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Sample records for accelerated life-test model

  1. a Development of Accelerated Life Test Method for Blower Motor for Automobile Using Inverse Power Law Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Wae-Gyeong; Lee, Soo-Hong

    Reliability of automotive parts has been one of the most interesting fields in the automotive industry. Especially small DC motor was issued because of the increasing adoption for passengers' safety and convenience. This study was performed to develop the accelerated life test method using Inverse power law model for small DC motors. The failure mode of small DC motor includes brush wear-out. Inverse power law model is applied effectively the electronic components to reduce the testing time and to achieve the accelerating test conditions. Accelerated life testing method was induced to bring on the brush wear-out as increasing voltage of motor. Life distribution of the small DC motor was supposed to follow Weibull distribution and life test time was calculated under the conditions of B10 life and 90% confidence level.

  2. Neural Network Models of Simple Mechanical Systems Illustrating the Feasibility of Accelerated Life Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Jones, Steven P.; Jansen, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    A complete evaluation of the tribological characteristics of a given material/mechanical system is a time-consuming operation since the friction and wear process is extremely systems sensitive. As a result, experimental designs (i.e., Latin Square, Taguchi) have been implemented in an attempt to not only reduce the total number of experimental combinations needed to fully characterize a material/mechanical system, but also to acquire life data for a system without having to perform an actual life test. Unfortunately, these experimental designs still require a great deal of experimental testing and the output does not always produce meaningful information. In order to further reduce the amount of experimental testing required, this study employs a computer neural network model to investigate different material/mechanical systems. The work focuses on the modeling of the wear behavior, while showing the feasibility of using neural networks to predict life data. The model is capable of defining which input variables will influence the tribological behavior of the particular material/mechanical system being studied based on the specifications of the overall system.

  3. Accelerated life testing of solar absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Bo; Moeller, K.; Frei, Ulrich; Koehl, Michael

    1994-09-01

    Results from a comprehensive case study on accelerated life testing of some selective solar collector absorber coatings for DHW systems are reviewed. The study was conducted within Task X `Solar Materials Research and Development' of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program from 1987 to 1992 and is unique due to its quantitative and systematic approach for durability assessment. The work of case study involved the development of both experimental and theoretical tools to aid the assessment of service life or absorber coatings. This entailed performance analysis, failure analysis, microclimate characterization, environmental resistance testing and life date analysis. Predicted in-service degradation of coatings from accelerated life testing was found to be in fairly good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with what was actually observed on coatings installed and tested for three years in solar collectors working under typical DHW conditions.

  4. Kalman Filter Models for Extrapolations in Dose-Response Experiments and Accelerated Life-Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-09

    Kalman-Filter models with Gaussian innovations provide a useful and easy to implement tool for inference from dose - response experiments and...proposed dose - response relationship. This is in contrast to the currently used approaches wherein there is an implicit commitment to the validity of

  5. Earth Scanner Bearing Accelerated Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Brian J.; VanDyk, Steven G.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2000-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) optical instrument for NASA Goddard will measure biological and physical processes on the Earth's surface and in the lower atmosphere. A key component of the instrument is an extremely accurate scan mirror motor/encoder assembly. Of prime concern in the performance and reliability of the scan motor/encoder is bearing selection and lubrication. This paper describes life testing of the bearings and lubrication selected for the program.

  6. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 250 C, 200C and 125C accelerated tests are described. The wear-out distributions from the 250 and 200 C tests were used to estimate the activation energy between the two test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear-out region. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three devices types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment is assessed. Guidlines for the development of accelerated life-test conditions are proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life-test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits is described.

  7. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  8. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the time period from May 1976 to December 1979 and encompasses the three phases of accelerated testing: Phase 1, the 250 C testing; Phase 2, the 200 C testing; and Phase 3, the 125 C testing. The duration of the test in Phase 1 and Phase 2 was sufficient to take the devices into the wear out region. The wear out distributions were used to estimate the activation energy between the 250 C and the 200 C test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test, 20,000 hours, was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear out region; consequently the third data point at 125 C for determining the consistency of activation energy could not be obtained. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three device types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment was assessed. Guidelines for the development of accelerated life test conditions were proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits was explored in Phase 4 of this study and is attached as an appendix to this report.

  9. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  10. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  11. A new method of accelerated life testing based on the Grey System Theory for a model-based lithium-ion battery life evaluation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Weijun; Sun, Zechang; Wei, Xuezhe; Dai, Haifeng

    2014-12-01

    The lack of data samples is the main difficulty for the lifetime study of a lithium-ion battery, especially for a model-based evaluation system. To determine the mapping relationship between the battery fading law and the different external factors, the testing of batteries should be implemented to the greatest extent possible. As a result, performing a battery lifetime study has become a notably time-consuming undertaking. Without reducing the number of testing items pre-specified within the test matrices of an accelerated life testing schedule, a grey model that can be used to predict the cycle numbers that result in the specific life ending index is established in this paper. No aging mechanism is required for this model, which is exclusively a data-driven method obtained from a small quantity of actual testing data. For higher accuracy, a specific smoothing method is introduced, and the error between the predicted value and the actual value is also modeled using the same method. By the verification of a phosphate iron lithium-ion battery and a manganese oxide lithium-ion battery, this grey model demonstrated its ability to reduce the required number of cycles for the operational mode of various electric vehicles.

  12. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  13. Instrumentation for accelerated life tests of concentrator solar cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez, N; Vázquez, M; González, J R; Jiménez, F J; Bautista, J

    2011-02-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic is an emergent technology that may be a good economical and efficient alternative for the generation of electricity at a competitive cost. However, the reliability of these new solar cells and systems is still an open issue due to the high-irradiation level they are subjected to as well as the electrical and thermal stresses that they are expected to endure. To evaluate the reliability in a short period of time, accelerated aging tests are essential. Thermal aging tests for concentrator photovoltaic solar cells and systems under illumination are not available because no technical solution to the problem of reaching the working concentration inside a climatic chamber has been available. This work presents an automatic instrumentation system that overcomes the aforementioned limitation. Working conditions have been simulated by forward biasing the solar cells to the current they would handle at the working concentration (in this case, 700 and 1050 times the irradiance at one standard sun). The instrumentation system has been deployed for more than 10 000 h in a thermal aging test for III-V concentrator solar cells, in which the generated power evolution at different temperatures has been monitored. As a result of this test, the acceleration factor has been calculated, thus allowing for the degradation evolution at any temperature in addition to normal working conditions to be obtained.

