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Sample records for accelerated expanding universe

  1. Thermodynamics of an accelerated expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bin; Gong Yungui; Abdalla, Elcio

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the laws of thermodynamics in an accelerating universe driven by dark energy with a time-dependent equation of state. In the case we consider that the physically relevant part of the Universe is that enveloped by the dynamical apparent horizon, we have shown that both the first law and second law of thermodynamics are satisfied. On the other hand, if the boundary of the Universe is considered to be the cosmological event horizon the thermodynamical description based on the definitions of boundary entropy and temperature breaks down. No parameter redefinition can rescue the thermodynamics laws from such a fate, rendering the cosmological event horizon unphysical from the point of view of the laws of thermodynamics.

  2. Focusing of geodesic congruences in an accelerated expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Albareti, F.D.; Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la E-mail: cembra@fis.ucm.es

    2012-12-01

    We study the accelerated expansion of the Universe through its consequences on a congruence of geodesics. We make use of the Raychaudhuri equation which describes the evolution of the expansion rate for a congruence of timelike or null geodesics. In particular, we focus on the space-time geometry contribution to this equation. By straightforward calculation from the metric of a Robertson-Walker cosmological model, it follows that in an accelerated expanding Universe the space-time contribution to the Raychaudhuri equation is positive for the fundamental congruence, favoring a non-focusing of the congruence of geodesics. However, the accelerated expansion of the present Universe does not imply a tendency of the fundamental congruence to diverge. It is shown that this is in fact the case for certain congruences of timelike geodesics without vorticity. Therefore, the focusing of geodesics remains feasible in an accelerated expanding Universe. Furthermore, a negative contribution to the Raychaudhuri equation from space-time geometry which is usually interpreted as the manifestation of the attractive character of gravity is restored in an accelerated expanding Robertson-Walker space-time at high speeds.

  3. Scalar curvature of spacelike hypersurfaces and certain class of cosmological models for accelerated expanding universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledo, Juan A.; Rubio, Rafael M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the scalar curvature of spacelike hypersurfaces in the family of cosmological models known as generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes, and give several rigidity results under appropriate mathematical and physical assumptions. On the other hand, we show that this family of spacetimes provides suitable models obeying the null convergence condition to explain accelerated expanding universes.

  4. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  5. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes. PMID:26628035

  6. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  7. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  8. The Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.

    2015-11-01

    Introducing the Universe; Part I. Conceptual Foundations: 1. Newtonian cosmology; 2. General relativity; 3. Relativistic cosmology; Part II. General Relativity: 4. General covariance; 5. Equivalence principle; 6. Space-time curvature; 7. Einstein field equations of gravitation; Part III. Universal Expansion: 8. Cosmological field equations; 9. Cosmography; 10. Expansion dynamics; Part IV. Expansion Models: 11. Radiation; 12. Matter; 13. Dark energy; 14. Observational constraints; 15. Concordance cosmological model; Part V. Expansion History: 16. Particle era; 17. Plasma era; 18. Galaxy era; 19. Afterword: the new modern cosmology; Part VI: Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  9. How hot are expanding universes?

    SciTech Connect

    Obadia, Nathaniel

    2008-10-15

    A way to address the conundrum of quantum gravity is to illustrate the potentially fundamental interplay between quantum field theory, curved space-times physics, and thermodynamics. So far, when studying moving quantum systems in the vacuum, the only known perfectly thermal temperatures are those obtained for constant (or null) accelerations A in constant (or null) Hubble parameters H space-times. In this paper, restricting ourselves to conformally coupled scalar fields, we present the most comprehensive expression for the temperature undergone by a moving observer in the vacuum, valid for any time-dependent linear accelerations and Hubble parameters: T={radical}(A{sup 2}+H{sup 2}+2Ht)/2{pi} where t=dt/d{tau} is the motion's Lorentz factor. The inequivalence between a constant T and actual thermality is explained. As a byproduct, all the Friedmann universes for which observers at rest feel the vacuum as a thermal bath are listed.

  10. Acceleration of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2012-05-01

    An alternative cosmological model called black hole universe has been recently proposed by the author. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole to the present state by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with an infinite number of layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we live, the outside space called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of space-time, and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. In this study. we will analyze the acceleration of black hole universe that accretes its ambient matter in an increasing rate. We will also compare the result obtained from the black hole universe model with the measurement of type Ia supernova and the result from the big bang cosmology.

  11. Ion acceleration in expanding ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Schunk, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma expansion along the ambient magnetic field in regions of density gradients provides a mechanism for accelerating ions. A brief review of the basic phenomenon of plasma expansion is given. Estimates of the energies of the accelerated ions in an expanding ionospheric plasma along geomagnetic flux tubes are obtained by solving the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations. It is found that, over certain altitude ranges, each ion species can be the most energetic; the maximum energies of the different ions are found to be limited to less than about 10 eV for H(+), 5 eV for He(+), and less than about 1.5 eV for O(+).

  12. Expanding the Universe of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Definitions of "education" and "rural" are debunked and expanded. The three major tasks of rural education are educating people to understand their own needs, the unavoidable changes that will transform rural Australia within their lifetimes, and the range of technologies that can enhance their well-being. Presents a strategy for educating…

  13. An Expanding Universe in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, David

    1991-01-01

    Two computer-generated star charts that can be used as overlay transparencies to show an expanding universe are presented. Directions on how to use the star charts to determine the Hubble constant and the age of the universe are provided. (KR)

  14. Descending entropy in expanding the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, Yuriy A.

    2015-11-01

    Inter-relation between 1-form of nonmetricity and change of entropy in the course of time is considered in the study. It is shown that change of entropy in expanding universe will be always negative. The obtained result contravenes the second law of thermodynamics, however it explains available ordered macrostructures in the universe.

  15. Distant Supernovae Indicate Ever-Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    ESO Astronomers Contribute towards Resolution of Cosmic Puzzle Since the discovery of the expansion of the Universe by American astronomer Edwin Hubble in the 1920's, by measurement of galaxy velocities, astronomers have tried to learn how this expansion changes with time. Until now, most scientists have been considering two possibilities: the expansion rate is slowing down and will ultimately either come to a halt - whereafter the Universe would start to contract, or it will continue to expand forever. However, new studies by two independent research teams, based on observations of exploding stars ( supernovae ) by ESO astronomers [1] with astronomical telescopes at the La Silla Observatory as well as those of their colleagues at other institutions, appear to show that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating . The results take the discovery of the cosmological expansion one step further and challenge recent models of the Universe. If the new measurements are indeed correct, they show that the elusive "cosmological constant" , as proposed by Albert Einstein , contributes significantly to the evolution of the Universe. The existence of a non-zero cosmological constant implies that a repulsive force, counter-acting gravity, currently dominates the universal expansion , and consequently leads to an ever-expanding Universe. This new research is being named as the "Breakthrough of the Year" by the renowned US science journal Science in the December 18, 1998, issue. A Press Release is published by the journal on this occasion. "Fundamental Parameters" of the Universe Three fundamental parameters govern all cosmological models based on the theory of General Relativity. They are 1. the current expansion rate as described by Hubble's constant , i.e. the proportionality factor between expansion velocity and distance 2. the average matter density in the Universe, and 3. the amount of "other energy" present in space. From the measured values of these fundamental

  16. Mining Energy in an Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward R.

    1995-06-01

    In principle, the expansion of the universe can be harnessed to provide energy. In a gedankenexperiment, energy is gained by connecting together widely separated bodies with strings. The tension and the energy generated are calculated for single strings. Mining energy in an expanding universe in this way raises unresolved issues concerning the conservation of energy. Apparently, the tethered-body experiment delivers "nascent" energy that previously did not exist in any identifiable and quantifiable form. It is argued that energy in a homogeneous and unbounded universe, in general, is not conserved on the cosmic scale.

  17. The Accelerating Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-05-15

    From keV electrons in terrestrial aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a plutocratic proclivity to concentrate energy in a tiny minority of suprathermal particles. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have observed and that much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory and diverse astronomical locations. It will be argued that new mechanisms are required to account for recent observations of galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebulae and interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic media and some candidates will be discussed.

  18. The accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-02-01

    From keV electrons in the aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a perverse, yet pervasive, proclivity to select a tiny minority of particles and boost them to high energy. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have explored. Much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory, interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic locations. As it celebrates its centenary, cosmic ray physics, has assumed a new importance in solving one of the greatest problems consuming its illustrious scion - elementary particle physics - namely the nature of dark matter.

  19. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  20. Historical Notes on the Expanding Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Belenkyi, Ari; Nussbaumer, Harry; Peacock, John

    2014-01-01

    The article Measuring the Hubble constant by Mario Livio and Adam Riess (Physics Today, October 2013, page 41) reviewed studies of the expanding universe from the 1920s to the present. Although the history of the subject underwent considerable compression to fit the length of a magazine article, we think it may leave a misleading impression of some of the key steps to our current understanding. We therefore offer the following clarifications. Most significantly, papers by Arthur Eddington and by Willem de Sitter in 1930, who successfully promoted Georges Lematres 1927 article for the Scientific Society of Brussels, effected a paradigm shift in interpretation of extragalactic redshifts in 1930. Before then, the astronomical community was generally unaware of the existence of nonstatic cosmological solutions and did not broadly appreciate that redshifts could be thought of locally as Doppler shifts in an expanding matter distribution. Certainly, in 1929 Edwin Hubble referred only to the de Sitter solution of 1917. At the time, the relation between distance and redshift predicted in that model was generally seen purely as a manifestation of static spacetime curvature.

  1. Gravitational wave memory in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave memory effect in an expanding FLRW spacetime. We find that if the gravitational field is decomposed into gauge-invariant scalar, vector, and tensor modes after the fashion of Bardeen, only the tensor mode gives rise to memory, and this memory can be calculated using the retarded Green's function associated with the tensor wave equation. If locally similar radiation source events occur on flat and FLRW backgrounds, we find that the resulting memories will differ only by a redshift factor, and we explore whether or not this factor depends on the expansion history of the FLRW universe. We compare our results to related work by Bieri, Garfinkle, and Yau.

  2. Henry Norris Russell and the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, D.

    2013-04-01

    Henry Norris Russell, one of the most influential American astronomers of the first half of the 20th Century, had a special place in his heart for the Lowell Observatory. Although privately critical of the founder for his pronouncements about life on Mars and the superiority of the Mars Hill observing site, he always supported the Observatory in public and professional circles. He staunchly supported Tombaugh's detection of a planet as leading from Lowell's prediction, and always promoted V. M. Slipher's spectroscopic investigations of planetary and stellar phenomena. But how did he react to Slipher's puzzling detection of the extreme radial velocities of spiral nebulae starting in 1912, and how did he regard the extension and interpretation of those observations by Hubble and others in following decades? Here we describe the arc of Russell's reactions, dating from Slipher's first detection, as an indicator of how mainstream stellar astronomers reacted to the concept of an expanding universe.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, B. A.

    2005-07-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  4. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  5. Celestial dynamics and astrometry in expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2012-08-01

    Post - Newtonian theory of motion of celestial bodies and propagation of light was instrumental in conducting the critical experimental tests of general relativity and in building the astronomical ephemerides of celestial bodies in the solar system with an unparalleled precision. The cornerstone of the theory is the postulate that the solar system is gravitationally isolated from the rest of the universe and the background spacetime is asymptotically flat. The present talk abolishes this postulate and lays down the principles of celestial dynamics of particles and light moving in gravitational field of a localized astronomical system embedded to the expanding universe. We formulate the precise mathematical concept of the Newtonian limit of Einstein ’s field equations in the conformally - flat spacetime and analyse the geodesic equations of motion o f particles and light in this limit. We demonstrate that the equations of motion of particles and light can be reduced to their Newtonian counterparts by doing conformal transformations of time and space coordinates. However, the Newtonian equations for particles and light differ by terms of the first order in the Hubble constant. This leads to the important conclusion that the equations of motion used currently by Space Navigation Centres and Astronomical Observatories for calculating orbits of celestial bodies, are incomplete and missing some terms of cosmological origin. We explicitly identify the missing terms and demonstrate that they bring about a noticeable discrepancy between the observed and calculated astronomical ephemerides. We argue that a number of observed celestial anomalies in the solar system can be explained as caused by the Hubble expansion of the universe.

  6. Celestial ephemerides in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2012-09-01

    The post-Newtonian theory of motion of celestial bodies and propagation of light was instrumental in conducting the critical experimental tests of general relativity and in building the astronomical ephemerides of celestial bodies in the Solar System with unparalleled precision. The cornerstone of the theory is the postulate that the Solar System is gravitationally isolated from the rest of the Universe and the background spacetime is asymptotically flat. The present article extends this theoretical concept and formulates the principles of celestial dynamics of particles and light moving in the gravitational field of a localized astronomical system embedded to the expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. We formulate the precise mathematical concept of the Newtonian limit of Einstein’s field equations in the conformally flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime and analyze the geodesic motion of massive particles and light in this limit. We prove that by doing conformal spacetime transformations, one can reduce the equations of motion of particles and light to the classical form of the Newtonian theory. However, the time arguments in the equations of motion of particles and light differ from each other in terms being proportional to the Hubble constant H. This leads to the important conclusion that the equations of light propagation used currently by space navigation centers for fitting range and Doppler-tracking observations of celestial bodies are missing some terms of the cosmological origin that are proportional to the Hubble constant H. We also analyze the effect of the cosmological expansion on motion of electrons in atoms. We prove that the Hubble expansion does not affect the atomic frequencies and hence does not affect the atomic time scale used in the creation of astronomical ephemerides. We derive the cosmological correction to the light travel time equation and argue that its measurement opens an exciting opportunity to

  7. The expanding universe of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Balachandran, Aru; Westaway, David

    2006-03-01

    Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrP(C). Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of "mad cow disease" (BSE) the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases--including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI), bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE), and Nor98 of sheep--have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE) and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk) can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of "sporadic" disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded. PMID:16609731

  8. The Expanding Universe of Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Joel C; Balachandran, Aru; Westaway, David

    2006-01-01

    Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrPC. Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of “mad cow disease” (BSE) the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases—including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI), bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE), and Nor98 of sheep—have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE) and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk) can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of “sporadic” disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded. PMID:16609731

  9. Tachyonic resonance preheating in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper the tachyonic resonance preheating generated from the bosonic trilinear ϕχ2 interactions in an expanding universe is studied. In λϕ4/4 inflationary model the trilinear interaction, in contrast to the four-legs ϕ2χ2, breaks the conformal symmetry explicitly and the resonant source term becomes nonperiodic, making the Floquet theorem inapplicable. We find that the occupation number of the produced χ particles has a nonlinear exponential growth with exponent ˜x3/2, where x is the conformal time. This should be contrasted with preheating from a periodic resonant source arising, for example, from the four-legs ϕ2χ2 interaction, where the occupation number has a linear exponential growth. We present an analytic method to compute the interference term coming from phases accumulated in nontachyonic scattering regions and show that the effects of the interference term cause ripples on x3/2 curve, a result which is confirmed by numerical analysis. Studying the effects of backreaction of the χ particles, we show that tachyonic resonance preheating in our model can last long enough to transfer most of the energy from the background inflation field ϕ, providing an efficient model for preheating in the chaotic inflation models.

  10. Evolution of gravitational orbits in the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro; Jetzer, Philippe

    2007-03-01

    The gravitational action of the smooth energy-matter components filling in the universe can affect the orbit of a planetary system. Changes are related to the acceleration of the cosmological scale size R. In a universe with significant dark matter, a gravitational system expands or contracts according to the amount and equation of state of the dark energy. At present time, the Solar System, according to the ΛCDM scenario emerging from observational cosmology, should be expanding if we consider only the effect of the cosmological background. Its fate is determined by the equation of state of the dark energy alone. The mean motion and periastron precession of a planet are directly sensitive to R¨/R, whereas variations with time in the semimajor axis and eccentricity are related to its time variation. Actual bounds on the cosmological deceleration parameters q0 from accurate astrometric data of perihelion precession and changes in the third Kepler’s law in the Solar System fall short of 10 orders of magnitude with respect to estimates from observational cosmology. Future radio-ranging measurements of outer planets could improve actual bounds by 5 orders of magnitude.

  11. The effect of a massive object on an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandra, Roshina; Lasenby, Anthony N.; Hobson, Michael P.

    2012-06-01

    A tetrad-based procedure is presented for solving Einstein's field equations for spherically symmetric systems; this approach was first discussed by Lasenby, Doran & Gull in the language of geometric algebra. The method is used to derive metrics describing a point mass in a spatially flat, open and closed expanding universe, respectively. In the spatially flat case, a simple coordinate transformation relates the metric to the corresponding one derived by McVittie. Nonetheless, our use of non-comoving ('physical') coordinates greatly facilitates physical interpretation. For the open and closed universes, our metrics describe different space-times to the corresponding McVittie metrics and we believe the latter to be incorrect. In the closed case, our metric possesses an image mass at the antipodal point of the universe. We calculate the geodesic equations for the spatially flat metric and interpret them. For radial motion in the Newtonian limit, the force acting on a test particle consists of the usual 1/r2 inwards component due to the central mass and a cosmological component proportional to r that is directed outwards (inwards) when the expansion of the universe is accelerating (decelerating). For the standard Λ cold dark matter concordance cosmology, the cosmological force reverses direction at about z≈ 0.67. We also derive an invariant fully general relativistic expression, valid for arbitrary spherically symmetric systems, for the force required to hold a test particle at rest relative to the central point mass.

  12. Expanding Advanced Civilizations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, C.

    The 1950 lunch-table remark by Enrico Fermi `Where is everybody' has started intensive scientific and philosophical discussions about what we call nowadays the `Fermi paradox': If there had been ever a single advanced civilization in the cosmological history of our galaxy, dedicated to expansion, it would have had plenty of time to colonize the entire galaxy via exponential growth. No evidence of present or past alien visits to earth are known to us, leading to the standard conclusion that no advanced expanding civilization has ever existed in the milky-way. This conclusion rest fundamentally on the ad-hoc assumption, that any alien civilizations dedicated to expansion at one time would remain dedicated to expansions forever. Considering our limited knowledge about alien civilizations we need however to relax this basic assumption. Here we show that a substantial and stable population of expanding advanced civilization might consequently exist in our galaxy.

  13. General conditions for scale-invariant perturbations in an expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad E-mail: whkinney@buffalo.edu

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the general properties of expanding cosmological models which generate scale-invariant curvature perturbations in the presence of a variable speed of sound. We show that in an expanding universe, generation of a super-Hubble, nearly scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations over a range of wavelengths consistent with observation requires at least one of three conditions: (1) accelerating expansion, (2) a speed of sound faster than the speed of light, or (3) super-Planckian energy density.

  14. Acceleration of the Universe and Gravity Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verozub, L. V.; Kochetov, A. Y.

    2001-09-01

    The recent results by two teams (the Supernova Cosmology Project and the High-z Supernova Search Team) give evidence that the deceleration parameter in the standard cosmological model is negative. It means that the acceleration of the Universe is positive. It is inconsistent with Newtonian gravitation law, and in General Relativity can be explained only by a nonzero cosmological constant. In the paper [L. V. Verozub, A.Y. Kochetov, Phys. and kinem. Of spacial bodies, 15, 171 (1999)] a model of an expending dust ball from the viewpoint of our gravitation equations [L. V. Verozub, Phys. Lett. A, 156, 404 (1991)] has been considered. It follows from the results that at some parameters of the model the acceleration of the expanding dust ball can be positive. This unexpected from the viewpoint of the Newtonian mechanics fact is a consequence of the peculiarity of the gravitational force [L. V. Verozub, Astr. Nachr. 317, 107 (1996)] resulting from the above gravitation equations. n the present paper a detail analysis of the A.Riess at al. observation data from the viewpoint of the above-mentioned model is given. It is shown that the negative value of the deceleration parameter can be considered as a consequence of the gravitation force peculiarity. It is an alternative explanation to the generally accepted one, which is based on a nonzero cosmological constant in the Einstein's equations.

  15. Spherical Accretion in a Uniformly Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Wasserman, Ira

    1996-10-01

    We consider spherically symmetric accretion of material from an initially homogeneous, uniformly expanding medium onto a Newtonian point mass M. The gas is assumed to evolve adiabatically with a constant adiabatic index F, which we vary over the range Γ ɛ [1, 5/3]. We use a one-dimensional Lagrangian code to follow the spherical infall of material as a function of time. Outflowing shells gravitationally bound to the point mass fall back, giving rise to a inflow rate that, after a rapid rise, declines as a power law in time. If there were no outflow initially, Bondi accretion would result, with a characteristic accretion time-scale ta,0. For gas initially expanding at a uniform rate, with a radial velocity U = R/t0 at radius R, the behavior of the flow at all subsequent times is determined by ta,0/t0. If ta,0/t0 ≫ 1, the gas has no time to respond to pressure forces, so the fluid motion is nearly collisionless. In this case, only loosely bound shells are influenced by pressure gradients and are pushed outward. The late-time evolution of the mass accretion rate Mdot is close to the result for pure dust, and we develop a semianalytic model that accurately accounts for the small effect of pressure gradients in this limit. In the opposite regime, ta,0/t0 ≪ 1, pressure forces significantly affect the motion of the gas. At sufficiently early times, t ≤ ttr, the flow evolved along a sequence of quasi-stationary, Bondi-like states, with a time-dependent Mdot determined by the slowly varying gas density at large distances. However, at later times, t ≥ ttr, the fluid flow enters a dustllke regime; ttr is the time when the instantaneous Bondi accretion radius reaches the marginally bound radius. The transition time ttr depends sensitively on ta,0/t0 for a given Γ and can greatly exceed t0. We show that there exists a critical value Γ = 11/9, below which the transition from fluid to ballistic motion disappears. As one application of our calculations, we consider the

  16. Equations of motion in an Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Petrov, Alexander N.

    2015-06-01

    We make use of an effective field-theoretical approach to derive post-Newtonian equations of motion of hydrodynamical inhomogeneities in cosmology. The matter Lagrangian for the perturbed cosmological model includes dark matter, dark energy, and ordinary baryonic matter. The Lagrangian is expanded in an asymptotic Taylor series around a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. The small parameter of the decomposition is the magnitude of the metric tensor perturbation. Each term of the expansion series is gauge-invariant and all of them together form a basis for the successive post-Newtonian approximations around the background metric. The approximation scheme is covariant and the asymptotic nature of the Lagrangian decomposition does not require the post-Newtonian perturbations to be small though computationally it works the most effectively when the perturbed metric is close enough to the background metric. Temporal evolution of the background metric is governed by dark matter and dark energy and we associate the large-scale inhomogeneities of matter as those generated by the primordial cosmological perturbations in these two components with δρ/ρ ≤ 1. The small scale inhomogeneities are generated by the baryonic matter which is considered as a bare perturbation of the background gravitational field, dark matter and energy. Mathematically, the large scale structure inhomogeneities are given by the homogeneous solution of the post-Newtonian equations while the small scale inhomogeneities are described by a particular solution of these equations with the stress-energy tensor of the baryonic matter that admits δρ/ρ ≫ 1. We explicitly work out the field equations of the first post-Newtonian approximation in cosmology and derive the post-Newtonian equations of motion of the large and small scale inhomogeneities which generalize the covariant law of conservation of stress-energy-momentum tensor of matter in asymptotically-flat spacetime.

  17. In Our Expanding Universe, How Far Can We See and Where Can We Go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Lionel D.

    2009-04-01

    The latest experimental observations conclude that we are living in an infinite universe that is expanding exponentially outward. Clearly, the full extent of this infinite universe is not accessible to our observations today. As we look back toward the Big Bang, there is a visible horizon beyond which we cannot see. As we look toward the future, there is an accessible horizon beyond which we cannot go. What happens to these horizons as we move into the future? Do they grow to encompass the whole universe, or shrink to nothingness as the universe evolves? Do the myriads of galaxies currently seen on deep sky photographs eventually disappear over the horizon as they accelerate beyond the speed of light? Are there distant galaxies visible today that can never be reached, even if we learn to travel at the speed of light? This presentation answers these and other perplexing questions regarding the observational limits of our expanding universe.

  18. Minimal length uncertainty and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, A.; Mortazavi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, minimal length uncertainty is used as a constraint to solve the Friedman equation. It is shown that, based on the minimal length uncertainty principle, the Hubble scale is decreasing which corresponds to an accelerating universe.

  19. Cellular Instabilities and Self-Acceleration of Expanding Spherical Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Kwon, O. C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation we aim to provide experimental information on and thereby understanding of the generation and propagation of spark-ignited, outwardly propagating cellular flames, with three major focuses. The first is to unambiguously demonstrate the influence of the four most important parameters in inducing hydrodynamic and diffusional-thermal cellularities, namely thermal expansion, flame thickness, non-unity Lewis number, and global activation energy. The second is to investigate the critical state for the onset of cellularity for the stretch-affected, expanding flame. The third is to identify and consequently quantify the phenomena of self-acceleration and possibly auto-turbulization of cellular flames. Due to space limitation the effects of activation energy and the critical state for the onset of cellularity will not be discussed herein. Experiments were conducted using C3H8-air and H2-O2-N2 mixtures for their opposite influences of non-equidiffusivity. The additional system parameters varied were the chamber pressure (p) and the mixture composition including the equivalence ratio (phi). From a sequence of the flame images we can assess the propensity of cell formation, and determine the instantaneous flame radius (R), the flame propagation rate, the global stretch rate experienced by the flame, the critical flame radius at which cells start to grow, and the average cell size.

  20. Electron dynamics and ion acceleration in expanding-plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Cannat, F.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P. Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-12-01

    In most expanding-plasma thrusters, ion acceleration occurs due to the formation of ambipolar-type electric fields; a process that depends strongly on the electron dynamics of the discharge. The electron properties also determine the heat flux leaving the thruster as well as the maximum ion energy, which are important parameters for the evaluation of thruster performance. Here we perform an experimental and theoretical investigation with both magnetized, and unmagnetized, low-pressure thrusters to explicitly determine the relationship between the ion energy, E i , and the electron temperature, T e0. With no magnetic field a relatively constant value of {{E}i}/{{T}e0}≈ 6 is found for xenon, while when a magnetic nozzle is present, {{E}i}/{{T}e0} is between about 4-5. These values are shown to be a function of both the magnetic field strength, as well as the electron energy distribution function, which changes significantly depending on the mass flow rate (and hence neutral gas pressure) used in the thruster. The relationship between the ion energy and electron temperature allows estimates to be made for polytropic indices of use in a number of fluid models, as well as estimates of the upper limits to the performance of these types of systems, which for xenon and argon result in maximum specific impulses of about 2500 s and 4500 s respectively.

  1. Browsing Your Virtual Library: The Case of Expanding Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Wayne; Enright, Jeanne; Mackenzie, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Describes "Expanding Universe: a classified search tool for amateur astronomy," a Web site maintained by the Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library which uses a modified form of the Dewey Decimal Classification to organize a large file of astronomy hotlinks. Highlights include structure, HTML coding, design requirements, and future possibilities.…

  2. Einstein's conversion from his static to an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry

    2014-02-01

    In 1917 Einstein initiated modern cosmology by postulating, based on general relativity, a homogenous, static, spatially curved universe. To counteract gravitational contraction he introduced the cosmological constant. In 1922 Alexander Friedman showed that Albert Einstein's fundamental equations also allow dynamical worlds, and in 1927 Georges Lemaître, backed by observational evidence, concluded that our universe was expanding. Einstein impetuously rejected Friedman's as well as Lemaître's findings. However, in 1931 he retracted his former static model in favour of a dynamic solution. This investigation follows Einstein on his hesitating path from a static to the expanding universe. Contrary to an often advocated belief the primary motive for his switch was not observational evidence, but the realisation that his static model was unstable.

  3. Cosmic Accelerators: Engines of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan

    2009-06-23

    The universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. While the night sky appears calm, it is populated by colossal explosions, jets from supermassive black holes, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and shock waves of gas moving at supersonic speeds. These accelerators in the sky boost particles to energies far beyond those we can produce on earth. New types of telescopes, including the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting in space, are now discovering a host of new and more powerful accelerators. Please come and see how these observations are revising our picture of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  4. Self-Attracting Poisson Clouds in an Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoin, Jean

    We consider the following elementary model for clustering by ballistic aggregation in an expanding universe. At the initial time, there is a doubly infinite sequence of particles lying in a one-dimensional universe that is expanding at constant rate. We suppose that each particle p attracts points at a certain rate a(p)/2 depending only on p, and when two particles, say p and q, collide by the effect of attraction, they merge as a single particle p*q. The main purpose of this work is to point at the following remarkable property of Poisson clouds in these dynamics. Under certain technical conditions, if at the initial time the system is distributed according to a spatially stationary Poisson cloud with intensity μ0, then at any time t > 0, the system will again have a Poissonian distribution, now with intensity μt, where the family solves a generalization of Smoluchowski's coagulation equation.

  5. The Hubble party balloon and the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendri, G.; Rosi, T.; Oss, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that the metaphor of the inflated balloon used to describe expanding space-time according to the Hubble law can be transformed into a simple laboratory experiment. We obtain, in terms of measured recession speeds and distances of ink dots drawn on a party balloon, easy renditions of various cosmological models, such as the static one and the Einstein–De Sitter universe.

  6. An Intuitive Approach to Visualizing the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherard, Paul K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the expansion of the universe for a general audience can be a daunting task. Here we present an intuitive representation of the expansion of the universe. To first-order approximation, the expansion of the universe the can be fit to a constant expansion rate. This simple model extrapolates this approximation for the entire history of the universe to create an intuitive expansion diagram that displays the essential characteristics of space-time and the casually and non-casually connected universe. Here, Minkowski space (zero curvature) is transformed to a 3-sphere model which is represented in 2D as a 1-sphere (a circle). The representation is similar to Penrose diagrams where, in this case, space and time have finite representations. Although the model is simplistic, it offers a visual representation of many of the characteristics of the observable universe. Namely, Hubble flow, a horizon, and a clear representation the space-time light paths of that converge on the observer at the present moment (the observable universe). Such diagrams could be valuable for educators to elucidate to an interested audience, including undergraduate and graduate astronomy students, the nature of our expanding universe.

  7. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; Bates, D.A.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2006-10-06

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  8. Accelerated expansion of the Universe in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.

    2004-09-15

    We show that in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with negative Gauss-Bonnet coefficient and without a cosmological constant, one can explain the acceleration of the expanding Universe. We first introduce a solution of the Gauss-Bonnet gravity with negative Gauss-Bonnet coefficient and no cosmological constant term in an empty (n+1)-dimensional bulk. This solution can generate a de Sitter spacetime with curvature n(n+1)/{l_brace}(n-2)(n-3) vertical bar {alpha} vertical bar {r_brace}. We show that an (n-1)-dimensional brane embedded in this bulk can have an expanding feature with acceleration. We also considered a four-dimensional brane world in a five-dimensional empty space with zero cosmological constant and obtain the modified Friedmann equations. The solution of these modified equations in matter-dominated era presents an expanding Universe with negative deceleration and positive jerk which is consistent with the recent cosmological data. We also find that for this solution, the 'n' th derivative of the scale factor with respect to time can be expressed only in terms of Hubble and deceleration parameters.

  9. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  10. Medical humanities and philosophy: is the universe expanding or contracting?

    PubMed

    Stempsey, William E

    2007-12-01

    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered as a distinct field of study has suffered as a result. Indeed, consensus on whether the philosophy of medicine even constitutes a legitimate field of study is lacking. This paper presents an argument for the importance of a broad conception of the philosophy of medicine and the central role it should play in organizing and interpreting the various fields of study that make up the metamedical multiverse. PMID:17549604

  11. Dynamical evolution of domain walls in an expanding universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, William H.; Ryden, Barbara S.; Spergel, David N.

    1989-01-01

    Whenever the potential of a scalar field has two or more separated, degenerate minima, domain walls form as the universe cools. The evolution of the resulting network of domain walls is calculated for the case of two potential minima in two and three dimensions, including wall annihilation, crossing, and reconnection effects. The nature of the evolution is found to be largely independent of the rate at which the universe expands. Wall annihilation and reconnection occur almost as fast as causality allows, so that the horizon volume is 'swept clean' and contains, at any time, only about one, fairly smooth, wall. Quantitative statistics are given. The total area of wall per volume decreases as the first power of time. The relative slowness of the decrease and the smoothness of the wall on the horizon scale make it impossible for walls to both generate large-scale structure and be consistent with quadrupole microwave background anisotropy limits.

  12. Kuss Middle School: Expanding Time to Accelerate School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts 2020, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2004, Kuss Middle School became the first school declared "Chronically Underperforming" by the state of Massachusetts. But by 2010, Kuss had transformed itself into a model for schools around the country seeking a comprehensive turnaround strategy. Kuss is using increased learning time as the primary catalyst to accelerate learning, deepen…

  13. Kinematic Repulsions Between Inertial Systems in AN Expanding Inflationary Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, D.

