40 mm) cracks at constant δK. Small cracks grow along prior austenite grain boundaries, while long cracks propagate by a brittle transgranular mode associated with tempered martensite. The small crack acceleration is maximum at low δK levels and decreases with increasing crack length at constant stress, or with increasing stress at constant small crack size. Reductions in corrosion fatigue growth rate correlate with increased brittle transgranular cracking. Crack mouth opening, proportional to the crack solution volume to surface area ratio, determines the environmental enhancement of growth rate and the proportions of inter- and transgranular cracking. Small cracks grow at rapid rates because of enhanced hydrogen production, traceable to increased hydrolytic acidification and reduced oxygen inhibition within the occluded cell.

  11. Use of dynamic speckle interferometry for contactless diagnostics of fatigue crack initiation and determining its growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Kamantsev, I. S.; Veselova, V. E.; Gorkunov, E. S.; Gladkovskii, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    Steel 09G2S specimens are subjected to cyclic tests, and real-time monitoring of the initiation of a fatigue crack and its growth kinetics is performed by dynamic speckle interferometry. The time averaging of speckles are used to reveal a relation between the parameters that characterize random and deterministic changes in the relief height and speckle images of the surface near the notch during crack initiation.

  12. Prediction and Verification of Ductile Crack Growth from Simulated Defects in Strength Overmatched Butt Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Owen S.

    1997-01-01

    Defects that develop in welds during the fabrication process are frequently manifested as embedded flaws from lack of fusion or lack of penetration. Fracture analyses of welded structures must be able to assess the effect of such defects on the structural integrity of weldments; however, the transferability of R-curves measured in laboratory specimens to defective structural welds has not been fully examined. In the current study, the fracture behavior of an overmatched butt weld containing a simulated buried, lack-of-penetration defect is studied. A specimen designed to simulate pressure vessel butt welds is considered; namely, a center crack panel specimen, of 1.25 inch by 1.25 inch cross section, loaded in tension. The stress-relieved double-V weld has a yield strength 50% higher than that of the plate material, and displays upper shelf fracture behavior at room temperature. Specimens are precracked, loaded monotonically while load-CMOD measurements are made, then stopped and heat tinted to mark the extent of ductile crack growth. These measurements are compared to predictions made using finite element analysis of the specimens using the fracture mechanics code Warp3D, which models void growth using the Gurson-Tvergaard dilitant plasticity formulation within fixed sized computational cells ahead of the crack front. Calibrating data for the finite element analyses, namely cell size and initial material porosities are obtained by matching computational predictions to experimental results from tests of welded compact tension specimens. The R-curves measured in compact tension specimens are compared to those obtained from multi-specimen weld tests, and conclusions as to the transferability of R-curves is discussed.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  14. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  15. Crack-growth properties of various elastomers with potential application in small joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, D T; Savory, K M; Bachus, K N

    1997-10-01

    Silastic small joint spacers for the metacarpophalangeal joint fail catastrophically at a reported rate ranging from 2 to 26%. Although the exact cause of this problem is not known, it is speculated that failure is due to the propagation of flaws generated in the material surface. In addition to wear secondary to bony impingement, these flaws can be introduced through manufacturing, surgical handling, and in vivo frictional wear. In an effort to identify an elastomeric material that will function similarly to Silastic as a self-hinging joint spacer but provide an increased functional life, we have investigated and compared the crack-growth properties of two polyurethanes, ChronoFlex and Medicaflex, and a thermoplastic elastomer, Santoprene, with those of Silastic. The materials were evaluated after sterilization by either ethylene oxide or gamma irradiation in an ASTM standard flexing machine under conditions of high humidity and body temperature both before and after artificially aging. In each case, the materials investigated presented significantly lower crack-growth rates than Silastic (p < 0.001).

  16. Crack-growth properties of various elastomers with potential application in small joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, D T; Savory, K M; Bachus, K N

    1997-10-01

    Silastic small joint spacers for the metacarpophalangeal joint fail catastrophically at a reported rate ranging from 2 to 26%. Although the exact cause of this problem is not known, it is speculated that failure is due to the propagation of flaws generated in the material surface. In addition to wear secondary to bony impingement, these flaws can be introduced through manufacturing, surgical handling, and in vivo frictional wear. In an effort to identify an elastomeric material that will function similarly to Silastic as a self-hinging joint spacer but provide an increased functional life, we have investigated and compared the crack-growth properties of two polyurethanes, ChronoFlex and Medicaflex, and a thermoplastic elastomer, Santoprene, with those of Silastic. The materials were evaluated after sterilization by either ethylene oxide or gamma irradiation in an ASTM standard flexing machine under conditions of high humidity and body temperature both before and after artificially aging. In each case, the materials investigated presented significantly lower crack-growth rates than Silastic (p < 0.001). PMID:9335353

  17. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth of oxide dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Gieseke, B.G.

    1996-04-01

    The fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of copper dispersion strengthened with aluminum oxide (0.15 wt % Al) was examined. In the unirradiated condition, the fracture toughness was about 45 kJ/m{sup 2} (73 MPa{radical}m) at room temperature, but decreased significantly to only 3 Kj/m{sup 2} (20 MPa{radical}m), at 250{degrees}C. After irradiation at approximately 250{degrees}C to about 2.5 displacements per atom (dpa), the toughness was very low, about 1 kJ/m{sup 2} (48 MOa{radical}m), and at 250{degrees}C the toughness was very low, about 1kJ/m{sup 2} (12 mPa{radical}m). The fatigue crack growth rate of unirradiated material at room temperature is similiar to other candidate structural alloys such as V-4Cr-4Ti and 316L stainless steel. The fracture properties of this material at higher temperatures and in controlled environments need further investigation, in both irradiated and unirradiated conditions.

  18. Fatigue crack growth properties of a cryogenic structural steel at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Konosu, Shinji; Kishiro, Tomohiro; Ivano, O.; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The structural materials of the coils of superconducting magnets utilized in thermonuclear fusion reactors are used at liquid helium (4.2 K) temperatures and are subjected to repeated thermal stresses and electromagnetic forces. A high strength, high toughness austenitic stainless steel (12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N) has recently been developed for large, thick-walled components used in such environments. This material is non-magnetic even when subjected to processing and, because it is a forging material, it is advantageous as a structural material for large components. In the current research, a large forging of 12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N austenitic stainless steel, was fabricated to a thickness of 250 mm, which is typical of section thicknesses encountered in actual equipment. The tensile fatigue crack growth properties of the forging were examined at liquid helium temperature as a function of specimen location across the thickness of the forging. There was virtually no evidence of variation in tensile strength or fatigue crack growth properties attributable to different sampling locations in the thickness direction and no effect of thickness due to the forging or solution treatment associated with large forgings was observed.

  19. Fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layered structures using guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostson, E.; Fromme, P.

    2009-11-01

    This contribution investigates the application of low frequency guided ultrasonic waves for monitoring fatigue crack growth at fastener holes in the 2nd layer of multi-layered plate structures, a common problem in aerospace industry. The model multi-layered structure investigated consists of two aluminum plate-strips adhesively bonded using a structural paste adhesive. Guided ultrasonic waves were excited using multiple piezoelectric discs bonded to the surface of the multi-layered structure. The wave propagation in the tensile specimen was measured using a laser interferometer and compared to numerical simulations. Thickness and width mode shapes of the excited flexural waves were identified from Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) calculations. Experiments and 3D Finite Element (FE) simulations show a change in the scattered field around fastener holes caused by a defect in the 2nd layer. The amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave was monitored during fatigue experiments at a single point. The measured changes in the amplitude of the ultrasonic signal due to fatigue crack growth agree well with FE simulations.

  20. Development and practical application of accelerated solvent extraction for the isolation of cocaine/crack biomarkers in meconium samples.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Cínthia de Carvalho; Lima, Marcela Bittar; Oliveira, Carolina Dizioli Rodrigues de; Menck, Rafael de Almeida; Diniz, Edna Maria de Albuquerque; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2014-04-15

    A method using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the isolation of cocaine/crack biomarkers in meconium samples, followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) and the simultaneous quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and validated. Initially, meconium samples were submitted to an ASE procedure, which was followed by SPE with Bond Elut Certify I cartridges. The analytes were derivatizated with PFP/PFPA and analyzed by GC-MS. The limits of detection (LOD) were between 11 and 17ng/g for all analytes. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were 30ng/g for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, and 20ng/g for cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester and cocaethylene. Linearity ranged from the LOQ to 1500ng/g for all analytes, with a coefficients of determination greater than 0.991, except for m-hydroxybenzoylecgonine, which was only qualitatively detected. Precision and accuracy were evaluated at three concentration levels. For all analytes, inter-assay precision ranged from 3.2 to 18.1%, and intra-assay precision did not exceed 12.7%. The accuracy results were between 84.5 and 114.2% and the average recovery ranged from 17 to 84%. The method was applied to 342 meconium samples randomly collected in the University Hospital-University of São Paulo (HU-USP), Brazil. Cocaine biomarkers were detected in 19 samples, which represent 5.6% of exposure prevalence. Significantly lower birth weight, length and head circumference were found for the exposed newborns compared with the non-exposed group. This is the first report in which ASE was used as a sample preparation technique to extract cocaine biomarkers from a complex biological matrix such as meconium samples. The advantages of the developed method are the smaller demand for organic solvents and the minor sample handling, which allows a faster and accurate procedure, appropriate to confirm fetal exposure to cocaine/crack. PMID:24657406

  1. An investigation of crack growth at interfaces in bimaterials and composites using a consistent shear-lag model

    SciTech Connect

    Popejoy, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of a crack impinging upon an interface between dissimilar materials is studied using a Consistent Shear-Lag (COSL) model. The goal is to determine whether the crack will penetrate the interface or be deflected into it. Since the stress and displacement fields in the vicinity of the interface usually create computational difficulties, especially when the elastic moduli vary greatly, the COSL model is modified to include an interlayer region at the interface to act as a buffer. The energy release rates for both doubly-deflected and penetrating cracks are determined. The effect of elastic mismatch on the energy release rates, and hence on the mode of crack extension, is investigated. These results compare favorably with analytical solutions for similar bimaterial problems. When applied to composite materials, this model shows that the fiber volume fraction has little effect on the ratio of energy release rates. To account for the possibility of flaws and imperfections within composites, the previous formulation is modified to include a crack impinging upon an initially debonded zone. Proximity of the crack tip to the debond is very important in predicting the mode of crack growth.