  14. Instrumentation for accelerated life tests of concentrator solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, N.; Vázquez, M.; González, J. R.; Jiménez, F. J.; Bautista, J.

    2011-02-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic is an emergent technology that may be a good economical and efficient alternative for the generation of electricity at a competitive cost. However, the reliability of these new solar cells and systems is still an open issue due to the high-irradiation level they are subjected to as well as the electrical and thermal stresses that they are expected to endure. To evaluate the reliability in a short period of time, accelerated aging tests are essential. Thermal aging tests for concentrator photovoltaic solar cells and systems under illumination are not available because no technical solution to the problem of reaching the working concentration inside a climatic chamber has been available. This work presents an automatic instrumentation system that overcomes the aforementioned limitation. Working conditions have been simulated by forward biasing the solar cells to the current they would handle at the working concentration (in this case, 700 and 1050 times the irradiance at one standard sun). The instrumentation system has been deployed for more than 10 000 h in a thermal aging test for III-V concentrator solar cells, in which the generated power evolution at different temperatures has been monitored. As a result of this test, the acceleration factor has been calculated, thus allowing for the degradation evolution at any temperature in addition to normal working conditions to be obtained.

  15. Prediction of reliability on thermoelectric module through accelerated life test and Physics-of-failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2011-09-01

    Thermoelectric cooling module (TEM) which is electric device has a mechanical stress because of temperature gradient in itself. It means that structure of TEM is vulnerable in an aspect of reliability but research on reliability of TEM was not performed a lot. Recently, the more the utilization of thermoelectric cooling devices grows, the more the needs for life prediction and improvement are increasing. In this paper, we investigated life distribution, shape parameter of the TEM through accelerated life test (ALT). And we discussed about how to enhance life of TEM through the Physics-of-failure. Experimental results of ALT showed that the thermoelectric cooling module follows the Weibull distribution, shape parameter of which is 3.6. The acceleration model is coffin Coffin-Manson and material constant is 1.8.

  16. Methodology to improve design of accelerated life tests in civil engineering projects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhou, Jilai; Gao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    For reliability testing an Energy Expansion Tree (EET) and a companion Energy Function Model (EFM) are proposed and described in this paper. Different from conventional approaches, the EET provides a more comprehensive and objective way to systematically identify external energy factors affecting reliability. The EFM introduces energy loss into a traditional Function Model to identify internal energy sources affecting reliability. The combination creates a sound way to enumerate the energies to which a system may be exposed during its lifetime. We input these energies into planning an accelerated life test, a Multi Environment Over Stress Test. The test objective is to discover weak links and interactions among the system and the energies to which it is exposed, and design them out. As an example, the methods are applied to the pipe in subsea pipeline. However, they can be widely used in other civil engineering industries as well. The proposed method is compared with current methods.

  17. Methodology to Improve Design of Accelerated Life Tests in Civil Engineering Projects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhou, Jilai; Gao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    For reliability testing an Energy Expansion Tree (EET) and a companion Energy Function Model (EFM) are proposed and described in this paper. Different from conventional approaches, the EET provides a more comprehensive and objective way to systematically identify external energy factors affecting reliability. The EFM introduces energy loss into a traditional Function Model to identify internal energy sources affecting reliability. The combination creates a sound way to enumerate the energies to which a system may be exposed during its lifetime. We input these energies into planning an accelerated life test, a Multi Environment Over Stress Test. The test objective is to discover weak links and interactions among the system and the energies to which it is exposed, and design them out. As an example, the methods are applied to the pipe in subsea pipeline. However, they can be widely used in other civil engineering industries as well. The proposed method is compared with current methods. PMID:25111800

  18. Geometry of the q-exponential distribution with dependent competing risks and accelerated life testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fode; Shi, Yimin; Wang, Ruibing

    2017-02-01

    In the information geometry suggested by Amari (1985) and Amari et al. (1987), a parametric statistical model can be regarded as a differentiable manifold with the parameter space as a coordinate system. Note that the q-exponential distribution plays an important role in Tsallis statistics (see Tsallis, 2009), this paper investigates the geometry of the q-exponential distribution with dependent competing risks and accelerated life testing (ALT). A copula function based on the q-exponential function, which can be considered as the generalized Gumbel copula, is discussed to illustrate the structure of the dependent random variable. Employing two iterative algorithms, simulation results are given to compare the performance of estimations and levels of association under different hybrid progressively censoring schemes (HPCSs).

  19. Failure modes and effects criticality analysis and accelerated life testing of LEDs for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, M.; Christou, A.

    2012-12-01

    While use of LEDs in Fiber Optics and lighting applications is common, their use in medical diagnostic applications is not very extensive. Since the precise value of light intensity will be used to interpret patient results, understanding failure modes [1-4] is very important. We used the Failure Modes and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) tool to identify the critical failure modes of the LEDs. FMECA involves identification of various failure modes, their effects on the system (LED optical output in this context), their frequency of occurrence, severity and the criticality of the failure modes. The competing failure modes/mechanisms were degradation of: active layer (where electron-hole recombination occurs to emit light), electrodes (provides electrical contact to the semiconductor chip), Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surface layer (used to improve current spreading and light extraction), plastic encapsulation (protective polymer layer) and packaging failures (bond wires, heat sink separation). A FMECA table is constructed and the criticality is calculated by estimating the failure effect probability (β), failure mode ratio (α), failure rate (λ) and the operating time. Once the critical failure modes were identified, the next steps were generation of prior time to failure distribution and comparing with our accelerated life test data. To generate the prior distributions, data and results from previous investigations were utilized [5-33] where reliability test results of similar LEDs were reported. From the graphs or tabular data, we extracted the time required for the optical power output to reach 80% of its initial value. This is our failure criterion for the medical diagnostic application. Analysis of published data for different LED materials (AlGaInP, GaN, AlGaAs), the Semiconductor Structures (DH, MQW) and the mode of testing (DC, Pulsed) was carried out. The data was categorized according to the materials system and LED structure such as AlGaInP-DH-DC, Al

  20. Closeout Report for the Refractory Metal Accelerated Heat Pipe Life Test Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.; Reid, R.; Stewart, E.; Hickman, R.; Mireles, O.