    2013-09-01

    The cosmological background radiation is observed to be isotropic only within a coordinate system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. This indicates that the Hubble motion describes the recessional motion of an inertial system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. It is shown that when the Hubble parameter is kinematically defined directly in terms of the positions and velocities of mass particles in the universe, it then also defines inertial systems themselves in terms of the distribution and motion of mass particles. It is independent of the velocity of photons because photons always have a speed c relative to the inertial system in which they are located. Therefore the definition of their velocity depends on the definition of the Hubble parameter itself and cannot be used to define H. The derivative of the kinematically defined Hubble parameter with respect to time is shown to always be positive and highly repulsive at the time of the origin of the universe. A model is used which describes a universe that is balanced at the time of its origin so that H approaches zero as the universe expands to infinity.

  14. Expanding the Accelerated Schools Coaching Model: New Applications To Enhance Parallel Reform Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, J. Sabrina

    This article describes how the Los Angeles Accelerated Schools Center (LAASC) expanded the original role of the accelerated schools coach to enhance the effectiveness of parallel reform efforts. Two such efforts are the Design for Excellence Linking Teaching and Achievement (DELTA) collaborative and the Los Angeles Annenberg Metropolitan Project…

  15. Damping of relativistic shocks in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Miller, J. C.; Motta, S.

    1980-10-01

    Consideration is given to the propagation and damping of a strong relativistic shock wave in a uniform medium in light of the possible importance of the phenomenon in galaxy formation. A rigorous proof is presented of the conjecture of Liang and Baker (1977) that the damping time for a shock propagating into a uniform medium tends to infinity as the velocity jump tends to the speed of light, for the case of a barotropic fluid in special relativity. The damping of strong shocks in the spatially flat Robertson-Walker space-time is then examined in order to determine the implications of the conjecture for cosmology. It is concluded that in an expanding spatially flat universe the damping time never exceeds the cosmic expansion time, which would tend to make dubious the role played by shock wave propagation in galaxy formation.

  16. An alternative coupled expanding universe without cosmological singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo

    In this paper an alternative cosmological scenario which resolves the conventional initial sin-gularity problem is proposed. The space-time geometry has an unconventional 2D (1D+1) topological constraint (TC) connecting two manifolds with different curvatures. The two man-ifolds are called L (Left) and R (Right). While the L manifold has always an open curvature, the R can be flat or closed. The TC structure is described as a squeezed space-time following a quasi-stable state according to the luminiferous medium theory [1]. We demonstrate that both the metrics and expansion of the considered new cosmological scenario are well defined and consistent with the presence of an accelerated universe without dark energy. On approach to the initial singularity, the 1D-spatial constraint is found to be stable as time goes to zero. [1] C.I. Christov, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation Volume 80, Issue 1, September 2009, Pages 91-101

  17. Rotating black holes in an expanding Universe from fake supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimento, Samuele; Klemm, Dietmar

    2015-02-01

    Using the recipe of Meessen and Palomo-Lozano (2009 J. High Energy Phys. JHEP05(2009)042), where all fake supersymmetric backgrounds of matter-coupled fake N = 2, d = 4 gauged supergravity were classified, we construct dynamical rotating black holes in an expanding FLRW Universe. This is done for two different prepotentials that are both truncations of the stu model and correspond to just one vector multiplet. In this scenario, the cosmic expansion is driven by two U(1) gauge fields and by a complex scalar that rolls down its potential. Generically, the solutions of Meessen and Palomo-Lozano are fibrations over a Gauduchon-Tod base space, and we make three different choices for this base, namely flat space, the three-sphere and the Berger sphere. In the first two cases, the black holes are determined by harmonic functions on the base, while in the last case they obey a deformed Laplace equation that contains the squashing parameter of the Berger sphere. This is the generalization to a cosmological context of the usual recipe in ungauged supergravity, where black holes are given in terms of harmonic functions on three-dimensional Euclidean space. The constructed solutions may be instrumental in addressing analytically certain aspects of black hole physics in a dynamical context.

  18. Entropy change and phase transitions in an expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, N.; Masood, T.; Demir, N.

    2015-12-01

    The work compiles a correlated study of a gravitational quasi equilibrium thermodynamic approach for establishing and signifying a unique behavior of the cosmological entropy and phase transitions in an expanding Universe. On the basis of prescribed boundary conditions for the cluster temperature a relation for the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters has been derived. A more productive and signifying approach of the correlation functions used for galaxy clustering phenomena shows a unique behavior of the entropy change where a phenomenon known as the gravitational phase transition occurs. This unique behavior occurs with a symmetry breaking from mild clustering to low clustering and from mild clustering to high clustering which differs from a normal symmetry breaking in material sciences. We also derive results for the specific latent heat associated with the phase transitions of 3.20 T_c and 0.55 T_c for the mildly clustered phase to the low clustered phase and from the mildly clustered phase to the highly clustered phase, respectively.

  19. Life, the Universe, and Nothing: Life and Death in an Ever-expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Lawrence M.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2000-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the cosmological constant is not zero, or that we live in an open universe. We examine the implications for the future under these assumptions, and find that they are striking. If the universe is cosmological constant-dominated, our ability to probe the evolution of large-scale structure will decrease with time; presently observable distant sources will disappear on a timescale comparable to the period of stellar burning. Moreover, while the universe might expand forever, the integrated conscious lifetime of any civilization will be finite, although it can be astronomically long. We argue that this latter result is far more general. In the absence of possible exotic and uncertain strong gravitational effects, the total information recoverable by any civilization over the entire history of our universe is finite. Assuming that consciousness has a physical computational basis, and therefore is ultimately governed by quantum mechanics, life cannot be eternal. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  20. Charged black holes in expanding Einstein-de Sitter universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuela G.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2015-06-01

    Inspired by a previous work by McClure and Dyer (2006) (Class. Quantum Grav. 23 1971), we analyze some solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations that were originally written to describe charged black holes in cosmological backgrounds. A detailed analysis of the electromagnetic sources for a sufficiently general metric is performed, and we then focus on deriving the electromagnetic four-current as well as the conserved electric charge of each metric. The charged McVittie solution is revisited, and a brief study of its causal structure is performed, showing that it may represent a charged black hole in an expanding universe, with the black hole horizon being formed at infinite late times. Charged versions of solutions originally put forward by Vaidya (Vd) and Sultana and Dyer (SD) are also analyzed. It is shown that the charged SD metric requires a global electric current, besides a central (spherically symmetric) electric charge. With the aim of comparing to the charged McVittie metric, new charged solutions of Vd and SD types are considered. In these cases, the original mass and charge parameters are replaced by particular functions of the cosmological time. In the new generalized charged Vaidya metric, the black hole horizon never forms, whereas in the new generalized SD case, both the Cauchy and the black hole horizons develop at infinite late times. A charged version of the Thakurta metric is also studied here. It is also a new solution. As in the charged SD case, the natural source of the electromagnetic field is a central electric charge with an additional global electric current. The global structure is briefly studied, and it is verified that the corresponding spacetime may represent a charged black hole in a cosmological background. All the solutions present initial singularities as found in the McVittie metric.

  1. Expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations that induce an anomalous acceleration into the Standard Model of Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Temple, Blake; Smoller, Joel

    2009-08-25

    We derive a system of three coupled equations that implicitly defines a continuous one-parameter family of expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations, such that the Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology is embedded as a single point in this family. By approximating solutions near the center to leading order in the Hubble length, the family reduces to an explicit one-parameter family of expanding spacetimes, given in closed form, that represents a perturbation of the Standard Model. By introducing a comoving coordinate system, we calculate the correction to the Hubble constant as well as the exact leading order quadratic correction to the redshift vs. luminosity relation for an observer at the center. The correction to redshift vs. luminosity entails an adjustable free parameter that introduces an anomalous acceleration. We conclude (by continuity) that corrections to the redshift vs. luminosity relation observed after the radiation phase of the Big Bang can be accounted for, at the leading order quadratic level, by adjustment of this free parameter. The next order correction is then a prediction. Since nonlinearities alone could actuate dissipation and decay in the conservation laws associated with the highly nonlinear radiation phase and since noninteracting expanding waves represent possible time-asymptotic wave patterns that could result, we propose to further investigate the possibility that these corrections to the Standard Model might be the source of the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies, an explanation not requiring the cosmological constant or dark energy. PMID:19706502

  2. Expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations that induce an anomalous acceleration into the Standard Model of Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Blake; Smoller, Joel

    2009-01-01

    We derive a system of three coupled equations that implicitly defines a continuous one-parameter family of expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations, such that the Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology is embedded as a single point in this family. By approximating solutions near the center to leading order in the Hubble length, the family reduces to an explicit one-parameter family of expanding spacetimes, given in closed form, that represents a perturbation of the Standard Model. By introducing a comoving coordinate system, we calculate the correction to the Hubble constant as well as the exact leading order quadratic correction to the redshift vs. luminosity relation for an observer at the center. The correction to redshift vs. luminosity entails an adjustable free parameter that introduces an anomalous acceleration. We conclude (by continuity) that corrections to the redshift vs. luminosity relation observed after the radiation phase of the Big Bang can be accounted for, at the leading order quadratic level, by adjustment of this free parameter. The next order correction is then a prediction. Since nonlinearities alone could actuate dissipation and decay in the conservation laws associated with the highly nonlinear radiation phase and since noninteracting expanding waves represent possible time-asymptotic wave patterns that could result, we propose to further investigate the possibility that these corrections to the Standard Model might be the source of the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies, an explanation not requiring the cosmological constant or dark energy. PMID:19706502

  3. Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    After twenty years of expanding school-choice options, state leaders, educators, and families have a new tool: course choice, a strategy for students to learn from unconventional providers that might range from top-tier universities or innovative community colleges to local employers, labs, or hospitals. In "Expanding the Education Universe:…

  4. Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-04

    Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

  5. Exploding Stars and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae are exceptionally interesting astronomical objects: they punctuate the end of stellar evolution, create the heavy elements, and blast the interstellar gas with energetic shock waves. By studying supernovae, we can learn how these important aspects of cosmic evolution take place. Over the decades, we have learned that some supernovae are produced by gravitational collapse, and others by thermonuclear explosions. By understanding what supernovae are, or at least learning how they behave, supernovae explosions have been harnessed for the problem of measuring cosmic distances with some astonishing results. Carefully calibrated supernovae provide the best extragalactic distance indicators to probe the distances to galaxies and to measure the Hubble constant. Even more interesting is the evidence from supernovae that cosmic expansion has been speeding up over the last 5 billion years. We attribute this acceleration to a mysterious dark energy whose effects are clear, but whose nature is obscure. Combining the cosmic expansion history traced by supernovae with clues from galaxy clustering and cosmic geometry from the microwave background has produced today's standard, but peculiar, picture of a universe that is mostly dark energy, braked (with diminishing effect) by dark matter, and illuminated by a pinch of luminous baryons. In this talk, I will show how the attempt to understand supernovae, facilitated by ever-improving instruments, has led to the ability to measure the properties of dark energy. Looking ahead, the properties of supernovae as measured at infrared wavelengths seem to hold the best promise for more precise and accurate distances to help us understand the puzzle of dark energy. My own contribution to this work has been carried out in joyful collaboration with many excellent students, postdocs, and colleagues and with generous support from the places I have worked, the National Science Foundation, and from NASA.

  6. The expanding regulatory universe of p53 in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fesler, Andrew; Zhang, Ning; Ju, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppresser gene TP53 is one of the most frequently deleted or mutated genes in gastrointestinal cancers. As a transcription factor, p53 regulates a number of important protein coding genes to control cell cycle, cell death, DNA damage/repair, stemness, differentiation and other key cellular functions. In addition, p53 is also able to activate the expression of a number of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) through direct binding to the promoter region of these miRNAs.  Many miRNAs have been identified to be potential tumor suppressors by regulating key effecter target mRNAs. Our understanding of the regulatory network of p53 has recently expanded to include long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Like miRNA, lncRNAs have been found to play important roles in cancer biology.  With our increased understanding of the important functions of these non-coding RNAs and their relationship with p53, we are gaining exciting new insights into the biology and function of cells in response to various growth environment changes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the ever expanding involvement of non-coding RNAs in the p53 regulatory network and its implications for our understanding of gastrointestinal cancer.

  7. Expanding School-District/University Partnerships to Advance Health Promoting Schools Implementation and Efficacy in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chieh-Hsing; Chang, Fong-Ching; Liao, Li-Ling; Niu, Yu-Zhen; Cheng, Chi-Chia; Shih, Shu-Fang; Chang, Tzu-Chau; Chou, Hsin-Pei

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Taiwan government expanded its support of school-district/university partnership programs that promote the implementation of the evidenced-based Health Promoting Schools (HPS) program. This study examined whether expanding the support for this initiative was effective in advancing HPS implementation, perceived HPS impact and perceived…

  8. Inhomogeneous and anisotropic Universe and apparent acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanizza, G.; Tedesco, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) Bianchi type I (plane symmetric) model of the Universe. We study and solve Einstein field equations. We investigate the effects of such a model of the Universe; in particular, these results are important in understanding the effect of the combined presence of an inhomogeneous and anisotropic universe. The observational magnitude-redshift data deviated from the UNION 2 catalog have been analyzed in the framework of this LTB anisotropic universe, and the fit has been achieved without the inclusion of any dark energy.

  9. The Power of Montessori's Positive Psychology in an Expanding Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Relates Montessori theory of development with the concept of connection to the universe and natural world, noting Montessori education's role in nurturing reestablished connection with the natural world. Describes events leading to a fulfilled life as part of psychological normalization, noting the importance of identifying positive tendencies of…

  10. Promising Practices: New York State Universal Prekindergarten. Expanded Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Susan A.; Lekies, Kristi S.; Cochran, Mon

    In response to recent state legislation, school districts in New York developed plans for universal prekindergarten (UPK) programs for the 1998-1999 academic year. Based on an analysis of the first year prekindergarten program plans for 63 upstate New York districts (with follow-up information on 29 districts) and 32 New York City districts, this…

  11. Accelerating universal Kriging interpolation algorithm using CUDA-enabled GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tangpei

    2013-04-01

    Kriging algorithms are a group of important interpolation methods, which are very useful in many geological applications. However, the algorithm based on traditional general purpose processors can be computationally expensive, especially when the problem scale expands. Inspired by the current trend in graphics processing technology, we proposed an efficient parallel scheme to accelerate the universal Kriging algorithm on the NVIDIA CUDA platform. Some high-performance mathematical functions have been introduced to calculate the compute-intensive steps in the Kriging algorithm, such as matrix-vector multiplication and matrix-matrix multiplication. To further optimize performance, we reduced the memory transfer overhead by reconstructing the time-consuming loops, specifically for the execution on GPU. In the numerical experiment, we compared the performances among different multi-core CPU and GPU implementations to interpolate a geological site. The improved CUDA implementation shows a nearly 18× speedup with respect to the sequential program and is 6.32 times faster compared to the OpenMP-based version running on Intel Xeon E5320 quad-cores CPU and scales well with the size of the system.

  12. Supernovae, an accelerating universe and the cosmological constant

    PubMed Central

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of supernova explosions halfway back to the Big Bang give plausible evidence that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating since that epoch, approximately 8 billion years ago and suggest that energy associated with the vacuum itself may be responsible for the acceleration. PMID:10200242

  13. Expanding the Universe of "Astronomy on Tap" Public Outreach Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Levine, Brian; Livermore, Rachael C.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Tyndall, Amy; Muna, Demitri; Garofali, Kristen; Morris, Brett; Byler, Nell; Fyhrie, Adalyn; Rehnberg, Morgan; Hart, Quyen N.; Connelly, Jennifer L.; Silvia, Devin W.; Morrison, Sarah J.; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Tremblay, Grant; Schwamb, Megan E.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomy on Tap (AoT, astronomyontap.org) is free public outreach event featuring engaging science presentations in bars, often combined with music, games, and prizes, to encourage a fun, interactive atmosphere. AoT events feature several short astronomy-related presentations primarily by local professional scientists, but also by visiting scientists, students, educators, amatuer astronomers, writers, and artists. Events are held in social venues (bars, coffee shops, art galleries, etc.) in order to bring science directly to the public in a relaxed, informal atmosphere. With this we hope to engage a more diverse audience than typical lectures at academic and cultural institutions and to develop enthusiasm for science among voting, tax-paying adults. The flexible format and content of an AoT event is easy to adapt and expand based on the priorities, resources, and interests of local organizers. The social nature of AoT events provides important professional development and networking opportunities in science communication. Since the first New York City event in April 2013, Astronomy on Tap has expanded to more than ten cities globally, including monthly events in NYC, Austin, Seattle, and Tucson; semi-regular events in Columbus, New Haven, Santiago, Toronto, and Denver; occasional (so far) events in Rochester (NY), Baltimore, Lansing, and Washington, DC; and one-off events in Chicago and Taipei. Several venues regularly attract audiences of over 200 people. We have received media coverage online, in print, and occasionally even on radio and television. In this poster we describe the overarching goals and characteristics of AoT events, distinct adaptations of various locations, resources we have developed, and the methods we use to coordinate among the worldwide local organizers.

  14. Accelerated universes from type IIA compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blåbäck, Johan; Danielsson, Ulf; Dibitetto, Giuseppe E-mail: ulf.danielsson@physics.uu.se

    2014-03-01

    We study slow-roll accelerating cosmologies arising from geometric compactifications of type IIA string theory on T{sup 6}/(Z{sub 2}  ×  Z{sub 2}). With the aid of a genetic algorithm, we are able to find quasi-de Sitter backgrounds with both slow-roll parameters of order 0.1. Furthermore, we study their evolution by numerically solving the corresponding time-dependent equations of motion, and we show that they actually display a few e-folds of accelerated expansion. Finally, we comment on their perturbative reliability.

  15. Black holes in an expanding universe and supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietmar; Nozawa, Masato

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the supersymmetric solutions to five and six-dimensional minimal (un)gauged supergravities for which the bilinear Killing vector constructed from the Killing spinor is null. We focus on the spacetimes which admit an additional SO (1 , 1) boost symmetry. Upon the toroidal dimensional reduction along the Killing vector corresponding to the boost, we show that the solution in the ungauged case describes a charged, nonextremal black hole in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe with an expansion driven by a massless scalar field. For the gauged case, the solution corresponds to a charged, nonextremal black hole embedded conformally into a Kantowski-Sachs universe. It turns out that these dimensional reductions break supersymmetry since the bilinear Killing vector and the Killing vector corresponding to the boost fail to commute. This represents a new mechanism of supersymmetry breaking that has not been considered in the literature before.

  16. Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Hechanova

    2007-07-25

    Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability.

  17. Functional diversification of Argonautes in nematodes: an expanding universe

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Amy H.; Blaxter, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many diverse RNAi (RNA interference) pathways have been discovered that mediate gene silencing at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The diversity of RNAi pathways is inherently linked to the evolution of Ago (Argonaute) proteins, the central protein component of RISCs (RNA-induced silencing complexes). An increasing number of diverse Agos have been identified in different species. The functions of most of these proteins are not yet known, but they are generally assumed to play roles in development, genome stability and/or protection against viruses. Recent research in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has expanded the breadth of RNAi functions to include transgenerational epigenetic memory and, possibly, environmental sensing. These functions are inherently linked to the production of secondary siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) that bind to members of a clade of WAGOs (worm-specific Agos). In the present article, we review briefly what is known about the evolution and function of Ago proteins in eukaryotes, including the expansion of WAGOs in nematodes. We postulate that the rapid evolution of WAGOs enables the exceptional functional plasticity of nematodes, including their capacity for parasitism. PMID:23863149

  18. Dynamics of Q-balls in an expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Palti, Eran; Saffin, P.M.; Copeland, E.J.

    2004-10-15

    We analyze the evolution of light Q-balls in a cosmological background, and find a number of interesting features. For Q-balls formed with a size comparable to the Hubble radius, we demonstrate that there is no charge radiation, and that the Q-ball maintains a constant physical radius. Large expansion rates cause charge migration to the surface of the Q-ball, corresponding to a nonhomogeneous internal rotation frequency. We argue that this is an important phenomenon as it leads to a large surface charge and possible fragmentation of the Q-ball. We also explore the deviation of the Q-ball profile function from the static case. By introducing a parameter {epsilon}, which is the ratio of the Hubble parameter to the frequency of oscillation of the Q-ball field, and using solutions to an analytically approximated equation for the profile function, we determine the dependence of the new features on the expansion rate. This allows us to gain an understanding of when they should be considered and when they can be neglected, thereby placing restrictions on the existence of homogeneous Q-balls in expanding backgrounds.

  19. Stochastic acceleration of solar cosmic rays in an expanding coronal magnetic bottle

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D.J.

    1980-04-01

    Several key features of the coronal propagation of solar cosmic rays have previously been explained by a ''magnetic bottle'' model proposed by Schatten and Mullan. The major apparent difficulty with that model is that expansion of the closed bottle might have a severe cooling effect on the cosmic rays trapped inside. In the present paper, we examine this difficulty by applying the equation for stochastic acceleration to an expanding bottle. Following our earlier suggestion, the scattering centers are taken to be small-scale magnetic inhomogeneities which are present in the corona prior to the flare, and which are set into turbulent motion when a flare-induced shock passes by. We identify the inhomogeneities with the collapsing magnetic neutral sheets discussed by Levine in the context of normal coronal heating. We find that the acceleration efficiencies can indeed be high enough to offset expansive cooling: within the time intervals that are typically available for closed bottle evolution (1000--3000 s), protons can be accelerated from 1 keV to 100 MeV and more. Our results indicate that the flux of particles which are accelerated to (say) 100 MeV is very sensitive to shock speed if this speed is less than about 10/sup 3/ km s/sup -1/.

  20. Heating and acceleration of solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous expanding plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Viñas, Adolfo F.

    2016-03-01

    Near the Sun (< 10Rs) the acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super-Alfvénic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  1. Positive Deviance during Organization Change: Researchers' Social Construction of Expanded University Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Claire Euline

    2013-01-01

    Many universities have expanded from teaching only to include research goals, requiring shifts in organization behavior. An exploratory case study method was used to examine these dynamics among positive deviant researchers at the University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech), the single case examined, from a social construction perspective. As a…

  2. Black hole in the expanding universe from intersecting branes

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Nozawa, Masato

    2010-02-15

    We study physical properties and global structures of a time-dependent, spherically symmetric solution obtained via the dimensional reduction of intersecting M-branes. We find that the spacetime describes a maximally charged black hole which asymptotically tends to the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe filled by a stiff matter. The metric solves the field equations of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton system, in which four Abelian gauge fields couple to the dilation with different coupling constants. The spacetime satisfies the dominant energy condition and is characterized by two parameters, Q and {tau}, related to the Maxwell charge and the relative ratio of black-hole horizon radii, respectively. In spite of the nontrivial time dependence of the metric, it turns out that the black-hole event horizon is a Killing horizon. This unexpected symmetry may be ascribed to the fact that the 11-dimensional brane configurations are supersymmetric in the static limit. Finally, combining with laws of the trapping horizon, we discuss the thermodynamic properties of the black hole. It is shown that the horizon possesses a nonvanishing temperature, contrary to the extremal Reissner-Nordstroem solution.

  3. Black holes in an expanding universe from fake supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimento, Samuele; Klemm, Dietmar

    2013-04-01

    In arXiv:0902.4814, a general recipe to construct fake supersymmetric solutions to fake N = 2, d = 4 gauged supergravity coupled to abelian vector multiplets was presented. We use these results to find new multi-centered black hole solutions in an asymptotically FLRW universe. These satisfy the weak energy condition and are maximally charged under two U(1) gauge fields coupled to a scalar, which drives the cosmic expansion while rolling down its potential. As a special subcase, our black holes include the ones constructed previously by Gibbons and Maeda in arXiv:0912.2809. The latter contain two non-negative real numbers n S , n T obeying the constraint n S + n T = 4, with the cases n T = 4 and n T = 1 corresponding to the Kastor-Traschen and the Maeda-Ohta-Uzawa solution respectively. We show that n S , n T arise directly as exponents in the prepotential of the fake supergravity theory, and that the above constraint stems from the fact that the prepotential must be a homogeneous function of degree two. Finally, some physical properties of the black holes, like asymptotic behaviour, curvature singularities and trapping horizons, are also discussed. Similar to other solutions that appeared previously in the literature, there is a symmetry enhancement near the event horizon, which becomes therefore a Killing horizon, in spite of the highly dynamical nature of the original spacetime. The temperature associated to this Killing horizon turns out to be nonvanishing.

  4. The formation and evolution of galaxies in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino-Rodriguez, Daniel

    This PhD thesis is part of an ongoing effort in improving the theory of galaxy formation in a LCDM Universe. We include more realistic models of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback. A special attention has been given to the role of supernova explosions and stellar winds in the galaxy assembly. These processes happen at very small scales (parsecs), but they affect the inter-stellar medium (ISM) at Kpc-scales and regulate the formation of a whole galaxy. Previous attempts of mimicking these effects in simulations of galaxy formation use very simplified assumptions. We develop a much more realistic prescription for modeling the feedback, which minimizes any ad hoc sub-grid physics. We start with developing high resolution models of the ISM and formulate the conditions required for its realistic functionality: formation of a multi-phase medium with hot chimneys, super-bubbles, cold molecular phase, and very slow consumption of gas. We find that this can be achieved only by doing what the real Universe does: formation of dense (> 10 H atoms cm -3 ), cold ( T [approximate] 100 K) molecular phase, where star formation happens, and which young stars disrupt. Another important ingredient is the effect of runaway stars: massive binary stars ejected from molecular clouds when one of the companions becomes a supernova. These stars can move to 10-100 parsecs away from molecular clouds before exploding themselves as supernovae. This greatly facilitates the feedback. Once those effects are implemented into cosmological simulations, galaxy formation proceeds more realistically. For example, we do not have the overcooling problem. The angular momentum problem (resulting in a too massive bulge) is also reduced substantially: the rotation curves are nearly flat. The galaxy formation also becomes more violent. Just as often observed in absorption lines studies, there are substantial outflows from forming and active galaxies. At high redshifts we routinely find gas

  5. The Turning and Evolution of the Recent Acceleration Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi; Tan, A.

    2007-05-01

    The turning point and evolution characteristics of the universe are investigated through solving the Friedmann equation with a non-zero cosmological constant. Choosing the present-time Hubble constant, the radius of the present universe , and the density parameter in matter as three key parameters, we obtain the density parameter in dark energy, the cosmological constant, the mass of the universe, the turning point redshif, the age of the present universe, and the time-dependent expansion rate, velocity, radius, and acceleration parameter of the universe. It is shown that the turing point redshift is soly dependent of the density parameters in matter and dark energy. For the flat universe, it turned from past deceleration to recent acceleration when its size was 1/2 to 2/3 of the present size if the density parameter in matter is between 0.2 and 0.4. The expansion rate is very large at initial and decreases with time to approach the Hubble constant. The expansion velocity can be over the light speed in the early period, which decreases to the minimum at the turning point and then increases with time to approach the ratio of the present radius to the Hubble radius times the square root of the density parameter in dark energy. The solution of the time-dependent radius increases with time. The present time depends on the three key parameters. The universe with a larger present radius, smaller Hubble constant, or smaller density parameter in dark energy is elder. The universe with greater density parameter in dark energy accelerates faster recently. The open and closed universes can also be accelerated recently. The turning points and evolution characteristics among different types of the universe and different sets of key parameters are compared. This presentation will show the details, supported by NASA grant (NNG04GD59G).

  6. Teaching and Research with Accelerators at Tarleton State University

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel K.

    2009-03-10

    Tarleton State University students began performing both research and laboratory experiments using accelerators in 1998 through visitation programs at the University of North Texas, US Army Research Laboratory, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Carderock. In 2003, Tarleton outfitted its new science building with a 1 MV pelletron that was donated by the California Institution of Technology. The accelerator has been upgraded and supports a wide range of classes for both the Physics program and the ABET accredited Engineering Physics program as well as supplying undergraduate research opportunities on campus. A discussion of various laboratory activities and research projects performed by Tarleton students will be presented.

  7. The solutions and thermodynamic dark energy in the accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, E. C. Günay

    2016-03-01

    Recently, Tachyonic matter expressed in terms of scalar field is suggested to be the reason of acceleration of the universe as dark energy [1]-[3]. In this study, dynamic solutions and thermodynamic properties of matters such as Tachyonic matters were investigated.

  8. When can an "Expanding Universe" look "Static" and vice versa: A comprehensive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2015-02-01

    The Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric expressed, in terms of comoving coordinates (r, t), always looks nonstatic. But by employing the recently derived curvature/Schwarzschild form, (R, T), of FRW metric (A. Mitra, Gravit. Cosmol. 19 (2013) 134), we show here that FRW metric can assume static forms when the net energy density (ρe) is solely due to the vacuum contribution. Earlier this question was explored by Florides (Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 12 (1980) 563) whose approach was complex and of purely mathematical nature. Also, unlike Florides, we do not assume any a priori separability of T(r, t) = F(r)G(t) and thus our treatment is truly general and yet simpler. More interestingly, even if the net energy density involved in a certain FRW model may appear to be nonzero from its algebric appearance, it may still be possible that tacitly ρe = 0 and the model actually corresponds to a vacuum Minkowski metric. For instance, it has been found that FRW universes which appear to be expanding with a fixed speed in comoving coordinates are intrinsically static universes. While such a linearly expanding universe having k = -1 is well-known as the Milne universe, the corresponding k = 0 case has recently been shown to be vacuum in disguise (A. Mitra, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 442 (2014) 382). In addition, here we show that even the k = +1 linearly "expanding" universe (in comoving coordinates) tacitly corresponds to Einstein's static universe.

  9. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe by particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ibotombi N.; Devi, Bembem Y.

    2016-04-01

    A spatially flat FRW Universe in the context of particle creation has been discussed by assuming a variable deceleration parameter which is a function of scale factor. A dust model in which creation of particles giving a negative creation pressure has been studied. Treating the Universe as an open adiabatic system, it is supposed that matter creation takes place out of gravitational energy. In this model, the Universe shows an accelerating phase of its expansion. Total number of particles increases while number of particle density decreases. Some physical implications of this model are investigated.

  10. The Expanded Developmental Periphery: Framing the Institutional Role of University Continuing Education Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Burton Clark's notion of the expanded developmental periphery provides a useful conceptual framework for examining the differing relationships between continuing and professional education units and the institutional core of traditional research universities. The intent is to examine how Clark's notion offers a…

  11. The Great Attractor: At the Limits of Hubble's Law of the Expanding Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdin, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Presents the origin and mathematics of Hubble's Law of the expanding universe. Discusses limitations to this law and the related concepts of standard candles, elliptical galaxies, and streaming motions, which are conspicuous deviations from the law. The third of three models proposed as explanations for streaming motions is designated: The Great…

  12. Accelerated expansion of the universe à la the Stueckelberg mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Arık, Metin; Katırcı, Nihan; Kavuk, Mehmet E-mail: metin.arik@boun.edu.tr E-mail: mehmet.kavuk@boun.edu.tr

    2014-07-01

    We investigate a cosmological model in which the Stueckelberg fields are non-minimally coupled to the scalar curvature in a gauge invariant manner. We present not only a solution that can be considered in the context of the late time acceleration of the universe but also a solution compatible with the inflationary cosmology. Distinct behaviors of the scalar and vector fields together with the real valued mass gained by the Stueckelberg mechanism lead the universe to go through the two different accelerated expansion phases with a decelerated expansion phase between them. On the other hand, in the solutions we present, if the mass is null then the universe is either static or exhibits a simple power law expansion due to the vector field potential.

  13. National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J

    2012-07-01

    For 2011-13, US health spending is projected to grow at 4.0 percent, on average--slightly above the historically low growth rate of 3.8 percent in 2009. Preliminary data suggest that growth in consumers' use of health services remained slow in 2011, and this pattern is expected to continue this year and next. In 2014, health spending growth is expected to accelerate to 7.4 percent as the major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act begin. For 2011 through 2021, national health spending is projected to grow at an average rate of 5.7 percent annually, which would be 0.9 percentage point faster than the expected annual increase in the gross domestic product during this period. By 2021, federal, state, and local government health care spending is projected to be nearly 50 percent of national health expenditures, up from 46 percent in 2011, with federal spending accounting for about two-thirds of the total government share. Rising government spending on health care is expected to be driven by faster growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and the introduction of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for health insurance exchange plans. PMID:22692089

  14. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactors in Japanese Universities: Experimental Study Using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shiroya, S.; Unesaki, H.; Misawa, T.