  2. The Effects of Test Temperature, Temper, and Alloyed Copper on the Hydrogen-Controlled Crack Growth Rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young, Jr.; J.R. Scully

    2000-09-17

    The hydrogen embrittlement controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt.% Zn, 2.14 wt% Mg, 2.19 wt.% Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged, peak aged, and overaged conditions were tested in 90% relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 and 90 C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from underaged to overaged) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal copper and low copper alloys, the fracture path was predominantly intergranular at all test temperatures (25-90 C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II crack growth rates for normal (2.19 wt.%) and low (0.06 wt.%) copper alloys in the peak aged and overaged tempers showed the beneficial effect of copper additions on stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt.% copper alloy, the significant decrease ({approx} 10 times at 25 C) in stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. IN the 0.06 wt.% copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor, {nu}{sub 0}, resulting in a modest ({approx} 2.5 times at 25 C) decrease in crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II crack growth rate. Overaged, copper bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen environment assisted cracking but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

  3. In Search of a Time Efficient Approach to Crack and Delamination Growth Predictions in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Carvalho, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Analysis benchmarking was used to assess the accuracy and time efficiency of algorithms suitable for automated delamination growth analysis. First, the Floating Node Method (FNM) was introduced and its combination with a simple exponential growth law (Paris Law) and Virtual Crack Closure technique (VCCT) was discussed. Implementation of the method into a user element (UEL) in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) was also presented. For the assessment of growth prediction capabilities, an existing benchmark case based on the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen was briefly summarized. Additionally, the development of new benchmark cases based on the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen to assess the growth prediction capabilities under mixed-mode I/II conditions was discussed in detail. A comparison was presented, in which the benchmark cases were used to assess the existing low-cycle fatigue analysis tool in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) in comparison to the FNM-VCCT fatigue growth analysis implementation. The low-cycle fatigue analysis tool in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) was able to yield results that were in good agreement with the DCB benchmark example. Results for the MMB benchmark cases, however, only captured the trend correctly. The user element (FNM-VCCT) always yielded results that were in excellent agreement with all benchmark cases, at a fraction of the analysis time. The ability to assess the implementation of two methods in one finite element code illustrated the value of establishing benchmark solutions.

  4. Fatigue crack growth behavior of an 8090 Al-Li alloy under mixed mode 1--mode 3 loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.V.; Prasad, N.E.

    1993-11-15

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have evoked considerable interest in recent years because of their high specific strengths and stiffness. An additional advantage of these alloys is their superior fatigue crack growth resistance as compared to the conventional aluminium alloys. However, most of the fatigue crack growth investigations have dealt with crack propagation behavior under mode 1 and loading. A recent study on monotonic fracture behavior of 8090 Al-Li alloys has shown that these alloys possess lower fracture toughness under mode 3 loading as compared to mode 1 loading. The fracture resistance under mixed mode 1 - mode 3 loading was also found to be lower than that under pure mode 1 loading. However, no experimental data is available on the mixed mode 1--mode 3 fatigue crack growth behavior in Al-Li alloys. The objective of the present paper is to study the effect of combined mode 1--mode 3 loading on the fatigue crack growth behavior of an 8090 Al-Li alloy.

  5. Effect of Test Frequency on Fatigue Crack Growth Rates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI Alloy at Cryogenic Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-31

    In order to clarify the effect of test frequency on the fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy have been investigated at cryogenic temperature. The fatigue crack growth tests were conducted using the test frequencies of 5 and 20 Hz, respectively. At 4 K, the effects of the test frequencies on the fatigue crack growth rates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy were not clear or significant. The fatigue crack growth rates in the low propagation rate region at 4 K were smaller than those at 293 K. On the other hand, those in the high propagation rate region at 4 K were bigger than those at 293 K. The former is considered that the crack closure level was higher as compared to that at 293 K and the latter is due to the difference values of the fracture toughness at 4 and 293 K, respectively. The fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) specimens in the high propagation rate regions at each test temperature revealed the striations, and furthermore accompanied with the flute fracture surface at 4 K. On the other hand, those of CT specimens in the low propagation rate region at 4 K were found facet-like fracture surfaces corresponding with almost the {alpha}-grain size.

  6. Dependence of crack growth kinetics on dendrite orientation and water chemistry for Alloy 182 weld metal in high-temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Meng, Fanjiang

    2015-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking growth rates of Alloy 182 weld metals in T-S and T-L orientations in 288 °C pure water with various dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations were measured. Extensive inter-dendritic stress corrosion cracking paths on the side surfaces and fracture surfaces were observed. The crack growth path in the T-S orientation specimen was perpendicular to the applied loading direction, and parallel to the loading direction in the T-L specimen. Crack growth rates of the T-S specimen were significantly higher than those of the T-L specimen under the same test conditions. The crack growth rate decreased significantly with decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration. Adding dissolved hydrogen in water caused an apparent decrease of the alternating current potential drop signal during crack growth monitoring.

  7. Elevated-temperature crack-growth studies of advanced titanium aluminides. Final report, September 1986-April 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, S.

    1987-09-01

    Ordered intermetallic titanium aluminide Ti Al alloyed with niobium possesses attractive high-temperature properties and moderate low temperature ductibility. Currently, its application is limited to static components in aircraft gas turbine engines. To extend their use to rotating components of turbine engines, better understanding of life limiting processes such as creep/fatigue crack growth and fracture is required. Phase I of this Air Force Small Business Innovative Research program involved investigation of fatigue crack growth in an alpha two titanium aluminide plus niobium alloy (titanium - 16 wt% aluminum - 10 wt% niobium) as a function of temperature and environment. Computer-automated fatigue-crack-growth tests were conducted in both air and vacuum environments at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1200 F (649 C). Two heat treatment conditions, namely, beta solution and alpha + beta solution resulted in coarse- and fine-grain materials, respectively, with varying alpha two morphology. Fractographic analyses were conducted for all test specimens.

  8. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  9. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth arid/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a Function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test material&

  10. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  11. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case 1 loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case 1 loading history, and alumina for the Case 3 loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test materials.

  12. Subcritical Crack Growth in CVI SiCf/SiC Composites at Elevated Temperatures: Effect of Fiber Creep Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.

    2001-10-26

    We extended subcritical crack-growth studies in SiCf/SiC composites to include composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers and a broader test temperature range. These studies were in addition to more systematic tests on materials reinforced with Nicalon-CG fibers. We tested 0/90 woven composites with a carbon interphase in argon at 1373K and 1473K and compared the results with previous tests in argon from 1173K to 1373K. The results in inert environments are copnsistent with a proposed fiber-creep-controlled crack-growth mechanism. Measured nonlinear creep equations for both fiber types. Estimates of local strains during crack growth are in reasonable agreement with estimated fiber creep strains for the given times and temperatures.

  13. A two-scale time-dependent damage model based on non-planar growth of micro-cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Dascalu, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the theoretical developments and the numerical applications of a time-dependent damage law. This law is deduced from considerations at the micro-scale where non-planar growth of micro-cracks, following a subcritical propagation criterion, is assumed. The orientation of the crack growth is governed by the maximum energy release rate at the crack tips and the introduction of an equivalent straight crack. The passage from micro-scale to macro-scale is done through an asymptotic homogenization approach. The model is built in two steps. First, the effective coefficients are calculated at the micro-scale in finite periodical cells, with respect to the micro-cracks length and their orientation. Then, a subcritical damage law is developed in order to establish the evolution of damage. This damage law is obtained as a differential equation depending on the microscopic stress intensity factors, which are a priori calculated for different crack lengths and orientations. The developed model enables to reproduce not only the classical short-term stress-strain response of materials (in tension and compression) but also the long-term behavior encountering relaxation and creep effects. Numerical simulations show the ability of the developed model to reproduce this time-dependent damage response of materials.

  14. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Brittle Materials with Finite Thickness Subjected to Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chio, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of slow crack growth (SCG) was performed for brittle materials with finite thickness subjected to constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") loading in flexure. The numerical solution showed that the conventional, simple, one-dimensional analytical solution can be used with a maximum error of about 5% in determining the SCG parameters of a brittle material with the conditions of a normalized thickness (a ratio of specimen thickness to initial crack size) T > 3.3 and of a SCG parameter n > 10. The change in crack shape from semicircular to elliptical configurations was significant particularly at both low stress rate and low T, attributed to predominant difference in stress intensity factor along the crack front. The numerical solution of SCG parameters was supported within the experimental range by the data obtained from constant stress-rate flexural testing for soda-lime glass microslides at ambient temperature.