    2013-01-01

    With the selection of a gas-cooled reactor, this heat pipe accelerated life test activity was closed out and its resources redirected. The scope of this project was to establish the long-term aging effects on Mo-44.5%Re sodium heat pipes when subjected to space reactor temperature and mass fluences. To date, investigators have demonstrated heat pipe life tests of alkali metal systems up to .50,000 hours. Unfortunately, resources have not been available to examine the effect of temperature, mass fluence, or impurity level on corrosion or to conduct post-test forensic examination of heat pipes. The key objective of this effort was to establish a cost/time effective method to systematically test alkali metal heat pipes with both practical and theoretical benefits. During execution of the project, a heat pipe design was established, a majority of the laboratory test equipment systems specified, and operating and test procedures developed. Procurements for the heat pipe units and all major test components were underway at the time the stop work order was issued. An extremely important outcome was the successful fabrication of an annular wick from Mo-5%Re screen (the single, most difficult component to manufacture) using a hot isostatic pressing technique. This Technical Publication (TP) includes specifics regarding the heat pipe calorimeter water-cooling system, vendor design for the radio frequency heating system, possible alternative calorimeter designs, and progress on the vanadium equilibration technique. The methods provided in this TP and preceding project documentation would serve as a good starting point to rapidly implement an accelerated life test. Relevant test data can become available within months, not years, and destructive examination of the first life test heat pipe might begin within 6 months of test initiation. Final conclusions could be drawn in less than a quarter of the mission duration for a long-lived, fission-powered, deep space probe.

  1. Accelerated life tests of specimen heat pipe from Communication Technology Satellite (CTS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.; Kaufman, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe of stainless steel with methanol working fluid identical to one now on the CTS satellite was life tested in the laboratory at accelerated conditions for 14 200 hours, equivalent to about 70 000 hours at flight conditions. The noncondensible gas inventory increased about 20 percent over the original charge. The observed gas increase is estimated to increase operating temperature by about 2.2 C, insufficient to harm the electronic gear cooled by the heat pipes in the satellite. Tests of maximum heat input against evaporator elevation agree well with the manufacturer's predictions.

  2. Bayesian Analysis of Step-Stress Accelerated Life Test with Exponential Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Pan, R.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we propose a general Bayesian inference approach to the step-stress accelerated life test with type II censoring. We assume that the failure times at each stress level are exponentially distributed and the test units are tested in an increasing order of stress levels. We formulate the prior distribution of the parameters of life-stress function and integrate the engineering knowledge of product failure rate and acceleration factor into the prior. The posterior distribution and the point estimates for the parameters of interest are provided. Through the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrate a nonconjugate prior case using an industrial example. It is shown that with the Bayesian approach, the statistical precision of parameter estimation is improved and, consequently, the required number of failures could be reduced.

  3. Accelerated life test of sputtering and anode deposit spalling in a small mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Tantalum and molybdenum sputtered from discharge chamber components during operation of a 5 centimeter diameter mercury ion thruster adhered much more strongly to coarsely grit blasted anode surfaces than to standard surfaces. Spalling of the sputtered coating did occur from a coarse screen anode surface but only in flakes less than a mesh unit long. The results were obtained in a 200 hour accelerated life test conducted at an elevated discharge potential of 64.6 volts. The test approximately reproduced the major sputter erosion and deposition effects that occur under normal operation but at approximately 75 times the normal rate. No discharge chamber component suffered sufficient erosion in the test to threaten its structural integrity or further serviceability. The test indicated that the use of tantalum-surfaced discharge chamber components in conjunction with a fine wire screen anode surface should cure the problems of sputter erosion and sputtered deposits spalling in long term operation of small mercury ion thrusters.

  4. Accelerated cable life testing of EPR-insulated medium voltage distribution cables

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.D. ); Bernstein, B.S. ); Smith, J.T. III ); Thue, W.A. , Stuart, FL ); Groeger, J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents results aimed at developing a reliable accelerated aging tank test for EPR-insulated cables. Aging was performed at 2 to 4 times rated voltage on load cycling to temperatures of 45 C, 60 C, 75 C, and 90 C at the conductor with water in the conductor strands and outside the cable. Results show that cable failure is more rapid at the highest electrical stress and lowest conductor load cycle temperature. Cables aged at higher temperatures and various levels of electrical stress rarely failed and retained in excess of 40% of their original breakdown strength after 1,500+ days of aging. Aging performed at 90 C load cycle temperature and 4 times rated voltage with air on the outside and water at the conductor of the cable showed more rapid loss of life than with water outside. Results indicate the optimum aging conditions for EPR-insulated cables in the accelerated cable life test (ACLT) differ significantly from those previously observed for XLPE-insulated cables, and that the appropriate test methodology for EPR-insulated cables requires additional study.

  5. Design of the fiber optic support system and fiber bundle accelerated life test for VIRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ian M.; Beno, Joseph H.; Hayes, Richard J.; Heisler, James T.; Mock, Jason R.; Mollison, Nicholas T.; Good, John M.; Hill, Gary J.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Anderson, Seth C.; Bauer, Svend M.; Kelz, Andreas; Roth, Martin M.; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2010-07-01

    The quantity and length of optical fibers required for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope* Dark Energy eXperiment (HETDEX) create unique fiber handling challenges. For HETDEX‡, at least 33,600 fibers will transmit light from the focal surface of the telescope to an array of spectrographs making up the Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS). Up to 96 Integral Field Unit (IFU) bundles, each containing 448 fibers, hang suspended from the telescope's moving tracker located more than 15 meters above the VIRUS instruments. A specialized mechanical system is being developed to support fiber optic assemblies onboard the telescope. The discrete behavior of 448 fibers within a conduit is also of primary concern. A life cycle test must be conducted to study fiber behavior and measure Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) as a function of time. This paper focuses on the technical requirements and design of the HETDEX fiber optic support system, the electro-mechanical test apparatus for accelerated life testing of optical fiber assemblies. Results generated from the test will be of great interest to designers of robotic fiber handling systems for major telescopes. There is concern that friction, localized contact, entanglement, and excessive tension will be present within each IFU conduit and contribute to FRD. The test apparatus design utilizes six linear actuators to replicate the movement of the telescope over 65,000 accelerated cycles, simulating five years of actual operation.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF THE PCFBC-EXPOSED AND ACCELERATED LIFE-TESTED CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    1999-09-30

    Development of the hot gas filtration technology has been the focus of DOE/FETC and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation during the past twenty years. Systems development during this time has successfully lead to the generation and implementation of high temperature Siemens Westinghouse particulate filtration systems that are currently installed and are operational at Demonstration Plant sites, and which are ready for installation at commercial plant sites. Concurrently, materials development has advanced the use of commercially available oxide- and nonoxide-based monoliths, and has fostered the manufacture and use of second generation, oxide-based, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites and filament wound materials. This report summarizes the material characterization results for commercially available and second generation filter materials tested in Siemens Westinghouse's advanced, high temperature, particulate removal system at the Foster Wheeler, pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion, pilot-scale test facility in Karhula, Finland, and subsequent extended accelerated life testing of aged elements in Siemens Westinghouse pressurized fluidized-bed combustion simulator test facility in Pittsburgh, PA. The viability of operating candle filters successfully for over 1 year of service life has been shown in these efforts. Continued testing to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring three years of service operation on aged filter elements is recommended.