    2001-06-17

    A series of basic experiments for an accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADSR) was officially launched in financial year 2000 at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) as a joint-use program among Japanese universities. These experiments are closely related to the future plan of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. A final goal of this plan is to establish a next-generation neutron source as a substitute for the 5-MW Kyoto University Reactor and based on the ADSR concept to promote joint research among Japanese universities. An attractive point of the ADSR system is that either pulsed or steady neutrons can be provided depending on the accelerator's operation mode.

  15. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Brau, James E [University of Oregon

    2014-06-25

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  16. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2010-11-23

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  17. Nonlinear electromagnetic fields as a source of universe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2016-04-01

    A model of nonlinear electromagnetic fields with a dimensional parameter β is proposed. From PVLAS experiment the bound on the parameter β was obtained. Electromagnetic fields are coupled with the gravitation field and we show that the universe accelerates due to nonlinear electromagnetic fields. The magnetic universe is considered and the stochastic magnetic field is a background. After inflation the universe decelerates and approaches to the radiation era. The range of the scale factor, when the causality of the model and a classical stability take place, was obtained. The spectral index, the tensor-to-scalar ratio, and the running of the spectral index were estimated which are in approximate agreement with the Planck, WMAP, and BICEP2 data.

  18. Universality of the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    AlGendy, Mohammad; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2014-08-20

    On the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star, the effective centrifugal force decreases the effective acceleration due to gravity (as measured in the rotating frame) at the equator while increasing the acceleration at the poles due to the centrifugal flattening of the star into an oblate spheroid. We compute the effective gravitational acceleration for relativistic rapidly rotating neutron stars and show that for a star with mass M, equatorial radius R{sub e} , and angular velocity Ω, the deviations of the effective acceleration due to gravity from the nonrotating case take on a universal form that depends only on the compactness ratio M/R{sub e} , the dimensionless square of the angular velocity Ω{sup 2}R{sub e}{sup 3}/GM, and the latitude on the star's surface. This dependence is universal, in that it has very little dependence on the neutron star's equation of state. The effective gravity is expanded in the slow-rotation limit to show the dependence on the effective centrifugal force, oblate shape of the star, and the quadrupole moment of the gravitational field. In addition, an empirical fit and simple formula for the effective gravity is found. We find that the increase in the acceleration due to gravity at the poles is of the same order of magnitude as the decrease in the effective acceleration due to gravity at the equator for all realistic value of mass, radius, and spin. For neutron stars that spin with frequencies near 600 Hz, the difference between the effective gravity at the poles and the equator is about 20%.

  19. Unemployment, Entrepreneurial Education and Mega Universities: Challenges to Expanding Access in Education in Nigeria University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Undie, John Atewhoble; Okafor, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In fundamental economics, individuals acquired education for two broad reasons, as an investment and as consumption. The investment function of education has continued to create tension for job search leading to cases of unemployment. Entrepreneurship education and establishment of mega universities have been identified as panaceas. This paper…

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of North Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, J. M.; Matteson, S.; McDaniel, F. D.; Duggan, J. L.

    1989-04-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometry system designed for analysis of electronic materials is being developed and installed on the University of North Texas 3 MV tandem accelerator (National Electrostatics Corporation 9-SDH). High-resolution magnetic (40° deflection, {M}/{ΔM ≈ 350}, maximum mass-energy product 69 MeVu) and electro static (45 ° deflection, E/ q of 4.8 MeV, {E}/{ΔE}≈ 730 ) analysis, coupled with a 1.5 m time-of-flight path and total energy detection (surface barrier detector) forms the basis of the detection system. In order to provide stable element detection capability at the parts-per-trillion level in electronic materials (Si, GaAs, HgCdTe), a custom ion source, incorporating mass analysis of the sputtering beam, ultraclean slits, low cross-contamination and UHV capability, is being constructed.

  1. Accelerating Universes from Compactification on a Warped Conifold

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    2007-02-09

    We find a cosmological solution corresponding to the compactification of 10D supergravity on a warped conifold that easily circumvents the ''no-go'' theorem given for a warped or flux compactification, providing new perspectives for the study of supergravity or superstring theory in cosmological backgrounds. With fixed volume moduli of the internal space, the model can explain a physical Universe undergoing an accelerated expansion in the 4D Einstein frame, for a sufficiently long time. The solution found in the limit that the warp factor dependent on the radial coordinate y is extremized (giving a constant warping) is smooth and it supports a flat four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology undergoing a period of accelerated expansion with slowly rolling or stabilized volume moduli.

  2. Accelerating universes from compactification on a warped conifold.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ishwaree P

    2007-02-01

    We find a cosmological solution corresponding to the compactification of 10D supergravity on a warped conifold that easily circumvents the "no-go" theorem given for a warped or flux compactification, providing new perspectives for the study of supergravity or superstring theory in cosmological backgrounds. With fixed volume moduli of the internal space, the model can explain a physical Universe undergoing an accelerated expansion in the 4D Einstein frame, for a sufficiently long time. The solution found in the limit that the warp factor dependent on the radial coordinate y is extremized (giving a constant warping) is smooth and it supports a flat four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology undergoing a period of accelerated expansion with slowly rolling or stabilized volume moduli. PMID:17358928

  3. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  4. The Day We Found the Universe: The Little-Known History of How We Came to Understand the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartusiak, M.

    2011-09-01

    This will be an overview of the birth of modern cosmology in the 1920s, when the true nature and startling size of the universe was at last revealed. While today Edwin Hubble gets most of the credit, the story is far more complex, involving battles of wills, clever insights, and wrong turns made by a number of investigators before Hubble. The Hubble Space Telescope could easily have had another name if certain events had turned out differently: if Lick Observatory director James Keeler had not prematurely died in 1900 and solved the mystery of the spiral nebulae years earlier; if Lick astronomer Heber Curtis had not taken a promotion in 1920, taking him out of the game; or if astronomer Harlow Shapley, Hubble's nemesis, was not mulishly wedded to a flawed vision of the cosmos. Half the work to prove the universe was expanding was actually performed by Lowell Observatory astronomer Vesto Slipher; Hubble used Slipher's data in 1929 to establish what came to be known as the Hubble Law without citation or acknowledgment, a serious breach of scientific protocol. Even then, Hubble was never a vocal champion of the idea that the universe was expanding. Hubble always coveted an unblemished record: the perfect wife, the perfect scientific findings, the perfect friends. Throughout his life, Hubble claimed that the galaxies fleeing outward were apparent velocities. He wanted to protect his legacy in case a new law of physics was revealed that changed that explanation.

  5. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  6. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  7. University programs of the U.S. Department of Energy advanced accelerator applications program

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D. E.; Ward, T. E.; Bresee, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY-01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of transmutation of nuclear waste. An Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF), which may be built during the first decade of the 21st Century, is a major component of this effort. The ADTF would include a large, state-of-the-art charged-particle accelerator, proton-neutron target systems, and accelerator-driven R&D systems. This new facility and its underlying science and technology will require a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians. In addition, other applications of nuclear science and engineering (e.g., proliferation monitoring and defense, nuclear medicine, safety regulation, industrial processes, and many others) require increased academic and national infrastructure and student populations. Thus, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project to support the infrastructure requirements of nuclear energy, science and technology fields as well as the special needs of the DOE transmutation program. In this paper we describe university programs that have supported, are supporting, and will support the R&D necessary for the AAA Project. Previous work included research for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, current (FY-01) programs include graduate fellowships and research for the AAA Project, and it is expected that future programs will expand and add to the existing programs.

  8. A Fine-Tooth Comb to Measure the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomical instruments needed to answer crucial questions, such as the search for Earth-like planets or the way the Universe expands, have come a step closer with the first demonstration at the telescope of a new calibration system for precise spectrographs. The method uses a Nobel Prize-winning technology called a 'laser frequency comb', and is published in this week's issue of Science. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 26a/08 A Laser Comb for Astronomy "It looks as if we are on the way to fulfil one of astronomers' dreams," says team member Theodor Hänsch, director at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Germany. Hänsch, together with John Hall, was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics for work including the frequency comb technique. Astronomers use instruments called spectrographs to spread the light from celestial objects into its component colours, or frequencies, in the same way water droplets create a rainbow from sunlight. They can then measure the velocities of stars, galaxies and quasars, search for planets around other stars, or study the expansion of the Universe. A spectrograph must be accurately calibrated so that the frequencies of light can be correctly measured. This is similar to how we need accurate rulers to measure lengths correctly. In the present case, a laser provides a sort of ruler, for measuring colours rather than distances, with an extremely accurate and fine grid. New, extremely precise spectrographs will be needed in experiments planned for the future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), which is being designed by ESO, the European Southern Observatory. These new spectrographs will need to be calibrated with even more accurate 'rulers'. In fact, they must be accurate to about one part in 30 billions - a feat equivalent to measuring the circumference of the Earth to about a millimetre! "We'll need something beyond what current technology can offer, and that's where the laser frequency comb comes in. It is

  9. A Fine-Tooth Comb to Measure the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomical instruments needed to answer crucial questions, such as the search for Earth-like planets or the way the Universe expands, have come a step closer with the first demonstration at the telescope of a new calibration system for precise spectrographs. The method uses a Nobel Prize-winning technology called a 'laser frequency comb', and is published in this week's issue of Science. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 26a/08 A Laser Comb for Astronomy "It looks as if we are on the way to fulfil one of astronomers' dreams," says team member Theodor Hänsch, director at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Germany. Hänsch, together with John Hall, was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics for work including the frequency comb technique. Astronomers use instruments called spectrographs to spread the light from celestial objects into its component colours, or frequencies, in the same way water droplets create a rainbow from sunlight. They can then measure the velocities of stars, galaxies and quasars, search for planets around other stars, or study the expansion of the Universe. A spectrograph must be accurately calibrated so that the frequencies of light can be correctly measured. This is similar to how we need accurate rulers to measure lengths correctly. In the present case, a laser provides a sort of ruler, for measuring colours rather than distances, with an extremely accurate and fine grid. New, extremely precise spectrographs will be needed in experiments planned for the future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), which is being designed by ESO, the European Southern Observatory. These new spectrographs will need to be calibrated with even more accurate 'rulers'. In fact, they must be accurate to about one part in 30 billions - a feat equivalent to measuring the circumference of the Earth to about a millimetre! "We'll need something beyond what current technology can offer, and that's where the laser frequency comb comes in. It is

  10. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  11. Lilienfeld Prize Lecture: Life, The Universe, and Nothing: Life and Death in an Ever-Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    2001-04-01

    In this talk, I will ruminate on the future of the Universe, and also on the future of life within it, using as my starting point recent observations in cosmology that have changed the way we think about the Universe on large scales. I will briefly review these observations and then discuss why the Universe we appear to inhabit may be the worst of all possible universes, as far as the long-term quality and quantity of life is concerned. Then, I will describe how fundamental aspects of the way in which we teach cosmology, in particular the relation between geometry and destiny, have been altered by the recognition that the cosmological constant may be zero. Finally, I will introduce the fascinating, if somewhat academic question of whether life can be eternal in an eternally expanding universe. Surprisingly, perhaps, the answer to this question appears to hinge on issues of basic physics, in particular on issues of quantum mechanics and computation, which may determine whether life is ultimately analogue or digital.

  12. Expanding Research Capacity at United States Universities: A Study of Academic Research and Development Investment from 1990-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Mathies, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Growing emphasis has been placed on universities to contribute to the innovation process and as a result academic research and development expenditures have increased in recent years. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific ways in which universities have expanded their research capacity. This paper examines how universities in the United…

  13. Professional Development in the International Year of Astronomy: Expanding the Universe in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinfeld, Erika L.; Harman, P.; Lee, M. H.; Bailey, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    The International Year of Astronomy offers unparalleled opportunity to expand our audiences’ understanding about the universe. However, many learners, students and adults alike, are unfamiliar with the universe beyond the solar system. This collaborative workshop explores strategies for teacher professional development around the origin and evolution of the universe, using the resources of the Beyond the Solar System Professional Development Project as a guide. The Beyond the Solar System (BtSS) Professional Development Project is a NASA-supported initiative from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) designed to foster public understanding of NASA's exciting astronomy and space science research. The BtSS portfolio includes video resources, assessment tools, data about common student ideas, content presentations, online telescope investigations, and other classroom activities designed to deepen content knowledge and improve the quality of teaching and learning about current scientific models and evidence for the origin and evolution of our universe of galaxies. During this session, members of the BtSS Leadership Team from around the country will share their experience using these resources in educator workshops and teacher-training courses, and facilitate discussions among workshop participants about how these materials and pedagogical strategies can be used in their own professional development efforts during the International Year of Astronomy. EPO specialists and scientists will engage in focused exploration of the project's DVD--"Expanding the Universe in the Classroom"--in order make explicit connections between the themes of the International Year of Astronomy and their own work. The goals of this workshop are to equip professional development providers to support IYA education efforts in classrooms, afterschool programs, and informal education venues and to raise awareness about the opportunities for continuing Galileo's legacy of discovery

  14. Creation of quantized particles, gravitons, and scalar perturbations by the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Leonard

    2015-04-01

    Quantum creation processes during the very rapid early expansion of the universe are believed to give rise to temperature anisotropies and polarization patterns in the CMB radiation. These have been observed by satellites such as COBE, WMAP, and PLANCK, and by bolometric instruments placed near the South Pole by the BICEP collaborations. The expected temperature anisotropies are well-confirmed. The B-mode polarization patterns in the CMB are currently under measurement jointly by the PLANCK and BICEP groups to determine the extent to which the B-modes can be attributed to gravitational waves from the creation of gravitons in the earliest universe. As the original discoverer of the quantum phenomenon of particle creation from vacuum by the expansion of the universe, I will explain how the discovery came about and how it relates to the current observations. The first system that I considered when I started my Ph.D. thesis in 1962 was the quantized minimally-coupled scalar field in an expanding FLRW (Friedmann, Lemaitré, Robertson, Walker) universe having a general continuous scale factor a(t) with continuous time derivatives. I also considered quantized fermion fields of spin-1/2 and the spin-1 massless photon field, as well as the quantized conformally-invariant field equations of arbitrary integer and half-integer spins that had been written down in the classical context for general gravitational metrics by Penrose. It was during 1962 that I proved that quanta of the minimally-coupled scalar field were created by the general expanding FLRW universe. This was relevant also to the creation of quantized perturbations of the gravitational field, since these perturbations satisfied linear field equations that could be quantized in the same way as the minimally-coupled scalar field equation. In fact, in 1946, E.M. Lifshitz had considered the classical Einstein gravitational field in FLRW expanding universes and had shown that the classical linearized Einstein field

  15. On propagation of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an equation for the propagation time of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe. The velocity of electromagnetic waves propagation depends on the velocity of the interstellar medium in the observer's frame of reference. Gravitational radiation interacts weakly with the substance, so electromagnetic and gravitational waves propagate from a remote astrophysical object to the terrestrial observer at different time. Gravitational waves registration enables the inverse problem solution - by the difference in arrival time of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave signal, we can determine the characteristics of the emitting area of the astrophysical object.

  16. The magnetized universe: its origin and dissipation through acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Hui; Kronberg, Philip

    2010-09-02

    Problems of a magnetic universe and some, possible solutions: The greater the total energy of an astrophysical phenomena, the more restricted are the possible explanations. Magnetic energy is the most challenging because its origin is still considered problematic. We suggest that it is evident that the universe is magnetized because of radio lobes, extra galactic cosmic rays, an observed Faraday rotation measure, and the polarized emission of extra galactic radio structures. The implied energies are so large that only the formation of supermassive black holes, (SMBHs) at the center of every galaxy are remotely energetic enough to supply this immense energy, {approx} (1/10)10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}}c{sup 2}. (Only a galaxy cluster of 1000 galaxies has comparable energy, but is inversely rare.) Yet this energy appears to be largely transformed into accelerated relativistic particles, both electrons and ions. Only a large-scale coherent dynamo within the accretion disk forming the massive black hole makes a reasonable starting point. The subsequent winding of this dynamo derived flux by conducting, angular-momentum-dominated accreting matter produces the immense, coherent magnetic fluxes. We imbed this explanation in a list of similar phenomena at smaller scale and look for physical consistency among the various phenomena, especially the conversion of force-free magnetic energy into acceleration.

  17. Accelerating universe from nonminimal derivative coupling in 5D universal extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suroso, Agus; Zen, Freddy P.; Arianto; Gunara, Bobby E.

    2012-05-01

    We study a nonminimal derivative coupling of scalar field, where the scalar field is coupled to curvature tensor in the five dimensional bulk in the context of universal extra dimension model. We apply the Einstein equation in the bulk and show that the acelerated expanding solution for the four dimensional scale factor a(t) is exist. Then, we study four different cases of the solution which is correspond to four different types of evolution of the extra dimension scale factor b.

  18. Kinematically Accelerated Repulsions Due to Relative Motion between Mass Particles in an Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2016-03-01

    An accelerated expansion of the universe, due only to relative particle motion, is described here in the form of a particular model that illustrates its physical cause. A simplified three particle universe is considered here by defining coordinate positions for effective mass-points because their size is extremely small compared to the distances between them. The three particles initially form a static isosceles triangular configuration. The third particle at the triangle's apex could only then determine its position relative to the triangle by measuring the apex angle subtended by the base particles. If the two base particles then exert for an instant a force between only themselves, they will move away from each other while the third particle could physically maintain its position relative to the universe only by referring to these other two existing particles. It would then be required that the apex particle would accelerate outwards and away from the base particles in order to regain the smaller size of the original apex angle and subsequently generate a Hubble expansion for the particles.

  19. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt): an expanding universe of protein information.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cathy H; Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Natale, Darren A; Barker, Winona C; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Ferro, Serenella; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Huang, Hongzhan; Lopez, Rodrigo; Magrane, Michele; Martin, Maria J; Mazumder, Raja; O'Donovan, Claire; Redaschi, Nicole; Suzek, Baris

    2006-01-01

    The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) provides a central resource on protein sequences and functional annotation with three database components, each addressing a key need in protein bioinformatics. The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), comprising the manually annotated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot section and the automatically annotated UniProtKB/TrEMBL section, is the preeminent storehouse of protein annotation. The extensive cross-references, functional and feature annotations and literature-based evidence attribution enable scientists to analyse proteins and query across databases. The UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) speed similarity searches via sequence space compression by merging sequences that are 100% (UniRef100), 90% (UniRef90) or 50% (UniRef50) identical. Finally, the UniProt Archive (UniParc) stores all publicly available protein sequences, containing the history of sequence data with links to the source databases. UniProt databases continue to grow in size and in availability of information. Recent and upcoming changes to database contents, formats, controlled vocabularies and services are described. New download availability includes all major releases of UniProtKB, sequence collections by taxonomic division and complete proteomes. A bibliography mapping service has been added, and an ID mapping service will be available soon. UniProt databases can be accessed online at http://www.uniprot.org or downloaded at ftp://ftp.uniprot.org/pub/databases/. PMID:16381842

  20. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt): an expanding universe of protein information

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cathy H.; Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Natale, Darren A.; Barker, Winona C.; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Ferro, Serenella; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Huang, Hongzhan; Lopez, Rodrigo; Magrane, Michele; Martin, Maria J.; Mazumder, Raja; O'Donovan, Claire; Redaschi, Nicole; Suzek, Baris

    2006-01-01

    The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) provides a central resource on protein sequences and functional annotation with three database components, each addressing a key need in protein bioinformatics. The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), comprising the manually annotated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot section and the automatically annotated UniProtKB/TrEMBL section, is the preeminent storehouse of protein annotation. The extensive cross-references, functional and feature annotations and literature-based evidence attribution enable scientists to analyse proteins and query across databases. The UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) speed similarity searches via sequence space compression by merging sequences that are 100% (UniRef100), 90% (UniRef90) or 50% (UniRef50) identical. Finally, the UniProt Archive (UniParc) stores all publicly available protein sequences, containing the history of sequence data with links to the source databases. UniProt databases continue to grow in size and in availability of information. Recent and upcoming changes to database contents, formats, controlled vocabularies and services are described. New download availability includes all major releases of UniProtKB, sequence collections by taxonomic division and complete proteomes. A bibliography mapping service has been added, and an ID mapping service will be available soon. UniProt databases can be accessed online at or downloaded at . PMID:16381842

  1. Activities of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new (gamma) ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal; (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report.

  2. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE EXPANDING BLAST WAVE OF {eta} CARINA'S GREAT ERUPTION OF 1843

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, S.; Domainko, W.; Hinton, J. A. E-mail: wilfried.domainko@mpi-hd.mpg.d

    2010-08-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV {<=} E {<=} 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission in the direction of {eta} Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE, and Fermi satellites. So far this emission has been interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars. However, the existence of a very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 'Great Eruption' provides an alternative particle acceleration site in this system. Here, we explore an alternate scenario and find that inverse Compton emission from electrons accelerated in the blast wave can naturally explain both the flux and spectral shape of the measured hard X-ray and HE {gamma}-ray emission. This scenario is further supported by the lack of significant variability in the INTEGRAL and Fermi measured fluxes.

  3. Neutron Scattering Simulations at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thienan; Jackson, Daniel; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport code (MCNP) has many applications ranging from radiography to reactor design. It has particle interaction capabilities, making it useful for simulating neutron collisions on surfaces of varying compositions. The neutron flux within the accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky was simulated using MCNP. With it, the complex's capabilities to contain and thermalize 7 MeV neutrons produced via 2H(d,n)3He source reaction to an acceptable level inside the neutron hall and adjoining rooms were analyzed. This will aid in confirming the safety of researchers who are working in the adjacent control room. Additionally, the neutron transport simulation was used to analyze the impact of the collimator copper shielding on various detectors located around the neutron scattering hall. The purpose of this was to attempt to explain any background neutrons that are observed at these detectors. The simulation shows that the complex performs very well with regards to neutron containment and thermalization. Also, the tracking information for the paths taken by the neutrons show that most of the neutrons' lives are spent inside the neutron hall. Finally, the neutron counts were analyzed at the positions of the neutron monitor detectors located at 90 and 45 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  4. Disparate British Breast Reconstruction Utilization: Is Universal Coverage Sufficient to Ensure Expanded Care?

    PubMed Central

    Offodile, Anaeze C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Our intent is to improve the understanding of the ability of healthcare providers to deliver high-quality care as we approach an era of universal coverage. We adopted 2 unique vantage points in this article: (1) the mandated coverage for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) surgery as a microcosmic surrogate for universal coverage overall and (2) we then scrutinized the respective IBR utilization rates in a contemporaneous system of 2 healthcare delivery models in the United Kingdom, that is, the public National Health Service trust versus private-sector hospitals. A literature review was performed for IBR rates across public trust and private-sector hospitals in the United Kingdom. The IBR rate among public trust hospitals was 17% compared with 43% in the private sector. In the trust hospital setting, the enactment of 2 government mandates, intended to increase the access to cancer care, seemed to fall short in maximizing the ability of surgical practitioners to deliver quality care to patients. Among women who did not receive IBR, 65% felt that they had received the sufficient amount of information to appropriately inform their decision. In addition, only 46% of this same cohort reported a consultation with a reconstructive surgeon preoperatively. Private-sector hospitals delivered better IBR care because of the likely presence of infrastructure and financial incentives for physicians. These results serve as a call for a better alignment between policy initiatives designed to expand care access and the perogatives of physicians to ensure an optimized delivery of the expanded care such policy mandates. PMID:27482486

  5. Expanding a flutter envelope using data from accelerating flight: Application to the F-16 fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Charles A.

    Due to the destructive nature of flutter, flutter testing is a mandatory requirement for certification of both civilian and military aircraft. However, along with the complexity of newer aircraft, the time and cost associated with flutter testing has increased dramatically. Considering that many of the test techniques and analysis methods used to perform flutter testing date back to the 1950s and 1960's it may be time to take a fresh look at how flutter testing can best be accomplished. This thesis revisits flutter testing techniques and proposes an alternative to traditional flutter testing. The alternative uses flight test data from an aircraft that is performing an acceleration to clear the flutter envelope of the aircraft. Four academic issues arise from this new test approach. (1) Are frequencies and dampings affected by the acceleration of the aircraft? (2) Can parameter identification algorithms extract frequency and damping values from the time varying data? (3) Can the vibration response at airspeeds (or Mach numbers) beyond which the aircraft has accelerated be anticipated? (4) What formal criteria can be used to determine when the aircraft needs to end the acceleration and terminate the test point? The academic contribution of this thesis is to address these issues. It is shown that although the frequencies and damping values do change the change is so small that it is irrelevant. It is also shown that by taking small windows of data, within which the change in parameters is small, it is possible to accurately identify parameters from the time varying data. Finally it is shown that at least in principal parameters can be predicted using data from sub-critical airspeeds, and that testing can be discontinued before an unstable flight condition is reached.

  6. Ion accelerator facilities at the University of Göttingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrmacher, M.; Hofsäss, H.

    2005-10-01

    The accelerators at the II. Physikalisches Institut of the University of Göttingen were reinstalled in a new building during the summer of 2003. They cover a wide energy range and are used for many different applications. The highest energies are obtained with the 3 MV Pelletron MaRPel, which is preferentially used for ion beam analysis. Ions in the energy range from 30 keV to 1000 keV are delivered by the 500 kV heavy ion implanter IONAS which is used for analysis, implantation and ion beam modification. ADONIS and STRINGER are mass-separated ion beam deposition (MSIBD) systems which produce 30 keV mass separated beams which can be decelerated to 20 eV to synthesize isotopically pure hard coatings like cubic BN, tetrahedral bounded amorphous C (ta-C) and BxC. The low energy implanter IOSCHKA delivers ions of 10 keV maximum, which can be slowed down to a few eV. The targets can be transferred in UHV to an STM set-up to investigate surface modifications after single ion impacts or the development of surface ripple patterns.

  7. Ion acceleration enhanced by additional neutralizing electrons in a magnetically expanding double layer plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-15

    Electrons neutralizing an ion beam are additionally supplied to a magnetically expanding double layer (DL) plasma from the downstream side of the DL. The rf power and the argon gas pressure are maintained at 200 W and 55 mPa, respectively, and the source magnetic field is varied in the range of about 70-550 G. It is observed that the ion beam energy corresponding to the DL potential drop increases up to 30 eV with an increase in the magnetic field when supplying the additional electrons, while it saturates at 20 eV for the case of the absence of the additional electrons. The supplied electrons are believed to be an energy source for the DL such that increasing the magnetic field is able to increase the potential drop beyond the limit found in the absence of the supplied electrons.

  8. The effect of radio-frequency self bias on ion acceleration in expanding argon plasmas in helicon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebold, Matthew D.

    Time-averaged plasma potential differences up to ˜ 165 V over several hundred Debye lengths are observed in low pressure (pn < 1 mTorr) expanding argon plasmas in the Madison Helicon Experiment. The potential gradient leads to ion acceleration exceeding Ei ≈ 7 kTe in some cases. Up to 1 kW of 13.56 MHz RF power is supplied to a half-turn, double-helix antenna in the presence of a nozzle magnetic field up to 1 kG. An RPA measures the IEDF and an emissive probe measures the plasma potential. Single and double probes measure the electron density and temperature. Two distinct mode hops, the capacitive-inductive (E-H) and inductive-helicon (H-W) transitions, are identified by jumps in electron density as RF power is increased. In the capacitive mode, large fluctuations of the plasma potential (Vp--p ≳ 140 V, Vp--p/Vp ≈ 150%) exist at the RF frequency, leading to formation of a self-bias voltage. The mobile electrons can flow from the upstream region during an RF cycle whereas ions cannot, leading to an initial imbalance of flux, and the self-bias voltage builds as a result. The plasma potential in the expansion chamber is held near the floating potential for argon (Vp ≈ 5kTe/e). In the capacitive mode, the ion acceleration is not well described by an ambipolar relation. The accelerated population decay is consistent with that predicted by charge-exchange collisions. Grounding the upstream endplate increases the self-bias voltage compared to a floating endplate. In the inductive and helicon modes, the ion acceleration more closely follows an ambipolar relation, a result of decreased capacitive coupling due to the decreased RF skin depth. The scaling of the potential gradient with the argon flow rate, magnetic field and RF power are investigated, with the highest potential gradients observed for the lowest flow rates in the capacitive mode. The magnitude of the self-bias voltage agrees well with that predicted for RF sheaths. Use of the self-bias effect in a

  9. Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-01-01

    High selectivities and exquisite control over reaction outcomes entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature’s known repertoire. We will use this review to outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progressions have been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been discovered and exploited for chemical synthesis, emphasizing reactions that do not have natural counterparts. The new functions have mechanistic parallels to the native reaction mechanisms that often manifest as catalytic promiscuity and the ability to convert from one function to the other with minimal mutation. We present examples of how non-natural activities have been improved by directed evolution, mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Examples of new enzyme functions include epoxide opening reactions with non-natural nucleophiles catalyzed by a laboratory-evolved halohydrin dehalogenase, cyclopropanation and other carbene transfer reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 variants, and non-natural modes of cyclization by a modified terpene synthase. Lastly, we describe discoveries of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for expanding the enzyme universe. PMID:25649694

  10. Collision of strong gravitational and electromagnetic waves in the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    An exact analytical model of the process of collision and nonlinear interaction of gravitational and/or electromagnetic soliton waves and strong nonsoliton electromagnetic traveling waves of arbitrary profile propagating in the expanding universe (the symmetric Kasner spacetime) is presented. In contrast to intuitive expectations that rather strong traveling waves can destroy the soliton, it occurs that the soliton survives during its interaction with electromagnetic waves of arbitrary amplitude and profile, but its parameters begin to evolve under the influence of this interaction. If a traveling electromagnetic wave possesses a finite duration, the soliton parameters after interaction take constant values again, but these values in general are different from those before the interaction. Based on exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, our model demonstrates a series of nonlinear phenomena, such as (a) creation of gravitational waves in the collision of two electromagnetic waves, (b) creation of electromagnetic soliton waves in the collision of a gravitational soliton with traveling electromagnetic waves, (c) scattering of a part of a soliton wave in the direction of propagation of a traveling electromagnetic wave, and (d) quasiperiodic oscillating character of fields in the wave interaction region and multiple mutual transformations of gravitational and electromagnetic waves in this region. The figures illustrate these features of nonlinear wave interactions in general relativity.

  11. A New Viewpoint (The expanding universe, Dark energy and Dark matter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwele, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Just as the relativity paradox once threatened the validity of physics in Albert Einstein's days, the cosmos paradox, the galaxy rotation paradox and the experimental invalidity of the theory of dark matter and dark energy threaten the stability and validity of physics today. These theories and ideas and many others, including the Big Bang theory, all depend almost entirely on the notion of the expanding universe, Edwin Hubble's observations and reports and the observational inconsistencies of modern day theoretical Physics and Astrophysics on related subjects. However, much of the evidence collected in experimental Physics and Astronomy aimed at proving many of these ideas and theories is ambiguous, and can be used to prove other theories, given a different interpretation of its implications. The argument offered here is aimed at providing one such interpretation, attacking the present day theories of dark energy, dark matter and the Big Bang, and proposing a new Cosmological theory based on a modification of Isaac Newton's laws and an expansion on Albert Einstein's theories, without assuming any invalidity or questionability on present day cosmological data and astronomical observations.

  12. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  13. Some clues to understand MOND and the accelerated expansion of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Hasmukh K.

    2011-12-01

    This letter points out that the values of `critical-acceleration' of MOND, and the `accelerated-expansion' of the universe are just two of the fourteen strikingly equal values of accelerations recurring in different physical situations. Some of them could be explained by a new law of equality of potential-energy and energy-of-mass of reasonably-independent systems (Tank in Astrophys. Space Sci. 330:203-205, 2010; Tank in Adv. Stud. Theor. Phys. 5:45-55, 2011). This new conservation-law, of equality of potential-energy, energy-of-mass and `kinetic-energy' may be a clue to understand MOND, and the `accelerated-expansion' of the universe. Alternative expressions for the cosmological red-shift, the `critical-acceleration' of MOND and Newton's law of universal gravitation are also presented for comparison of three different accelerations.

  14. Phenomenology of a realistic accelerating universe using only planck-scale physics

    PubMed

    Albrecht; Skordis

    2000-03-01

    Modern data are showing increasing evidence that the Universe is accelerating. So far, all attempts to account for the acceleration have required some fundamental dimensionless quantities to be extremely small. We show how a class of scalar field models (which may emerge naturally from superstring theory) can account for acceleration which starts in the present epoch with all the potential parameters O(1) in Planck units. PMID:11017213

  15. Einstein's other gravity and the acceleration of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2010-06-15

    Spacetime curvature plays the primary role in general relativity but Einstein later considered a theory where torsion was the central quantity. Just as the Einstein-Hilbert action in the Ricci curvature scalar R can be generalized to f(R) gravity, we consider extensions of teleparallel, or torsion scalar T, gravity to f(T) theories. The field equations are naturally second order, avoiding pathologies, and can give rise to cosmic acceleration with unique features.