  15. Effects of subcritical crack growth on fracture toughness of ceramics assessed in chevron-notched three-point bend tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, L. Y.; Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical computational study was carried out to assess the effects of subcritical crack growth on crack stability in the chevron-notched three-point bend specimens. A power-law relationship between the subcritical crack velocity and the applied stress intensity were used along with compliance and stress-intensity relationships for the chevron-notched bend specimen to calculate the load response under fixed deflection rate and a machine compliance. The results indicate that the maximum load during the test occurs at the same crack length for all the deflection rates; the maximum load, however, is dependent on the deflection rate for rates below the critical rate. The resulting dependence of the apparent fracture toughness on the deflection rate is compared to experimental results on soda-lime glass and polycrystalline alumina.

  16. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  17. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-05

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-K{sub I}) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness H{sub V} for a wide range of N and H{sub V} values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.

  18. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  19. Separating the Influence of Environment from Stress Relaxation Effects on Dwell Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental embrittlement and crack tip visco-plastic stress relaxation play a significant role in determining the dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) resistance of nickel-based disk superalloys. In the current study performed on the Low Solvus High Refractory (LSHR) disk alloy, the influence of these two mechanisms were separated so that the effects of each could be quantified and modeled. Seven different microstructural variations of LSHR were produced by controlling the cooling rate and the subsequent aging and thermal exposure heat treatments. Through cyclic fatigue crack growth testing performed both in air and vacuum, it was established that four out of the seven LSHR heat treatments evaluated, possessed similar intrinsic environmental resistance to cyclic crack growth. For these four heat treatments, it was further shown that the large differences in dwell crack growth behavior which still persisted, were related to their measured stress relaxation behavior. The apparent differences in their dwell crack growth resistance were attributed to the inability of the standard linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) stress intensity parameter to account for visco-plastic behavior. Crack tip stress relaxation controls the magnitude of the remaining local tensile stresses which are directly related to the measured dwell crack growth rates. It was hypothesized that the environmentally weakened grain boundary crack tip regions fail during the dwells when their strength is exceeded by the remaining local crack tip tensile stresses. It was shown that the classical creep crack growth mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding did not contribute to crack growth, but the local visco-plastic behavior still plays a very significant role by determining the crack tip tensile stress field which controls the dwell crack growth behavior. To account for the influence of the visco-plastic behavior on the crack tip stress field, an empirical modification to the LEFM stress

  20. Sustained load crack growth design data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Kenny, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to provide sustained load crack growth (SLCG) data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing MIL-P-26536 hydrazine and refined hydrazine. Fracture mechanics data on crack growth threshold for heat-treated forgings, aged and unaged welds, and aged and unaged heat-affected zones (HAZ) are presented. All tests were made on uniaxially loaded fracture mechanics specimens involving part-through cracks, and an electrical discharge machined notch was used to start the crack. Fracture mechanics design curves of crack growth threshold stress intensity versus temperature are obtained for the temperature range 40-71 C. Major conclusions are that extreme susceptibility to SLCG in hydrazine is a universal property of unaged weld metal in Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy of normal interstitial content, and that aging both weld metal and HAZ at 510 C for 4 hr after welding completely removes all susceptibility to SLCG induced by hydrazine, with less susceptibility to SLCG in refined hydrazine.

  1. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has recently developed a new standard for creep-fatigue crack growth testing, E 2760-10, that supports testing compact specimens, C(T), under load controlled conditions. C(T) specimens are commonly used for fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth testing under constant-load-amplitude conditions. The use of these specimens is limited to positive load ratios. They are also limited in the amount of crack growth data that can be developed at high stress intensity values due to accumulation of plastic and/or creep strains leading to ratcheting in the specimen. Testing under displacement control can potentially address these shortcomings of the load-controlled tests for which the C(T) geometry is unsuitable. A double edge notch tension-compression, DEN(T-C), specimen to perform displacement controlled creep-fatigue crack growth testing is developed and optimized with the help of finite element and boundary element analyses. Accurate expressions for estimating the fracture mechanics crack tip parameters such as the stress intensity parameter, K, the crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD), and the load-line displacement (LLD) are developed over a wide range of crack sizes for the DEN(T-C) specimen. A new compliance relationship for use in experimental testing has been developed by using the compliance form available in ASTM E-647 standard. Experimentally determined compliance value compared well with the new relation for C15 steel (AISI 1015) and P91 steel tested at room and elevated temperature conditions respectively. Fatigue crack growth rate data generated using the DEN(T-C) specimens on the two metallic materials are in good agreement with the data generated using standard compact specimens; thus validating the stress-intensity factor and the compliance equation for the double edge notch tension-compression specimen. The testing has shown that the DEN(T-C) specimen is prone to crack asymmetry issues. Through

  2. Residual stress effect on fatigue crack growth in thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Kiciak, A.; Glinka, G.; Burns, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Recently derived weight functions for a single, semi-elliptical, longitudinal crack in a thick wall cylinder with the diameter ratio D{sub 0}/D{sub i} = 2, have been used to analyze fatigue crack propagation in autofrettaged and non-autofrettaged, pressurized cylinders. Two levels of autofrettage, 30 and 60%, have been considered. The influences of the level of autofrettage, surface crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack propagation relation have been investigated. The development of cracks has been compared to the experimental results. The results of analyses confirm beneficial influence of autofrettage. It has been shown that the discrepancies between the observed and calculated crack developments cannot be ascribed to the influence of surface crack closure. The comparison of the experiments and predictions unveils the need for an additional series of experiments.

  3. Subcritical crack growth and other time- and environment-dependent behavior in crustal rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Stable crack growth strongly influences both the fracture strength of brittle rocks and some of the phenomena precursory to catastrophic failure. Quantification of the time and environment dependence of fracture propagation is attempted with the use of a fracture mechanics technique. Some of the difficulties encountered when applying techniques originally developed for simple synthetic materials to complex materials like rocks are examined. A picture of subcritical fracture propagation is developed that embraces the essential ingredients of the microstructure, a microcrack process zone, and the different roles that the environment plays. To do this, the results of (1) fracture mechanics experiments on five rock types, (2) optical and scanning electron microscopy, (3) studies of microstructural aspects of fracture in ceramics, and (4) exploratory tests examining the time-dependent response of rock to the application of water are examined.

  4. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Growth and Fracture Properties of Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Kimmel, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The criteria used to prevent failure of wind-tunnel models and support hardware were revised as part of a project to enhance the capabilities of cryogenic wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center. Specifically, damage-tolerance fatigue life prediction methods are now required for critical components, and material selection criteria are more general and based on laboratory test data. The suitability of two candidate model alloys (AerMet 100 and C-250 steel) was investigated by obtaining the fatigue crack growth and fracture data required for a damage-tolerance fatigue life analysis. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the newly implemented damage tolerance analyses required of wind-tunnel model system components.

  5. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  6. A Size Effect on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Threshold of Alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garr, K. R.; Hresko, G. C., III

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) tests were conducted on Alloy 718 in the solution annealed and aged condition at room temperature. In each test, the FCGR threshold was measured using the decreasing (Delta)K method. Initial testing was at two facilities, one of which used C(T) specimens with W = 127 mm. Previous data at the other facility had been obtained with specimens with W = 50.8 mm. A comparison of test results at R = 0.1 showed that the threshold for the 127 mm specimen was considerably higher than that of the 50.8 mm specimen. A check showed that this difference was not due to a heat-to-heat or lab-to-lab variation. Additional tests were conducted on specimens with W = 25.4 mm and at other R values. Data for the various specimens is presented along with parameters usually used to describe threshold behavior.

  7. Slow Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Prediction of Ceramic Components Subjected to Variable Load History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama

    2001-01-01

    Present capabilities of the NASA CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code include probabilistic life prediction of ceramic components subjected to fast fracture, slow crack growth (stress corrosion), and cyclic fatigue failure modes. Currently, this code has the capability to compute the time-dependent reliability of ceramic structures subjected to simple time-dependent loading. For example, in slow crack growth (SCG) type failure conditions CARES/Life can handle the cases of sustained and linearly increasing time-dependent loads, while for cyclic fatigue applications various types of repetitive constant amplitude loads can be accounted for. In real applications applied loads are rarely that simple, but rather vary with time in more complex ways such as, for example, engine start up, shut down, and dynamic and vibrational loads. In addition, when a given component is subjected to transient environmental and or thermal conditions, the material properties also vary with time. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a methodology capable of predicting the time-dependent reliability of components subjected to transient thermomechanical loads that takes into account the change in material response with time. In this paper, the dominant delayed failure mechanism is assumed to be SCG. This capability has been added to the NASA CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code, which has also been modified to have the ability of interfacing with commercially available FEA codes executed for transient load histories. An example involving a ceramic exhaust valve subjected to combustion cycle loads is presented to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and the CARES/Life program.

  8. Effect of postweld treatment on the fatigue crack growth rate of electron-beam-welded AISI 4130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Chun; Chang, Yih

    1996-10-01

    This article studies the effect of in-chamber electron beam and ex-chamber furnace postweld treatments on the fatigue crack growth rate of electron-beam-welded AISI 4130 steel. Mechanical properties of the weldment are evaluated by tensile testing, while the fatigue properties are investigated by a fatigue crack propagation method. Microstructural examination shows that both postweld treatments temper the weldment by the appropriate control of beam pattern width, input beam energy, and furnace temperature. In addition, the ductility, strength, and microhardness of the weldment also reflect this tempering effect. The fatigue crack growth rate is decreased after both postweld treatments. This is mainly caused by the existence of a toughened microstructure and relief of the residual stress due to the fact that (1) the residual stress becomes more compressive as more beam energy is delivered into the samples and (2) postweld furnace tempering effectively releases the tensile stress into a compressive stress state.