  7. Surface composition and barium evaporation rate of ``pedigreed'' impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes during accelerated life testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomich, D. H.; Mescher, J. A.; Grant, J. T.

    1987-03-01

    A study has been made of the surface composition and barium evaporation rate of "pedigreed" impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes. The effect of air exposure on coated cathodes was examined and was found to have no significant effect on barium evaporation rate although in some cases longer reactivation times were required. No changes in surface topography were apparent following air exposure and reactivation. Life testing was done at 100°C above the typical operating temperature for the cathode, where the typical operating temperature was taken to be 950°C for coated cathodes and 1050°C for uncoated cathodes. The cathodes were examined at different stages of life testing, up to 1200 h. Significant decreases in barium evaporation rates were found after as few as 500 h of life testing. After 1000 h the evaporation rate had decreased more than an order of magnitude. Changes in surface composition were also found. The effects of tungsten particle size, used in manufacture of the billet, on barium evaporation rate were also studied but no correlation was found.

  8. Theory and practice of self-lubricated, oscillatory bearings for high-vacuum applications. II - Accelerated life tests and analysis of bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, C. R.

    1980-08-01

    Accelerated vacuum life tests of dry self-lubricating bearings were carried out by monitoring of friction torque and evaluation of the effects of thermal cycling and radial temperature gradients. Twenty-two bearings were tested for periods up to 15,000 hr in high vacuum and operated to 31 x 10 to the 9th degrees of oscillatory travel. A theoretical model of wear was constructed on the basis of friction, wear, and bearing torque test results, along with optical-scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic examination of bearing components.

  9. Accelerated cycle-life testing of small sealed lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.; Oh, S. H.; Kang, H. Y.

    An attempt has been made to devise methods for reducing the cycle-testing time of long-life sealed lead/acid batteries. In order for the accelerated test results to equate to the actual field operations, it is assumed that the failure modes under both normal and accelerated conditions must be the same. As a first step in the search for a reliable accelerated test, observations of the battery ageing process have been made under different daily duty cycles, viz., 1 (normal), 8 and 16 cycles/day at ambient temperature and 80% depth-of-discharge. It has been found that the main cause of failure is different for a given duty cycle. This complicates the task of applying accelerated test results to field operations. For the 8 cycles/day schedule, the main cause of failure is degradation of the positive active material. Positive grid corrosion is the main factor in the 16 cycles/day case. Under normal conditions, both grid corrosion and PbO 2 degradation appear to be equally significant.

  10. Study on constant-step stress accelerated life tests in white organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J P; Liu, C; Chen, X; Cheng, G L; Zhou, A X

    2014-11-01

    In order to obtain reliability information for a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED), two constant and one step stress tests were conducted with its working current increased. The Weibull function was applied to describe the OLED life distribution, and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and its iterative flow chart were used to calculate shape and scale parameters. Furthermore, the accelerated life equation was determined using the least squares method, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed to assess if the white OLED life follows a Weibull distribution, and self-developed software was used to predict the average and the median lifetimes of the OLED. The numerical results indicate that white OLED life conforms to a Weibull distribution, and that the accelerated life equation completely satisfies the inverse power law. The estimated life of a white OLED may provide significant guidelines for its manufacturers and customers.

  11. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  12. Accelerated life test of the USDOE OC-OTEC experimental system refurbished with magnetic bearings for the 3rd stage vacuum compressor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, L.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the accelerated life test (time-to-failure) performed, at the request of DOE, to evaluate the viability of the magnetic bearing system installed in the stage 3 vacuum pump. To this effect the plant was successfully operated for over 500 hours during the period September-November 1996. The first part of this report discusses system performance by deriving subsystem and system performance parameters from a typical record. This is followed by the discussion of the life tests. The instrumentation used to estimate the performance parameters given here is depicted. The third stage pump was operated for 535 hours without incident. It is concluded that magnetic bearings are the preferable choice for the OC-OTEC centrifugal vacuum pumps.

  13. Thermal reliability analysis of a BLDC motor in a high-speed axial fan by the accelerated-life test and numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Jin-Huek; Lee, Tae-Gu; Moon, Sun-Ae; Lee, Sang-Jae; Yoo, Hoseon; Moon, Seung-Jae; Lee, Jae-Heon

    2008-09-01

    The thermal reliability of a closed-type BLDC motor for a high-speed fan is analyzed by an accelerated-life testing and numerical methods in this paper. Since a module and a motor part are integrated in a closed case, heat generated from a rotor in a motor and electronic components in the PCB module cannot be effectively removed to the outside. Therefore, the module will easily fail due to high temperature. The experiment for measuring the temperature and the surface heat flux of the electronic components is carried out to predict their surface temperature distributions and main heat sources. The accelerated-life test is accomplished to formulate the life equation depending on the environmental temperature. Moreover, the temperature of the PCB module is different from the environmental temperature since the heat generated from the motor cannot be effectively dissipated owing to the motor’s structure. Therefore a numerical method is used to predict the temperature of the PCB module, which is one of the life equation parameter, according to the environment. By numerically obtaining the maxima of the thermal stress and strain of the electronic components according to the operation environments with the temperature results, the fatigue cycle can be estimated.