  16. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for 14C and 129I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  17. The field of an accelerating black hole embedded in a magnetic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krori, K. D.; Barua, M.

    1984-09-01

    It is pointed out that the two most important exterior solutions of Einstein's equations are the Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions. The vacuum C-metric discovered by Levi-Civita (1918) provides a third solution. This metric represents a uniformly accelerating object. Farhoosh and Zimmerman suggest that the acceleration of an object is caused by the reaction of the emission of gravitational radiation which it anisotropically emits. An existence of magnetic fields with immersed stellar objects suggests the possibility that an accelerating black hole may also be embedded in a magnetic field. The present investigation is, therefore, concerned with the properties of an accelerating black hole imersed in a magnetic universe.

  18. A Universal Good: Expanding Voluntary, Early Learning Opportunities for Illinois' Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Sean

    This report was written to stimulate discussion about the potential and need for expanding access to voluntary, high-quality early childhood care and education programs in Illinois. The report compiles 13 short articles pertaining to early learning as follows: (1) "Ready to Succeed: Preparing Children for School, and for Life"; (2) "Going…

  19. A New Landscape: Opportunities and Pitfalls for Universities Expanding in the Persian Gulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiConsiglio, John

    2009-01-01

    Dozens of universities--primarily from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia--are eyeing the Gulf region as a largely untapped reservoir of academic potential and economic opportunity. During the last few years, UAE states like Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Qatar, and Ras al Khaymah have spent billions to entice top universities. And many colleges…

  20. Laser wakefield acceleration experiments at the University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Reed, S.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Levin, M.; Zigler, A.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing the laser power and electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 8x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 100 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using f/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of the laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. Betatron motion of electrons was also observed depending on laser power and electron density.

  1. Expanding the universe of categorical syllogisms: a challenge for reasoning researchers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Maxwell J

    2005-11-01

    Syllogistic reasoning, in which people identify conclusions from quantified premise pairs, remains a benchmark task whose patterns of data must be accounted for by general theories of deductive reasoning. However, psychologists have confined themselves to administering only the 64 premise pairs historically identified by Aristotle. By utilizing all combinations of negations, the present article identifies an expanded set of 576 premise pairs and gives the valid conclusions that they support. Many of these have interesting properties, and the identification of predictions and their verification will be an important next step for all proponents of such theories. PMID:16629289

  2. A new AMS facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J. K.; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-10-01

    Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), a national facility of government of India, is having a 15UD Pelletron accelerator for multidisciplinary ion beam based research programs. Recently, a new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility has been developed after incorporating many changes in the existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. A clean chemistry laboratory for 10Be and 26Al with all the modern facilities has also been developed for the chemical processing of samples. 10Be measurements on sediment samples, inter laboratory comparison results and 26Al measurements on standard samples are presented in this paper. In addition to the 10Be and 26Al AMS facilities, a new 14C AMS facility based on a dedicated 500 kV tandem ion accelerator with two cesium sputter ion sources, is also being setup at IUAC.

  3. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  4. Searching for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Intergalactic Absorption: The Expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Credits: Science: Michael L. Norman, Robert Harkness, Pascal Paschos, Rick Wagner, San Diego Supercomputer Center/University of California, San Diego Visualization: Mark Hereld, Joseph A. Insley, Michael E. Papka, Argonne National Laboratory; Eric C. Olson, University of Chicago This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The computation was performed at the National Institute for Computational Sciences (NICS).

  5. Expanding clinical medical training opportunities at the University of Nairobi: adapting a regional medical education model from the WWAMI program at the University of Washington.

    PubMed

    Child, Mara J; Kiarie, James N; Allen, Suzanne M; Nduati, Ruth; Wasserheit, Judith N; Kibore, Minnie W; John-Stewart, Grace; Njiri, Francis J; O'Malley, Gabrielle; Kinuthia, Raphael; Norris, Tom E; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-08-01

    A major medical education need in Sub-Saharan Africa includes expanding clinical training opportunities to develop health professionals. Medical education expansion is a complicated process that requires significant investment of financial and human resources, but it can also provide opportunities for innovative approaches and partnerships. In 2010, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief launched the Medical Education Partnership Initiative to invest in medical education and health system strengthening in Africa. Building on a 30-year collaborative clinical and research training partnership, the University of Nairobi in Kenya developed a pilot regional medical education program modeled on the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) medical education program at the University of Washington in the United States. The University of Nairobi adapted key elements of the WWAMI model to expand clinical training opportunities without requiring major capital construction of new buildings or campuses. The pilot program provides short-term clinical training opportunities for undergraduate students and recruits and trains clinical faculty at 14 decentralized training sites. The adaptation of a model from the Northwestern United States to address medical education needs in Kenya is a successful transfer of knowledge and practices that can be scaled up and replicated across Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25072575

  6. Expanding Clinical Medical Training Opportunities at the University of Nairobi: Adapting a Regional Medical Education Model from the WWAMI Program at the University of Washington

    PubMed Central

    Child, Mara J.; Kiarie, James N.; Allen, Suzanne M.; Nduati, Ruth; Wasserheit, Judith N.; Kibore, Minnie W.; John-Stewart, Grace; Njiri, Francis J.; O'Malley, Gabrielle; Kinuthia, Raphael; Norris, Tom E.; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-01-01

    A major medical education need in Sub-Saharan Africa includes expanding clinical training opportunities to develop health professionals. Medical education expansion is a complicated process that requires significant investment of financial and human resources, but it can also provide opportunities for innovative approaches and partnerships. In 2010, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) launched the Medical Education Partnership Initiative to invest in medical education and health system strengthening in Africa. Building on a 30-year collaborative clinical and research training partnership, the University of Nairobi in Kenya developed a pilot regional medical education program modeled on the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) medical education program at the University of Washington in the United States. The University of Nairobi adapted key elements of the WWAMI model to expand clinical training opportunities without requiring major capital construction of new buildings or campuses. The pilot program provides short-term clinical training opportunities for undergraduate students and recruits and trains clinical faculty at 14 decentralized training sites. The adaptation of a model from the Northwestern United States to address medical education needs in Kenya is a successful transfer of knowledge and practices that can be scaled up and replicated across Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25072575

  7. The Expanding Universe: Time, Space and Spirit--Keys to Scientific Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonebarger, Bill

    Nearly every culture has made important discoveries about the universe. Most cultures have searched for a better understanding of the cosmos and how the earth and human life relate. The discussion in this booklet considers time, space, and spirit. Time refers to a sense of history; space refers to geography; and spirit refers to life and thought.…

  8. Expanding Downward: Innovation, Diffusion, and State Policy Adoptions of Universal Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, F. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Framed within the theoretical framework of policy innovation and diffusion, this study explores both interstate (diffusion) and intrastate predictors of adoption of state universal preschool policies. Event history analysis methodology is applied to a state level dataset drawn from the Census, the NCES Common Core, the Book of the States, and…

  9. Expanding Horizons for Students with Dyslexia in the 21st Century: Universal Design and Mobile Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gavin; Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mobile technology in supporting people with dyslexia within the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning. The authors discuss how students with dyslexia can use mobile technology to address a diverse range of academic needs (such as reading, composing text, notetaking, metacognition and studying…

  10. The Internal Audit Function: Playing an Expanded Role in College and University Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 90 colleges and universities found that 40 percent have internal audit departments. Information on auditor time allocation, salary ranges, departmental independence, and auditor roles and responsibilities was collected. A summary analysis by type of institution (large, small, research, nonresearch, public, independent, four-year,…

  11. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. II - General features of spherical models at late times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. W.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper studies the density profile that forms around a spherically symmetric bound central core immersed in a homogeneous-background k = 0 or k = -1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, with zero pressure. Although the density profile in the linearized regime is almost arbitrary, in the nonlinear regime certain universal features of the density profile are obtained that are independent of the details of the initial conditions. The formation of 'halos' ('holes') with densities greater than (less than) the average cosmological density is discussed. It is shown that in most regions 'halos' form, and universal values are obtained for the slope of the ln (density)-ln (radius) profile in those 'halos' at late times, independently of the shape of the initial density profile. Restrictions are derived on where it is possible for 'holes' to exist at late times and on how such 'holes' must have evolved.

  12. Late time acceleration of the 3-space in a higher dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin

    2013-02-01

    We present cosmological solutions for (1+3+n)-dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity with an arbitrary dilaton coupling constant w and exponential dilaton self-interaction potentials in the string frame. We focus particularly on the class in which the 3-space expands with a time varying deceleration parameter. We discuss the number of the internal dimensions and the value of the dilaton coupling constant to determine the cases that are consistent with the observed universe and the primordial nucleosynthesis. The 3-space starts with a decelerated expansion rate and evolves into accelerated expansion phase subject to the values of w and n, but ends with a Big Rip in all cases. We discuss the cosmological evolution in further detail for the cases w = 1 and w = ½ that permit exact solutions. We also comment on how the universe would be conceived by an observer in four dimensions who is unaware of the internal dimensions and thinks that the conventional general relativity is valid at cosmological scales.

  13. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism. PMID:27165283

  14. Fermion production in dipolar electric field on de Sitter expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎloi, Mihaela-Andreea; Crucean, Cosmin

    2015-12-01

    The production of fermions in dipolar electric fields on de Sitter universe is studied. The amplitude and probability of pair production are computed using the exact solution of the Dirac equation in de Sitter spacetime. The form of the dipolar fields is established using the conformal invariance of the Maxwell equations. We obtain that the momentum conservation law is broken in the process of pair production in dipolar electric fields. Also we establish that there are nonvanishing probabilities for processes in which the helicity is conserved/nonconserved. The Minkowski limit is recovered when the expansion factor becomes zero.

  15. Production of scalar particles in electric field on de Sitter expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Băloi, Mihaela-Andreea

    2014-08-01

    The scalar particle production from vacuum in the presence of an electric field, on the de Sitter spacetime is studied. We use perturbation methods to define the transition amplitude. We obtain that the momentum is not conserved in this process. The probability density of pair production is computed by squaring the transition amplitude. Our graphical representations show that, the probability of scalar particle production was important only in the early stages of the universe, when Hubble's constant was very large in comparison with the mass of the particle. Also, we propose here a criterion for particle-antiparticle separation.

  16. Fermion production in dipolar electric field on de Sitter expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Băloi, Mihaela-Andreea Crucean, Cosmin

    2015-12-07

    The production of fermions in dipolar electric fields on de Sitter universe is studied. The amplitude and probability of pair production are computed using the exact solution of the Dirac equation in de Sitter spacetime. The form of the dipolar fields is established using the conformal invariance of the Maxwell equations. We obtain that the momentum conservation law is broken in the process of pair production in dipolar electric fields. Also we establish that there are nonvanishing probabilities for processes in which the helicity is conserved/nonconserved. The Minkowski limit is recovered when the expansion factor becomes zero.

  17. Dark Energy Models and Cosmic Acceleration with Anisotropic Universe in f(T) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sehrish, Azeem

    2014-04-01

    This paper is devoted to studing the accelerated expansion of the universe in context of f(T) theory of gravity. For this purpose, we construct different f(T) models and investigate their cosmological behavior through equation of state parameter by using holographic, new agegraphic and their power-law entropy corrected dark energy models. We discuss the graphical behavior of this parameter versus redshift for particular values of constant parameters in Bianchi type I universe model. It is shown that the universe lies in different forms of dark energy, namely quintessence, phantom, and quintom corresponding to the chosen scale factors, which depend upon the constant parameters of the models.

  18. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. I - Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for adiabatic density perturbations in the early universe is studied. Analytical solutions are obtained for the evolution of linearized spherically symmetric adiabatic density perturbations and the two-point correlation function for these perturbations in the radiation-dominated portion of the early universe. The results are then extended to the regime after decoupling. It is found that: (1) adiabatic spherically symmetric perturbations comparable in scale with the maximum Jeans length would survive the radiation-dominated regime; (2) irregular fluctuations are smoothed out up to the scale of the maximum Jeans length in the radiation era, but regular fluctuations might survive on smaller scales; (3) in general, the only surviving structures for irregularly shaped adiabatic density perturbations of arbitrary but finite scale in the radiation regime are the size of or larger than the maximum Jeans length in that regime; (4) infinite plane waves with a wavelength smaller than the maximum Jeans length but larger than the critical dissipative damping scale could survive the radiation regime; and (5) black holes would also survive the radiation regime and might accrete sufficient mass after decoupling to nucleate the formation of galaxies.

  19. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  20. Roles of Different Forms of Scale Factor in Non-linear Electrodynamics for Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sayani; Debnath, Ujjal

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we have assumed the modified Lagrangian of non-linear electrodynamics for accelerated universe. The energy density and pressure for non-linear electromagnetic theory have been considered in terms of both electric and magnetic fields. The Einstein's filed equations have been considered in FRW universe for Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. Since we are considering the non-linear form of Lagrangian for accelerating universe, so four forms of scale factors like logamediate, intermediate, emergent and power law forms are chosen in our investigation. For every expansion, the natures of electric field and magnetic field have been shown through graphical representation. The electric and magnetic fields increase for logamediate, intermediate and emergent expansion and decrease in power law expansion.

  1. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    ScienceCinema

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department?s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics ?for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.? DOE?s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter?s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  2. Tidal interactions in the expanding universe - The formation of prolate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binney, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The study estimates the magnitude of the anisotropy that can be tidally induced in neighboring initially spherical protostructures, be they protogalaxies, protoclusters, or even uncollapsed density enhancements in the large-scale structure of the universe. It is shown that the linear analysis of tidal interactions developed by Peebles (1969) predicts that the anisotropy energy of a perturbation grows to first order in a small dimensionless parameter, whereas the net angular momentum acquired is of second order. A simple model is presented for the growth of anisotropy by tidal interactions during the nonlinear stage of the development of perturbations. A possible observational test is described of the alignment predicted by the model between the orientations of large-scale perturbations and the positions of neighboring density enhancements.

  3. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. IV - The evolution of the correlation function. [galaxy distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for the large-scale distribution of galaxies in an expanding universe is studied on the assumption that the perturbation densities lie in a Gaussian distribution centered on any given mass scale. The perturbations are evolved according to the Friedmann equation, and the correlation function for the resulting distribution of perturbations at the present epoch is calculated. It is found that: (1) the computed correlation function gives a satisfactory fit to the observed function in cosmological models with a density parameter (Omega) of approximately unity, provided that a certain free parameter is suitably adjusted; (2) the power-law slope in the nonlinear regime reflects the initial fluctuation spectrum, provided that the density profile of individual perturbations declines more rapidly than the -2.4 power of distance; and (3) both positive and negative contributions to the correlation function are predicted for cosmological models with Omega less than unity.

  4. Dynamical vacuum energy in the expanding Universe confronted with observations: a dedicated study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Valent, Adrià; Solà, Joan; Basilakos, Spyros

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many efforts, our theoretical understanding of the ultimate nature of the dark energy component of the universe still lags well behind the astounding experimental evidence achieved from the increasingly sophisticated observational tools at our disposal. While the canonical possibility is a strict cosmological constant, or rigid vacuum energy density ρΛ = const., the exceeding simplicity of this possibility lies also at the root of its unconvincing theoretical status, as there is no explanation for the existence of such constant for the entire cosmic history. Herein we explore general models of the vacuum energy density slowly evolving with the Hubble function H and/or its time derivative, ρΛ = ρΛ(H,dot H). Some of these models are actually well-motivated from the theoretical point of view and may provide a rich phenomenology that could be explored in future observations, whereas some others have more limitations. In this work, we put them to the test and elucidate which ones are still compatible with the present observations and which ones are already ruled out. We consider their implications on structure formation, in combination with data on type Ia supernovae, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations, and the predicted redshift distribution of cluster-size collapsed structures. The relation of these vacuum models on possible evidence of dynamical dark energy recently pointed out in the literature is also briefly addressed.

  5. Dynamical vacuum energy in the expanding Universe confronted with observations: a dedicated study

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Valent, Adrià; Solà, Joan; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: sola@ecm.ub.edu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many efforts, our theoretical understanding of the ultimate nature of the dark energy component of the universe still lags well behind the astounding experimental evidence achieved from the increasingly sophisticated observational tools at our disposal. While the canonical possibility is a strict cosmological constant, or rigid vacuum energy density ρ{sub Λ} = const., the exceeding simplicity of this possibility lies also at the root of its unconvincing theoretical status, as there is no explanation for the existence of such constant for the entire cosmic history. Herein we explore general models of the vacuum energy density slowly evolving with the Hubble function H and/or its time derivative, ρ{sub Λ} = ρ{sub Λ}(H, H-dot ). Some of these models are actually well-motivated from the theoretical point of view and may provide a rich phenomenology that could be explored in future observations, whereas some others have more limitations. In this work, we put them to the test and elucidate which ones are still compatible with the present observations and which ones are already ruled out. We consider their implications on structure formation, in combination with data on type Ia supernovae, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations, and the predicted redshift distribution of cluster-size collapsed structures. The relation of these vacuum models on possible evidence of dynamical dark energy recently pointed out in the literature is also briefly addressed.

  6. Recent results from the University of Washington's 38 mm ram accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Turenne, J. A.; Chew, G.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-07-01

    The ram accelerator is a propulsive device that accelerates projectiles using gasdynamic cycles similar to those which generate thrust in airbreathing ramjets. The projectile, analogous to the centerbody of a ramjet, travels supersonically through a stationary tube containing a gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixture. The projectile itself carries no onboard propellant. A combustion zone follows the projectile and stabilizes the shock structure. The resulting pressure distribution continuously accelerates the projectile. Several modes of ram accelerator operation have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. At velocities below the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed of the propellant mixture, the thermally choked propulsion mode accelerates the projectiles. At projectile velocities between approximately 90 and 110 percent of the C-J speed, a transdetonative propulsion mode occurs. At velocities beyond 110 percent of the C-J speed, projectiles experience superdetonative propulsion. This paper presents recent experimental results from these propulsion modes obtained with the University of Washington's 38-mm bore ram accelerator. Data from investigations with hydrogen diluted-gas mixtures are also introduced.

  7. To theory of asymptotically stable accelerating Universe in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Garkun, A.S.; Kudin, V.I.; Minkevich, A.V. E-mail: kudzin_w@tut.by

    2014-12-01

    Homogeneous isotropic cosmological models built in the framework of the Poincar'e gauge theory of gravity based on general expression of gravitational Lagrangian with indefinite parameters are analyzed. Special points of cosmological solutions for flat cosmological models at asymptotics and conditions of their stability in dependence of indefinite parameters are found. Procedure of numerical integration of the system of gravitational equations at asymptotics is considered. Numerical solution for accelerating Universe without dark energy is obtained.

  8. An Expanding 4d Universe in a 5d Kaluza-Klein Cosmology with Higher Dimensional Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.

    In the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory, we investigate a (4+1)-dimensional universe consisting of a (4+1)-dimensional Robertson-Walker type metric coupled with a (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The matter part consists of an energy density together with a pressure subject to 4D part of the (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The dark part consists of just a dark pressure bar {p}, corresponding to the extra-dimension endowed by a scalar field, with no element of dark energy. It is shown that the reduced Einstein field equations are free of 4D pressure and are just affected by an effective pressure produced by the 4D energy density and dark pressure. It is then proposed that the expansion of the universe may be controlled by the equation of state in higher dimension rather than four dimensions. This may account for the current acceleration at the beginning or in the middle of matter dominant era.

  9. CLUSTEREASY: A program for lattice simulations of scalar fields in an expanding universe on parallel computing clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Gary

    2008-10-01

    We describe an MPI C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe on parallel clusters. The program is a parallel programming extension of the simulation program LATTICEEASY. The ability to run these simulations on parallel clusters, however, greatly extends the range of scales and times that can be simulated. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://www.science.smith.edu/departments/Physics/fstaff/gfelder/latticeeasy/. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for. Catalogue identifier: AEBJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7469 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 613 334 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++/MPI Computer: Cluster. Must have the library FFTW installed Operating system: Any RAM: Typically 4 MB to 1 GB per processor Classification: 1.9 External routines: A single-precision version of the FFTW library (http://www.fftw.org/) must be available on the target machine. Nature of problem: After inflation the universe consisted of interacting fields in a high energy, nonthermal state [1]. The evolution of these fields cannot be described with standard approximation techniques such as linearization, kinetic theory, or Hartree expansion, and must thus be simulated numerically. Fortunately, the fields rapidly acquire large occupation numbers over a range of frequencies, so their evolution can be accurately modeled with classical field theory [2]. The specific fields and

  10. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Hogan, Mark

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  11. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  12. The Accelerating Universe: Infinite Expansion, the Cosmological Constant, and the Beauty of the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2000-12-01

    Advance Praise for The Accelerating Universe "The Accelerating Universe is not only an informative book about modern cosmology. It is rich storytelling and, above all, a celebration of the human mind in its quest for beauty in all things." -Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams "This is a wonderfully lucid account of the extraordinary discoveries that have made the last years a golden period for observational cosmology. But Mario Livio has not only given the reader one clear explanation after another of what astronomers are up to, he has used them to construct a provocative argument for the importance of aesthetics in the development of science and for the inseparability of science, art, and culture." -Lee Smolin, author of The Life of the Cosmos "What a pleasure to read! An exciting, simple account of the universe revealed by modern astronomy. Beautifully written, clearly presented, informed by scientific and philosophical insights." -John Bahcall, Institute for Advanced Study "A book with charm, beauty, elegance, and importance. As authoritative a journey as can be taken through modern cosmology." -Allan Sandage, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington

  13. Implications of an Absolute Simultaneity Theory for Cosmology and Universe Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kipreos, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift–distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  14. Implications of an absolute simultaneity theory for cosmology and universe acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift-distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  15. Expanded Search for z ~ 10 Galaxies from HUDF09, ERS, and CANDELS Data: Evidence for Accelerated Evolution at z > 8?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesch, P. A.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Labbé, I.; Trenti, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Carollo, C. M.; Franx, M.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Magee, D.

    2012-02-01

    We search for z ~ 10 galaxies over ~160 arcmin2 of Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR data in the Chandra Deep Field South, using the public HUDF09, Early Release Science, and CANDELS surveys, that reach to 5σ depths ranging from 26.9 to 29.4 in H 160 AB mag. z >~ 9.5 galaxy candidates are identified via J 125 - H 160 > 1.2 colors and non-detections in any band blueward of J 125. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry is key for separating the genuine high-z candidates from intermediate-redshift (z ~ 2-4) galaxies with evolved or heavily dust obscured stellar populations. After removing 16 sources of intermediate brightness (H 160 ~ 24-26 mag) with strong IRAC detections, we only find one plausible z ~ 10 galaxy candidate in the whole data set, previously reported in Bouwens et al.. The newer data cover a 3 × larger area and provide much stronger constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function (LF). If the evolution of the z ~ 4-8 LFs is extrapolated to z ~ 10, six z ~ 10 galaxies are expected in our data. The detection of only one source suggests that the UV LF evolves at an accelerated rate before z ~ 8. The luminosity density is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude in only 170 Myr from z ~ 10 to z ~ 8. This increase is >=4 × larger than expected from the lower redshift extrapolation of the UV LF. We are thus likely witnessing the first rapid buildup of galaxies in the heart of cosmic reionization. Future deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data, reaching to well beyond 29 mag, can enable a more robust quantification of the accelerated evolution around z ~ 10. Based on data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope operated by AURA, Inc., for NASA under contract NAS5-26555. Partially based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  16. Scalar-tensor gravity with a non-minimally coupled Higgs field and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jonghyun; Lee, Tae Hoon

    2016-03-01

    We consider general couplings, including non-minimal derivative coupling, of a Higgs boson field to scalar-tensor gravity and calculate their contributions to the energy density and pressure in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. In a special case where the kinetic term of the Higgs field is non-minimally coupled to the Einstein tensor, we seek de Sitter solutions for the cosmic scale factor and discuss the possibility that the late-time acceleration and the inflationary era of our universe can be described by means of scalar fields with self-interactions and the Yukawa potential.

  17. Einstein's Biggest Blunder? High-Redshift Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2001-12-01

    Nearly 4 years ago, two teams of observational astronomers reported that high-redshift Type Ia supernovae are fainter than expected in a decelerating or freely coasting universe. The radical conclusion that the universe has been accelerating in the past few billion years, possibly because of a nonzero value for Einstein's cosmological constant, has gripped the worlds of astronomy and physics, causing a flurry of new research. Having participated on both teams (but much more closely with one than the other), here I provide a personal, historical account of the story. This Essay is one of a series of invited contributions that will appear in the PASP throughout the years 2000 and 2001 to mark the new millennium. (Eds.)

  18. Mass varying neutrinos, quintessence, and the accelerating expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Chitov, Gennady Y.; August, Tyler; Natarajan, Aravind; Kahniashvili, Tina

    2011-02-15

    We analyze the mass varying neutrino scenario. We consider a minimal model of massless Dirac fermions coupled to a scalar field, mainly in the framework of finite-temperature quantum field theory. We demonstrate that the mass equation we find has nontrivial solutions only for special classes of potentials, and only within certain temperature intervals. We give most of our results for the Ratra-Peebles dark energy (DE) potential. The thermal (temporal) evolution of the model is analyzed. Following the time arrow, the stable, metastable, and unstable phases are predicted. The model predicts that the present Universe is below its critical temperature and accelerates. At the critical point, the Universe undergoes a first-order phase transition from the (meta)stable oscillatory regime to the unstable rolling regime of the DE field. This conclusion agrees with the original idea of quintessence as a force making the Universe roll towards its true vacuum with a zero {Lambda} term. The present mass varying neutrino scenario is free from the coincidence problem, since both the DE density and the neutrino mass are determined by the scale M of the potential. Choosing M{approx}10{sup -3} eV to match the present DE density, we can obtain the present neutrino mass in the range m{approx}10{sup -2}-1 eV and consistent estimates for other parameters of the Universe.

  19. The acceleration and dissolution of stars moving through the blackbody radiation of a collapsing universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argon, Alice L.

    This dissertation deals with the motion and ablation of stars in the collapse phase of a closed Friedmann universe. Stars are initially accelerated due to the collapse of space. Radiation drag becomes increasingly important, however, and in most of the cases considered leads to maximum speeds and rapid deceleration. The external blackbody radiation also leads to mass loss, which acts as an additional accelerating mechanism. Three species of degenerate stars are considered: black dwarfs (BD), white dwarfs (WD), and neutron stars (NS). Each is assumed to have a non-degenerate, ionized atmosphere. In the star's rest frame the external blackbody radiation appears highly anisotropic, with most of the radiation entering the atmosphere through a narrow cone centered on the forward direction (opposite to the direction of motion). This radiation is Compton scattered. Atmospheric electrons (and hence ions) are accelerated azimuthally. After having travelled about one quarter of a circumference, they detach themselves from the star and stream away. The atmosphere is constantly replenished by upwelling from the interior. Mass loss then is a result of mechanical forces and is not due to thermal boiling. Four optical depths are considered for each species: 0, 1, 2, and 3. Maximum speeds and related temperatures are given for BD0, BD1, WD0, WD1, WD2, NS0, NS1, NS2 and NS3.

  20. MCNP Neutron Simulations: The Effectiveness of the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory Pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Daniel; Nguyen, Thien An; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of the Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky is marked by the unique addition of a pit in the main neutron scattering room underneath the neutron source and detection shielding assembly. This pit was constructed as a neutron trap in order to decrease the amount of neutron flux within the laboratory. Such a decrease of background neutron flux effectively reduces as much noise as possible in detection of neutrons scattering off of desired samples to be studied. This project uses the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to model the structure of the accelerator complex, gas cell, and the detector's collimator and shielding apparatus to calculate the neutron flux in various sections of the laboratory. Simulations were completed with baseline runs of 107 neutrons of energies 4 MeV and 17 MeV, produced respectively by 3H(p,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He source reactions. In addition, a comparison model of the complex with simply a floor and no pit was designed, and the respective neutron fluxes of both models were calculated and compared. The results of the simulations seem to affirm the validity of the pit design in significantly reducing the overall neutron flux throughout the accelerator complex, which could be used in future designs to increase the precision and reliability of data. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  1. Can the Virtual University Expand Access to Higher Education in Africa? The Dialectic of the Local and the Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adala, A. Atieno

    2010-01-01

    A recent phenomenon in higher education is the emergence of the virtual university. Some observers have attributed its emergence to globalization and technological innovation. This dissertation study is about one particular instance of the virtual university phenomenon, the African Virtual University (AVU). The AVU initiative was launched with…

  2. Acceleration of the universe: a reconstruction of the effective equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan

    2016-04-01

    The present work is based upon a parametric reconstruction of the effective or total equation of state in a model for the universe with accelerated expansion. The constraints on the model parameters are obtained by maximum likelihood analysis using the supernova distance modulus data, observational Hubble data, baryon acoustic oscillation data and cosmic microwave background shift parameter data. For statistical comparison, the same analysis has also been carried out for the wCDM dark energy model. Different model selection criteria (Akaike information criterion (AIC)) and (Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC)) give the clear indication that the reconstructed model is well consistent with the wCDM model. Then both the models (weff(z) model and wCDM model) have also been presented through (q0,j0) parameter space. Tighter constraint on the present values of dark energy equation of state parameter (wDE(z = 0)) and cosmological jerk (j0) have been achieved for the reconstructed model.

  3. Acceleration of the universe: a reconstruction of the effective equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan

    2016-07-01

    The present work is based upon a parametric reconstruction of the effective or total equation of state in a model for the universe with accelerated expansion. The constraints on the model parameters are obtained by maximum likelihood analysis using the supernova distance modulus data, observational Hubble data, baryon acoustic oscillation data and cosmic microwave background shift parameter data. For statistical comparison, the same analysis has also been carried out for the wCDM dark energy model. Different model selection criteria (Akaike information criterion (AIC)) and (Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC)) give the clear indication that the reconstructed model is well consistent with the wCDM model. Then both the models (w_{eff}(z) model and wCDM model) have also been presented through (q_0 ,j_0 ) parameter space. Tighter constraint on the present values of dark energy equation of state parameter (w_{DE}(z = 0)) and cosmological jerk (j_0) have been achieved for the reconstructed model.

  4. Redshift-Drift as a Test for Discriminating Between Decelerating Inhomogeneous and Accelerating Universe Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Priti; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Exact inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's equations have been used in the literature to build models reproducing the cosmological data without dark energy. However, owing to the degrees of freedom pertaining to these models, it is necessary to get rid of the degeneracy often exhibited by the problem of distinguishing between them and accelerating universe models. We give an overview of redshift drift in inhomogeneous cosmologies, and explain how it serves to this purpose. One class of models which fits the data is the Szekeres Swiss-cheese class where non-spherically symmetric voids exhibit a typical size of about 400 Mpc. We present our calculation of the redshift drift in this model, and compare it with the results obtained by other authors for alternate scenarios.

  5. σCDM coupled to radiation: Dark energy and Universe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.; Müller, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the Chiral Cosmological Model (CCM) coupled to cold dark matter (CDM) has been investigated as σCDM model to study the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Dark sector fields (as Dark Energy content) coupled to cosmic dust were considered as the source of Einstein gravity in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Such model had a beginning at the matter-dominated era. The purposes of our present investigation are two-fold: To extend “life” of the σCDM for earlier times to radiation-dominated era and to take into account variation of the exponential potential V = V0exp -λ φ MP + V0exp -λ χ MP via variation of the interaction parameter λ. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to investigate possible values of initial conditions constrained by the measured amount of the dark matter, dark energy and radiation component today. Our analysis includes dark energy contribution to critical density, the ratio of the kinetic and potential energies, deceleration parameter, effective equation of state (EoS) and evolution of DE EoS with variation of coupling constant λ. A comparison with the ΛCDM model was performed. A new feature of the model is the existence of some values of potential coupling constant, leading to a σCDM solution without transition into accelerated expansion epoch.

  6. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  7. Creating Career Ladders in University Systems: The Accelerated Associate's Degree Program for Unemployed Licensed Nurses at the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendez, Edwin; Suarez, Carlos

    This document describes the Accelerated Associate's Degree Program for Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) at the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico. The program, targeting unemployed LPNs living in San Juan, Puerto Rico, allows students to complete an associate's degree in one year. Fifty-four students enrolled during the first year and 50% of…

  8. FRW Like Cosmological Model and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe from Non Commutative Seiberg-Witten Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissaoui, H.; Mebarki, N.; Bouhalouf, H.