  9. A review of crack propagation under unsteady loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, H. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1992-01-01

    The theories and research current available on crack propagation under unsteady loadings, especially those of acoustic origin, are reviewed. Since the original theories on fatigue failure did not account for random loading conditions, modified theories which provide statistical methods for evaluating the random loading have emerged. The impact of acoustic fatigue in the aerospace industry, basic principles such as fatigue crack initiation and propagation and load interactions, and testing procedures are discussed. Attention is also given to metal and metal alloy structures, fiber-reinforced composites and nonmetallic structures, short crack growth, and the effects of temperature, moisture, and corrosion on structures. Suggestions for future research in this field are presented, namely, studies on the effect of 'snap-through' response and associated crack growth patterns, studies in microcrack and 'small crack'; propagation under unsteady loading conditions, and the development of an accurate analytical model to predict acceleration and retardation effects in fatigue crack growth under random loading conditions.

  10. Application of an interface failure model to predict fatigue crack growth in an implanted metallic femoral stem.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Browne, M; Taylor, M; Gregson, P J

    2004-03-01

    A novel computational modelling technique has been developed for the prediction of crack growth in load bearing orthopaedic alloys subjected to fatigue loading. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has been used to define a three-dimensional fracture model, which explicitly models the opening, sliding and tearing process. This model consists of 3D nonlinear spring elements implemented in conjunction with a brittle material failure function, which is defined by the fracture energy for each nonlinear spring element. Thus, the fracture energy criterion is implicit in the brittle material failure function to search for crack initiation and crack development automatically. A degradation function is employed to reduce interfacial fracture properties corresponding to the number of cycles; thus fatigue lifetime can be predicted. Unlike other failure modelling methods, this model predicts the failure load, crack path and residual stiffness directly without assuming any pre-flaw condition. As an example, fatigue of a cobalt based alloy (CoCrMo) femoral stem is simulated. Experimental fatigue data was obtained from four point bending tests. The finite element model simulated a fully embedded implant with a constant point load. Comparison between the model and mechanical test results showed good agreement in fatigue crack growth rate.

  11. On the relative role of processes whose sequence results in crack growth in the cladding of LMFBR fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, E. Ya.

    1991-08-01

    Processes are discussed the joint effect of which results in crack development in austenitic steel-clad oxide fuel pins. Such processes include generation of Te which is considered as the main embrittling agent, its transport and accumulation at the cladding inner surface, where together with Cs it forms a liquid surface-acting medium, and finally, development of intergranular cracks in the cladding caused by the contact with this medium. As the process of crack growth in itself proceeds faster than accumulation of liquid surfactants at the cladding, the cracks will be able to reach the critical length only after the necessary amount of Te has been accumulated. Its accumulation is determined and therefore, controlled by the process of Te transport in the fuel grains. It is shown that the main contribution to the accumulation of Te at the cladding surface is provided by the hottest internal zones of the fuel pellet. On the basis of the analysis given, means are discussed, for inhibiting or blocking the crack growth.

  12. Fatigue and fatigue crack growth processes in hard tissues: The importance of age and surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Hessam

    With the progressive increase in partially and fully dentate seniors, fracture has become an increasingly common form of restored tooth failure. Dentin undergoes progressive changes in microstructure with patient age, and studies are now suggesting that there is a reduction in fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of this tissue. This dissertation explores aging of dentin, the influence of flaws that are introduced during restorative processes on the fatigue properties of dentin, and proposes models for characterizing the damage initiation and growth process during fatigue of dentin. Results from this investigation show that the fatigue crack growth properties (Paris Law parameters (C, m) andDeltaKth) of human dentin undergo the most significant changes at a patient age of 42 years. Based on the fatigue crack growth responses, three age groups were established including young (age≤33), aged (34≤age ≤49) and old (50≤age) patients for further analysis. There were significant differences in the initiation and growth behavior between the tissues of patients from the three age groups. With regards to the influence of restorative processes, there was no influence on the quasi-static responses of dentin. However, the endurance limit of dentin treated with the dental burs (28 MPa) and abrasive air jet (35 MPa) were approximately 36% and 20% lower than that of the control (44 MPa), respectively. Both cutting processes caused a significant reduction (p≤0.0001) in fatigue strength. An accumulative damage model was developed to characterize fatigue of the control and bur treated dentin as well as provide a model for fatigue life prediction. The damage models were derived as a function of number of loading cycles (N), and ratio of applied stress to ultimate strength (r). The developed models provide estimations for the initial state of damage, the state of damage during the life, as well as the damage accumulation rate for cyclic loading of dentin

  13. Slow Crack Growth and Fracture Toughness of Sapphire for the International Space Station Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    The fracture toughness, inert flexural strength, and slow crack growth parameters of the r- and a-planes of sapphire grown by the Heat Exchange Method were measured to qualify sapphire for structural use in the International Space Station. The fracture toughness in dry nitrogen, K(sub Ipb), was 2.31 +/- 0.12 MPa(square root of)m and 2.47 +/- 0.15 MPa(squre root of)m for the a- and r-planes, respectively. Fracture toughness measured in water via the operational procedure in ASTM C1421 was significantly lower, K(sub Ivb) = 1.95+/- 0.03 MPa(square root of)m, 1.94 +/- 0.07 and 1.77 +/- 0.13 MPa(square root of)m for the a- , m- and r-planes, respectively. The mean inert flexural strength in dry nitrogen was 1085 +/- 127 MPa for the r-plane and 1255 +/- 547 MPa for the a-plane. The power law slow crack growth exponent for testing in water was n = 21 +/- 4 for the r-plane and n (greater than or equal to) 31 for the a-plane. The power law slow crack growth coefficient was A = 2.81 x 10(exp -14) m/s x (MPa(squre root of)m)/n for the r-plane and A (approx. equals)2.06 x 10(exp -15) m/s x (MPa(square root of)m)/n for the a-plane. The r- and a-planes of sapphire are relatively susceptible to stress corrosion induced slow crack growth in water. However, failure occurs by competing modes of slow crack growth at long failure times and twinning for short failure time and inert environments. Slow crack growth testing needs to be performed at low failure stress levels and long failure times so that twinning does not affect the results. Some difficulty was encountered in measuring the slow crack growth parameters for the a-plane due to a short finish (i.e., insufficient material removal for elimination of the damage generated in the early grinding stages). A consistent preparation method that increases the Weibull modulus of sapphire test specimens and components is needed. This would impart higher component reliability, even if higher Weibull modulus is gained at the sacrifice of

  14. Overcoming challenges to accelerating linear growth in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P S

    2012-04-01

    This policy review highlights the need to focus on stunting as an indicator of under-five undernutrition and explores the major challenges and priority public health options for accelerating linear growth in children. Early childhood stunting predicts poor human capital including shorter adult height, lower attained schooling, reduced adult income, and decreased offspring birth weight. The current prevalence of stunting is disconcerting but there has been a relatively faster decline recently. It is imperative to intervene before birth to address stunting. Pertinent ongoing interventions (delaying early child birth, adequate antenatal care and maternal iron-folate supplementation) are beneficial but have sub-optimal coverage. There is only a narrow window of opportunity in early life--the first two years. Effective coverage of children below two years of age with a package of interventions (breastfeeding; immunization; appropriate complementary feeding; treatment of infections, especially diarrhea; safe water supply; and sanitation) merits urgent investigation for greater impact.

  15. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  16. Should We Promote Catch-Up Growth or Growth Acceleration in Low-Birthweight Infants?

    PubMed

    Singhal, Atul

    2015-01-01

    The idea that catch-up growth or growth acceleration has adverse effects on long-term health has generated much debate. This pattern of growth is most commonly seen after birth in infants of low birthweight; a global problem affecting over 20 million newborns a year. Faster postnatal growth may have short-term benefits but increases the long-term risk of aging, obesity and metabolic disease. Consequently, the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unclear and is likely to differ in different populations. In infants born prematurely, faster postnatal growth improves long-term cognitive function but is associated with later risk factors for cardiovascular disease. So, on balance, the current policy is to promote faster growth by increasing nutrient intake (e.g. using higher-nutrient preterm formulas). Whether the same policy should apply to larger preterm infants is not known. Similarly, in infants from impoverished environments, the short-term benefits of faster postnatal growth may outweigh long-term disadvantages. However, whether similar considerations apply to infants from countries in transition is uncertain. For term infants from developed countries, promoting catch-up growth by nutritional supplementation has few advantages for short- or long-term health. Overall therefore, a 'one size fits all' solution for the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unlikely. PMID:26111563

  17. Should We Promote Catch-Up Growth or Growth Acceleration in Low-Birthweight Infants?

    PubMed

    Singhal, Atul

    2015-01-01

    The idea that catch-up growth or growth acceleration has adverse effects on long-term health has generated much debate. This pattern of growth is most commonly seen after birth in infants of low birthweight; a global problem affecting over 20 million newborns a year. Faster postnatal growth may have short-term benefits but increases the long-term risk of aging, obesity and metabolic disease. Consequently, the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unclear and is likely to differ in different populations. In infants born prematurely, faster postnatal growth improves long-term cognitive function but is associated with later risk factors for cardiovascular disease. So, on balance, the current policy is to promote faster growth by increasing nutrient intake (e.g. using higher-nutrient preterm formulas). Whether the same policy should apply to larger preterm infants is not known. Similarly, in infants from impoverished environments, the short-term benefits of faster postnatal growth may outweigh long-term disadvantages. However, whether similar considerations apply to infants from countries in transition is uncertain. For term infants from developed countries, promoting catch-up growth by nutritional supplementation has few advantages for short- or long-term health. Overall therefore, a 'one size fits all' solution for the optimal pattern of postnatal growth is unlikely.