  14. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  15. Using accelerated life testing procedures to compare the relative sensitivity of rainbow trout and the federally listed threatened bull trout to three commonly used rangeland herbicides (picloram, 2,4-D, and clopyralid)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.; Sappington, L.S.; Nelson, K.J.; Valle, J.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted 96-h static acute toxicity studies to evaluate the relative sensitivity of juveniles of the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard cold-water surrogate rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) to three rangeland herbicides commonly used for controlling invasive weeds in the northwestern United States. Relative species sensitivity was compared using three procedures: standard acute toxicity testing, fractional estimates of lethal concentrations, and accelerated life testing chronic estimation procedures. The acutely lethal concentrations (ALC) resulting in 50% mortality at 96 h (96-h ALC50s) were determined using linear regression and indicated that the three herbicides were toxic in the order of picloram acid > 2,4-D acid > clopyralid acid. The 96-h ALC50 values for rainbow trout were as follows: picloram, 41 mg/L; 2.4-D, 707 mg/L; and clopyralid, 700 mg/L. The 96-h ALC50 values for bull trout were as follows: picloram, 24 mg/L; 2.4-D, 398 mg/L; and clopyralid, 802 mg/L. Fractional estimates of safe concentrations, based on 5% of the 96-h ALC50, were conservative (overestimated toxicity) of regression-derived 96-h ALC5 values by an order of magnitude. Accelerated life testing procedures were used to estimate chronic lethal concentrations (CLC) resulting in 1% mortality at 30 d (30-d CLC1) for the three herbicides: picloram (1 mg/L rainbow trout, 5 mg/L bull trout), 2,4-D (56 mg/L rainbow trout, 84 mg/L bull trout), and clopyralid (477 mg/L rainbow trout; 552 mg/L bull trout). Collectively, the results indicated that the standard surrogate rainbow trout is similar in sensitivity to bull trout. Accelerated life testing procedures provided cost-effective, statistically defensible methods for estimating safe chronic concentrations (30-d CLC1s) of herbicides from acute toxicity data because they use statistical models based on the entire mortality:concentration: time data matrix. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  16. Using accelerated life testing procedures to compare the relative sensitivity of rainbow trout and the federally listed threatened bull trout to three commonly used rangeland herbicides (picloram, 2,4-D, and clopyralid).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, James F; Allert, Ann; Sappington, Linda S; Nelson, Karen J; Valle, Janet

    2008-03-01

    We conducted 96-h static acute toxicity studies to evaluate the relative sensitivity of juveniles of the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard cold-water surrogate rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) to three rangeland herbicides commonly used for controlling invasive weeds in the northwestern United States. Relative species sensitivity was compared using three procedures: standard acute toxicity testing, fractional estimates of lethal concentrations, and accelerated life testing chronic estimation procedures. The acutely lethal concentrations (ALC) resulting in 50% mortality at 96 h (96-h ALC50s) were determined using linear regression and indicated that the three herbicides were toxic in the order of picloram acid > 2,4-D acid > clopyralid acid. The 96-h ALC50 values for rainbow trout were as follows: picloram, 41 mg/L; 2.4-D, 707 mg/L; and clopyralid, 700 mg/L. The 96-h ALC50 values for bull trout were as follows: picloram, 24 mg/L; 2.4-D, 398 mg/L; and clopyralid, 802 mg/L. Fractional estimates of safe concentrations, based on 5% of the 96-h ALC50, were conservative (overestimated toxicity) of regression-derived 96-h ALC5 values by an order of magnitude. Accelerated life testing procedures were used to estimate chronic lethal concentrations (CLC) resulting in 1% mortality at 30 d (30-d CLC1) for the three herbicides: picloram (1 mg/L rainbow trout, 5 mg/L bull trout), 2,4-D (56 mg/L rainbow trout, 84 mg/L bull trout), and clopyralid (477 mg/L rainbow trout; 552 mg/L bull trout). Collectively, the results indicated that the standard surrogate rainbow trout is similar in sensitivity to bull trout. Accelerated life testing procedures provided cost-effective, statistically defensible methods for estimating safe chronic concentrations (30-d CLC1s) of herbicides from acute toxicity data because they use statistical models based on the entire mortality:concentration:time data matrix.

  17. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure.

  18. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25038

  19. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  20. Investigation of Gallium Nitride Transistor Reliability through Accelerated Life Testing and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    appreciated my associations with classmates and friends: Ben Crossley, Derrick Langley, Will Cobb, Neal Kraft , Scott Callihan, Dane Fuller, Kurt... saturation region, when VD ≥ (VG – VT), the drain current is 2( ) ( ) 2 ( )D G T W xI V V L d d      . (8) Typical drain current versus...The unity current gain cut-off frequency is sat T gs g gd vf L L L    (11) where vsat is the saturation velocity of the narrow bandgap

  1. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  2. Modeling Reliability Growth in Accelerated Stress Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    HASS and HASA Explained, Milwaukee, WI: Quality Press, 2009. [13] A. J. Porter, "Failure Mode Verification: Applying Highly Accelerated Life Testing...and Production Conference - Proceedings of the Technical Program, Des Plaines, IL, 1998. [16] M. Silverman, "Summary of HALT and HASS results at

  3. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  4. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  5. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  6. High Efficiency Water Heating Technology Development Final Report. Part I, Lab/Field Performance Evaluation and Accelerated Life Testing of a Hybrid Electric Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH)

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Murphy, Richard W.; Rice, C. Keith; Linkous, Randall Lee

    2016-04-01

    DOE has supported efforts for many years with the objective of getting a water heater that uses heat pump technology (aka a heat pump water heater or HPWH) successfully on the residential equipment market. The most recent previous effort (1999-2002) produced a product that performed very well in ORNL-led accelerated durability and field tests. The commercial partner for this effort, Enviromaster International (EMI), introduced the product to the market under the trade name Watter$aver in 2002 but ceased production in 2005 due to low sales. A combination of high sales price and lack of any significant infrastructure for service after the sale were the principal reasons for the failure of this effort. What was needed for market success was a commercial partner with the manufacturing and market distribution capability necessary to allow economies of scale to lead to a viable unit price together with a strong customer service infrastructure. General Electric certainly meets these requirements, and knowing of ORNL s expertise in this area, approached ORNL with the proposal to partner in a CRADA to produce a high efficiency electric water heater. A CRADA with GE was initiated early in Fiscal Year, 2008. GE initially named its product the Hybrid Electric Water Heater (HEWH).

  7. Extended life testing evaluation of complementary MOS integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosnan, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of the extended life testing evaluation of complementary MOS integrated circuits was twofold: (1) To ascertain the long life capability of complementary MOS devices. (2) To assess the objectivity and reliability of various accelerated life test methods as an indication or prediction tool. In addition, the determination of a suitable life test sequence for these devices was of importance. Conclusions reached based on the parts tested and the test results obtained was that the devices were not acceptable.

  8. Statistical Modeling of Photovoltaic Reliability Using Accelerated Degradation Techniques (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Jones, W.