    2010-10-01

    An FRW like cosmological model in the non commutative Seiberg-Witten space-time is proposed. The pure NCG dynamical apparent horizon and Hawking temperature are obtained and explicit expressions of the scale factor, Hubble and deceleration parameters are derived. The accelerated expansion of the universe scenario is also discussed.

  9. Expanding Cooperation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC)

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, Ian L.

    2006-08-01

    The DOE and the NASULGC have agreed to have closer cooperation with the purpose of expanding the access of the DOE to the research and Extension capacities of the state universities and land-grant colleges. The objective of this expanded cooperation will be to provide access to Extension and Outreach Systems for delivering products and services of the DOE research and development programs and to develop partnerships in research that will increase the productivity of DOE and NASULGC-affiliated institution research programs. NASULGC is uniquely qualified to partner with the DOE because they represent each of the institutions involved in the national extension system. Five projects have been developed to initiate the expanded cooperation between DOE/EERE and BAA/NASULGC. In some cases, these are pilot projects designed to develop information that can support broadened cooperation. They are offered for action by the BAA to the EERE Board. Agreement on the initiation of these projects will result in their implementation during the 2004 calendar year. At midyear and at the end of 2004, those responsible for each of the projects will provide an accounting of activities and assessment of results for expanding energy education, research and technical assistance. The five suggested projects are; Expanding the Opportunities for Cooperation and Communication o Advisory Boards o Meetings o EERE new hires; Use of Extension and Outreach Systems for the Dissemination and Delivery of DOE/EERE Products and Services; Youth Education in Science and Technology; Engaging the Research Capacity of NASULGC Institutions; and Workshops at the DOE Labs for Scientists from the NASULGC-Affiliated Institutions.

  10. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; Irwin, Jimmy; J-PAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful "redshift machine", with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 "IFU", it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  11. The accelerating universe and other cosmological aspects of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Felice, Antonio

    I give a short introduction to standard cosmology and a review of what it is meant by "the dark energy enigma" in chapter l. In chapter 2, I mention and describe some attempts found in the literature of the past few years to attack this problem. Dark energy candidates for which the equation-of-state parameter w is less than -1 violate the dominant energy condition. In scalar-tensor theories of gravity, however, the expansion of the universe can mimic the behavior of general relativity with w < -1 dark energy, without violating any energy conditions. I examine, in chapter 3, whether this possibility is phenomenologically viable by studying Brans-Dicke models and characterizing both the naturalness of the models themselves, and additional observational constraints from limits on the time-dependence of Newton's constant. I find that only highly contrived models would lead observers to measure w < -1. In chapter 4, I consider general curvature-invariant modifications of the Einstein-Hilbert action that become important only in regions of extremely low space-time curvature. I investigate the far future evolution of the universe in such models, examining the possibilities for cosmic acceleration and other ultimate destinies. The models generically possess de Sitter space as an unstable solution and exhibit an interesting set of attractor solutions which, in some cases, provide alternatives to dark energy models. In chapter 5, I study a baryogenesis mechanism operating in the context of hyperextended inflation and making use of a coupling between the scalar field and a standard model global current, such as B or B - L . The method is efficient at temperatures at which these currents are not conserved due to some higher dimensional operator. The particle physics and cosmological phenomenology are discussed. I consider constraints stemming from nucleosynthesis and solar system experiments.

  12. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato a.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; J-PAS Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful “redshift machine”, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 “IFU”, it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  13. Expanding the Role of Institutional Research at Small Private Universities: A Case Study in Enrollment Management Using Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antons, Christopher M.; Maltz, Elliot N.

    2006-01-01

    This case study documents a successful application of data-mining techniques in enrollment management through a partnership between the admissions office, a business administration master's-degree program, and the institutional research office at Willamette University (Salem, Oregon). (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  14. Expanding Access for Training of Science Teachers through ODL: A Case Study of University of Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okunuga, A. O.; Olaoluniyi, O.; Opara, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Rising up to the challenge of shortage of middle manpower in Nigeria, the University of Lagos established the Correspondence and Open Studies Unit (COSU), now Distance Learning Institute DLI). Accounting, Business Administration and Science-Education were the pilot courses at the B.Sc. level. The Special Entry Preparatory Programme (SEPP) was…

  15. Expanding the Social Frame of Knowledge: Interdisciplinary, Degree-Granting Fields in American Colleges and Universities, 1975-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brint, Steven G.; Turk-Bicakci, Lori; Proctor, Kristopher; Murphy, Scott Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The number of interdisciplinary, degree-granting fields in American colleges and universities has grown rapidly, with socially incorporative programs (women's studies, ethnic studies, and non-Western area studies) accounting for a large share. These fields have diffused widely over time, while other interdisciplinary fields have not. Variables…

  16. Expanding (3+1)-dimensional universe from a lorentzian matrix model for superstring theory in (9+1) dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Nishimura, Jun; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2012-01-01

    We reconsider the matrix model formulation of type IIB superstring theory in (9+1)-dimensional space-time. Unlike the previous works in which the Wick rotation was used to make the model well defined, we regularize the Lorentzian model by introducing infrared cutoffs in both the spatial and temporal directions. Monte Carlo studies reveal that the two cutoffs can be removed in the large-N limit and that the theory thus obtained has no parameters other than one scale parameter. Moreover, we find that three out of nine spatial directions start to expand at some "critical time," after which the space has SO(3) symmetry instead of SO(9). PMID:22304254

  17. Evidence of the accelerated expansion of the Universe from weak lensing tomography with COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrabback, T.; Hartlap, J.; Joachimi, B.; Kilbinger, M.; Simon, P.; Benabed, K.; Bradač, M.; Eifler, T.; Erben, T.; Fassnacht, C. D.; High, F. William; Hilbert, S.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Kuijken, K.; Marshall, P. J.; Mellier, Y.; Morganson, E.; Schneider, P.; Semboloni, E.; van Waerbeke, L.; Velander, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure in the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), in which we combine space-based galaxy shape measurements with ground-based photometric redshifts to study the redshift dependence of the lensing signal and constrain cosmological parameters. After applying our weak lensing-optimized data reduction, principal-component interpolation for the spatially, and temporally varying ACS point-spread function, and improved modelling of charge-transfer inefficiency, we measured a lensing signal that is consistent with pure gravitational modes and no significant shape systematics. We carefully estimated the statistical uncertainty from simulated COSMOS-like fields obtained from ray-tracing through the Millennium Simulation, including the full non-Gaussian sampling variance. We tested our lensing pipeline on simulated space-based data, recalibrated non-linear power spectrum corrections using the ray-tracing analysis, employed photometric redshift information to reduce potential contamination by intrinsic galaxy alignments, and marginalized over systematic uncertainties. We find that the weak lensing signal scales with redshift as expected from general relativity for a concordance ΛCDM cosmology, including the full cross-correlations between different redshift bins. Assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology, we measure σ_8(Ω_m/0.3)0.51 = 0.75±0.08 from lensing, in perfect agreement with WMAP-5, yielding joint constraints Ω_m = 0.266+0.025-0.023, σ_8 = 0.802+0.028-0.029 (all 68.3% conf.). Dropping the assumption of flatness and using priors from the HST Key Project and Big-Bang nucleosynthesis only, we find a negative deceleration parameter q0 at 94.3% confidence from the tomographic lensing analysis, providing independent evidence of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. For a flat wCDM cosmology and prior w ∈ [-2,0], we obtain w <-0.41 (90% conf.). Our dark energy

  18. Accelerating the commercialization of university technologies for military healthcare applications: the role of the proof of concept process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Rosibel; DeLong, Hal; Kenyon, Jessica; Wilson, Eli

    2011-06-01

    The von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at UC San Diego (vonliebig.ucsd.edu) is focused on accelerating technology transfer and commercialization through programs and education on entrepreneurism. Technology Acceleration Projects (TAPs) that offer pre-venture grants and extensive mentoring on technology commercialization are a key component of its model which has been developed over the past ten years with the support of a grant from the von Liebig Foundation. In 2010, the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center partnered with the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), to develop a regional model of Technology Acceleration Program initially focused on military research to be deployed across the nation to increase awareness of military medical needs and to accelerate the commercialization of novel technologies to treat the patient. Participants to these challenges are multi-disciplinary teams of graduate students and faculty in engineering, medicine and business representing universities and research institutes in a region, selected via a competitive process, who receive commercialization assistance and funding grants to support translation of their research discoveries into products or services. To validate this model, a pilot program focused on commercialization of wireless healthcare technologies targeting campuses in Southern California has been conducted with the additional support of Qualcomm, Inc. Three projects representing three different universities in Southern California were selected out of forty five applications from ten different universities and research institutes. Over the next twelve months, these teams will conduct proof of concept studies, technology development and preliminary market research to determine the commercial feasibility of their technologies. This first regional program will help build the needed tools and processes to adapt and replicate this model across other regions in the

  19. GPU-Accelerated Stony-Brook University 5-class Microphysics Scheme in WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, J.; Huang, B.; Huang, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system. Microphysics plays an important role in weather and climate prediction. Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the WRF, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University scheme (SBU-YLIN) is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In the past few years, co-processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) has been a disruptive technology in High Performance Computing (HPC). GPUs use the ever increasing transistor count for adding more processor cores. Therefore, GPUs are well suited for massively data parallel processing with high floating point arithmetic intensity. Thus, it is imperative to update legacy scientific applications to take advantage of this unprecedented increase in computing power. CUDA is an extension to the C programming language offering programming GPU's directly. It is designed so that its constructs allow for natural expression of data-level parallelism. A CUDA program is organized into two parts: a serial program running on the CPU and a CUDA kernel running on the GPU. The CUDA code consists of three computational phases: transmission of data into the global memory of the GPU, execution of the CUDA kernel, and transmission of results from the GPU into the memory of CPU. CUDA takes a bottom-up point of view of parallelism is which thread is an atomic unit of parallelism. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions. To test SBU-YLIN, we used a CONtinental United States (CONUS) benchmark data set for 12 km resolution domain for October 24, 2001. A WRF domain is a geographic region of interest discretized into a 2-dimensional grid parallel to the ground. Each grid point has

  20. The Acceleration of the Universe in the Light of Supernovae: The Key Role of CTIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuy, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of acceleration and dark energy arguably constitutes the most revolutionary discovery in astrophysics in recent years. The Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) played a key role in this amazing discovery through three systematic surveys organized by staff astronomers: the “Tololo Supernova Program“ (1986-2000), the Calán/Tololo Project (1989-1993), and the “High-Z Supernova Search Team” (1994-1998). CTIO's state of the art instruments also were fundamental in the independent discovery of acceleration by the “Supernova Cosmology Project” (1992-1999). Here I summarize the work on supernovae carried out from CTIO that led to the discovery of acceleration and dark energy and provide a brief historical summary on the use of Type Ia supernovae in cosmology in order to provide context for the CTIO contribution.

  1. Restoration of accelerator facilities damaged by Great East Japan Earthquake at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Takashi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Shimada, Kenzi; Yoshida, Hidetomo P; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University is a joint-use institution for education and research in a wide variety of fields ranging from physics to medicine. Accelerator facilities at the CYRIC provide opportunities for implementing a broad research program, including medical research using positron emission tomography (PET), with accelerated ions and radioisotopes. At the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, no human injuries occurred and a smooth evacuation was made in the CYRIC, thanks to the anti-earthquake measures such as the renovation of the cyclotron building in 2009 mainly to provide seismic strengthening, fixation of shelves to prevent the falling of objects, and securement of the width of the evacuation route. The preparation of an emergency response manual was also helpful. However, the accelerator facilities were damaged because of strong shaking that continued for a few minutes. For example, two columns on which a 930 cyclotron was placed were damaged, and thereby the 930 cyclotron was inclined. All the elements of beam transport lines were deviated from the beam axis. Some peripheral devices in a HM12 cyclotron were broken. Two shielding doors fell from the carriage onto the floor and blocked the entrances to the rooms. The repair work on the accelerator facilities was started at the end of July 2011. During the repair work, the joint use of the accelerator facilities was suspended. After the repair work was completed, the joint use was re-started at October 2012, one and a half years after the earthquake. PMID:25030295

  2. The Type Ia Supernova Pipeline for the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siffert, B. B.; Reis, R. R. R.; Calvão, M. O.

    2014-10-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is an astronomical facility being built in Sierra de Javalambre, Spain. The main goal is to study the expansion of the Universe through different cosmological observables such as baryonic acoustic oscillations, type Ia supernovae and galaxy clusters. The main instrument will be a 2.5 m telescope equipped with a system of 56 narrow band filters in the optical. Here we present a sketch of the pipeline we are developing to detect type Ia supernovae with J-PAS. First we describe each individual step of the pipeline, such as image subtraction and source selection. Then we show some results we obtained when applying our pipeline to images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the ALHAMBRA survey, which had a set of narrow band filters similar to the ones that will be used by J-PAS.

  3. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Don; Nord, Brian

    2014-09-01

    As is true of a far more famous story, it all began a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away. It even involved a binary star system. A small star, called a white dwarf, had become a burned out husk of its former self and it turned to gorging on hydrogen and helium from its bloated red giant neighbor. The transferred gas reignited the fires of the white dwarf until the temperature from the fusion reaction proved too much for the gravity that struggled to contain it. In the blink of an eye, the star detonated in a supernova, a cosmic maelstrom seen perhaps only once per century in a typical galaxy.

  4. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don; Nord, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As is true of a far more famous story, it all began a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away. It even involved a binary star system. A small star, called a white dwarf, had become a burned out husk of its former self and it turned to gorging on hydrogen and helium from its bloated red giant neighbor. The transferred gas reignited the fires of…

  5. Comments on an Expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Stuart; Samuel, Stuart

    2005-12-12

    Various results are obtained for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. We derive an exact equation that determines Hubble's law, clarify issues concerning the speeds of faraway objects and uncover a 'tail-light angle effect' for distant luminous sources. The latter leads to a small, previously unnoticed correction to the parallax distance formula.

  6. Misconceptions about an Expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Stuart; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-12-14

    Various results are obtained for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. We derive an exact equation that determines Hubble's law, clarify issues concerning the speeds of faraway objects and uncover a ''tail-light angle effect'' for distant luminous sources. The latter leads to a small, previously unnoticed correction to the parallax distance formula.

  7. Uniformly expanding vacuum: A possible interpretation of the dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peng; Yuan, Fang-Fang

    2016-06-01

    Following the spirit of the equivalence principle, we take a step further to recognize the free fall of the observer as a method to eliminate causes that would lead the perceived vacuum to change its original state. Thus, it is expected that the vacuum should be in a rigid Minkowski state or be uniformly expanding. By carefully investigating the impact on measurement caused by the expansion, we clarify the exact meaning of the uniformly expanding vacuum and find that this proposal may be able to explain the current observations of an accelerating universe.

  8. A simple model of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a symmetric manner

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2013-07-23

    We construct a simple model of universe which 'unifies' vacuum energy and radiation on the one hand, and matter and dark energy on the other hand in the spirit of a generalized Chaplygin gas model. Specifically, the phases of early inflation and late accelerated expansion are described by a generalized equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} having a linear component p = αρc{sup 2} and a polytropic component p = kρ{sup 1+1/n}c{sup 2}. For α= 1/3, n= 1 and k=−4/(3ρ{sub P}), where ρ{sub P}= 5.1610{sup 99} g/m{sup 3} is the Planck density, this equation of state describes the transition between the vacuum energy era and the radiation era. For t≥ 0, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion that brings it from the Planck size l{sub P}= 1.6210{sup −35} m to a size a{sub 1}= 2.6110{sup −6} m on a timescale of about 23.3 Planck times t{sub P}= 5.3910{sup −44} s (early inflation). When t > t{sub 1}= 23.3t{sub P}, the universe decelerates and enters in the radiation era. We interpret the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era as a second order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ= 0). For α= 0, n=−1 and k=−ρ{sub Λ}, where ρ{sub Λ}= 7.0210{sup −24} g/m{sup 3} is the cosmological density, the equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} describes the transition from a decelerating universe dominated by pressureless matter (baryonic and dark matter) to an accelerating universe dominated by dark energy (late inflation). This transition takes place at a size a{sub 2}= 0.204l{sub Λ}. corresponding to a time t{sub 2}= 0.203t{sub Λ} where l{sub Λ}= 4.38 10{sup 26} m is the cosmological length and t{sub Λ}= 1.46 10{sup 18} s the cosmological time. The present universe turns out to be just at the transition between these two periods (t{sub 0}∼t{sub 2}). Our model gives the same results as the standard

  9. A simple model of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a symmetric manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2013-07-01

    We construct a simple model of universe which "unifies" vacuum energy and radiation on the one hand, and matter and dark energy on the other hand in the spirit of a generalized Chaplygin gas model. Specifically, the phases of early inflation and late accelerated expansion are described by a generalized equation of state p/c2 = αρ+kρ1+1/n having a linear component p = αρc2 and a polytropic component p = kρ1+1/nc2. For α = 1/3, n = 1 and k = -4/(3ρP), where ρP = 5.161099 g/m3 is the Planck density, this equation of state describes the transition between the vacuum energy era and the radiation era. For t >= 0, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion that brings it from the Planck size lP = 1.6210-35 m to a size a1 = 2.6110-6 m on a timescale of about 23.3 Planck times tP = 5.3910-44 s (early inflation). When t > t1 = 23.3tP, the universe decelerates and enters in the radiation era. We interpret the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era as a second order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ = 0). For α = 0, n = -1 and k = -ρΛ, where ρΛ = 7.0210-24 g/m3 is the cosmological density, the equation of state p/c2 = αρ+kρ1+1/n describes the transition from a decelerating universe dominated by pressureless matter (baryonic and dark matter) to an accelerating universe dominated by dark energy (late inflation). This transition takes place at a size a2 = 0.204lΛ. corresponding to a time t2 = 0.203tΛ where lΛ = 4.38 1026 m is the cosmological length and tΛ = 1.46 1018 s the cosmological time. The present universe turns out to be just at the transition between these two periods (t0 ~ t2). Our model gives the same results as the standard ΛCDM model for t >> tP and completes it by incorporating a phase of early inflation for t < 23.3tP in a very natural manner. Furthermore, it reveals a nice "symmetry" between the early and the late

  10. Java Based Tool To Explore The Discovery Of Dark Energy And The Accelerated Expansion Of The Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, Milan; Lim, R.; Hu, Z.; Park, D.; Wells, D.; Wong, F.; Perrault, S.; Shvarts, E.; Levitin, S.; Rios, M.; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.

    2008-05-01

    The discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe through observations of High-Redshift supernovae and its implication for the existence of Dark Energy as the dominant component of our universe, surely counts as one of the most important moments in the entire history of physics and astronomy. This discovery has great appeal to the general public, both because of the heroic lore to observe distant supernovae and because of the strange relativistic properties of the Dark Energy. To bring this development to the non-professionals, the Cal State L.A. Science Visualization project developed an easy to use Java based tool, which may be used in college, pre-college or public science education. The tool utilizes multimedia presentations, such as graphs or images, to simulate the search for and observations of high-redshift supernovae, and interactively leads to the discovery of the created universe fluid content. Model universes are selected in a semi-random manner, which displays range of interesting possibilities for the effective equation of state, the shape of the Hubble diagram, or the nature of the expansion. The Java-based tool is deployed through Java webstart for both high-end and low-end terminal users across platforms.

  11. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  13. Accelerators/decelerators of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a case study of Iranian health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background At the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), held in Cairo, the global community agreed to the goal of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and rights by 2015. This research explores the accelerators and decelerators of achieving universal access to the sexual and reproductive health targets and accordingly makes some suggestions. Method We have critically reviewed the latest national reports and extracted the background data on each SRH indicator. The key stakeholders, both national and international, were visited and interviewed at two sites. A total of 55 in-depth interviews were conducted with religious leaders, policy-makers, senior managers, senior academics, and health care managers. Six focus-group discussions were also held among health care providers. The study was qualitative in nature. Results Obstacles on the road to achieving universal access to SRH can be viewed from two perspectives. One gap exists between current achievements and the targets. The other gap arises due to age, marital status, and residency status. The most recently observed trends in the indicators of the universal access to SRH shows that the achievements in the “unmet need for family planning” have been poor. Unmet need for family planning could directly be translated to unwanted pregnancies and unwanted childbirths; the former calls for sexual education to underserved people, including adolescents; and the latter calls for access to safe abortion. Local religious leaders have not actively attended international goal-setting programs. Therefore, they usually do not presume a positive attitude towards these goals. Such negative attitudes seem to be the most important factors hindering the progress towards universal access to SRH. Lack of international donors to fund for SRH programs is also another barrier. In national levels both state and the society are interactively playing their roles. We have used a

  14. A Co-Investigator Project for the Cornell University Cleft Accelerated Plasma Experimental Rocket-CAPER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    The CAPER rocket campaign was to follow the SCIFER experiment as a detailed study of the ion acceleration processes in the Cleft Ion Fountain (CIF) above 1000 km altitude. The SCIFER rocket demonstrated that the experiment was feasible and that the CIF acceleration processes on the dayside are different from those observed in the discrete aurora on the nightside. The responsibility of the GI/UAF co-investigator project was to provide the real-time acquisition and display of large-and small-scale ground observations, and satellite solar wind data at the launch control center at Longyearbyen, Svalbard for the determination of the launch conditions and the later interpretation of the rocket observations. The rocket campaign was proposed for January of 1998, but was slipped to January of 1999. The rocket was launched on January 21, 1999 at 06 h 13 m 30 s UT. All of the GI/UAF co-investigator systems functioned well, except the narrow-field TV camera which was to follow the 140 km conjugate of the payload on command from GPS tracking data sent from Andoya. The data were not available during the flight, and the camera tracked the nominal conjugate. Unfortunately, the trajectory was well west of nominal, so no useful narrow-field conjugate data were acquired . In addition, the payload missed the region of more intense precipitation, brighter aurora, stronger currents, and likely large fluxes of transverse ion acceleration. On the other hand, good data were acquired across a region of the ionosphere that appears to have had a double convection boundary because of the IMF switching its z component shortly before launch. These data are important for understanding the reaction of the magnetosphere and ionosphere to changes in the IMF.

  15. Schools Can't Wait: Accelerating the Redesign of University Principal Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Given the urgency for increased student achievement, it would seem that redesigning principal preparation programs around leadership practices that have an impact on students' learning would be a high priority in every university. Yet, it is not. Despite some movement in some areas, the overall pace of change has been too slow, the changes are not…

  16. Note on "Continuous matter creation and the acceleration of the universe: the growth of density fluctuations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Jesus, J. F.; Oliveira, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Recently, de Roany and Pacheco (Gen Relativ Gravit, doi: 10.1007/s10714-010-1069-2 ) performed a Newtonian analysis on the evolution of perturbations for a class of relativistic cosmological models with Creation of Cold Dark Matter (CCDM) proposed by the present authors (Lima et al. in JCAP 1011:027, 2010). In this note we demonstrate that the basic equations adopted in their work do not recover the specific (unperturbed) CCDM model. Unlike to what happens in the original CCDM cosmology, their basic conclusions refer to a decelerating cosmological model in which there is no transition from a decelerating to an accelerating regime as required by SNe type Ia and complementary observations.

  17. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G.; Tigelhoefer, A.

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  18. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  19. Accelerated Schools Centers: How To Address Challenges to Institutionalization and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meza, James, Jr.

    The Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) at the University of New Orleans (UNO) was established in spring 1990, funded by a 3-year grant from Chevron. Beginning with 1 pilot school in 1991, the UNO Accelerated Schools Center has expanded to 36 schools representing 19 school districts in Louisiana and 3 schools from the Memphis City Schools district.…

  20. EXPANDED SEARCH FOR z {approx} 10 GALAXIES FROM HUDF09, ERS, AND CANDELS DATA: EVIDENCE FOR ACCELERATED EVOLUTION AT z > 8?

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.

    2012-02-01

    We search for z {approx} 10 galaxies over {approx}160 arcmin{sup 2} of Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR data in the Chandra Deep Field South, using the public HUDF09, Early Release Science, and CANDELS surveys, that reach to 5{sigma} depths ranging from 26.9 to 29.4 in H{sub 160} AB mag. z {approx}> 9.5 galaxy candidates are identified via J{sub 125} - H{sub 160} > 1.2 colors and non-detections in any band blueward of J{sub 125}. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry is key for separating the genuine high-z candidates from intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 2-4) galaxies with evolved or heavily dust obscured stellar populations. After removing 16 sources of intermediate brightness (H{sub 160} {approx} 24-26 mag) with strong IRAC detections, we only find one plausible z {approx} 10 galaxy candidate in the whole data set, previously reported in Bouwens et al.. The newer data cover a 3 Multiplication-Sign larger area and provide much stronger constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function (LF). If the evolution of the z {approx} 4-8 LFs is extrapolated to z {approx} 10, six z {approx} 10 galaxies are expected in our data. The detection of only one source suggests that the UV LF evolves at an accelerated rate before z {approx} 8. The luminosity density is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude in only 170 Myr from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 8. This increase is {>=}4 Multiplication-Sign larger than expected from the lower redshift extrapolation of the UV LF. We are thus likely witnessing the first rapid buildup of galaxies in the heart of cosmic reionization. Future deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data, reaching to well beyond 29 mag, can enable a more robust quantification of the accelerated evolution around z {approx} 10.

  1. Expanding the spectrum of phenotypes associated with germline PIGA mutations: a child with developmental delay, accelerated linear growth, facial dysmorphisms, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and progressive CNS abnormalities.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, Saskia N; Harakalova, Magdalena; Brilstra, Eva H; van Berkestijn, Frédérique M C; Hofstede, Floris C; van Vught, Adrianus J; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; van Haaften, Gijs; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidyl inositol glycan (PIG) enzyme subclasses are involved in distinct steps of glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchor protein biosynthesis. Glycolsyl phosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins have heterogeneous functions; they can function as enzymes, adhesion molecules, complement regulators and co-receptors in signal transduction pathways. Germline mutations in genes encoding different members of the PIG family result in diverse conditions with (severe) developmental delay, (neonatal) seizures, hypotonia, CNS abnormalities, growth abnormalities, and congenital abnormalities as hallmark features. The variability of clinical features resembles the typical diversity of other glycosylation pathway deficiencies such as the congenital disorders of glycosylation. Here, we report the first germline missense mutation in the PIGA gene associated with accelerated linear growth, obesity, central hypotonia, severe refractory epilepsy, cardiac anomalies, mild facial dysmorphic features, mildly elevated alkaline phosphatase levels, and CNS anomalies consisting of progressive cerebral atrophy, insufficient myelinization, and cortical MRI signal abnormalities. X-exome sequencing in the proband identified a c.278C>T (p.Pro93Leu) mutation in the PIGA gene. The mother and maternal grandmother were unaffected carriers and the mother showed 100% skewing of the X-chromosome harboring the mutation. These results together with the clinical similarity of the patient reported here and the previously reported patients with a germline nonsense mutation in PIGA support the determination that this mutation caused the phenotype in this family. PMID:24259184

  2. The André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory - The new accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.; Klein, M.; Mous, D. J. W.; Alary, J.-F.

    2015-10-01

    The University of Ottawa, Canada, has installed a multi-element, 3 MV tandem AMS system as the cornerstone of their new Advanced Research Complex and the principal analytical instrument of the André E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. Manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., the Netherlands, it is equipped with a 200 sample ion source, a high resolution, 120° injection magnet, a 90° high energy analysis magnet (mass-energy product 350 MeV-AMU), a 65°, 1.7 m radius electric analyzer and a 2 channel gas ionization detector. It is designed to analyze isotopes ranging from tritium to the actinides and to accommodate the use of fluoride target materials. This system is being extended with a second injection line, consisting of selected components from the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. This line will contain a pre-commercial version of the Isobar Separator for Anions, manufactured by Isobarex Corp., Bolton, Ontario, Canada. This instrument uses selective ion-gas reactions in a radio-frequency quadrupole cell to attenuate both atomic and molecular isobars. This paper discusses the specifications of the new AMS equipment, reports on the acceptance test results for 10Be, 14C, 26Al and 127I and presents typical spectra for 10Be and actinide analyses.

  3. Using Dark Matter Haloes to Learn about Cosmic Acceleration: A New Proposal for a Universal Mass Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit or overpredict the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy or a modified gravity implement a modified Press-Schechter formalism, which relates the linear overdensities to the abundance of dark matter haloes at the same time. We critically examine the universality of the Press-Schechter formalism for different cosmologies, and show that the halo abundance is best correlated with spherical linear overdensity at 94% of collapse (or observation) time. We then extend this argument to ellipsoidal collapse (which decreases the fractional time of best correlation for small haloes), and show that our results agree with deviations from modified Press-Schechter formalism seen in simulated mass functions. This provides a novel universal prescription to measure linear density evolution, based on current and future observations of cluster (or dark matter) halo mass function. In particular, even observations of cluster abundance in a single epoch will constrain the entire history of linear growth of cosmological of perturbations.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. Accelerating health equity: the key role of universal health coverage in the Sustainable Development Goals.

    PubMed

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Mills, Anne; Palu, Toomas

    2015-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), to be committed to by Heads of State at the upcoming 2015 United Nations General Assembly, have set much higher and more ambitious health-related goals and targets than did the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The main challenge among MDG off-track countries is the failure to provide and sustain financial access to quality services by communities, especially the poor. Universal health coverage (UHC), one of the SDG health targets indispensable to achieving an improved level and distribution of health, requires a significant increase in government investment in strengthening primary healthcare - the close-to-client service which can result in equitable access. Given the trend of increased fiscal capacity in most developing countries, aiming at long-term progress toward UHC is feasible, if there is political commitment and if focused, effective policies are in place. Trends in high income countries, including an aging population which increases demand for health workers, continue to trigger international migration of health personnel from low and middle income countries. The inspirational SDGs must be matched with redoubled government efforts to strengthen health delivery systems, produce and retain more and relevant health workers, and progressively realize UHC. PMID:25925656

  6. Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied…

  7. Hydrodynamic vacuum sources of dark matter self-generation in an accelerating universe without a Big Bang

    SciTech Connect

    Chefranov, S. G.; Novikov, E. A.

    2010-11-15

    these dark matter particles. Good quantitative agreement of this exact solution with the cosmological observations of SnIa, SDSS-BAO, and the decrease in the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe has been obtained.

  8. Expanded Yegua

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Grayson, S.; Benes, J.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional flexure generally 12-15 km wide. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of good to excellent reservoir-quality sands. From the western edge of the Houston salt dome basin to the San Marcos arch, this trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County, Texas. El Campo field in Wharton County, Texas, was discovered in December 1985 by Ladd Petroleum Corporation with the drilling of the Ladd Petroleum 1 Popp well. Mud logs acquired while drilling indicated that a very sandy reservoir, with encouraging quantities of natural gas and condensate had been encountered. Subsequent open-hold logging generated more questions than answers about the prospective sand section. Additional open hole logs (EPT/ML,SHDT) were run to identify what turned out to be an extremely laminated sand-shale sequence over 400 ft thick. Subsequent development drilling and the acquisition of a 120 ft whole core provided valuable data in analyzing this prolific, geopressured natural gas and condensate Yegua reservoir. Whole-core data, open-hole logs, and computer logs were integrated to develop petro-physical evaluation procedures and to determine the environment of deposition. El Campo field is believed to represent an extremely thick, delta front slope to distal delta front facies.

  9. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  10. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Observational constraints on the accelerating universe in the framework of a 5D bounce cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Bo; Xu, Li-Xin; Liu, Mo-Lin; Gui, Yuan-Xing

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of a five-dimensional (5D) bounce cosmological model, a useful function f(z) is obtained by giving a concrete expression of deceleration parameter Then using the obtained Hubble parameter H(z) according to the function f(z), we constrain the accelerating universe from recent cosmic observations: the 192 ESSENCE SNe Ia and the 9 observational H(z) data. The best fitting values of transition redshift ZT and current deceleration parameter qo are given as . Furthermore, in the 5D bounce model it can be seen that the evolution of equation of state (EOS) for dark energy wde can cross over -1 at about z = 0.23 and the current value w0de = -1.15 < -1. On the other hand, by giving a concrete expression of model-independent EOS of dark energy wde, in the 5D bounce model we obtain the best fitting values from the recently observed data: the 192 ESSENCE SNe Ia, the observational H(z) data, the 3-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) baryon acoustic peak and the x-ray gas mass fraction in clusters.