  18. Determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient of dental ceramics using different methods.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Miranda, Walter Gomes; Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    This study compared three methods for the determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient (n) of two veneering ceramics (VM7 and d.Sign), two glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress 2) and a glass-infiltrated alumina composite (In-Ceram Alumina). Discs (n = 10) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations and polished. The constant stress-rate test was performed at five constant stress rates to calculate n(d) . For the indentation fracture test to determine n(IF) , Vickers indentations were performed and the crack lengths were measured under an optical microscope. For the constant stress test (performed only for d.Sign for the determination of n(s) ) four constant stresses were applied and held constant until the specimens' fracture and the time to failure was recorded. All tests were performed in artificial saliva at 37°C. The n(d) values were 17.2 for Empress 2, followed by d.Sign (20.5), VM7 (26.5), Empress (30.2), and In-Ceram Alumina (31.1). In-Ceram Alumina and Empress 2 showed the highest n(IF) values, 66.0 and 40.2, respectively. The n(IF) values determined for Empress (25.2), d.Sign (25.6), and VM7 (20.1) were similar. The n(s) value determined for d.Sign was 31.4. It can be concluded that the n values determined for the dental ceramics evaluated were significantly influenced by the test method used.

  19. Overlapping Spreading Centers: Implications from Crack Growth Simulation by the Displacement Discontinuity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere, Jean-Christophe; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1986-02-01

    Overlapping spreading centers (OSC's) are a fundamental aspect of accretionary processes at intermediate and fast-spreading centers and typically occur at deep points along the axial depth profile. They have a characteristic geometry consisting of two en echelon overlapping, curving ridges separated by an elongated depression. The length to width ratio of this overlap basin is typically 3∶1. We have been successful in reproducing the overlapping spreading center geometry by modelling the growth of two initially parallel elastic cracks of given length and offset in a tensile stress field at infinity. A boundary element displacement discontinuity method was used to solve this problem. Our calculated results are compared with seafloor observations in terms of the size and shape of the overlap region. For small OSC's, there is a very good agreement between calculations and observations but, for large ones, the overlap basin tends to be longer than our predicted results indicate. This suggests that the assumptions made in the model (i.e., perfectly elastic, isotropic and homogeneous medium) are perhaps valid for the brittle lid above the magma chamber that underlies OSC's with small offsets (< 2 km) but oversimplified for OSC's with large offsets. Our modelling shows that the initial interaction of closely spaced surface ruptures along spreading centers is to deflect away from one another as they approach. The deflection will be the greatest for small misalignments of the fracture systems, thus even minor misalignments of the spreading centers may result in the development of OSC's. Where the misalignment is less than the width of the cracking front, the fracture systems may meet head-on creating a saddle point along the axial depth profile. Our results support the hypothesis suggested by Macdonald et al. [1984] in which overlapping spreading centers develop where two magmatic pulses migrate toward each other along the strike of the spreading center following fracture

  20. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  1. In-situ scanning electron microscope studies of crack growth in an aluminum metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Edge-notched specimens of a cast and extruded Al alloy-based, alumina particulate-reinforced composite in the annealed condition were tested in situ in a SEM apparatus equipped with a deformation stage permitting the direct observation of crack growth phenomena. Fracture in this composite is seen to proceed by initiation of microcracks ahead of the macrocrack; as deformation proceeds, the microcracks lengthen, and crack propagation occurs when the region of intense plastic straining becomes comparable to the macrocrack-microcrack distance. The sequence is then repeated.

  2. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  3. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  4. Significance of crack opening monitoring for determining the growth behavior of hydrofractures

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kazushi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1993-01-28

    A method for determining the size of a crack induced by hydraulic fracturing is presented. The procedure is based on the measurement of the crack opening displacement and the fracture mechanics approach. The proposed method has been tested by conducting laboratory small-scale hydraulic fracturing tests on a granite. It is shown from the preliminary tests that the method provides a reasonable prediction of experimentally observed crack sizes.

  5. Statistical investigation of fatigue crack initiation and growth around chamfered rivet holes in Alclad 2024 T3 as affected by corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadragas, M. I.; Fine, M. E.; Moran, B.

    1994-01-01

    In panel specimens with rivet holes cracks initiate in the blunted knife edge of the chamfered rivet hole and propagate inward as well as along the hole. The fatigue lifetime to dominant crack information was defined as the number of cycles, N500 micrometer, to formation of a 500 micrometer long crack. Statistical data on N500 micrometer and on crack propagation after N500 micrometer were obtained for a large number of uncorroded specimens and specimens corroded in an ASTM B 117 salt spray. Considerable variation in N500 micrometer and crack propagation behavior was observed from specimen to specimen of the same nominal geometry with chamfered rivet holes increased the probability for both early formation and later formation of a propagating 500 micrometer fatigue crack. The growth of fatigue cracks after 500 micrometer size was little affected by prior salt spray.

  6. Cohesive zone model for intergranular slow crack growth in ceramics: influence of the process and the microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero de la Osa, M.; Estevez, R.; Olagnon, C.; Chevalier, J.; Tallaron, C.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic polycrystals are prone to slow crack growth (SCG) which is stress and environmentally assisted, similarly to observations reported for silica glasses. The kinetics of fracture are known to be dependent on the load level, the temperature and the relative humidity. In addition, evidence is available on the influence of the microstructure on the SCG rate with an increase in the crack velocity with decreasing the grain size. Crack propagation takes place beyond a load threshold, which is grain size dependent. We present a cohesive zone model for the intergranular failure process. The methodology accounts for an intrinsic opening that governs the length of the cohesive zone and allows the investigation of grain size effects. A rate and temperature-dependent cohesive model is proposed (Romero de la Osa M, Estevez R et al 2009 J. Mech. Adv. Mater. Struct. 16 623-31) to mimic the reaction-rupture mechanism. The formulation is inspired by Michalske and Freiman's picture (Michalske and Freiman 1983 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 66 284-8) together with a recent study by Zhu et al (2005 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53 1597-623) of the reaction-rupture mechanism. The present investigation extends a previous work (Romero de la Osa et al 2009 Int. J. Fracture 158 157-67) in which the problem is formulated. Here, we explore the influence of the microstructure in terms of grain size, their elastic properties and residual thermal stresses originating from the cooling from the sintering temperature down to ambient conditions. Their influence on SCG for static loadings is reported and the predictions compared with experimental trends. We show that the initial stress state is responsible for the grain size dependence reported experimentally for SCG. Furthermore, the account for the initial stresses enables the prediction of a load threshold below which no crack growth is observed: a crack arrest takes place when the crack path meets a region in compression.

  7. Slow and fast motion of cracks in inelastic solids. Part 1: Slow growth of cracks in a rate sensitive tresca solid. Part 2: Dynamic crack represented by the Dugdale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, M. P.; Sih, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    An extension is proposed of the classical theory of fracture to viscoelastic and elastic-plastic materials in which the plasticity effects are confined to a narrow band encompassing the crack front. It is suggested that the Griffith-Irwin criterion of fracture, which requires that the energy release rate computed for a given boundary value problem equals the critical threshold, ought to be replaced by a differential equation governing the slow growth of a crack prior to the onset of rapid propagation. A new term which enters the equation of motion in the dissipative media is proportional to the energy lost within the end sections of the crack, and thus reflects the extent of inelastic behavior of a solid. A concept of apparent surface energy is introduced to account for the geometry dependent and the rate dependent phenomena which influence toughness of an inelastic solid. Three hypotheses regarding the condition for fracture in the subcritical range of load are compared. These are: (1) constant fracture energy (Cherepanov), (2) constant opening displacement at instability (Morozov) and (3) final stretch criterion (Wnuk).