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a cutting-edge life-testing technique, accelerated degradation testing (ADT), for PV reliability testing. The ADT technique is a cost-effective and flexible reliability testing method with multiple (MADT) and Step-Stress (SSADT) variants. In an environment with limited resources, including equipment (chambers), test units, and testing time, these techniques can provide statistically rigorous prediction of lifetime and other interesting parameters, such as failure rate, warranty time, mean time to failure, degradation rate, activation energy, acceleration factor, and upper limit level of stress. J-V characterization can be used for degradation data and the generalized Eyring model can be used for the thermal-humidity stress condition. The SSADT model can be constructed based on the cumulative damage model (CEM), which assumes that the remaining test united are failed according to cumulative density function of current stress level regardless of the history on previous stress levels.

  9. Predictive Service Life Tests for Roofing Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David M.; Cash, Carl G.; Davies, Arthur G.

    2002-09-01

    The average service life of roofing membranes used in low-slope applications on U.S. Army buildings is estimated to be considerably shorter than the industry-presumed 20-year design life, even when installers carefully adhere to the latest guide specifications. This problem is due in large part to market-driven product development cycles, which do not include time for long-term field testing. To reduce delivery costs, contractors may provide untested, interior membranes in place of ones proven satisfactory in long-term service. Federal procurement regulations require that roofing systems and components be selected according to desired properties and generic type, not brand name. The problem is that a material certified to have satisfactory properties at installation time will not necessarily retain those properties in service. The overall objective of this research is to develop a testing program that can be executed in a matter of weeks to adequately predict a membrane's long-term performance in service. This report details accelerated aging tests of 12 popular membrane materials in the laboratory, and describes outdoor experiment stations set up for long-term exposure tests of those same membranes. The laboratory results will later be correlated with the outdoor test results to develop performance models and predictive service life tests.

  10. Cycle life testing and modeling of graphite/LiCoO2 cells under different state of charge ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Hendricks, Christopher; Pecht, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are used for energy storage in a wide array of applications, and do not always undergo full charge and discharge cycling. This study quantifies the effect of partial charge-discharge cycling on Li-ion battery capacity loss by means of cycling tests conducted on graphite/LiCoO2 pouch cells under different state of charge (SOC) ranges and discharge currents. The results are used to develop a model of capacity fade for batteries under full or partial cycling conditions. This study demonstrates that all of the variables studied including mean SOC, change in SOC (ΔSOC) and discharge rate have a significant impact on capacity loss rate during the cycling operation. This study is useful in identifying the SOC ranges with slow degradation rates.

  11. Perceived discrimination and health-related quality of life: testing the Reserve Capacity Model in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Howarter, Alisha D; Bennett, Kymberley K

    2013-01-01

    This study tested aspects of the Reserve Capacity Model (Gallo & Matthews, 2003; Gallo, Penedo Espinosa de los Monteros, & Arguelles, 2009) as a means of understanding disparities in health-related quality of life appraisals among Hispanic Americans. Questionnaire data were collected from 236 Hispanic participants, including measures of perceived discrimination, optimism, social support, symptoms of trait anxiety, and physical and mental health-related quality of life. Path analysis indicated direct, negative associations between perceived discrimination and both forms of health-related quality of life. Results also showed that these relationships were partially mediated by the reserve capacity variable of optimism and by symptoms of anxiety, though evidence for mediation by anxiety was stronger than for optimism. Findings suggest that perceived discrimination depletes intrapersonal reserves in Hispanic Americans, which, in turn, induces negative emotions. Implications for community-level interventions are discussed.

  12. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  13. AUSSAT battery life test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorian, P. W.; Pickett, D. F., Jr.; Bogner, R. S.; Chao, T. I.; Jordan, J. P.; Clark, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    AUSSAT Pty. Ltd., the Australian National Satellite organization, has contracted with the Hughes Aircraft Company (HAC) for the construction of 3 satellites based on the now familiar HS-376 product line. As part of the AUSSAT contract, HAC is conducting an extensive NiCd battery life test program. The life test program, objectives and test results to date are described. Particular emphasis is given to the evaluation of the FS2117 separator as a future replacement for the Pellon 2505 separator of which only a very limited quantity remains.

  14. Modeling lateral acceleration effects on pilot performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korn, J.; Kleinan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Attendant to the direct side force maneuver of a Vectored Force Fighter is the transverse acceleration imposed on the pilot. This lateral acceleration (Gy), when combind with a positive Gz stress, is a potential source of pilot tracking performance impairment. A research effort to investigate these performance decrements includes experimental as well as anaytical pilot performance modeling using the Optimal Control Model.

  15. Normalization of Gravitational Acceleration Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the con- sequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the nonsphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of a nonspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities which must be removed in order to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Three unique algorithms have been developed to eliminate these singularities by Samuel Pines [1], Bill Lear [2], and Robert Gottlieb [3]. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two1 of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear [2] and Gottlieb [3] algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre Polynomials and ALFs for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  16. Accelerated test design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an accelerated life test program for electric batteries is discussed. A number of observations and suggestions on the procedures and objectives for conducting an accelerated life test program are presented. Equations based on nonlinear regression analysis for predicting the accelerated life test parameters are discussed.

  17. Surfzone alongshore advective accelerations: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The sources, magnitudes, and impacts of non-linear advective accelerations on alongshore surfzone currents are investigated with observations and a numerical model. Previous numerical modeling results have indicated that advective accelerations are an important contribution to the alongshore force balance, and are required to understand spatial variations in alongshore currents (which may result in spatially variable morphological change). However, most prior observational studies have neglected advective accelerations in the alongshore force balance. Using a numerical model (Delft3D) to predict optimal sensor locations, a dense array of 26 colocated current meters and pressure sensors was deployed between the shoreline and 3-m water depth over a 200 by 115 m region near Duck, NC in fall 2013. The array included 7 cross- and 3 alongshore transects. Here, observational and numerical estimates of the dominant forcing terms in the alongshore balance (pressure and radiation-stress gradients) and the advective acceleration terms will be compared with each other. In addition, the numerical model will be used to examine the force balance, including sources of velocity gradients, at a higher spatial resolution than possible with the instrument array. Preliminary numerical results indicate that at O(10-100 m) alongshore scales, bathymetric variations and the ensuing alongshore variations in the wave field and subsequent forcing are the dominant sources of the modeled velocity gradients and advective accelerations. Additional simulations and analysis of the observations will be presented. Funded by NSF and ASDR&E.