  11. The big bang as a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change of the scalar curvature in an expanding early Universe: The "hyperinflation" scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashitskii, E. A.; Pentegov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    We suggest that the Big Bang could be a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change in the scalar curvature of the 4D spacetime in an expanding cold Universe filled with a nonlinear scalar field φ and neutral matter with an equation of state p = νɛ (where p and ɛ are the pressure and energy density of the matter, respectively). We consider the Lagrangian of a scalar field with nonlinearity φ4 in a curved spacetime that, along with the term-ξ R|φ|2 quadratic in φ (where ξ is the interaction constant between the scalar and gravitational fields and R is the scalar curvature), contains the term ξ Rφ0(φ + φ+) linear in φ, where φ0 is the vacuum mean of the scalar field amplitude. As a consequence, the condition for the existence of extrema of the scalar-field potential energy is reduced to an equation cubic in φ. Provided that ν > 1/3, the scalar curvature R = [κ(3ν-1)ɛ-4Λ] (where κ and Λ are Einstein's gravitational and cosmological constants, respectively) decreases with decreasing ɛ as the Universe expands, and a first-order phase transition in variable "external field" parameter proportional to R occurs at some critical value R c < 0. Under certain conditions, the critical radius of the early Universe at the point of the first-order phase transition can reach an arbitrary large value, so that this scenario of unrestricted "inflation" of the Universe may be called "hyperinflation." After the passage through the phase-transition point, the scalar-field potential energy should be rapidly released, which must lead to strong heating of the Universe, playing the role of the Big Bang.

  12. Expanding the Scope of Anatomical Sciences: The Case of "Human Evolution--The Fossil Evidence" Course at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notzer, Netta; Abramovitz, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The Anatomy Department at Tel-Aviv University Medical School offers its students an elective course of 26 didactic hours on human evolution. The course is open to students from all faculties, who must fulfill all academic requirements, without a prerequisite of a background in anatomy. Approximately 120 students attend annually, a third of them…

  13. U.S. College and University Initiatives To Expand Educational Opportunities for Black South Africans: A Models Workshop. Information Exchange: Working Paper #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micou, Ann McKinstry, Ed.

    In 1979 the Institute of International Education (IIE), a nonprofit organization that works on education programs in 145 countries and with U.S. colleges and universities, began a scholarship program for black South Africans wanting to study in the United States. The models workshop, held at the offices of the IIE in 1987, was made possible by the…

  14. Lemaître, the expanding universe, and the cosmological constant (German Title: Lemaître, das expandierende Universum und die kosmologische Konstante )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, Kurt

    The scientific and human relations of Albert Einstein and Georges Lemaître are discussed. In 1927 the later had interpreted the general theory of relativity for a model of an expanding cosmos using a positive value of the cosmological constant. In the three open questions between them: expansion of cosmos, primordial state of a quantum vacuum (``primeval atom''), importance of the cosmological constant for vacuum energy, Lemaître finally won over the heavily opposing Einstein. The philosophical and ontological tendency of Einstein's thinking was contrasted with the strict epistemological line of the catholic priest Lemaître. The dramatic changes between friendship and controversy finally led to a diminution of Lemaître's reputation as ``Darwin of Cosmology''. In that case, the late Einstein proved to be a hindrance rather than a promoter of evolution in cosmology.

  15. Anisotropic Expansion of the Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Zhang proposed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state of temperature and density with hundred billion-trillion solar masses due to continuously inhaling matter from its outside. The structure of the entire space is similarly hierarchical or layered and the evolution is iterative. In each of iteration a universe passes through birth, growth, and death. The entire life of a universe roughly divides into three periods with different rates of expansion: slowly growing child universe, fast expanding adult universe, and gradually dying aged universe. When one universe expands to die out, a new universe grows up from its inside. On the AAS 211th meeting, the black hole universe model was shown to be consistent with Mach's principle, observations, and Einstein's general relativity. This new cosmological model can explain the cosmic microwave background radiation, quasars, and element abundances with the well-developed physics. Dark energy is not required for the universe to accelerate. Inflation is not necessary because the black hole universe does not have the horizon problem. In this presentation, the author will explain why the expansion of the universe is anisotropic as shown by the observed anisotropy of the Hubble constant. He will also compare the significant differences between the black hole universe and the big bang cosmology.

  16. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  17. Black Hole Universe Model and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2011-01-01

    Considering black hole as spacetime and slightly modifying the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach principle and Einsteinian general relativity and self consistently explains various observations of the universe without difficulties. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole and gradually grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient material and merging with other black holes. The entire space is infinitely and hierarchically layered and evolves iteratively. The innermost three layers are the universe that we lives, the outside space called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and zero limits for both the mass density and absolute temperature. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of spacetime, and tend to expand outward physically. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published in peer-review journals. This study will show how this new model explains the acceleration of the universe and why dark energy is not required. We will also compare the black hole universe model with the big bang cosmology.

  18. Unsolved Mysteries of Science: A Mind-Expanding Journey through a Universe of Big Bangs, Particle Waves, and Other Perplexing Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, John

    2001-08-01

    A LIVELY EXPLORATION OF THE BIGGEST QUESTIONS IN SCIENCE How Did the Universe Begin? The Big Bang has been the accepted theory for decades, but does it explain everything? How Did Life on Earth Get Started? What triggered the cell division that started the evolutionary chain? Did life come from outer space, buried in a chunk of rock? What is Gravity? Newton's apple just got the arguments started, Einstein made things more complicated. Just how does gravity fit in with quantum theory? What Is the Inside of the Earth Like? What exactly is happening beneath our feet, and can we learn enough to help predict earthquakes and volcanic eruptions? How Do We Learn Language? Is language acquisition an inborn biological ability, or does every child have to start from scratch? Is There a Missing Link? The story of human evolution is not complete. In addition to hoaxes such as "Piltdown Man" and extraordinary finds such as "Lucy," many puzzles remain. What, in the end, do we mean by a "missing link"?

  19. TWO-STEP ACCELERATION MODEL OF COSMIC RAYS AT MIDDLE-AGED SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: UNIVERSALITY IN SECONDARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be M{approx_equal} 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This 'two-step' acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  20. Two-step Acceleration Model of Cosmic Rays at Middle-aged Supernova Remnants: Universality in Secondary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be Msime 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This "two-step" acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  1. Expanding Space: the Root of all Evil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Matthew J.; Barnes, Luke A.; James, J. Berian; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2007-07-01

    While it remains the staple of virtually all cosmological teaching, the concept of expanding space in explaining the increasing separation of galaxies has recently come under fire as a dangerous idea whose application leads to the development of confusion and the establishment of misconceptions. In this paper we develop a notion of expanding space that is completely valid as a framework for the description of the evolution of the universe and whose application allows an intuitive understanding of the influence of universal expansion. We also demonstrate how arguments against the concept in general have failed thus far, as they imbue expanding space with physical properties not consistent with the expectations of general relativity.

  2. Accelerating Universe with Binary Mixture of Dark Energy and Perfect Fluid in LRS Bianchi - V Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anil Kumar; Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The present study deals with spatial homogeneous but totally anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi-I dark energy model in general relativity. The Einstein's field equations have been studied under the assumption of a power law time variation of the expansion factor. The Hubble's parameter ( H) and distance modulus ( μ) in our descended model are found to be good concordance with recent data of astrophysical observations under appropriate condition. The physical and geometrical behavior of universe have been discussed in detail.

  3. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  4. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: The University of Michigan-Coulter Translational Research Partnership Program.

    PubMed Central

    Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the “valley of death”. The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: Scientific, Intellectual Property, Market, and Regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers. PMID:21167009

  5. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: the University of Michigan-Coulter translational research partnership program.

    PubMed

    Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the "valley of death". The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). PMID:21167009

  6. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  7. The Black Hole Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    The black hole universe model is a multiverse model of cosmology recently developed by the speaker. According to this new model, our universe is a fully grown extremely supermassive black hole, which originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up from a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient matter or merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers or universes hierarchically. The innermost three layers include the universe that we live, the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes, and the outside space called mother universe. The outermost layer is infinite in mass, radius, and entropy without an edge and limits to zero for both the matter density and absolute temperature. All layers are governed by the same physics and tend to expand physically in one direction (outward or the direction of increasing entropy). The expansion of a black hole universe decreases its density and temperature but does not alter the laws of physics. The black hole universe evolves iteratively and endlessly without a beginning. When one universe expands out, a new similar one is formed from inside star-like and supermassive black holes. In each of iterations, elements are resynthesized, matter is reconfigurated, and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. The black hole universe is consistent with the Mach principle, observations, and Einsteinian general relativity. It has only one postulate but is able to explain all phenomena occurred in the universe with well-developed physics. The black hole universe does not need dark energy for acceleration and an inflation epoch for flatness, and thus has a devastating impact on the big bang model. In this talk, I will present how this new cosmological model explains the various aspects of the universe, including the origin

  8. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  9. (n+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric expanding structures in R2-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Esmaeil

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we consider higher-dimensional structures in R2-gravity in an expanding background. We assume a Ricci scalar constant background and use this assumption as the basic constraint to find solutions. Two classes of solutions are presented in which every one includes naked singularity and wormhole geometries. Both classes of solutions show inflationary phase of expansion favored by recent acceleration of the universe. Traversability of the wormhole solutions is discussed. The possibility of satisfying or violating the weak energy condition (WEC) for wormholes is explored. For one class of solutions, particular choices of constants result in wormholes which satisfy the WEC all over the spacetime.

  10. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  11. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  12. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  13. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  14. The Beginning and End of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Cosmology is the scientific study of how the Universe began more than 13 billion years ago, how its properties have changed, and what its future might be. The balance of forces and energy cause the Universe to expand, first accelerating, then decelerating and then accelerating again. Within this overall structure, the interplay of atoms and light with the mysterious dark matter and dark energy causes stars and galaxies to form and evolve, leading to galaxies like our own home, the Milky Way. Observational cosmology uses telescopes on Earth and in space to reach back in time to find the faint remaining echoes of the Big Bang and to trace the formation and evolution of the galaxies and structures that fill the Universe. In this lecture, Dr. Gradner will give an overview of cosmology, outlining the 13-billion year history of the Universe, and highlighting the very rapid progress this field has made i the last decade. He will discuss the role that NASA space telescopes have played in this progress and wil continue to play in the years to come. He will give a time-based history of the Universe, discussing the successive processes that formed matter, particles, atoms, stars and galaxies. In particular, he will focus on cosmological inflation, the rapid accelerated expansion that marks the beginning of the Universe, and dark energy, a tenuous substance that overcomes gravity and whose properties will determine its final fate.

  15. The Beginning and End of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmology is the scientific study of how the Universe began more than 13 billion years ago, how its properties have changed, and what its future might be. The balance of forces and energy cause the Universe to expand, first accelerating, then decelerating and then accelerating again. Within this overall structure, the interplay of atoms and light with the mysterious dark matter and dark energy causes stars and galaxies to form and evolve, leading to galaxies like our own home, the Milky Way. Observational cosmology uses telescopes on Earth and in space to reach back in time to find the faint remaining echoes of the Big Bang and to trace the formation and evolution of the galaxies and structures that fill the Universe. In this lecture, Dr. Gardner will give an overview of cosmology, outlining the 13-billion year history of the Universe, and highlighting the very rapid progress this field has made in the last decade. He will discuss the role that NASA space telescopes have played in this progress and will continue to play in the years to come. He will give a time-based history of the Universe, discussing the successive processes that formed matter, particles, atoms, stars and galaxies. In particular, he will focus on cosmological inflation, the rapid accelerated expansion that marks the beginning of the Universe, and dark energy, a tenuous substance that overcomes gravity and whose properties will determine its final fate.

  16. Expanding the Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Original research and content creation in the university environment have historically been the domain of faculty and their graduate students. Nowadays, however, undergraduate programs at universities across the country are putting undergrads in the center of the action. This article describes some of these programs--at Duke University (North…

  17. Expanding Assessment Methods and Moments in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Jennifer; de Pont, Genevieve; Brailsford, Ian

    2012-01-01

    History courses at The University of Auckland are typically assessed at two or three moments during a semester. The methods used normally employ two essays and a written examination answering questions set by the lecturer. This study describes an assessment innovation in 2008 that expanded both the frequency and variety of activities completed by…

  18. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  19. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  20. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  1. Expanded Roles for HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanded roles for human resource development (HRD). "The Roles of Consultants in Gainsharing Firms: Empirical Results" (Eunsang Cho, Gary N. McLean) reports findings that consultants are moderately involved at the separation, preparation, evaluation, and design stages and have low…

  2. EXPANDED BED BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year pilot-scale research investigation at the EPA Lebanon Pilot Plant was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a unique biological secondary treatment process, designated the Expanded Bed Biological Treatment Process (EBBT). The EBBT process is a three-phase (oxygen/...

  3. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  4. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  5. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Through the presentation of its Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics career education conferences for secondary school young women, the Math/Science Network continues its efforts to remove the educational, psychological, and cultural barriers which prevent women from entering math-and science-based careers. The Expanding Your Horizons conferences were presented on 77 college, university and high school campuses across the United States. This year, these unique one day conferences reached 15,500 students, 3,000 parents and educators, and involved 3,000 career women who volunteered their services as conference planners, workshop leaders, speakers, and role models.

  6. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  7. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  8. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  9. GPU accelerated dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the computational bottlenecks in discrete dislocation dynamics modeling (associated with segment-segment interactions as well as the treatment of free surfaces), discuss the parallelization and optimization strategies, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) computation in accelerating dislocation dynamics simulations and expanding their scope. Individual algorithmic benchmark tests as well as an example large simulation of a thin film are presented.

  10. Expanding the Trilinos developer community.

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2010-10-01

    The Trilinos Project started approximately nine years ago as a small effort to enable research, development and ongoing support of small, related solver software efforts. The 'Tri' in Trilinos was intended to indicate the eventual three packages we planned to develop. In 2007 the project expanded its scope to include any package that was an enabling technology for technical computing. Presently the Trilinos repository contains over 55 packages covering a broad spectrum of reusable tools for constructing full-featured scalable scientific and engineering applications. Trilinos usage is now worldwide, and many applications have an explicit dependence on Trilinos for essential capabilities. Users come from other US laboratories, universities, industry and international research groups. Awareness and use of Trilinos is growing rapidly outside of Sandia. Members of the external research community are becoming more familiar with Trilinos, its design and collaborative nature. As a result, the Trilinos project is receiving an increasing number of requests from external community members who want to contribute to Trilinos as developers. To-date we have worked with external developers in an ad hoc fashion. Going forward, we want to develop a set of policies, procedures, tools and infrastructure to simplify interactions with external developers. As we go forward with multi-laboratory efforts such as CASL and X-Stack, and international projects such as IESP, we will need a more streamlined and explicit process for making external developers 'first-class citizens' in the Trilinos development community. This document is intended to frame the discussion for expanding the Trilinos community to all strategically important external members, while at the same time preserving Sandia's primary leadership role in the project.

  11. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  12. A New Cosmological Model: Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2007-12-01

    An alternative cosmological model called by Black Hole Universe is newly developed. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses due to continuously inhaling matter from its outside - the mother universe. The structure and evolution of the black hole universe are spatially hierarchical and temporally iterative. In each of iterations, the matter reconfigures and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. A universe passes through birth, growth, and death. The entire life of a universe roughly divides into three periods with different rates of expansion. In the early period, the universe was a child, which did not eat much and thus grew slowly. In the middle period, the universe is an adult, which expands quickly with a speed up to the speed of light. And in the final period, the universe will become elder and slow down the expansion till a complete stop when the outside matter is all swallowed. The black hole universe model is consistent with the Mach principle, the observations of the universe, and the Einstein general theory of relativity and can be understood with the well-developed physics. This new model does not need a dark energy for acceleration and has a great impact on the traditional big bang cosmology. In this presentation, we will show the origin, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe, explain the cosmic microwave background radiation, describe the energy mechanism of quasars, illustrate the black hole nucleosynthesis of elements, analyze the mechanisms of redshifts, and compare the black hole universe model with the big bang cosmology.

  13. Expanding the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch-Brioso, Karen

    2009-01-01

    They are not the topics found in a conventional law review: An Austin-based journal delved into the reproductive rights of Hispanic women entering into commercial surrogacy contracts. The next issue of a University of California, Berkeley-based journal will probe the Voting Rights Act--and how it affects Puerto Ricans. A Harvard-based review once…

  14. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  15. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  16. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.; Imrich, Kenneth J.

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  17. UPDATE HANFORD SITE D & D PROGRAMS ACCELERATE EXPAND

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-04-22

    A large, new decontamination and decommissioning organization targeted toward rapid, focused work on aging and highly contaminated structures was formed at the DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington state in autumn 2003. Managed by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, the new organization has made significant progress during its first six months. Under the direction of Mike Lackey, who recently joined Fluor from the Portland General Electric Trojan Plant, the Fluor Hanford D&D organization is tackling the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and is nearly finished demolishing the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility. In addition, the D&D organization is progressing through the development and public comment phases of its required environmental permitting, planning work and procurement services to D&D three other Hanford facilities: 224-T and 224-B Plutonium Concentration Facilities, and the U Plant radiochemical processing facility. It is also planning and beginning to D&D the spent fuel handling areas of the Site's 100-K Reactor Area. The 586-square mile Hanford Site, the oldest plutonium production center in the world, served as the ''workhorse'' of the American nuclear defense arsenal from 1944 through 1989. Hanford produced the special nuclear material for the plutonium cores of the Trinity (test) and Nagasaki explosions, and then went on to produce more than half of the weapons plutonium ever manufactured by the United States, and about one-fourth of that manufactured worldwide. As a result, Hanford, the top-secret ''Paul Bunyan'' in the desert, is one of the most contaminated areas in the world. Its cleanup agreement with state and federal regulators, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement,'' celebrates its 15th anniversary this spring, at a time when operations dealing with unstable plutonium leftovers, corroded spent fuel, and liquids wastes in single-shelled tanks conclude. As these crucial jobs are coming to an end, D&D has gained traction as a central Site mission.

  18. Large classical universes emerging from quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2009-04-15

    It is generally believed that one cannot obtain a large universe from quantum cosmological models without an inflationary phase in the classical expanding era because the typical size of the universe after leaving the quantum regime should be around the Planck length, and the standard decelerated classical expansion after that is not sufficient to enlarge the universe in the time available. For instance, in many quantum minisuperspace bouncing models studied in the literature, solutions where the universe leaves the quantum regime in the expanding phase with appropriate size have negligible probability amplitude with respect to solutions leaving this regime around the Planck length. In this paper, I present a general class of moving Gaussian solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation where the velocity of the wave in minisuperspace along the scale factor axis, which is the new large parameter introduced in order to circumvent the above-mentioned problem, induces a large acceleration around the quantum bounce, forcing the universe to leave the quantum regime sufficiently big to increase afterwards to the present size, without needing any classical inflationary phase in between, and with reasonable relative probability amplitudes with respect to models leaving the quantum regime around the Planck scale. Furthermore, linear perturbations around this background model are free of any trans-Planckian problem.

  19. A transition from a decelerated to an accelerated phase of the universe expansion from the simplest non-trivial polynomial function of T in the f(R,T) formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, P. H. R. S.; Ribeiro, G.; Correa, R. A. C.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present cosmological solutions from the simplest non-trivial polynomial function of T in f(R,T) theory of gravity, with R and T standing for the Ricci scalar and trace of the energy-momentum tensor, respectively. Although such an approach yields a highly non-linear differential equation for the scale factor, we show that it is possible to obtain analytical solutions for the cosmological parameters. For some values of the free parameters, the model is able to predict a transition from a decelerated to an accelerated expansion of the universe and the values of the deceleration parameter agree with observation.

  20. What Are the Appropriate Models for St. Petersburg College and the University Partnership Center To Expand Access to Bachelor's and Master's Degrees? Project Eagle Evaluation Question #5. Benchmarking St. Petersburg College: A Report to Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Joyce

    St. Petersburg College (SPC) (Florida), formerly a two-year community college, now offers four-year degrees. This paper discusses the findings of SPC's evaluation question focusing on what the appropriate models are for St. Petersburg College and the University Partnership Center (UPC) to increase access to bachelor's and master's programs.…

  1. Expander chunked codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Shenghao; Ye, Baoliu; Yin, Yitong; Lu, Sanglu

    2015-12-01

    Chunked codes are efficient random linear network coding (RLNC) schemes with low computational cost, where the input packets are encoded into small chunks (i.e., subsets of the coded packets). During the network transmission, RLNC is performed within each chunk. In this paper, we first introduce a simple transfer matrix model to characterize the transmission of chunks and derive some basic properties of the model to facilitate the performance analysis. We then focus on the design of overlapped chunked codes, a class of chunked codes whose chunks are non-disjoint subsets of input packets, which are of special interest since they can be encoded with negligible computational cost and in a causal fashion. We propose expander chunked (EC) codes, the first class of overlapped chunked codes that have an analyzable performance, where the construction of the chunks makes use of regular graphs. Numerical and simulation results show that in some practical settings, EC codes can achieve rates within 91 to 97 % of the optimum and outperform the state-of-the-art overlapped chunked codes significantly.

  2. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5 cm/μs, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50 mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup −} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  3. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  4. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  5. The APT Accelerator.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, George P.

    1996-05-01

    The accelerator for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is a high-power RF linac designed to produce a 100-mA CW proton beam at an energy of 1300 MeV. A heavy-metal target produces large quantities of spallation neutrons, which are slowed to thermal energies and captured in a feed material to make tritium. The baseline accelerator design consists of a 75-keV proton injector, a 7-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), a 100-MeV coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL), and a 1300-MeV side-coupled linac (SCL). The RFQ operates at a frequency of 350 MHz, while the CCDTL and SCL operate at 700-MHz. A quadrupole-magnet transport system conveys the 1300-MeV beam to production target/blanket assemblies where beam expanders using non-linear magnetic elements transform the linac output distribution into large-area rectangular distributions having a nearly uniform density. All the linac accelerating structures use conventional water-cooled copper technology. The SCL section is based on the well-proven 800-MeV LANSCE high-duty-factor linac at Los Alamos. The CCDTL is a new hybrid accelerating structure that combines the best features of the conventional drift-tube linac and the coupled-cavity linac to provide efficient and stable acceleration in the intermediate velocity range. Approximately 263 1-MW CW klystrons are needed to drive the 130-MW proton beam. The total ac-power requirement for the APT plant is about 438 MW, most of which is needed for the accelerator. An advanced-technology option is being considered that would replace the conventional SCL with a superconducting RF linac composed of sequences of 4-cell elliptical-type cavities. This option would reduce the electric power consumption significantly and would provide increased operational flexibility. * Work supported by the US Department of Energy.

  6. Development of PUNDA (Parametric Universal Nonlinear Dynamics Approximator) Models for Self-Validating Knowledge-Guided Modelling of Nonlinear Processes in Particle Accelerators \\& Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, Bijan; Schweiger, Carl; Hartman, Eric

    2007-10-07

    The difficult problems being tackled in the accelerator community are those that are nonlinear, substantially unmodeled, and vary over time. Such problems are ideal candidates for model-based optimization and control if representative models of the problem can be developed that capture the necessary mathematical relations and remain valid throughout the operation region of the system, and through variations in system dynamics. The goal of this proposal is to develop the methodology and the algorithms for building high-fidelity mathematical representations of complex nonlinear systems via constrained training of combined first-principles and neural network models.

  7. A varying polytropic gas universe and phase space analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we will consider a phenomenological model of a dark fluid that is able to explain an accelerated expansion of our low redshift universe and the phase transition to this accelerated expanding universe. Recent developments in modern cosmology towards understanding of the accelerated expansion of the large scale universe involve various scenarios and approaches. Among these approaches, one of well-known and accepted practice is modeling of the content of our universe via dark fluid. There are various models of dark energy fluid actively studied in recent literature and polytropic gas is among them. In this work, we will consider a varying polytropic gas which is a phenomenological modification of polytropic gas. Our model of varying polytropic dark fluid has been constructed to analogue to a varying Chaplygin gas actively discussed in the literature. We will consider interacting models, where dark matter is a pressureless fluid, to have a comprehensive picture. Phase space analysis is an elegant mathematical tool to earn general understanding of large scale universe and easily see an existence of a solution to cosmological coincidence problem. Imposing some constraints on parameters of the models, we found late time attractors for each case analytically. Cosmological consequences for the obtained late time attractors are discussed.

  8. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  9. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  10. Beyond Academic Outcomes: Expanding into Comprehensive Assessment while Preserving Faculty Ownership. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Dennis E.

    At Northeast Missouri State University, where faculty have directed student outcomes assessment for 20 years, assessment is expanding to include a broader university mission of developing the whole person. As assessment becomes more comprehensive, expanding into out-of-class experiences, there is a risk of losing faculty support. Three fundamental…

  11. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  12. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  13. Introduction to Korean Accelerator Science and Activities in Industrial Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Won

    2012-03-01

    After 20 years of the first large-scale accelerator in Korea, the Pohang Light Source (PLS) of 2.0 GeV at POSTECH, its upgrade (PLS-II) is now under commissioning with energy of 3.0 GeV. The users' service for synchrotron radiation is scheduled in April 2012. There are five big accelerator projects in various stages of construction, namely a high-intensity proton linac of 100 MeV, the PAL-XFEL of 10-GeV, a carbon therapy cyclotron of 400 MeV/u, and rare isotope accelerators for isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and In-flight Fragmentation (IFF). There are also strong demands for industrial uses of accelerators, especially in sterilization applications. In this paper, we report the current status of accelerator projects and its science in Korea, along with a brief review of accelerator R&D going back to the early 1960s at universities.

  14. Laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent nanotargets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. M.; Pomerantz, I.; Yin, L.; Wu, H. C.; Jung, D.; Albright, B. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shah, R.; Allinger, K.; Hörlein, R.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Blakeney, J.; Dyer, G.; Fuller, L.; Gaul, E.; Mccary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Here we present experimental results on laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent, overdense plasmas in the break-out afterburner (BOA) regime. Experiments were preformed at the Trident ultra-high contrast laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and at the Texas Petawatt laser facility, located in the University of Texas at Austin. It is shown that when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions occurs that lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the critical density in the non-relativistic limit. For given laser parameters, the optimal target thickness yielding the highest maximum ion energy is one in which this time window for ion acceleration overlaps with the intensity peak of the laser pulse. A simple analytic model of relativistically induced transparency is presented for plasma expansion at the time-evolving sound speed, from which these times may be estimated. The maximum ion energy attainable is controlled by the finite acceleration volume and time over which the BOA acts.

  15. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  16. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  17. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  18. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  19. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  20. Cosmic acceleration and Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Waheed, S.

    2012-10-15

    We study the accelerated expansion of the universe by exploring the Brans-Dicke parameter in different eras. For this, we take the FRW universe model with a viscous fluid (without potential) and the Bianchi type-I universe model with a barotropic fluid (with and without a potential). We evaluate the deceleration parameter and the Brans-Dicke parameter to explore cosmic acceleration. It is concluded that accelerated expansion of the universe can also be achieved for higher values of the Brans-Dicke parameter in some cases.

  1. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  2. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  3. Is Space Really Expanding? A Counterexample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodorowski, Michał J.

    2007-03-01

    In all Friedman models, the cosmological redshift is widely interpreted as a consequence of the general-relativistic phenomenon of expansion of space. Other commonly believed consequences of this phenomenon are superluminal recession velocities of distant galaxies, and the distance to the particle horizon greater than ct (where t is the age of the Universe), in apparent conflict with special relativity. Here, we study a particular Friedman model: empty universe. This model exhibits both cosmological redshift, superluminal velocities and infinite distance to the horizon. However, we show that the cosmological redshift is there simply a relativistic Doppler shift. Moreover, apparently superluminal velocities and ‘acausal’ distance to the horizon are in fact a direct consequence of special-relativistic phenomenon of time dilation, as well as of the adopted definition of distance in cosmology. There is no conflict with special relativity, whatsoever. In particular, inertial recession velocities are subluminal. Since in the real Universe, sufficiently distant galaxies recede with relativistic velocities, these special-relativistic effects must be at least partly responsible for the cosmological redshift and the aforementioned ‘superluminalities’, commonly attributed to the expansion of space. Let us finish with a question resembling a Buddhism-Zen ‘koan’: in an empty universe, what is expanding?

  4. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, S. Jay

    2015-11-01

    In the context of a homogeneous Universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the Universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions spanning several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the Universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the Universe.

  5. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical property of the equation of state in dark energy literature, whose physical consequences tend to be discarded by observations. This thus distinguishes the ten above sequences from an infinity of ways to describe Universe expansion.

  6. The Runaway Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Roger

    2004-10-26

    The Universe appears to be flat, accelerating and lightweight. In this talk, I will explain what these terms mean, how we developed this view and its implications. I will also discuss the connection between cosmology and particle physics experiments being conducted at accelerators and in underground laboratories. I will conclude with a description of some proposed telescopes that will help us understand much more about the geometry, expansion and contents of our Universe.

  7. Transparency parameters from relativistically expanding outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Bégué, D.; Iyyani, S.

    2014-09-01

    In many gamma-ray bursts a distinct blackbody spectral component is present, which is attributed to the emission from the photosphere of a relativistically expanding plasma. The properties of this component (temperature and flux) can be linked to the properties of the outflow and have been presented in the case where there is no sub-photospheric dissipation and the photosphere is in coasting phase. First, we present the derivation of the properties of the outflow for finite winds, including when the photosphere is in the accelerating phase. Second, we study the effect of localized sub-photospheric dissipation on the estimation of the parameters. Finally, we apply our results to GRB 090902B. We find that during the first epoch of this burst the photosphere is most likely to be in the accelerating phase, leading to smaller values of the Lorentz factor than the ones previously estimated. For the second epoch, we find that the photosphere is likely to be in the coasting phase.

  8. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions∕light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150–500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100–220 MeV energies. PMID:18561651

  9. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-05-15

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10{sup -11} achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions/light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 {mu}m (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150-500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100-220 MeV energies.

  10. The Expanding Marketplace for Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, N.; Sirles, P.

    2012-12-01

    While the image of geophysics for the proverbial "layman" often seems limited to volcanoes and earthquakes, and to the geoscientist this image enlarges to include oil or minerals exploration and whole earth studies, there has been a steady increase in the application of geophysics into the realm of "daily life", such as real estate deals, highway infrastructure, and flood protection. This expansion of applications can be attributed to the improved economics from advances in equipment and interpretation. Traditional geophysical methods that at one time often only fit within the budgets of oil, gas, and minerals exploration programs can now be economically applied to much smaller scale needs like contaminant mapping, landfill delineation, and levee investigations. A real-world, economic example of this expanding marketplace is our company, which began very small and was aimed almost exclusively at the minerals exploration market. Most of our growth has been in the last 10 years, when we have expanded to five offices and a staff with almost 40 geoscientist degrees (21 in geophysics); much of this growth has been in the non-oil, non-minerals arenas. While much of our work still includes minerals exploration, other projects this year include wind-farm foundation studies, cavity detection above underground nuclear tests, landfill studies, acid mine drainage problems, and leaks in evaporation ponds. A methodology example of this expanding market is the induced polarization (IP) survey, once primarily used for minerals exploration, particularly large porphyry copper deposits, but now efficient enough to also use in environmental studies. The IP method has been particularly useful in delineating and characterizing old, poorly documented landfills, and recent research suggests it may also be useful in monitoring the accelerated biodegradation processes used in some cases to rehabilitate the sites. Compared to temperature monitoring systems, IP may be more useful in providing

  11. Expanding Library Support of Faculty Research: Exploring Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jeanne M.; Tucker, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The changing research and information environment requires a reexamination of library support for research. This study considers research-related attitudes and practices to identify elements indicating readiness or resistance to expanding the library's role in research support. A survey of faculty conducted at the University of Nevada Las…

  12. Expanding Gerontology Enrollments: Successful Results of an Innovative Outreach Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sandra L.; Haley, William E.; Hyer, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    As state budget allocations for higher education decrease, "specialty" programs such as gerontology must continually demonstrate their productivity. State and private universities increasingly rely on student credit hours (SCH) or tuition generated, which is making it difficult for many gerontology programs to expand. The School of Aging Studies…

  13. Dynamics in a Maximally Symmetric Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewketu, Asnakew

    2016-03-01

    Our present understanding of the evolution of the universe relies upon the Friedmann- Robertson- Walker cosmological models. This model is so successful that it is now being considered as the Standard Model of Cosmology. So in this work we derive the Fried- mann equations using the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric together with Einstein field equation and then we give a simple method to reduce Friedmann equations to a second order linear differential equation when it is supplemented with a time dependent equation of state. Furthermore, as illustrative examples, we solve this equation for some specific time dependent equation of states. And also by using the Friedmann equations with some time dependent equation of state we try to determine the cosmic scale factor(the rate at which the universe expands) and age of the Friedmann universe, for the matter dominated era, radiation dominated era and for both matter and radiation dominated era by considering different cases. We have finally discussed the observable quantities that can be evidences for the accelerated expansion of the Friedmann universe. I would like to acknowledge Addis Ababa University for its financial and material support to my work on the title mentioned above.