  8. Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Particles for the Self-Sensing of Fatigue Crack Growth in an Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leser, William Paul

    Future aerospace vehicles will be built using novel materials for mission conditions that are difficult to replicate in a laboratory. Structural health monitoring and condition-based maintenance will be critical to ensure the reliability of such vehicles. A multi-functional aluminum alloy containing embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) particles to detect fatigue crack growth is proposed. The regions of intensified strain near the tip of a growing fatigue crack cause the SMA particles to undergo a solid-to-solid phase transformation from austenite to martensite, releasing a detectable and identifiable acoustic emission (AE) signal that can be used to locate the crack in the affected component. This study investigates the AE response of two SMA systems, Ni-Ti, and Co-Ni-Al. Tensile (Ni-Ti) and compressive (Co-Ni-Al) tests were conducted to study the strain-induced transformation response in both of the alloy systems. It was found that the critical stress for transformation in both SMA systems was easily identified by a burst of AE activity during both transformation and reverse transformation. AE signals from these experiments were collected for use as training data for a Bayesian classifier to be used to identify transformation signals in a Al7050 matrix with embedded SMA particles. The Al/SMA composite was made by vacuum hot pressing SMA powder between aluminum plates. The effect of hot pressing temperature and subsequent heat treatments (solutionizing and peak aging) on the SMA particles was studied. It was found that, at the temperatures required, Co-Ni-Al developed a second phase that restricted the transformation from austenite to martensite, thus rendering it ineffective as a candidate for the embedded particles. Conversely, Ni-Ti did survive the embedding process and it was found that the solutionizing heat treatment applied after hot pressing was the main driver in determining the final transformation temperatures for the Ni-Ti particles. The effect of hot

  9. Visualization of Hydrogen Diffusion in a Hydrogen-Enhanced Fatigue Crack Growth in Type 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Noda, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    To study the influence of hydrogen on the fatigue strength of AISI type 304 metastable austenitic stainless steel, specimens were cathodically charged with hydrogen. Using tension-compression fatigue tests, the behavior of fatigue crack growth from a small drill hole in the hydrogen-charged specimen was compared with that of noncharged specimen. Hydrogen charging led to a marked increase in the crack growth rate. Typical characteristics of hydrogen effect were observed in the slip band morphology and fatigue striation. To elucidate the behavior of hydrogen diffusion microscopically in the fatigue process, the hydrogen emission from the specimens was visualized using the hydrogen microprint technique (HMT). In the hydrogen-charged specimen, hydrogen emissions were mainly observed in the vicinity of the fatigue crack. Comparison between the HMT image and the etched microstructure image revealed that the slip bands worked as a pathway for hydrogen to move preferentially. Hydrogen-charging resulted in a significant change in the phase transformation behavior in the fatigue process. In the noncharged specimen, a massive type α' martensite was observed in the vicinity of the fatigue crack. On the other hand, in the hydrogen-charged specimen, large amounts of ɛ martensite and a smaller amount of α' martensite were observed along the slip bands. The results indicated that solute hydrogen facilitated the ɛ martensitic transformation in the fatigue process. Comparison between the results of HMT and EBSD inferred that martensitic transformations as well as plastic deformation itself can enhance the mobility of hydrogen.

  10. Inhibitor protection of metals at the stage of corrosion-fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk, V.V.; Ratych, L.V.

    1994-07-01

    We suggest electrochemical methods for determining the intensity of local anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement of metals at the tip of corrosion-fatigue crack. Based on this, we develop a technique for estimating the efficiency of inhibitor protection of structural elements with cracks.

  11. Analysis of local fractures and crack growth in coal seams under compression

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Kuznetsov; V.A. Trofimov

    2006-01-15

    An analysis is performed for the effect that a growing rock pressure in stress concentration zones has on development of local fractures of coal due to stratal water, and on closing-up of bedding joints, which confines this process. It is shown that all of unstable cracks in a seam grow dynamically until the related bedding crack closing-up.

  12. Simulation of RCC Crack Growth Due to Carbon Oxidation in High-Temperature Gas Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, E. V.; Levin, D. A.; Picetti, Donald J.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    The carbon wall oxidation technique coupled with a CFD technique was employed to study the flow in the expanding crack channel caused by the oxidation of the channel carbon walls. The recessing 3D surface morphing procedure was developed and tested in comparison with the arcjet experimental results. The multi-block structured adaptive meshing was used to model the computational domain changes due to the wall recession. Wall regression rates for a reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples, that were tested in a high enthalpy arcjet environment, were computationally obtained and used to assess the channel expansion. The test geometry and flow conditions render the flow regime as the transitional to continuum, therefore Navier-Stokes gas dynamic approach with the temperature jump and velocity slip correction to the boundary conditions was used. The modeled mechanism for wall material loss was atomic oxygen reaction with bare carbon. The predicted channel growth was found to agree with arcjet observations. Local gas flow field results were found to affect the oxidation rate in a manner that cannot be predicted by previous mass loss correlations. The method holds promise for future modeling of materials gas-dynamic interactions for hypersonic flight.

  13. Strength, Fracture Toughness, and Slow Crack Growth of Zirconia/alumina Composites at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Various electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina. Flexure strength and fracture toughness of platelet composites were determined as a function of alumina content at 1000 C in air and compared with those of particulate composites determined previously. In general, elevated-temperature strength and fracture toughness of both composite systems increased with increasing alumina content. For a given alumina content, flexure strength of particulate composites was greater than that of platelet composites at higher alumina contents (greater than or equal to 20 mol%), whereas, fracture toughness was greater in platelet composites than in particulate composites, regardless of alumina content. The results of slow crack growth (SCG) testing, determined at 1000 C via dynamic fatigue testing for three different composites including 0 mol% (10-YSZ matrix), 30 mol % particulate and 30 mol% platelet composites, showed that susceptibility to SCG was greatest with SCG parameter n = 6 to 8 for both 0 and 30 mol% particulate composites and was least with n = 33 for the 30 mol% platelet composite.

  14. From monoscale to multiscale modeling of fatigue crack growth: Stress and energy density factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    The formalism of the earlier fatigue crack growth models is retained to account for multiscaling of the fatigue process that involves the creation of macrocracks from the accumulation of micro damage. The effects of at least two scales, say micro to macro, must be accounted for. The same data can thus be reinterpreted by the invariancy of the transitional stress intensity factors such that the microcracking and macrocracking data would lie on a straight line. The threshold associated with the sigmoid curve disappears. Scale segmentation is shown to be a necessity for addressing multiscale energy dissipative processes such as fatigue and creep. Path independency and energy release rate are monoscale criteria that can lead to unphysical results, violating the first principles. Application of monoscale failure or fracture criteria to nanomaterials is taking toll at the expense of manufacturing super strength and light materials and structural components. This brief view is offered in the spirit of much needed additional research for the reinforcement of materials by creating nanoscale interfaces with sustainable time in service. The step by step consideraton at the different scales may offer a better understanding of the test data and their limitations with reference to space and time.

  15. On the use of ultrasonic fatigue testing technique--variable amplitude loadings and crack growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Sander, M

    2013-12-01

    In the very high cycle fatigue regime high-frequency testing techniques are required. Using the ultrasonic fatigue technique, testing time could be reduced significantly in comparison to conventional servo-hydraulic machines. An ultrasonic fatigue testing system developed by the BOKU Vienna with load frequencies of about 20kHz is used for variable amplitude loading investigations in the VHCF regime. Therefore, the amplitude level during fatigue tests is controlled by a PC using an own developed software. Additionally, an in situ reconstruction of a damage equivalent load spectrum based on a load time history is introduced schematically. To optimize the experimental procedure a temperature-controlled pulse-pause adaption has been developed and implemented into the software. For quantifying the influence of variable amplitude loadings on the fatigue life, e.g. load interaction effects, the crack growth is measured by using the potential drop technique that is adapted to the ultrasonic fatigue testing system. Finally, the results of two-step-block loading tests are presented. PMID:23597637

  16. Measurement of fatigue crack growth kinetics of Copper-Kapton laminates by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, J.M.; Walters, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Copper-Kapton laminates fabricated with epoxy and Du Pont WA acrylic adhesives are used in printed circuit applications that are of current interest to the Department of Energy. Kinetics for fatigue crack growth at the Cu-epoxy interface were measured under a helium atmosphere over the temperature range of 473 to 563 K by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). A least squares treatment of data derived on the basis of a first-order fatigue mechanism resulted in: log(k(T)/s/sup -1/ = (14.6 +- 0.4) - (175.4 +- 3.8)/2.303RT, where k(T) is the rate coefficient for thermal fatigue, T is absolute temperature, and R is the ideal gas law constant (R = 0.00831 kJ/K mol). Error estimates for the pre-exponential factor and activation energy correspond to one standard deviation. Arguments are presented which indicate that the upper temperature limit for continuous use of the laminate is 85/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the laminate will meet and possibly exceed the 27-y shelf life required by the DOE.

  17. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics studies of He Bubble Growth in Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uberuaga, Blas; Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how materials respond to extreme environments is critical for predicting and improving performance. In materials such as tungsten exposed to plasmas for nuclear fusion applications, novel nanoscale fuzzes, comprised of tendrils of tungsten, form as a consequence of the implantation of He into the near surface. However, the detailed mechanisms that link He bubble formation to the ultimate development of fuzz are unclear. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the He implantation process, but are necessarily performed at implantation rates that are orders of magnitudes faster than experiment. Here, using accelerated molecular dynamics methods, we examine the role of He implantation rates on the physical evolution of He bubbles in tungsten. We find that, as the He rate is reduced, new types of events involving the response of the tungsten matrix to the pressure in the bubble become competitive and change the overall evolution of the bubble as well as the subsequent morphology of the tungsten surface. We have also examined how bubble growth differs at various microstructural features. These results highlight the importance of performing simulations at experimentally relevant conditions in order to correctly capture the contributions of the various significant kinetic processes and predict the overall response of the material.

  18. Use of ultrasonic back-reflection intensity for predicting the onset of crack growth due to low-cycle fatigue in stainless steel under block loading.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nurul; Arai, Yoshio; Araki, Wakako

    2015-02-01

    The present study proposes the use of ultrasonic back-reflected waves for evaluating low cycle fatigue crack growth from persistent slip bands (PSBs) of stainless steel under block loading. Fatigue under high-low block loading changes the back-reflected intensity of the ultrasonic wave that emanates from the surface. Measuring the change in ultrasonic intensity can predict the start of crack growth with reasonable accuracy. The present study also proposes a modified constant cumulative plastic strain method and a PSB damage evolution model to predict the onset of crack growth under block loads.