  18. Computing Models for FPGA-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Herbordt, Martin C.; Gu, Yongfeng; VanCourt, Tom; Model, Josh; Sukhwani, Bharat; Chiu, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Field-programmable gate arrays are widely considered as accelerators for compute-intensive applications. A critical phase of FPGA application development is finding and mapping to the appropriate computing model. FPGA computing enables models with highly flexible fine-grained parallelism and associative operations such as broadcast and collective response. Several case studies demonstrate the effectiveness of using these computing models in developing FPGA applications for molecular modeling. PMID:21603152

  19. Impact of flavour solvent (propylene glycol or triacetin) on vanillin, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, 2,4-decadienal, 2,4-heptadienal, structural parameters and sensory perception of shortcake biscuits over accelerated shelf life testing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ni; Hort, Joanne; Linforth, Robert; Brown, Keith; Walsh, Stuart; Fisk, Ian D

    2013-11-15

    The influence of choice of flavour solvent, propylene glycol (PG) or triacetin (TA), was investigated during accelerated shelf life (ASL) testing of shortcake biscuits. Specifically, the differential effect on the stability of added vanillin, the natural baked marker compound 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), specific markers of oxidative rancidity (2,4-decadienal, 2,4-heptadienal), and the structural parameters of hardness and fracturability. Significantly more HMF was formed during baking of biscuits prepared with TA; these biscuits were also more stable to oxidative degradation and loss of vanillin during ageing than biscuits prepared with PG. Fresh TA biscuits were significantly more brittle than fresh PG biscuits. There was no impact of solvent choice on hardness. Sensory evaluation of hardness, vanilla flavour and oily off-note was tested during ASL testing. There was no significant impact of storage on sensory ratings for either the PG or TA biscuits.

  20. Triservice/NASA cathode life test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windes, D.; Dutkowski, J.; Kaiser, R.; Justice, R.

    1999-05-01

    Since December 1992, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane Division (NSWCCD) has logged over 1,318,000 h of cathode life testing on 6 different cathode systems in the Triservice/NASA Cathode Life Test Facility. These include two types of reservoir cathodes designated as MK (Siemens), and RV (CPI, formerly Varian), and impregnated matrix cathodes designated M type (manufactured by Semicon and Hughes), TM (Transition Metal cathodes-CPI) and MMM (Mixed Metal Matrix cathodes-CPI). This paper will present results of the cathode life testing at this facility.

  1. Feasibility of Using Neural Network Models to Accelerate the Testing of Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Verification testing is an important aspect of the design process for mechanical mechanisms, and full-scale, full-length life testing is typically used to qualify any new component for use in space. However, as the required life specification is increased, full-length life tests become more costly and lengthen the development time. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, we theorized that neural network systems may be able to model the operation of a mechanical device. If so, the resulting neural network models could simulate long-term mechanical testing with data from a short-term test. This combination of computer modeling and short-term mechanical testing could then be used to verify the reliability of mechanical systems, thereby eliminating the costs associated with long-term testing. Neural network models could also enable designers to predict the performance of mechanisms at the conceptual design stage by entering the critical parameters as input and running the model to predict performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using neural networks to predict the performance and life of mechanical systems. To do this, we generated a neural network system to model wear obtained from three accelerated testing devices: 1) A pin-on-disk tribometer; 2) A line-contact rub-shoe tribometer; 3) A four-ball tribometer.

  2. Super nickel-cadmium battery design and life test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    The super nickel-cadmium (S Ni/Cd) cell design utilizes polymer impregnated zirconia separators which are inert in place of degradable nylon separators. The positive and negative electrodes are manufactured by electrochemical impregnation methods which produce more stable electrodes than the chemically deposited electrodes used in the standard Ni/Cd cell. The quantity of electrolyte used in the S Ni/Cd cell was also increased in comparison to the standard Ni/Cd cell. Accelerated and real-time life tests are presented. Ten years of real-time geosynchronous orbit (GEO) life test have been obtained at 80 percent depth of discharge. Low earth orbit test data are presented along with charge potential data as a function of charge rate and temperature. Six different sizes of S Ni/Cd cells ranging in size from 5 to 50 Ah have been designed and built.

  3. Extended Life Testing of Duplex Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, Jeffrey; Robertson, Michael; Hodges, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Space Systems performed bearing life testing for the Scan Mirror Motor/Encoder Assembly (SMMA), part of the Scan Mirror Assembly on-board the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) on the NASA Glory Spacecraft. The baseline bearing life test duration extended beyond the launch date for the Glory Spacecraft; a risk that the program was willing to undertake with the understanding that if any anomalies or failures occurred before the required life was achieved, then the mission objectives or operating profile could be modified on orbit to take those results into account. Even though the Glory Spacecraft failed to reach orbit during its launch in March of 2011, the bearing life testing was continued through a mutual understanding of value between Sierra Nevada Corporation and our customer; with a revised goal of testing to failure rather than completing a required number of life cycles. Life testing thus far has not only exceeded the original mission required life, but has also exceeded the published test data for Cumulative Degradation Factor (CDF) from NASA/CR-2009-215681. Many lessons were learned along the way regarding long life testing. The bearing life test has been temporarily suspended due to test support equipment issues.

  4. Computational needs for modelling accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Hanerfeld, H.

    1985-06-01

    The particle-in-cell MASK is being used to model several different electron accelerator components. These studies are being used both to design new devices and to understand particle behavior within existing structures. Studies include the injector for the Stanford Linear Collider and the 50 megawatt klystron currently being built at SLAC. MASK is a 2D electromagnetic code which is being used by SLAC both on our own IBM 3081 and on the CRAY X-MP at the NMFECC. Our experience with running MASK illustrates the need for supercomputers to continue work of the kind described. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. This paper presents the cycle life test results and also results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  6. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  7. Control system modeling for superconducting accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2006-10-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. FPGA based controller supported by MATLAB system was developed to investigate the novel firmware implementation. Algebraic model in complex domain is proposed for the system analyzing. Calibration procedure of a signal path is considered for a multi-channel control. Identification of the system parameters is carried out by the least squares method application. Control tables: Feed-Forward and Set-Point are determined for the required cavity performance, according to the recognized process. Feedback loop is tuned by fitting a complex gain of a corrector unit. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for feed-forward and feedback modes. Experimental results are presented for a cavity representative operation.