  14. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  15. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  16. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  17. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  18. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  19. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  20. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  1. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-02-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Emotional Giftedness: An Expanded View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piechowski, Michael M.

    This paper discusses an expanded definition of the concept of emotional giftedness in children as defined by Annemarie Roeper. In contrast to examples of academic and artistic prodigies, cases are reviewed that illustrate less tangibly measured examples of children's giftedness, such as expressions of compassion, moral sensitivity, positive…

  5. Common Ground: Expanding Our Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michele J.

    In "Common Ground: Dialogue, Understanding, and the Teaching of Composition," Kurt Spellmeyer seeks to familiarize students and teachers with the linguistic and cultural no-man's-land separating them. Reinstating the value of two writing conventions often used by traditional students--expressive and commonplaces--can help expand on the horizons of…

  6. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-11-17

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Paul Hanna and "Expanding Communities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared R.

    2004-01-01

    The development and promotion of the "expanding communities" curriculum design model for teaching elementary school social studies was a crucial episode in the history of social studies. This article profiles how the model developed in the mind of its most effective promoter, Paul Robert Hanna. Paul Hanna understood early in his career the…

  8. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-10-27

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. NASA Viz iPad App Expands Coverage Across Universe

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NASA Visualization Explorer app has broadened its scope to includemore awe-inspiring discoveries beamed back to Earth from the agency'sentire fleet of satellites, spacecraft and space tele...

  12. International or Global--The Expanding Universe of Librarianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Lynne M.

    2009-01-01

    This year, the United States Department of Education Title VI programs will celebrate their 50th anniversary. During the Cold War, the United States government passed the National Defense Education Act to marshal all possible resources to improve education in multiple subject areas, initiating the development of National Research Centers (NRCs) in…

  13. The expanding universe of disorders of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Obeso, Jose A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P; Burn, David J

    2014-08-01

    The basal ganglia were originally thought to be associated purely with motor control. However, dysfunction and pathology of different regions and circuits are now known to give rise to many clinical manifestations beyond the association of basal ganglia dysfunction with movement disorders. Moreover, disorders that were thought to be caused by dysfunction of the basal ganglia only, such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, have diverse abnormalities distributed not only in the brain but also in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems; this knowledge poses new questions and challenges. We discuss advances and the unanswered questions, and ways in which progress might be made. PMID:24954674

  14. College and University Health Care Professionals: An Expanding Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Phillip M.

    1980-01-01

    An historical perspective of the American College Health Association emphasizes the importance of teamwork among health personnel. The current trend in litigation toward health care professionals and the regulatory role of government has resulted in an apparent increase in legal activity, and necessitates teamwork between doctors and lawyers. (JN)

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  16. McVittie's legacy: Black holes in an expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Martin, Damien; Kleban, Matthew

    2010-05-15

    We prove that a class of solutions to Einstein's equations--originally discovered by McVittie in 1933--includes regular black holes embedded in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies. If the cosmology is dominated at late times by a positive cosmological constant, the metric is regular everywhere on and outside the black hole horizon and away from the big-bang singularity, and the solutions asymptote in the future and near the horizon to the Schwarzschild-de Sitter geometry. For solutions without a positive cosmological constant the would-be horizon is a weak null singularity.

  17. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  18. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-10

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  19. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  20. Cosmic strings in an expanding spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Stein-Schabes, J.A.; Burd, A.B.

    1987-04-01

    We investigate the stability of a static, infinitely long and straight vacuum string solution under inhomogeneous axisymmetric time-dependent perturbations. We find it to be perturbatively stable. We further extend our work by finding a string solutions in an expanding Universe. The back reaction of the string on the gravitational field has been ignored. The background is assumed to be a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. By numerically integrating the field equations in a radiation and matter dominated models, we discover oscillatory solutions. The possible damping of these oscillations is discussed. For late times the solution becomes identical to the static one studied in the first part of the paper. 19 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  2. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  3. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  4. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  5. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  6. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  7. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  8. Seal-less cryogenic expander

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, L.E.; Christopher, E.H.

    1987-12-08

    In an expander for use in a split Stirling cycle refrigeration system of the type wherein a displacer moves with reciprocating motion inside an expander housing, and wherein a plunger force and a regenerator force are formed on the displacer, the plunger force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum plunger force amplitude, and the regenerator force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum regenerator force amplitude, the improvement is described comprising: (a) means for maintaining displacer forces, such that the maximum plunger force amplitude is substantially equal to the maximum regenerator force amplitude; and (b) means for adjusting a time difference, the time difference being the time between the time of maximum plunger force and the time of maximum regenerator force such that a measure of the cooling power of the refrigeration system is maximized.

  9. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  10. On cosmic acceleration without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We elaborate on the proposal that the observed acceleration of the Universe is the result of the backreaction of cosmological perturbations, rather than the effect of a negative-pressure dark energy fluid or a modification of general relativity. Through the effective Friedmann equations describing an inhomogeneous Universe after smoothing, we demonstrate that acceleration in our local Hubble patch is possible even if fluid elements do not individually undergo accelerated expansion. This invalidates the no-go theorem that there can be no acceleration in our local Hubble patch if the Universe only contains irrotational dust. We then study perturbatively the time behavior of general-relativistic cosmological perturbations, applying, where possible, the renormalization group to regularize the dynamics. We show that an instability occurs in the perturbative expansion involving sub-Hubble modes, which indicates that acceleration in our Hubble patch may originate from the backreaction of cosmological perturbations on observable scales.

  11. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  12. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  13. Gravitomagnetic Instabilities in Anisotropically Expanding Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, Kostas; Kuiroukidis, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Demetrios B.; Vlahos, Loukas

    Gravitational instabilities in a magnetized Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe, in which the magnetic field was assumed to be too weak to destroy the isotropy of the model, are known and have been studied in the past. Accordingly, it became evident that the external magnetic field disfavors the perturbations' growth, suppressing the corresponding rate by an amount proportional to its strength. However, the spatial isotropy of the FRW universe is not compatible with the presence of large-scale magnetic fields. Therefore, in this paper we use the general-relativistic version of the (linearized) perturbed magnetohydrodynamic equations with and without resistivity, to discuss a generalized Jeans criterion and the potential formation of density condensations within a class of homogeneous and anisotropically expanding, self-gravitating, magnetized fluids in curved space-time. We find that, for a wide variety of anisotropic cosmological models, gravitomagnetic instabilities can lead to subhorizontal, magnetized condensations. In the nonresistive case, the power spectrum of the unstable cosmological perturbations suggests that most of the power is concentrated on large scales (small k), very close to the horizon. On the other hand, in a resistive medium, the critical wave-numbers so obtained, exhibit a delicate dependence on resistivity, resulting in the reduction of the corresponding Jeans lengths to smaller scales (well bellow the horizon) than the nonresistive ones, while increasing the range of cosmological models which admit such an instability.

  14. CAS CERN Accelerator School 5th General Accelerator Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.

    1994-01-01

    The fifth CERN Accelerator School (CAS) basic course on General Accelerator Physics was given at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, from 7 to 18 September 1992. Its syllabus was based on the previous similar courses held at Gif-sur-Yvette in 1984, Aarhus 1986, Salamanca 1988 and Juelich 1990, and whose proceedings were published as CERN Reports 85-19, 87-10, 89-05 and 91-04, respectively. However, certain topics were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while new subjects were introduced. As far as the proceedings of this school are concerned the opportunity was taken not only to include the lectures presented but also to select and revise the most appropriate chapters from the previous similar schools. In this way the present volumes constitute a rather complete introduction to all aspects of the design and construction of particle accelerators, including optics, emittance, luminosity, longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics, insertions, chromaticity, transfer lines, resonances, accelerating structures, tune shifts, coasting beams, lifetime, synchrotron radiation, radiation damping, beam-beam effects, diagnostics, cooling, ion and positron sources, RF and vacuum systems, injection and extraction, conventional, permanent and superconducting magnets, cyclotrons, RF linear accelerators, microtrons, as well as applications of particle accelerators (including therapy) and the history of accelerators. See hints under the relevant topics.

  15. Apparent and average accelerations of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Andersson, Lars E-mail: larsa@math.miami.edu

    2008-10-15

    In this paper we consider the relation between the volume deceleration parameter obtained within the Buchert averaging scheme and the deceleration parameter derived from supernova observation. This work was motivated by recent findings that showed that there are models which despite having {Lambda} = 0 have volume deceleration parameter q{sup vol}<0. This opens the possibility that back-reaction and averaging effects may be used as an interesting alternative explanation to the dark energy phenomenon. We have calculated q{sup vol} in some Lemaitre-Tolman models. For those models which are chosen to be realistic and which fit the supernova data, we find that q{sup vol}>0, while those models which we have been able to find which exhibit q{sup vol}<0 turn out to be unrealistic. This indicates that care must be exercised in relating the deceleration parameter to observations.

  16. A new look at the accelerating universe.

    PubMed

    Parker, L; Raval, A

    2001-01-29

    We show that the cosmological model having zero cosmological constant, but containing the vacuum energy of a simple quantized free scalar field of low mass (VCDM model), agrees with the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) and supernova (SNe-Ia) data at least as well as the classical cosmological model with a small nonzero cosmological constant. We also show that in the VCDM model the ratio of vacuum pressure to vacuum energy density is less than -1. We display the VCDM results for a set of parameters that give a very good fit to the CMBR power spectrum, and show that the same parameters also give a good fit to the SNe-Ia data. PMID:11177931

  17. Wright State Expands Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    By leasing the Eugene W. Kettering Engineering and Science Center in downtown Dayton, Ohio, Wright State University plans to enlarge significantly its activities in continuing education for engineers, scientists, and others. (JR)

  18. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented. PMID:21908658

  19. The universe dominated by oscillating scalar with non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: mukaida@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the expansion law of the universe dominated by the oscillating scalar field with non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity as G{sup μν}∂{sub μ}φ∂{sub ν}φ. In this system the Hubble parameter oscillates with a frequency of the effective mass of the scalar field, which formerly caused a difficulty in analyzing how the universe expands. We find an analytical solution for power law potentials and interpret the solution in an intuitive way by using a new invariant of the system. As a result, we find marginally accelerated expansion for the quadratic potential and no accelerated expansion for the potential with higher power.

  20. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  1. The Advanced Expander Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Arthur I.; Tabata, William K.

    1990-01-01

    The principal goals and design concepts of the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) program are briefly reviewed. The AETB is planned as the focal point for the development and demonstration of high-performance oxygen/hydrogen engine technology and advanced component technology for the next space engine. The engine will operate at pressures up to 1200 psia over a wide range of conditions, easily accommodating mission-focused components. The discussion covers design requirements, design approach, conceptual design, the AETB cycle, and the AETB control system.

  2. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  3. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  4. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  5. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  6. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  7. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  8. Expanding Science Teacher Preparation: the Role of External Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, John M.; Vokos, S.; Seeley, L.; Close, E.

    2006-12-01

    The Department of Physics and the School of Education at Seattle Pacific University are in the early stages of expanding the scope and reach of our science teacher preparation. We will describe how we are putting the puzzle together and our results to date. * Supported in part by NSF grant #ESI-0455796, NSF grant # DUE-0630460, NSF grant DUE-0310583, The Boeing Corporation, PhysTec and the SPU Science Initiative.

  9. Inflation and accelerated expansion tensor-vector-scalar cosmological solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Rivera, Luz Maria; Samushia, Lado; Ratra, Bharat

    2006-04-15

    We find exact exponentially expanding and contracting de Sitter solutions of the spatially homogeneous TeVeS cosmological equations of motion in the vacuum TeVeS model and a power law accelerated expanding solution in the presence of an additional ideal fluid with equation of state parameter -5/3<{omega}<-1. A preliminary stability analysis shows that the expanding vacuum solution is stable, while in the ideal fluid case stability depends on model parameter values. These solutions might provide a basis for incorporating early-time inflation or late-time accelerated expansion in TeVeS cosmology.

  10. Spreading of ultrarelativistically expanding shell: An application to GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Siutsou, I. A.; Vereshchagin, G. V.

    2014-02-01

    Optically thick energy dominated plasma created in the source of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) expands radially with acceleration and forms a shell with constant width measured in the laboratory frame. When strong Lorentz factor gradients are present within the shell it is supposed to spread at sufficiently large radii. There are two possible mechanisms of spreading: hydrodynamical and thermal ones. We consider both mechanisms evaluating the amount of spreading that occurs during expansion up to the moment when the expanding shell becomes transparent for photons. We compute the hydrodynamical spreading of an ultrarelativistically expanding shell. In the case of thermal spreading we compute the velocity spread as a function of two parameters: comoving temperature and bulk Lorentz factor of relativistic Maxwellian distribution. Based on this result we determine the value of thermal spreading of relativistically expanding shell. We found that thermal spreading is negligible for typical GRB parameters. Instead hydrodynamical spreading appears to be significant, with the shell width reaching ˜1010 cm for total energy E=1054 erg and baryonic loading B=10-2. Within the fireshell model such spreading will result in the duration of Proper Gamma-Ray Bursts up to several seconds.

  11. 32 CFR 147.21 - Expanding investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards § 147.21 Expanding investigations. Investigations and reinvestigations may be expanded under the provisions of Executive Order 12968 (60 FR 40245, 3 CFR 1995 Comp., p. 391) and other applicable statutes...

  12. 32 CFR 147.21 - Expanding investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards § 147.21 Expanding investigations. Investigations and reinvestigations may be expanded under the provisions of Executive Order 12968 (60 FR 40245, 3 CFR 1995 Comp., p. 391) and other applicable statutes...

  13. Heat expanded starch-based compositions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A heat expansion process similar to that used for expanded bead polystyrene was used to expand starch-based compositions. Foam beads made by solvent extraction had the appearance of polystyrene beads but their open-cell structure precluded them from expanding further when heated. Non-porous beads, p...

  14. Expander for Thin-Wall Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessin, R.

    1983-01-01

    Tool locally expands small-diameter tubes. Tube expander locally expands and deforms tube: Compressive lateral stress induced in elastomeric sleeve by squeezing axially between two metal tool parts. Adaptable to situations in which tube must have small bulge for mechanical support or flow control.

  15. Engelhard expands oxidation catalysts portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1997-02-26

    Engelhard says its agreement earlier this month to market Amoco Chemical`s proprietary maleic anhydride catalyst reflects an effort to expand its speciality catalysts business (CW, Feb. 19, p.5). In particular, the company says it is looking for additional alliances to bolster its oxidation catalysts portfolio. {open_quotes}There are some areas of oxidation catalysis that are reasonably attractive,{close_quotes} says Paul Lamb, marketing director/chemical catalysts. He says that while Engelhard is not interested in commodity oxidation catalysts, such as those used to make sulfuric acid, it does want to boost offerings for higher-value oxidation catalysts. Engelhard is collaborating with Geon to offer oxychlorination catalysts for making ethylene dichloride. It also markets oxidation catalysts for vinyl acetate production.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  17. Expanding Human Cognition and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spohrer, Jim; Pierce, Brian M.; Murray, Cherry A.; Golledge, Reginald G.; Horn, Robert E.; Turkle, Sherry; Yonas, Gerold; Glicken Turnley, Jessica; Pollack, Jordan; Burger, Rudy; Robinett, Warren; Wilson, Larry Todd; Bainbridge, W. S.; Canton, J.; Kuekes, P.; Loomis, J.; Penz, P.

    2013-01-01

    To be able to chart the most profitable future directions for societal transformation and corresponding scientific research, five multidisciplinary themes focused on major goals have been identified to fulfill the overall motivating vision of convergence described in the previous pages. The first, “Expanding Human Cognition and Communication,” is devoted to technological breakthroughs that have the potential to enhance individuals’ mental and interaction abilities. Throughout the twentieth century, a number of purely psychological techniques were offered for strengthening human character and personality, but evaluation research has generally failed to confirm the alleged benefits of these methods (Druckman and Bjork 1992; 1994). Today, there is good reason to believe that a combination of methods, drawing upon varied branches of converging science and technology, would be more effective than attempts that rely upon mental training alone.

  18. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  19. Nonsingular models of universes in teleparallel theories.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Jaume; Amoros, Jaume

    2013-02-15

    Different models of universes are considered in the context of teleparallel theories. Assuming that the universe is filled by a fluid with an equation of state P=-ρ-f(ρ), for different teleparallel theories and different equation of state we study its dynamics. Two particular cases are studied in detail: in the first one we consider a function f with two zeros (two de Sitter solutions) that mimics a huge cosmological constant at early times and a pressureless fluid at late times; in the second one, in the context of loop quantum cosmology with a small cosmological constant, we consider a pressureless fluid (P=0⇔f(ρ)=-ρ) which means there are de Sitter and anti-de Sitter solutions. In both cases one obtains a nonsingular universe that at early times is in an inflationary phase; after leaving this phase, it passes trough a matter dominated phase and finally at late times it expands in an accelerated way. PMID:25166366

  20. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  1. Late time cosmic acceleration from natural infrared cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, inspired by the ultraviolet deformation of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry in loop quantum cosmology, we formulate an infrared-modified cosmological model. We obtain the associated deformed Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and we show that the late time cosmic acceleration can be addressed by the infrared corrections. As a particular example, we applied the setup to the case of matter dominated universe. This model has the same number of parameters as ΛCDM, but a dynamical dark energy generates in the matter dominated era at the late time. According to our model, as the universe expands, the energy density of the cold dark matter dilutes and when the Hubble parameter approaches to its minimum, the infrared effects dominate such that the effective equation of state parameter smoothly changes from weff = 0 to weff = - 2. Interestingly and nontrivially, the unstable de Sitter phase with weff = - 1 is corresponding to Ωm =Ωd = 0.5 and the universe crosses the phantom divide from the quintessence phase with weff > - 1 and Ωm >Ωd to the phantom phase with weff < - 1 and Ωm <Ωd which shows that the model is observationally viable. The results show that the universe finally ends up in a big rip singularity for a finite time proportional to the inverse of the minimum of the Hubble parameter. Moreover, we consider the dynamical stability of the model and we show that the universe starts from the matter dominated era at the past attractor with weff = 0 and ends up in a future attractor at the big rip with weff = - 2.

  2. On evolution of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the model of evolution of the Universe where the Big Bang is regarded as an explosion of a photon superstar. The inflationary epoch is not necessary in the model. The model describes the fundamental phenomena observed: the Universe is expanding at an increasing rate, it is homogeneous and isotropic and contains no antimatter, and its metrics is almost flat.

  3. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  4. Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M; Fox, Robert V; Petkovic, Lucia M

    2009-04-07

    A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

  5. An experimental reciprocating expander for cryocooler application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minta, M.; Smith, J. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental reciprocating expander was designed with features appropriate for cryocooler cycles. The expander has a displacer piston, simple valves, and a hydraulic/pneumatic stroking mechanism. The expander has a valve in head configuration with the valves extending out the bottom of the vacuum enclosure while the piston extends out the top. The expander was tested using a CTI 1400 liquefier to supply 13 atm in the temperature range 4.2 to 12 K. Expander efficiency was measured in the range 84 to 93% while operating the apparatus as a supercritical wet expander and in the range 91 to 93% aa a single phase expander. The apparatus can also be modified to operate as a compressor for saturated helium vapor.

  6. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  7. Princeton Expands Family-Friendly Benefits for Graduate Students with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    Princeton University has expanded a package of family-friendly benefits for graduate students that is designed to encourage more women to pursue careers in higher education. Joan S. Girgus, special assistant on diversity to the dean of the faculty, states that the university tried to think more comprehensively about what was needed. In an effort…

  8. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  9. Transitions in expanding cosmological spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Beverly K.

    2015-04-01

    One may easily construct a sequence of vacuum spacetimes by starting with the spatially homogeneous, anisotropic, vacuum Kasner solution and adding one direction of spatial dependence (polarized Gowdy), rotations in the spatial symmetry plane (generic Gowdy), and the remaining allowed spatial rotations (Gowdy plus twists). In the time-direction of expanding spatial volume, the spatially dependent cases may be analyzed as averaged background spacetimes containing gravitational waves. The nature of the averaged background spacetime is known to change abruptly in moving from Kasner to Gowdy to Gowdy with twists. In addition, as pointed out by Ringstrom, generic Gowdy models exhibit two distinct behaviors for the averaged wave amplitude. The focus is on transitions involving the introduction of twists where the phenomenology is not well understood. Numerical simulations are used to study the details of the behavior in the transition from one case to another especially to investigate possible scaling relationships. A final topic will be the effect of the addition of matter and/or a cosmological constant to these models.

  10. Expanding discourse repertoires with hybridity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Gregory J.

    2012-09-01

    In "Hybrid discourse practice and science learning" Kamberelis and Wehunt present a theoretically rich argument about the potential of hybrid discourses for science learning. These discourses draw from different forms of "talk, social practice, and material practices" to create interactions that are "intertextually complex" and "interactionally dynamic." The hybrid discourse practices are described as involving the dynamic interplay of at least three key elements: "the lamination of multiple cultural frames, the shifting relations between people and their discourse, and the shifting power relations between and among people." Each of these elements requires a respective unit of analysis and are often mutually reinforcing. The authors present a theoretically cogent argument for the study of hybrid discourse practices and identify the potential such discourses may have for science education. This theoretical development leads to an analysis of spoken and written discourse around a set of educational events concerning the investigation of owl pellets by two fifth grade students, their classmates, and teacher. Two discourse segments are presented and analyzed by the authors in detail. The first is a discourse analysis of the dissection of the owl pellet by two students, Kyle and Max. The second analysis examines the science report of these same two students. In this article, I pose a number of questions about the study with the hope that by doing so I expand the conversation around the insightful analysis presented.

  11. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  12. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  13. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

  14. Improving and expanding NGO programmes.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1993-06-01

    India has massive problems and is in need of improving and expanding non governmental organization (NGO) programs by broadening the scope of NGO activities, identifying successful NGO activities, and by moving closer to the community to participate in their activities. The problems and experience in the last few decades indicate that with expansion bureaucratization takes place. The institution begins to depend on donors and follows donor-driven agendas. As more money is given by the government, many more so called GONGO or Government-NGO projects materialize. Another problem is that the government almost always approaches the NGOs for the implementation of a project, and there is complete lack of cooperation at the planning stage. The government is considering a loan from the World Bank and UNICEF to launch a mother and child health program, but there has not been any discussion with the dozens of people who have worked on issues concerning mother and child health issues for many years. There is a need to be more demanding of the government about the various programs that are implemented for the government. Very few NGO health and family welfare projects are run by ordinary nurses or ordinary Ayurvedic doctors under ordinary conditions. Since successful NGO work has to be extended to other parts of the country, they will have to be run by ordinary people with very ordinary resources. Over the years, the NGO community has become preoccupied with its own agenda. Today, despite very sophisticated equipment and infrastructure, they are not able to reach the 60,000-70,000 workers and employees. Some of the ideas with respect to the strengthens and weaknesses of community participation have to be shared. NGOs should include all the existing non governmental organizations throughout the country, and have a dialogue with other nongovernmental bodies such as trade unions. The challenge is to adjust the current agenda, prevailing style, and present way of operating and move

  15. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  16. Expanded carrier screening: A review of early implementation and literature.

    PubMed

    Lazarin, Gabriel A; Haque, Imran S

    2016-02-01

    Carrier screening is the practice of testing individuals to identify those at increased risks of having children affected by genetic diseases. Professional guidelines on carrier screening have been available for more than 15 years, and have historically targeted specific diseases that occur at increased frequencies in defined ethnic populations. Enabled by rapidly evolving technology, expanded carrier screening aims to identify carriers for a broader array of diseases and may be applied universally (equally across all ethnic groups). This new approach deviates from the well-established criteria for screening models. In this review, we summarize the rationale for expanded carrier screening using available literature regarding clinical and technical data, as well as provider perspectives. We also discuss important avenues for further research in this burgeoning field. PMID:26718446

  17. University Literacy: A Multi-Literacies Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Andrew; Schulz, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Literacy teachers in schools and universities share a common goal: to prepare students with the "literacies" they need to succeed in and beyond educational settings. In a "widening-participation" era universities must increase and expand their literacy offerings to help students make the most of their university experiences. At…

  18. AstroCom NYC: Expanding the Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, Saavik; Agueros, Marcel A.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Robbins, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is an undergraduate mentoring program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City (City University of New York - an MSI, American Museum of Natural History, and Columbia). AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students' residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and readies and inspires them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC provides a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, research and career mentors, outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. Stipends in part alleviate the burdens at home typical for CUNY students so they may concentrate on their academic success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. For our second cohort, we dramatically improved the application and screening process, implemented a number of tools to evaluate their potential for grad school, and began growing a network of potential hosts for summer internships around NY State and the US. We review these implementations and outcomes, as well as plans for Year 3, when we expect many of our current students to compete for external summer REUs, and after greatly expanding the program reach through a NASA community college initiative.

  19. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  20. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  1. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Cynthia E. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the 'Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics' program is to interest young women in grades six through twelve in a variety of careers where mathematics and science are important. Progress in encouraging young women to take courses in mathematics, science, and technological subjects is discussed. Also included are adult, student, and organizational information packets used for 'Expanding Your Horizons' conferences.

  2. Separation of craniopagus twins utilizing tissue expanders.

    PubMed

    Shively, R E; Bermant, M A; Bucholz, R D

    1985-11-01

    An example of craniopagus Siamese twins is presented. The methods used in their separation using skin expanders and scalp flaps to achieve primary closure of the wounds with hair-bearing scalp are outlined. A detailed discussion of the planning and the mathematical considerations of these skin expanders and scalp flaps is included. PMID:4059416

  3. Infinity of geodesics in a homogeneous and isotropic expanding space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adda, Fayçal Ben; Porchon, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we construct a discrete simulation of an expanding homogeneous and isotropic space-time that expands via expansion of its basic elements to figure out properties and characteristics of such a space-time and derive conclusions. We prove that in such an expanding space-time, the geodesics are curved and more precisely, they fluctuate on the boundaries of the expanding basic elements. The non-existence of privileged expansion direction leads to the existence of an infinity of fluctuating geodesics between any two locations in this space-time, that provides a prediction of polarization in geometric optics, and a prediction of an earlier acceleration of the expansion as for the cosmic inflation model. This simulation is a case study and an example of space-time with variable topology using the principle of variation of topology via a transformation that creates holes.

  4. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  5. [Traditions of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Brazdzionyte, Julija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the dimensions of the traditions of the idea of the university that are relevant in our today's world--the autonomy of the university, education of a free and creative personality, and belonging to the unified space of studies--and to review the experience of Kaunas University of Medicine in the development of the traditions of university studies. The research object was university studies, and the methods applied in this research were analysis of literature and analysis of documents. The article consists of the introduction, two parts, and generalization. The first part discusses the autonomy of the university, the importance of liberal studies, and the influence of the European higher education and provides a generalized survey of the historical tradition of university studies in Lithuania. The second part of the article reviews the predominant factors that condition the development of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine: organization of studies and implementation of liberal studies realized through general university education subjects into the modern content of university studies. The generalization of the results of the performed analysis allows for stating that the contents and the organization of curricula and the ongoing reforms at Kaunas University of Medicine expand the continuity of the traditions of the European university education, highlight the idea of the university, and realize university studies that reflect modern global tendencies. PMID:17090986

  6. Mapa-an object oriented code with a graphical user interface for accelerator design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shasharina, S.G.; Cary, J.R.

    1997-02-01

    We developed a code for accelerator modeling which will allow users to create and analyze accelerators through a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI can read an accelerator from files or create it by adding, removing and changing elements. It also creates 4D orbits and lifetime plots. The code includes a set of accelerator elements classes, C++ utility and GUI libraries. Due to the GUI, the code is easy to use and expand. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Mapa-an object oriented code with a graphical user interface for accelerator design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shasharina, Svetlana G.; Cary, John R.

    1997-02-01

    We developed a code for accelerator modeling which will allow users to create and analyze accelerators through a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI can read an accelerator from files or create it by adding, removing and changing elements. It also creates 4D orbits and lifetime plots. The code includes a set of accelerator elements classes, C++ utility and GUI libraries. Due to the GUI, the code is easy to use and expand.

  8. Time to Grow: Year Two Report on ExpandED Schools. A TASC Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traill, Saskia; Brohawn, Katie

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of data from the second year of The After-School Corporation's (TASC's) national demonstration of an expanded school day for elementary and middle school students shows that ExpandED Schools improved school culture, decreased rates of students' chronic absenteeism and helped students develop positive learning habits and attitudes.…

  9. An Early Cyclic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthibir

    2014-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive numerical study of the Emergent Cyclic Inflation scenario. This is a scenario where instead of traditional monotonic slow roll inflation, the universe expands over numerous short asymmetric cycles due to the production of entropy via interactions among different species. This is one of the very few scenarios of inflation which provides a nonsingular geodesically complete space-time and does not require any ``reheating'' mechanism. A special thanks to Loyola University for an excellent community to help this project grow.

  10. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  11. Lasers and new methods of particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    There has been a great progress in development of high power laser technology. Harnessing their potential for particle accelerators is a challenge and of great interest for development of future high energy colliders. The author discusses some of the advances and new methods of acceleration including plasma-based accelerators. The exponential increase in sophistication and power of all aspects of accelerator development and operation that has been demonstrated has been remarkable. This success has been driven by the inherent interest to gain new and deeper understanding of the universe around us. With the limitations of the conventional technology it may not be possible to meet the requirements of the future accelerators with demands for higher and higher energies and luminosities. It is believed that using the existing technology one can build a linear collider with about 1 TeV center of mass energy. However, it would be very difficult (or impossible) to build linear colliders with energies much above one or two TeV without a new method of acceleration. Laser driven high gradient accelerators are becoming more realistic and is expected to provide an alternative, (more compact, and more economical), to conventional accelerators in the future. The author discusses some of the new methods of particle acceleration, including laser and particle beam driven plasma based accelerators, near and far field accelerators. He also discusses the enhanced IFEL (Inverse Free Electron Laser) and NAIBEA (Nonlinear Amplification of Inverse-Beamstrahlung Electron Acceleration) schemes, laser driven photo-injector and the high energy physics requirements.

  12. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  13. New Targets for New Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentz, Bryce; Manukyan, Khachatur; Aprahamian, Ani

    2013-10-01

    New accelerators, such as the 5 MV Sta Ana accelerator at the University of Notre Dame, will produce more powerful beams up to 100's of μAmps. These accelerators require a complete rethinking of target preparation since the high intensity of such beams would melt conventional targets. Traditionally, accelerator targets are made with a tantalum backing because of its high atomic mass. However, tantalum is brittle, a poor conductor, and, if produced commercially, often contains impurities (e.g. fluorine) that produce undesirable background and reaction products. Tungsten, despite its brittle structure and poor conductivity, has a high atomic mass and lacks impurities, making it a more desirable backing. In conjunction with tungsten's properties, copper is robust and a far superior thermal conductor. We describe a new method of reactive joining that we developed for creating targets that use the advantageous properties of both tungsten and copper. This process involved placing a reactive mixture between tungsten and copper and applying a load force. The mixture is then ignited, and while under pressure, the system produces conditions to join the materials. We present our investigation to optimize the process of reactive joining, as well as some of the final target's properties. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1068192.

  14. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  15. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  16. Tissue expanders in post-burn alopecia: with or without galeotomies?