  19. Fatigue crack growth model RANDOM2 user manual. Appendix 1: Development of advanced methodologies for probabilistic constitutive relationships of material strength models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Lovelace, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    FORTRAN program RANDOM2 is presented in the form of a user's manual. RANDOM2 is based on fracture mechanics using a probabilistic fatigue crack growth model. It predicts the random lifetime of an engine component to reach a given crack size. Details of the theoretical background, input data instructions, and a sample problem illustrating the use of the program are included.

  20. Quantification of Resistance of Grain Boundaries to Short-Fatigue Crack Growth in Three Dimensions in High-Strength Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Zhai, Tongguang

    2012-08-01

    Based on the previous three-dimensional (3-D) crystallographic model for short-fatigue crack propagation through grain boundaries, the resistance of a grain boundary to the crack growth was quantified as a Weibull-type function of the twist component of crack plane deflection across the boundary. The effective driving force for the crack at a grain boundary was quantified as the applied driving force minus the resistance. This allowed the quantification of variation in growth rate at different grain boundaries along the crack front. The model could simulate satisfactorily that the crack front at the grain boundaries with high twist angle indeed was lagged behind those with low twist angle and that the crack growth rate on the surface varied significantly. The model was also used to predict short-fatigue crack growth statistically in different textures, showing potential application to texture design of alloys. Subsequent work still needs to be done to incorporate other factors, such as the tilt angle and Schmidt factor, into the model to render a more accurate simulation.

  1. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  2. Effects of laser peening on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. Z.; Huang, S.; Zuo, L. D.; Meng, X. K.; Sheng, J.; Tian, Q.; Han, Y. H.; Zhu, W. L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of laser peening (LP) with different laser peening coverage rates on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth (FCG) properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy were investigated. Residual stresses after LP and micro-structure with different fatigue striation patterns on fracture cross-sections were analyzed. Compressive residual stresses and dense dislocation arrangements can be obtained in the superficial layer after LP. The influence of compressive residual stresses induced under different LP coverage rates on FCG properties was revealed. LP coverage rate had an apparent influence on FCG properties as confirmed by the fatigue striation spacing on fracture cross-sections. Moreover, FCG rate decreased with the increase of compressive residual stresses perpendicular to the crack growth direction, which indicated that LP had an obvious inhibitory effects on FCG.

  3. Influence of hydrogen environment on fatigue crack growth in forged Ti-6Al-4V: fractographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddam, R.; Pederson, R.; Hörnqvist, M.; Antti, M.-L.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of high-pressure gaseous hydrogen environment (15 MPa) on the fatigue crack growth in forged Ti-6A1-4V at room temperature is investigated. It is observed that the fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate is fluctuating at 20 <= ΔK <= 26 MPa√m, and increase drastically at ΔK > 26 MPa√m in hydrogen environment. The effect of hydrogen on the FCG rate is dependent on the stress intensity level (ΔK). Detailed fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces is performed at different ΔK using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The differences in appearance of fracture surfaces in air and hydrogen are discussed.

  4. Numerical, micro-mechanical prediction of crack growth resistance in a fibre-reinforced/brittle matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Ghosh, Asish; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromechanics fracture models are incorporated into three distinct fracture process zones which contribute to the crack growth resistance of fibrous composites. The frontal process zone includes microcracking, fiber debonding, and some fiber failure. The elastic process zone is related only to the linear elastic creation of new matrix and fiber fracture surfaces. The wake process zone includes fiber bridging, fiber pullout, and fiber breakage. The R-curve predictions of the model compare well with empirical results for a unidirectional, continuous fiber C/C composite. Separating the contributions of each process zone reveals the wake region to contain the dominant crack growth resistance mechanisms. Fractography showed the effects of the micromechanisms on the macroscopic fracture behavior.

  5. Methodology Developed for Modeling the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their superior high-temperature properties, gas generator turbine airfoils made of single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys are fast becoming the standard equipment on today's advanced, high-performance aerospace engines. The increased temperature capabilities of these airfoils has allowed for a significant increase in the operating temperatures in turbine sections, resulting in superior propulsion performance and greater efficiencies. However, the previously developed methodologies for life-prediction models are based on experience with polycrystalline alloys and may not be applicable to single-crystal alloys under certain operating conditions. One of the main areas where behavior differences between single-crystal and polycrystalline alloys are readily apparent is subcritical fatigue crack growth (FCG). The NASA Lewis Research Center's work in this area enables accurate prediction of the subcritical fatigue crack growth behavior in single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures.

  6. Apparent activation energy of subcritical crack growth of SiC/SiC composites at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y.S.; Stackpoole, M.M.; Bordia, R.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the environmental effect of oxygen-containing gases on the subcritical crack growth of continuous fiber (Nicalon {open_quotes}SiC{close_quotes}) reinforced ceramic matrix (SiC) composites at elevated temperatures. This is a continuing project and the primary goal for this time period is to obtain an apparent activation energy for SiC/SiC materials with two different interfaces: carbon and boron nitride coatings. In the past six months, the authors have conducted studies of subcritical crack growth on SiC/SiC composite materials in a corrosive (O{sub 2}) as well as an inert (Ar) atmosphere for temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100{degree}C.

  7. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  8. Modeling and monitoring of tooth fillet crack growth in dynamic simulation of spur gear set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2015-05-01

    This study integrates a linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of the tooth fillet crack propagation into a nonlinear dynamic model of spur gear sets. An original formulation establishes the rigidity of sound and damaged teeth. The formula incorporates the contribution of the flexible gear body and real crack trajectories in the fillet zone. The work also develops a KI prediction formula. A validation of the equation estimates shows that the predicted KI are in close agreement with published numerical and experimental values. The representation also relies on the Paris-Erdogan equation completed with crack closure effects. The analysis considers that during dN fatigue cycles, a harmonic mean of ΔK assures optimal evaluations. The paper evaluates the influence of the mesh frequency distance from the resonances of the system. The obtained results indicate that while the dependence may demonstrate obvious nonlinearities, the crack progression rate increases with a mesh frequency augmentation. The study develops a tooth fillet crack propagation detection procedure based on residual signals (RS) prepared in the frequency domain. The proposed approach accepts any gear conditions as reference signature. The standard deviation and mean values of the RS are evaluated as gear condition descriptors. A trend tracking of their responses obtained from a moving linear regression completes the analysis. Globally, the results show that, regardless of the reference signal, both descriptors are sensitive to the tooth fillet crack and sharply react to tooth breakage. On average, the mean value detected the crack propagation after a size increase of 3.69 percent as compared to the reference condition, whereas the standard deviation required crack progressions of 12.24 percent. Moreover, the mean descriptor shows evolutions closer to the crack size progression.

  9. Influence of the Peak Tensile Overload Cycles on the Fatigue Crack Growth of Aluminum Alloy Under Spectrum Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranpour, Mohammad; Taheri, Farid

    2013-11-01

    Many structures such as aircrafts, risers, and offshore pipelines that are in contact with fluids, become subjected to complex variable amplitude loading (VAL) stress-time histories during their service lives. As a result, the structural life assessment and damage-tolerant analyses of such structures are considered as two important design criteria. In this paper, a VAL stress-time history is used to study the fatigue life of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy, with focus on the retardation effect resulting from the applied peak tensile overload cycles (TOLCs). Various so-called "clipping" levels are tested, and the results are compared with those obtained through an analytical method, using the Willenborg retardation approach, in conjunction with the Walker fatigue crack growth model. The results would demonstrate the significant influence of the TOLC present within VAL scenarios on retarding the fatigue crack growth rate of the material. The study also investigates the influence of various clipping levels on the fatigue response of the material, also highlighting the limitations of the analytical approach in estimating the resulting crack growth rate. It is observed that the analytical method predicts a higher fatigue life for the material subjected to VAL, which is non-conservative for design purposes. Some suggestions are provided for fatigue life estimation of the material when subjected to VAL scenarios.

  10. Experimental study of opening-mode crack growth in rock. Progress report and renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The objective is to relate fracture toughness to rock microstructure. Crack propagation measurements are made on samples of stockbridge marble and Stony Creek granite. Force-displacement curves are recorded and the texture of the fracture surfaces observed. (ACR)

  11. Surface Crack Growth Behavior of Pipeline Steel Under Disbonded Coating at Free Corrosion Potential in Near-Neutral pH Soil Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbewande, Afolabi; Chen, Weixing; Eadie, Reg; Kania, Richard; Van Boven, Greg; Worthingham, Robert; Been, Jenny

    2014-10-01

    Crack growth behavior of X65 pipeline steel at free corrosion potential in near-neutral pH soil environment under a CO2 concentration gradient inside a disbonded coating was studied. Growth rates were found to be highest at the open mouth of the simulated disbondment where CO2 concentrations, hence local hydrogen concentration in the local environment, was highest. Careful analysis of growth rate data using a corrosion-fatigue model of the form Δ K α / K {max/ β }/ f γ , where (1/ f γ ) models environmental contribution to growth, revealed that environmental contribution could vary by up to a factor of three. Such intense environmental contribution at the open mouth kept the crack tip atomically sharp despite the simultaneous occurrence of low-temperature creep and crack tip dissolution, which are the factors that blunt the crack tip. At other locations where environmental enhancement was lower, significant crack tip blunting attributed to both low-temperature creep and crack tip dissolution was observed. These factors both led to lower crack growth rates away from the open mouth.

  12. Fatigue flaw growth and NDI evaluation for preventing through cracks in spacecraft tankage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, D. E.; Hoeppner, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of parent and welded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy sheet under controlled cyclic stress conditions in room temperature air and 300 F air. Specimens possessing an initial surface defect of controlled dimensions were cycled under constant load amplitude until the propagating fatigue crack penetrated the back surface of the specimen. A series of precracked specimens were prepared to determine optimum penetrant, X-ray, ultrasonic, and eddy current nondestructive inspection procedures.

  13. Effect of Low Temperature on Fatigue Crack Formation and Microstructure-Scale Growth from Corrosion Damage in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2013-05-01

    The strong effect of cold temperature on the fatigue resistance of 7075-T651 is established. As temperature decreases from 296 K to 183 K (23 °C to -90 °C), the formation life for cracking about pit and EXCO corrosion perimeters increases, microstructure scale crack growth rates decrease in the range from 20 to 500 μm beyond the corrosion topography, and long crack growth rates similarly decline. Fatigue crack surface features correlate with reduced hydrogen embrittlement with decreasing temperature fed by localized H produced during precorrosion for pit and EXCO-proximate cracks, as well as by crack tip H produced by water vapor reaction during stressing for all crack sizes. The importance of the former H source increases with decreasing temperature for cracks sized below 200 μm. Decreasing temperature to 223 K (-50 °C) eliminates the contribution of environmental H through interaction of reduced water vapor pressure in equilibrium with ice and reduced H diffusion. The Knudsen flow model and exposure parameter, P_{{{{H}}2 {{O}}}}/f , enables improved modeling of temperature dependent crack propagation, but does not fully describe low temperature fatigue behavior due to possible rate limitation by H diffusion. Further decreases in MSC da/dN to 183 K (-90 °C) are related to reduced mobility of the corrosion-precharged H which may associate with vacancies from dissolution. Crack formation, and growth rates correlate with either elastic stress intensity range or cyclic crack tip opening displacement, and are available to predict corrosion effects on airframe fatigue for the important low temperature regime.

  14. Delamination-driven failure processes in two-dimensional composite structures: Delamination growth, crack kinking and nonlinear buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Sami Ibrahim

    Delamination is an important mode of failure in laminated and sandwich composites. This study describes a cohesive layer model which has been successfully employed to predict the initiation and track the growth of delamination. A significant feature of the present model is that it can be used for geometrically nonlinear problems as it is formulated in terms of appropriate stresses and strains. A finite element approach which could account for the contact between delaminated surfaces as well as the progressive failure of the cohesive layer was employed to study several test cases. As a preliminary, examples of a double cantilever and a compressed beam specimens were studied in detail to identify the role of the key parameters of the model, viz. the thickness of the cohesive layer and the strength and stiffness of the cohesive layer material. It is found that the model is fairly robust and is not sensitive to changes in parameters other than the critical strain energy release rates in the opening and shearing modes respectively. This was followed by an investigation of delamination growth in columns and rings made of laminated composite material as well as sandwich columns. A dynamic analysis incorporating appropriate damping with a sufficiently slow rate of application of load was implemented to closely simulate quasi-static loading. Experimental results are found to corroborate the accuracy of the model. In laminated composites, matrix cracking was found to have a significant effect in the advanced stages of loading history and this has been accounted for by the implementation of a micro-mechanical model installed in the material in conjunction with the cohesive layer model placed along the potential delamination. Better correlation with experimental results was thus achieved. It was observed in experiments that the interfacial crack in sandwich structures may not remain at the interface and tends to kink into the core. A kinking model which is based on identifying

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior Evaluation of Grainex Mar-M 247 for NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Lewandowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of Grainex Mar-M 247 is evaluated for NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility. The facility is used to test air-to-air seals primarily for use in advanced jet engine applications. Because of extreme seal test conditions of temperature, pressure, and surface speeds, surface cracks may develop over time in the disk bolt holes. An inspection interval is developed to preclude catastrophic disk failure by using experimental fatigue crack growth data. By combining current fatigue crack growth results with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work, an inspection interval is determined for the test disk. The fatigue crack growth life of the NASA disk bolt holes is found to be 367 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm using a factor of 2 on life at maximum operating conditions. Combining this result with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work gives a total fatigue life of 1032 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm. Eddy-current inspections are suggested starting at 665 cycles since eddy current detection thresholds are currently at 0.381 mm. Inspection intervals are recommended every 50 cycles when operated at maximum operating conditions.

  16. Techniques for predicting the lifetimes of wave-swept macroalgae: a primer on fracture mechanics and crack growth.

    PubMed

    Mach, Katharine J; Nelson, Drew V; Denny, Mark W

    2007-07-01

    Biomechanical analyses of intertidal and shallow subtidal seaweeds have elucidated ways in which these organisms avoid breakage in the presence of exceptional hydrodynamic forces imposed by pounding surf. However, comparison of algal material properties to maximum hydrodynamic forces predicts lower rates of breakage and dislodgment than are actually observed. Why the disparity between prediction and reality? Most previous research has measured algal material properties during a single application of force, equivalent to a single wave rushing past an alga. In contrast, intertidal macroalgae may experience more than 8000 waves a day. This repeated loading can cause cracks - introduced, for example, by herbivory or abrasion - to grow and eventually cause breakage, yet fatigue crack growth has not previously been taken into account. Here, we present methods from the engineering field of fracture mechanics that can be used to assess consequences of repeated force imposition for seaweeds. These techniques allow quantification of crack growth in wave-swept macroalgae, a first step towards considering macroalgal breakage in the realistic context of repeated force imposition. These analyses can also be applied to many other soft materials.

  17. Mechanics of the injected pulsejet into gelatin gel and evaluation of the effect by puncture and crack generation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Arafune, T.; Washio, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Ogawa, Y.; Tominaga, T.; Sakuma, I.; Kobayashi, E.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, fluid jets have become widely used in medical devices and have been created and evaluated in clinical environments. Such devices are classified into two broad groups; those adopting continuous jets and those adopting discrete (or pulsed) jets. We developed a discrete jet device for brain cancer treatment, called a laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) system. Although several studies have evaluated the availability and described the treatment mechanisms of fluid jet devices, the mechanisms of the fluid and injected material remain under-investigated. In this paper, we report the mechanism of frequent pulsejet injections into a viscoelastic biological material; namely, simulated gelatin brain tissue. The mechanism is evaluated by the injection depth, an easily measured parameter. To explain the injection mechanism, we propose that the pulsejet is pressured by forces introduced by resistance on the side surface of the hole and the reaction force proportionate to the injection depth. The pulsejet generated and propagated cracks in the gelatin, and the resistance eventually fractured the side surface of the hole. We evaluated the proposed model by measuring the behavior of pulsejets injected into gelatin by the LILJ. From the results, the following conclusions were obtained. First, the proposed model accurately describes the behavior of the injected pulsejet. Second, whether the hole or crack growth largely increases the final injection depth can be evaluated from differences in the decay constant. Finally, crack growth increases the final injection depth when the number of the injected pulsejets is greater than the inverse of the decay constant.

  18. National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J

    2012-07-01

    For 2011-13, US health spending is projected to grow at 4.0 percent, on average--slightly above the historically low growth rate of 3.8 percent in 2009. Preliminary data suggest that growth in consumers' use of health services remained slow in 2011, and this pattern is expected to continue this year and next. In 2014, health spending growth is expected to accelerate to 7.4 percent as the major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act begin. For 2011 through 2021, national health spending is projected to grow at an average rate of 5.7 percent annually, which would be 0.9 percentage point faster than the expected annual increase in the gross domestic product during this period. By 2021, federal, state, and local government health care spending is projected to be nearly 50 percent of national health expenditures, up from 46 percent in 2011, with federal spending accounting for about two-thirds of the total government share. Rising government spending on health care is expected to be driven by faster growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and the introduction of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for health insurance exchange plans. PMID:22692089

  19. National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J

    2012-07-01

    For 2011-13, US health spending is projected to grow at 4.0 percent, on average--slightly above the historically low growth rate of 3.8 percent in 2009. Preliminary data suggest that growth in consumers' use of health services remained slow in 2011, and this pattern is expected to continue this year and next. In 2014, health spending growth is expected to accelerate to 7.4 percent as the major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act begin. For 2011 through 2021, national health spending is projected to grow at an average rate of 5.7 percent annually, which would be 0.9 percentage point faster than the expected annual increase in the gross domestic product during this period. By 2021, federal, state, and local government health care spending is projected to be nearly 50 percent of national health expenditures, up from 46 percent in 2011, with federal spending accounting for about two-thirds of the total government share. Rising government spending on health care is expected to be driven by faster growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and the introduction of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for health insurance exchange plans.

  20. Fracture Toughness and Slow Crack Growth Behavior of Ni-YSZ and YSZ as a Function of Porosity and Temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Miladin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Nelson, George

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the fracture toughness of YSZ and Ni-YSZ and slow-crack growth behavior of Ni-YSZ at 20C and 800C. Results are presented for tests carried out in air for YSZ and in a gas mixture of 4%H2 and 96%Ar for Ni-YSZ containing various levels of porosity. The double-torsion test method was utilized to determine the fracture toughness from the peak load obtained during fast loading test specimens that had been precracked, while crack velocity versus stress intensity curves were obtained in the double torsion using hte load relaxation method. It was found that fracture toughness of these materials decreases with temperature and int he case of Ni-YSZ it also decreases with increasing porosity. The effect of temperature and microstructure, which was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, on the fracture behavior of these materials, is discussed.