    PubMed

    El Sakka, D M

    2015-09-30

    The tissue expansion technique is part of the reconstructive surgeon's armamentarium. It provides donor skin that is an optimal match in terms of skin colour, texture, sensation and hair-bearing characteristics. Tissue expansion of the scalp is one of the methods used for the management of alopecia. This method allows the expansion of normal hair-bearing scalp to cover the area of alopecia. Unfortunately, the tough galeal layer prevents easy and fast expansion of the scalp and increases the rate of expander extrusion. A prospective and retrospective comparative analysis of the use of subgaleal expanders with or without galeotomies to manage post-burn alopecia was conducted in the Burn Unit of the Menofia University Hospital, in the period from September 2010 to November 2014. Thirty expanders in 30 patients with alopecia were included in the study. These constitute the experience of a single surgeon. Twenty expanders were applied to the subgaleal plane without galeotomies and 10 were applied with galeotomies. Indications for scalp expansion were mainly post-burn alopecia and scarring. Complications and failures were recorded. Adding galeotomies to subgaleal tissue expander placement for scalp alopecia decreases the time of expansion, allows a larger amount of fluid to be injected each time without inducing pain, and decreases the rate of expander extrusion. Adding galeotomies to subgaleal tissue expander placement for post-burn alopecia ensures preservation of galeal blood supply for easier and faster expansion of the scalp and fewer expander extrusion complications. PMID:27279809

  17. WIPO Re:Search: Accelerating anthelmintic development through cross-sector partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthi, Roopa; Graef, Katy M.; Dent, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), malaria, and tuberculosis have a devastating effect on an estimated 1.6 billion people worldwide. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Re:Search consortium accelerates the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for these diseases by connecting the assets and resources of pharmaceutical companies, such as compound libraries and expertise, to academic or nonprofit researchers with novel product discovery or development ideas. As the WIPO Re:Search Partnership Hub Administrator, BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) fields requests from researchers, identifies Member organizations able to fulfill these requests, and helps forge mutually beneficial collaborations. Since its inception in October 2011, WIPO Re:Search membership has expanded to more than 90 institutions, including leading pharmaceutical companies, universities, nonprofit research institutions, and product development partnerships from around the world. To date, WIPO Re:Search has facilitated over 70 research agreements between Consortium Members, including 11 collaborations focused on anthelmintic drug discovery. PMID:25516832

  18. Advantages and Challenges of Superconducting Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischel, Detlef

    After a short review of the history toward high-energy superconducting (SC) accelerators for ion beam therapy (IBT), an overview is given on material properties and technical developments enabling to use SC components in a medical accelerator for full body cancer treatment. The design concept and the assembly of a commercially available SC cyclotron for proton therapy (PT) are described and the potential advantages for applying superconductivity are assessed. The discussion includes the first years of operation experience with regard to cryogenic and magnetic performance, automated beam control, and maintenance aspects. An outlook is given on alternative machine concepts for protons-only or for heavier ions. Finally, it is discussed whether the application of superconductivity might be expanded in the future to a broader range of subsystems of clinical IBT accelerators such as SC magnets for transfer beam lines or gantries.

  19. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  20. Hardware-Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-08-04

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32-bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. The hardware accelerated solutions are accurate enough to enable scientists to explore the experimental design space with greater efficiency than the methods currently in use. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedral meshes that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester.

  1. Accelerator physics experiments at Aladdin

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Cornacchia, M.; Jackson, A.; Zisman, M.S.

    1985-07-01

    The Aladdin accelerator is a 1 GeV synchrotron light source located at the University of Wisconsin. The results of experimental studies of the Aladdin accelerator are described. The primary purpose of the experiments reported was to investigate reported anomalies in the behavior of the linear lattice, particularly in the vertical plane. A second goal was to estimate the ring broadband impedance. Experimental observations and interpretation of the linear properties of the Aladdin ring are described, including the beta function and dispersion measurements. Two experiments are described to measure the ring impedance, the first a measurement of the parasitic mode loss, and the second a measurement of the beam transfer function. Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse emittance at 100 and 200 MeV are described and compared with predictions. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs. (LEW)

  2. Edubusiness Comes to the Academy. The Virtual University and the Threat to Academic Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriger, Thomas J.; Scheuerman, William E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the implications of the virtual university for academic labor studies programs by analyzing theoretical foundations of the National Learning Infrastructure Initiative and two rapidly expanding proprietary institutions, the University of Phoenix and Jones International University. (Author)

  3. Expandable insert serves as screw anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Expandable self-locking adapter secures components to panels having one accessible side. Mounting holes in the panels may not be threaded to accommodate screws, therefore, the adapter contains a female thread that will mate a mounting screw.

  4. Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy Covidien Energy Based Devices Concord, California May 26, 2010 Welcome to this OR Live program presented by Covidien energy-based devices. Good evening, and thank ...

  5. An Expanded Classification of the Plant Kingdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, B. S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an expanded classification of the plant kingdom, emphasizing major evolutionary steps and differences in levels of complexity. Describes subdivisions and suggests that this classification, reflecting unity and diversity, may be logical, understandable, and useful to students. (JN)

  6. Injuries Soar as Trampoline Parks Expand

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160184.html Injuries Soar as Trampoline Parks Expand Broken bones, fractures the most common complaints ... MONDAY, Aug. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As trampoline parks spring up across the United States, injuries to ...

  7. Dual-action expanded-latch mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. A.; Tewell, J. R.; Tobey, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Single drive actuator operates novel mechanism that expands, attaches to object, and withdraws to latch object firmly to another part. Packaging is extremely simple and compact, and eliminates need for machined parts or close tolerances.

  8. Expanding Literacy and Integrating Curricula through Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Dance embodies all of the multiple intelligences and uses Sternberg's intellectual components (memory, analysis, creativity, practicality). Integrated into the curriculum, dance can expand literacy and make learning more interactive. (SK)

  9. Vibrational relaxation of anharmonic oscillators in expanding flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffin, Stephen M.; Park, Chul

    1992-01-01

    Although the Landau-Teller vibrational model accurately predicts vibrational excitation process in post-shock and compressing flows, it under-predicts the rate of de-excitation in cooling and expanding flows. In the present paper, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Multiple quantum level transition rates are computed using SSH theory. The SSH transition rate results are compared with available experimental data and other theoretical models. Vibration-vibration exchange collisions are responsible for some vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The present results support the relaxation mechanisms proposed by Bray and by Treanor Rich and Rehm.

  10. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term. PMID:26266804

  11. Joule-Thomson Expander Without Check Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooling effected by bidirectional, reciprocating flow of gas. Type of Joule-Thomson (J-T) expander for cryogenic cooling requires no check valves to prevent reverse flow of coolant. More reliable than conventional J-T expander, containing network of check valves, each potential source of failure. Gas flows alternately from left to right and right to left. Heat load cooled by evaporation of liquid from left or right compartment, whichever at lower pressure.

  12. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  13. Hand-Operated Hydraulic Tube Expander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, David W.; Wolff, Edwin D.

    1995-01-01

    Hand-operated tool expands end portion of narrow metal or plastic tube to slightly larger diameter. Used on tubes with original inner diameters as small as 0.060 in. Includes replaceable tip comprising ferrule and tubular expansion sleeve sized for sliding fit into tube to be expanded. Expansion sleeve swells in response to internal hydraulic pressure generated by turning handle and thereby advancing piston.

  14. The deuteron accelerator preliminary design for BISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhu, F.; Wang, Z.; Gao, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    BISOL, which was named as Beijing_ISOL before (Cui et al., 2013), is the abbreviation of Beijing Isotope-Separation-On-Line neutron beam facility. It is proposed jointly by Peking University (PKU) and China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for basic science study and application. It is a double driven facility that can be driven by a reactor or a deuteron accelerator. The deuteron driver accelerator should accelerate the deuteron beam up to 40 MeV with maximum beam current of 10 mA. Proton beams up to 33 MeV and He2+ beams up to 81.2 MeV can also be accelerated in this accelerator. The accelerator can be operated on either CW (continuous waveform) or pulsed mode, and the ion energy can be adjusted in a wide range. The accelerator will also allow independent operation of the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beams) system. It will be mainly charged by PKU group. Details of the deuteron accelerator preliminary design for BISOL will be given in this paper.

  15. Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-03-02

    The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The

  16. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  17. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  18. Status of the Kansas State University superconducting linac project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Tom J.

    1986-05-01

    Funding for the construction of the superconducting linac at Kansas State University was approved by the Department of Energy on May 15, 1985. The project is funded out of the Division of Chemical Sciences, USDOE. Initial design and staff technical training was initiated during 1984-85 with laboratory personnel working at both Florida State University and Argonne National Laboratory. The linac under construction is based upon the Nb split-ring resonator technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory for ATLAS. The linac at Kansas State University will have 14 superconducting resonators with nine low-β (β=0.06) and five high-β (β=0.105) units operating at 97 MHz. Work has progressed on both of the single-resonator cryostats for time bunching and energy rebunching, respectively, with the major cryostat components presently under construction by C. E. Raymond Enterprise Manufacturing, a division of Combustion Engineering, with scheduled delivery of the single resonator cryostat vacuum housings, LN2-cooled heat shields, and LHe Dewars on January 17, 1986. Orders for all Nb-clad Cu resonators have been placed with Argonne National Laboratory and two low-β units are currently under construction. Requests for quotations for a 300-W LHe refrigerator (expandable to 500 W) 1000-l storage Dewar and LHe distribution system have been issued. The building addition which includes a new accelerator/experimental hall (˜6000 ft2 basement structure) and ground-level laboratory support space including additional experimental setup space, additional machine shop space, and mechanical equipment space, is currently under construction with a completion date scheduled for May 1986. Additional personnel training on LHe refrigeration systems is scheduled for January 1986, at the Texas Accelerator Center and at Florida State University.

  19. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  20. God and Mammon. Universities as Publishers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanneret, Marsh

    This book by the director of the University of Toronto Press, reviews the last 50 years in the history of university publishing (with emphasis on Toronto) and expresses concern about the accelerating trend by university presses to offset the cost of producing learned books and journals by profits from a simultaneous program of commercial…

  1. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  2. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  3. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  4. Sustained linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The subjective effects of sustained acceleration are discussed, including positive, negative, forward, backward, and lateral acceleration effects. Physiological effects, such as retinal and visual response, unconsciousness and cerebral function, pulmonary response, and renal output, are studied. Human tolerance and performance under sustained acceleration are ascertained.

  5. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  6. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  7. Universities and medical schools: reflections on a half-century of Canadian medical education.

    PubMed

    Naimark, A

    1993-05-01

    After 50 years of accelerated development, universities and medical schools have entered a period of uncertainty and instability. The Flexnerian paradigm of medical education, rooted in biomedical science and conducted under the aegis of a university, reached its apotheosis by the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Fuelled by the introduction of comprehensive, government-sponsored health care insurance and advances in technology, the demand for health care professionals and for access to facilities increased sharply. Medical education, research and advanced clinical services expanded dramatically aided by the emergence of academic health sciences centres and accompanied by a wave of medical curriculum reform. Now medical schools must strike a dynamic balance in responding to the continued expansion of knowledge and technology, the demand for social equity and the exigencies of prolonged fiscal constraint. They must also balance the biological and sociological approaches to medicine in establishing the foundations for the future development of Canadian medical education. PMID:8477376

  8. A Review of Distance Education in Ontario Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W. A. S.; Snowden, B. L.

    Ontario Universities' current and planned involvement with distance delivery of university level educational opportunities was reviewed. Additional considerations were: the feasibility of a cooperative approach to distance education, the organizational approach to expanding cooperation among the universities and between the universities and…

  9. EDITORIAL: Highlight Notes on "Semiclassical suppression of weak anisotropies of a generic Universe" by M. V. Battisti, R. Belvedere and G. Montani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, R. A.

    2009-06-01

    Observational evidence strongly suggests that we are currently living in a Universe that can be described by an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, i.e. a Universe that to a high degree is homogeneous and isotropic. It contains a negligible fraction of known ordinary (baryonic) matter, a substantial fraction of dark matter being, however, insufficient of closing and retarding the Universe, and some unknown kind of dark energy which causes the Universe to expand in an accelerated manner. This Universe should have begun in an inflationary initial phase which is believed to have been subject to quantum effects involving the yet to be identified quantum gravity and thus must be described by kind of a quantum cosmology. Application of quantum theory to the entire Universe poses some problems as the definition of a single wave function for the whole lacks an unambiguous meaning and interpretation. No measurements can be made on the wave function from inside the Universe. Initially the Universe was highly inhomogeneous and anisotropic, and correspondingly the wave function was highly inhomogeneous and anisotropic as well. How then did it proceed to become the wave function of the current homogeneous and isotropic Universe as it is observed today? For an initially anisotropic Universe the present paper solves this problem in a clever way. It considers the dynamics of a generic cosmological model in which the anisotropies are restricted to be quantum effects on an expanding homogeneous cosmology which is described by the (time- and space-dependent) semi-classical scale factor a(t, xi). The changes of its shape due to anisotropy, are included in quantum coordinates. The problem is treated in a perturbation theoretical way, with the anisotropies acting as quantum perturbations and assuming that the radius and shape of the Universe are of different physical nature. This assumption allows factorizing the wave function into semi-classical and quantum factors

  10. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Sessler

    2008-04-04

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  11. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Sessler

    2013-06-11

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  12. Stephani Cosmological Models with Accelerated Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkina, M. P.; Kopteva, E. M.; Egurnov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stephani cosmological models are considered which describe spacetimes for a shear-free matter distribution and include Friedmann models as a particular case. The possibility is considered of constructing cosmological models in which a change of sign of the acceleration of the Universe expansion arises only due to curvature.

  13. Universality in ant behaviour.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kim; Papavassiliou, Dario; de Figueiredo, Alexandre; Franks, Nigel R; Sendova-Franks, Ana B

    2015-01-01

    Prediction for social systems is a major challenge. Universality at the social level has inspired a unified theory for urban living but individual variation makes predicting relationships within societies difficult. Here, we show that in ant societies individual average speed is higher when event duration is longer. Expressed as a single scaling function, this relationship is universal because for any event duration an ant, on average, moves at the corresponding average speed except for a short acceleration and deceleration at the beginning and end. This establishes cause and effect within a social system and may inform engineering and control of artificial ones. PMID:25411406

  14. Probing gravitation, dark energy, and acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-02-20

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe arises from unknown physical processes involving either new fields in high energy physics or modifications of gravitation theory. It is crucial for our understanding to characterize the properties of the dark energy or gravity through cosmological observations and compare and distinguish between them. In fact, close consistencies exist between a dark energy equation of state function w(z) and changes to the framework of the Friedmann cosmological equations as well as direct spacetime geometry quantities involving the acceleration, such as ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar. We investigate these interrelationships, including for the case of super acceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  15. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  16. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  17. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Sessler, Andy

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  18. Research at Small Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    There are many excellent scientists in the natural and human sciences in Canada's small universities. If the institutions implement internal procedures to encourage and foster a research climate and if research councils consider alternative strategies for research funding, research productivity could expand greatly in quality and scope. (MSE)

  19. Duke University's Quality Appearance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Grounds Services Unit at Duke University has implemented a new program that involves a process of self evaluation, which embraces the concept of perpetual and continuous improvement. The Quality Appearance Program (QAP) embellishes and expands upon the Quality Assurance Program concept, but with a twist to grounds management improvement…

  20. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  1. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  2. The anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  3. Theory of rotation in big bang universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K.

    We assert that our Universe is both expanding and rotationg about an axis in four dimensional space-time. Rotation in our Universe must be in equal footing with expansion in the beginning of our Universe. Some fixed points in the velocity field of the rotating and expanding Universe will occur based on Brouwer's Fixed point Theorem in Mathematics. The fixed points are the place where relic particles will form. This can explain the inhomogeneity, the gaining of mass of the elementary particles, the production of electric charge and the predominant matter over antimatter in our Universe. We then examine an expression for the metric of the Universe. The metric should consist of three parts. The third part of the metric should support a vortices structure in the Universe. The governing equation for this third part of the metric should base on Weyl Tensor.

  4. Educating and Training Accelerator Scientists and Technologists for Tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Seryi, Andrei

    2012-07-01

    Accelerator science and technology is inherently an integrative discipline that combines aspects of physics, computational science, electrical and mechanical engineering. As few universities offer full academic programs, the education of accelerator physicists and engineers for the future has primarily relied on a combination of on-the-job training supplemented with intense courses at regional accelerator schools. This paper describes the approaches being used to satisfy the educational interests of a growing number of interested physicists and engineers.

  5. Educating and Training Accelerator Scientists and Technologists for Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Seryi, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Accelerator science and technology is inherently an integrative discipline that combines aspects of physics, computational science, electrical and mechanical engineering. As few universities offer full academic programs, the education of accelerator physicists and engineers for the future has primarily relied on a combination of on-the-job training supplemented with intensive courses at regional accelerator schools. This article describes the approaches being used to satisfy the educational curiosity of a growing number of interested physicists and engineers.

  6. Squeezing of Particle Distributions by Expanding Magnetic Turbulence and Space Weather Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D. J.; Tooprakai, P.; Seripienlert, A.; Chuychai, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Among the space weather effects due to gradual solar storms, greatly enhanced high-energy ion fluxes can cause radiation damage to satellites, spacecraft, and astronauts, which motivates examination of the transport of high-energy solar ions to Earth orbit. Ions of low kinetic energy (up to ˜2sim 2 MeV/nucleon) from impulsive solar events exhibit abrupt changes due to filamentation of magnetic connection from the Sun, indicating that anisotropic, field-aligned magnetic flux tube-like structures persist to Earth orbit. By employing a corresponding spherical two-component model of Alfv'enic (slab) and 2D magnetic fluctuations to trace simulated trajectories in the solar wind, we show that the distribution of high-energy (E≥1Egeq1 GeV) protons from gradual solar events is squeezed toward magnetic flux structures with a specific polarity due to the conical shape of the flux structures, which results from the expanding flow of the solar wind. It is difficult to observationally determine what polarity of flux structure the Earth is in at a given time, so this transport phenomenon contributes to event-to-event variability in ground level enhancements of GeV-range ions from solar storms, presenting a fundamental uncertainty in space weather prediction. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund, a Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, a Research Fellowship from the Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, the U.S. NSF (AGS-1063439 and SHINE AGS-1156094), NASA (Heliophysics Theory NNX08AI47G & NNX11AJ44G), and the Solar Probe Plus/ISIS project. KEYWORDS: [7807] SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS / Charged particle motion and acceleration, [7863] SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS / Turbulence, [2118] INTERPLANETARY PHYSICS / Energetic particles, solar, [7984] SPACE WEATHER / Space radiation environment

  7. Physics and Accelerator Applications of RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    H. Padamsee; K. W. Shepard; Ron Sundelin

    1993-12-01

    A key component of any particle accelerator is the device that imparts energy gain to the charged particle. This is usually an electromagnetic cavity resonating at a microwave frequency, chosen between 100 and 3000 MHz. Serious attempts to utilize superconductors for accelerating cavities were initiated more than 25 years ago with the acceleration of electrons in a lead-plated resonator at Stanford University (1). The first full-scale accelerator, the Stanford SCA, was completed in 1978 at the High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) (2). Over the intervening one and a half decades, superconducting cavities have become increasingly important to particle accelerators for nuclear physics and high energy physics. For continuous operation, as is required for many applications, the power dissipation in the walls of a copper structure is quite substantial, for example, 0.1 megawatts per meter of structure operating at an accelerating field of 1 million volts/meter (MV/m). since losses increase as the square of the accelerating field, copper cavities become severely uneconomical as demand for higher fields grows with the higher energies called for by experimenters to probe ever deeper into the structure of matter. Rf superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators. Practical structures with attractive performance levels have been developed for a variety of applications, installed in the targeted accelerators, and operated over significant lengths of time. Substantial progress has been made in understanding field and Q limitations and in inventing cures to advance performance. The technical and economical potential of rf superconductivity makes it an important candidate for future advanced accelerators for free electron lasers, for nuclear physics, and for high energy physics, at the luminosity as well as at the energy frontiers.

  8. Expanding the Traditional Physiology Class with Asynchronous Online Discussions and Collaborative Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taradi, Suncana Kukolja; Taradi, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Discussion and writing are very powerful ways to support learning. This article describes the use of a free, synchronous online forum to expand student-teacher discussions beyond the time/place constraints of the physical physiology classroom. The main participants were medical students enrolled in physiology class at the University of Zagreb…

  9. "On Course" for Supporting Expanded Participation and Improving Scientific Reasoning in Undergraduate Thesis Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Jason E.; Roy, Christopher P.; Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Reynolds, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Chemistry at Duke University has endeavored to expand participation in undergraduate honors thesis research while maintaining the quality of the learning experience. Accomplishing this goal has been constrained by limited departmental resources (including faculty time) and increased diversity in students' preparation to…

  10. Expanding the Dialogue: A Response to Bird and Godwin's "Film in the Undergraduate Anthropology Classroom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Denise

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to S. Elizabeth Bird and Jonathan P. Godwin's article "Film in the Undergraduate Anthropology Classroom: Applying Audience Response Research in Pedagogical Practice." The intention of my response is to expand the dialogue on film use to promote cultural understanding in university classes and campus-wide. Through…

  11. ROTC Seeks to Expand on Campuses, and Colleges Cope with a Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    With its forces stretched thin by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army is looking to significantly expand the number of Reserve Officers' Training Corps programs on college campuses for the first time since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, which led the Army to close more than 80 programs. At the University of Maryland-Baltimore County…

  12. Investing in Our Children: A Plan to Expand Access to Preschool and Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.; Cooper, Donna; Herman, Juliana; Lazarín, Melissa; Linden, Michael; Post, Sasha; Tanden, Neera

    2013-01-01

    This issue brief presents a plan to expand educational opportunities and care for children ages 0-5 years old by investing significant federal dollars to: (1) Make high-quality preschool universally accessible to all 3- and 4-year-old children; and (2) Enable more lower-income families to afford child care for children ages 0-3 years old. These…

  13. Doing More with Less: How a Library Expanded Its Oral History Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKether, Willie L.; Jeter, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights a successful collaborative project between the Toledo-Lucas County Library System, a university professor, and a local production company in order to expand the library's African American oral history collection. The project, made possible from a state technology grant, also resulted in the production of 20…

  14. Analyzing Collision Processes with the Smartphone Acceleration Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    It has been illustrated several times how the built-in acceleration sensors of smartphones can be used gainfully for quantitative experiments in school and university settings (see the overview in Ref. 1 ). The physical issues in that case are manifold and apply, for example, to free fall, radial acceleration, several pendula, or the exploitation…

  15. Quench detector for superconducting elements of the NICA accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. V.; Svetov, L. A.; Smirnova, Z. I.

    2014-07-01

    A universal quench detector is designed for new superconducting accelerators of the NICA accelerator complex under construction at JINR. The presence of a two-channel digital input permits the detector to be used both for comparing voltage across two nearest magnets by a bridge scheme and for separating a resistive constituent of the voltage across a controlled element.

  16. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  17. An Explanation of Redshift in a Static Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashmore, Lyndon

    A review of the literature on the Lyman alpha forest gives direct evidence on the dynamics of the universe. In an expanding universe one would expect the average temperature of the universe to fall as it expands - but a review of the Doppler parameters of the Hydrogen clouds in Quasar spectra shows that contrary to this, they are increasing in temperature (or at least, becoming increasingly disturbed) as the universe ages. Additionally, the evidence is that Hydrogen clouds are, on average, evenly spaced up to a redshift of one - if not beyond. These results beg the question, how is it that the Hydrogen clouds can have differing redshifts and hence widely differing `velocities' whilst, on average, remain equally spaced? Especially since this range of redshifts includes the supernovae data used to show `acceleration' and so called `time dilation.' Taking these results in isolation implies that the universe has been static for at least the last billion years or so and therefore a new model of redshift is needed to explain redshifts in a static universe. The model proposed here is that in a static universe, photons of light from distant galaxies are absorbed and reemitted by electrons in the plasma of intergalactic space and on each interaction the electron recoils. Energy is lost to the recoiling electron (New Tired Light theory) and thus the reemitted photon has less energy, a reduced frequency and therefore an increased wavelength. It has been redshifted. The Hubble relationship becomes 'photons of light from a galaxy twice as far away, make twice as many interactions with the electrons in the plasma of IG space, lose twice as much energy and undergo twice the redshift. A relationship between redshift and distance is found and, using published values of collision cross-sections and number density of electrons in IG space, a value for the Hubble constant is derived which is in good agreement with measured values. Assuming that the energy transferred to the recoiling

  18. Inertial Systems Kinematically Defined in an Inflationary Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological background radiation is observed to be isotropic only within a coordinate system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. This indicates that the Hubble motion describes the recessional motion of an inertial system that is at rest relative to its local Hubble drift. It is shown that when the Hubble parameter is kinematically defined directly in terms of the positions and velocities of mass particles in the universe, it then also defines inertial systems themselves in terms of the distribution and motion of mass particles. It is independent of the velocity of photons because photons always have a speed c relative to the inertial system in which they are located and therefore the definition of their velocity depends on the definition of the Hubble parameter itself and cannot be used to define H. The time derivative of the kinematically defined Hubble parameter is always positive and repulsive. It is shown to oppose the negative attractive acceleration of gravitation in a manner that leads to a universe that is balanced at the time of its origin so that H approaches zero as the universe expands to infinity.

  19. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  20. Electron acceleration by magnetic collapse during decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Euan D.; Potts, Hugh E.; Teodoro, Luis F. A.; Diver, Declan A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper identifies the non-equilibrium evolution of magnetic field structures at the onset of large-scale recombination of an inhomogeneously ionized plasma. The context for this is the Universe during the epoch of recombination. The electromagnetic treatment of this phase transition can produce energetic electrons scattered throughout the Universe, localized near the edges of magnetic domains. This is confirmed by a numerical simulation in which a magnetic domain is modelled as a uniform field region produced by a thin surrounding current sheet. Conduction currents sustaining the magnetic structure are removed as the charges comprising them combine into neutrals. The induced electric field accompanying the magnetic collapse is able to accelerate ambient stationary electrons (that is, electrons not participating in the current sheet) to energies of up to order 10keV. This is consistent with theoretical predictions. The localized electron acceleration leads to local imbalances of charge which has implications for charge separation in the early Universe.

  1. Non-expanded adipose stromal vascular fraction cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Min, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hao; Solano, Fabio; Lara, Fabian; Alfaro, Miguel; Rodriguez, Jorge Paz; Harman, Robert J; Patel, Amit N; Murphy, Michael P; Lee, Roland R; Minev, Boris

    2009-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), T regulatory cells, endothelial precursor cells, preadipocytes, as well as anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Safety of autologous adipose tissue implantation is supported by extensive use of this procedure in cosmetic surgery, as well as by ongoing studies using in vitro expanded adipose derived MSC. Equine and canine studies demonstrating anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non-expanded SVF cells have yielded promising results. Although non-expanded SVF cells have been used successfully in accelerating healing of Crohn's fistulas, to our knowledge clinical use of these cells for systemic immune modulation has not been reported. In this communication we discuss the rationale for use of autologous SVF in treatment of multiple sclerosis and describe our experiences with three patients. Based on this rationale and initial experiences, we propose controlled trials of autologous SVF in various inflammatory conditions. PMID:19393041

  2. Iowa Acceleration Scale Manual: A Guide for Whole-Grade Acceleration K-8. (3rd Edition, Manual)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assouline, Susan G.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann; Forstadt, Leslie; Lipscomb, Jonathon

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from years of nationwide use has resulted in a 3rd Edition of this unique, systematic, and objective guide to considering and implementing academic acceleration. Developed and tested by the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa, the IAS ensures that acceleration decisions are systematic, thoughtful, well reasoned, and defensible.…

  3. Self-accelerating Warped Braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Braneworld models with induced gravity have the potential to replace dark energy as the explanation for the current accelerating expansion of the Universe. The original model of Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) demonstrated the existence of a ''self-accelerating'' branch of background solutions, but suffered from the presence of ghosts. We present a new large class of braneworld models which generalize the DGP model. Our models have negative curvature in the bulk, allow a second brane, and have general brane tensions and localized curvature terms. We exhibit three different kinds of ghosts, associated to the graviton zero mode, the radion, and the longitudinal components of massive graviton modes. The latter two species occur in the DGP model, for negative and positive brane tension respectively. In our models, we find that the two kinds of DGP ghosts are tightly correlated with each other, but are not always linked to the feature of self-acceleration. Our models are a promising laboratory for understanding the origins and physical meaning of braneworld ghosts, and perhaps for eliminating them altogether.

  4. Self-accelerating warped braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Santiago, Jose; Park, Minjoon

    2007-01-15

    Braneworld models with induced gravity have the potential to replace dark energy as the explanation for the current accelerating expansion of the Universe. The original model of Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati (DGP) demonstrated the existence of a 'self-accelerating' branch of background solutions, but suffered from the presence of ghosts. We present a new large class of braneworld models which generalize the DGP model. Our models have negative curvature in the bulk, allow a second brane, and have general brane tensions and localized curvature terms. We exhibit three different kinds of ghosts, associated to the graviton zero mode, the radion, and the longitudinal components of massive graviton modes. The latter two species occur in the DGP model, for negative and positive brane tension, respectively. In our models, we find that the two kinds of DGP ghosts are tightly correlated with each other, but are not always linked to the feature of self-acceleration. Our models are a promising laboratory for understanding the origins and physical meaning of braneworld ghosts, and perhaps for eliminating them altogether.

  5. Design of an Advanced Expander Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John C.; Tabata, William K.

    1993-01-01

    The final design of the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is discussed. The AETB is a cryogenic rocket ground test unit being designed and built for NASA to enable validation of mission-focused technologies for advanced space engines. Based on the split expander cycle, it will operate at a nominal thrust of 20,000 lbf, a chamber pressure of 1200 psia, and may be operated off-design over a wide range of throttling conditions and mixture ratios. The design approach and configuration of the major components are described.

  6. DYNAMICAL MODEL OF AN EXPANDING SHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2012-06-10

    Expanding blast waves are ubiquitous in many astronomical sources, such as supernova remnants, X-ray emitting binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. I consider here the dynamics of such an expanding blast wave, both in the adiabatic and the radiative regimes. As the blast wave collects material from its surroundings, it decelerates. A full description of the temporal evolution of the blast wave requires consideration of both the energy density and the pressure of the shocked material. The obtained equation is different from earlier works in which only the energy was considered. The solution converges to the familiar results in both the ultrarelativistic and the sub-relativistic (Newtonian) regimes.

  7. University Engagement at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Sean Robert; Rynes, Amanda Renee

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  8. Observational Evidences of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the author has proposed an alternative cosmological model called black hole universe. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with an infinite number of layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and a zero limit for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The relationships among all layers or universes can be connected by a universe family tree. The entire space can be represented as a set of all universes. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of spacetime, and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. This presentation will demonstrate the observational evidences of the black hole universe in terms of the universe expansion, star-like and supermassive black holes, galactic evolutions, quasars, background radiation, and large scale structure. We will also compare the black hole universe with the big bang cosmology.

  9. Development of University Counseling Profession in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yii-nii; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yien-Hua; Lai, Pi-hui

    2015-01-01

    This article was to elaborate the development of the university counseling profession in Taiwan through an intensive literature review. The university student body has been expanding radically in the last three decades, and the student population, as well as their problems, have become more diverse and complex. Thus, the importance of university…

  10. Applications of the Strategic Defense Initiative's compact accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarelli, Nick; Lynch, Ted

    1991-12-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative's (SDI) investment in particle accelerator technology for its directed energy weapons program has produced breakthroughs in the size and power of new accelerators. These accelerators, in turn, have produced spinoffs in several areas: the radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator (RFQ linac) was recently incorporated into the design of a cancer therapy unit at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, an SDI-sponsored compact induction linear accelerator may replace Cobalt-60 radiation and hazardous ethylene-oxide as a method for sterilizing medical products, and other SDIO-funded accelerators may be used to produce the radioactive isotopes oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET). Other applications of these accelerators include bomb detection, non-destructive inspection, decomposing toxic substances in contaminated ground water, and eliminating nuclear waste.

  11. Applications of the Strategic Defense Initiative's compact accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanarelli, Nick; Lynch, Ted

    1991-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative's (SDI) investment in particle accelerator technology for its directed energy weapons program has produced breakthroughs in the size and power of new accelerators. These accelerators, in turn, have produced spinoffs in several areas: the radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator (RFQ linac) was recently incorporated into the design of a cancer therapy unit at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, an SDI-sponsored compact induction linear accelerator may replace Cobalt-60 radiation and hazardous ethylene-oxide as a method for sterilizing medical products, and other SDIO-funded accelerators may be used to produce the radioactive isotopes oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET). Other applications of these accelerators include bomb detection, non-destructive inspection, decomposing toxic substances in contaminated ground water, and eliminating nuclear waste.

  12. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  13. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  14. Space Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This training video, presented by the Lewis Research Center's Space Experiments Division, gives a background and detailed instructions for preparing the space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) for use. The SAMS measures, conditions, and records forces of low gravity accelerations, and is used to determine the effect of these forces on various experiments performed in microgravity. Inertial sensors are used to measure positive and negative acceleration over a specified frequency range. The video documents the SAMS' uses in different configurations during shuttle missions.

  15. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  16. Accelerating into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry

    2009-05-01

    Accelerator science has traditionally been associated with high-energy physics and nuclear physics. But the use of accelerators in other areas of science, as well as in medicine and industry, is steadily growing. Accelerators are now, for example, used to treat cancer using proton therapy, which can deposit radiation onto a tumour while causing much less damage to surrounding healthy tissue than with other treatment techniques.

  17. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  18. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  19. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  20. Properties of extruded expandable breadfruit products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried breadfruit was extruded with a twin screw extruder to develop a value-added expanded fruit product. This research studied the effects of barrel temperature (120-160°C), moisture content (13-25%), feeding rate (13-25 kg/h) and screw speed (115-175rpm) on physicochemical properties (bulk densit...