  8. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Elevation Bearing Assembly Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Phillip L.; Miller, James B.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Rasmussen, Kent; Wheeler, Donald R.; Rana, Mauro; Peri, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) elevation scan bearings lubricated with Pennzane SHF X2000 and 2% lead naphthenate (PbNp) were life tested for a seven-year equivalent Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operation. The bearing life assembly was tested continuously at an accelerated and normal rate using the scanning patterns developed for the CERES Earth Observing System AM-1 mission. A post-life-test analysis was performed on the collected data, bearing wear, and lubricant behavior.

  9. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  10. Reliability Evaluation of Bga Solder Joints during Accelerated Life Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ouk Sub; Myoung, No Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Hur, Man Jae; Hwang, Si Woon

    The use of BGA (Ball Grid Array) interconnects utilizing the lead-free solder joint has grown rapidly because of its small volume and diversity of application. Thus, it requires the continuous quantification and refinement of lead-free solder joint reliability. The lead-free solder creep and cyclically applied mechanical loads cause metal fatigue on the lead-free solder joint which inevitably leads to an electrical discontinuity. In the field application, BGA solder joints experience mechanical loads during temperature changes caused by power up/down events as the result of the CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatch between the substrate and the Si die. In this paper, extremely small resistance changes at joint area corresponding to through-cracks generated by thermal fatigue were measured. In this way, the failure was defined in terms of anomalous changes in electrical resistance of the joint. Furthermore the reliability of BGA solder joints in thermal cycling is evaluated by using the modified coffin-Manson criterion which may define and distinguish failure. Any change in circuit resistance according to the accumulated damage induced by the thermal cycling in the joint was recorded and evaluated in order to quantitate reliability of solder joint.

  11. Composite-Unit Accelerated Life Testing (CUALT) of Sonar Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    testing were identified and corrected. 2, Resolution of the current -runaway problem on the TR-316 was largely based on the CUALT experimental and...Kinnison - Suggested the use of in-air impedance NOSC experiments on individual resonators to understand the current -runaway problem. Homer Ding...2-1 2.2 Use of Current -Buy Transducers .................... 2-2 2.3 Use of Both Projector and Receiver Transducers .... 2-2 2.4 Hands-on ALT

  12. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  13. Ageing of Sony 18650HC Cells in LEO LifeTests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, G.; Buckle, R.; Hendel, B.; Mattle, T.; Spurrett, R.

    2008-09-01

    Results of a long-duration LEO life-test of a battery comprised of 72 Sony 18650HC cells are presented. The ongoing test, started in late 1999, has reached 84,000 cycles, equivalent to more than 14 years in LEO orbit at an acceleration factor of 1.7. Most cells have remained balanced in state of charge during the test but a few have dropped up to 150 mV in end of charge voltage and at the same time exhibited higher than average internal resistances. The battery continues to out-perform the predictions of the ABSL 'LIFE' model. A cell model developed at ESTEC is used to try to gain some insight into the cell ageing processes.

  14. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Bonner, Richard W.; Dussinger, Peter M.; Hartenstine, John R.; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 725 K (170 to 450 C), including space nuclear power system radiators, fuel cells, and high temperature electronics cooling. Historically, water has been used in heat pipes at temperatures up to about 425 K (150 C). Recent life tests, updated below, demonstrate that titanium/water and Monel/water heat pipes can be used at temperatures up to 550 K (277 C), due to water's favorable transport properties. At temperatures above roughly 570 K (300 C), water is no longer a suitable fluid, due to high vapor pressure and low surface tension as the critical point is approached. At higher temperatures, another working fluid/envelope combination is required, either an organic or halide working fluid. An electromotive force method was used to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This procedure was used to reject aluminum and aluminum alloys as envelope materials, due to their high decomposition potential. Titanium and three corrosion resistant superalloys were chosen as envelope materials. Life tests were conducted with these envelopes and six different working fluids: AlBr3, GaCl3, SnCl4, TiCl4, TiBr4, and eutectic diphenyl/diphenyl oxide (Therminol VP-1/Dowtherm A). All of the life tests except for the GaCl3 are ongoing; the GaCl3 was incompatible. As the temperature approaches 725 K (450 C), cesium is a potential heat pipe working fluid. Life tests results are also presented for cesium/Monel 400 and cesium/70-30 copper/nickel heat pipes operating near 750 K (477 C). These materials are not suitable for long term operation, due to copper transport from the condenser to the evaporator.

  15. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  16. Stochastic model of the residual acceleration environment in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinals, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    We describe a theoretical investigation of the effects that stochastic residual accelerations (g-jitter) onboard spacecraft can have on experiments conducted in a microgravity environment. We first introduce a stochastic model of the residual acceleration field, and develop a numerical algorithm to solve the equations governing fluid flow that allow for a stochastic body force. We next summarize our studies of two generic situations: stochastic parametric resonance and the onset of convective flow induced by a fluctuating acceleration field.

  17. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  18. Thermionic cathode life-test studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.; Smith, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-Lewis Research Center program for life testing commercial, high-current-density thermionic cathodes has been in progress since 1971. The purpose of the program is to develop long-life power microwave tubes for space communications. Four commercial-type cathodes are being evaluated in this investigation. They are the 'Tungstate', 'S' type, 'B' type, and 'M' type cathodes, all of which are capable of delivering 1 A/ sq cm or more of emission current at an operating temperature in the range of 1000-1100 C. The life test vehicles used in these studies are similar in construction to that of a high-power microwave tube and employ a high-convergence electron-gun structure; in contrast to earlier studies that used close-space diodes. These guns were designed for operation at 2 A/sq cm of cathode loading. The 'Tungstate' cathodes failed at 700 h or less and the 'S' cathode exhibited a lifetime of about 20,000 h. One 'B' cathode has failed after 27,000 h, the remaining units continuing to operate after up to 30,000 h. Only limited data are now available for the 'M' cathode, because only one has been operated for as long as 19,000 h. However, the preliminary results indicate the emission current from the 'M' cathode is more stable than the 'B' cathode and that it can be operated at a true temperature approximately 100 C lower than for the 'B' cathode.

  19. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  20. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  1. SVN 9 End-Of-Life testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatten, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    SVN 9 was a GPS Block I research and development satellite. When it was launched in Jun. 1984, questions regarding the future performance of atomic frequency standards in orbit remained to be answered. In Mar. 1994, after performing for twice its designed life span, SVN 9 was deactivated as a member of the operational GPS satellite constellation. During the next two months, U.S. Air Force and Rockwell personnel performed various tests to determine just how well the atomic frequency standards had withstood ten years in the space environment. The results of these tests are encouraging. With a full constellation of Block II/IIA satellites on orbit, as well as the anticipated launch of the Block IIR satellites, results from the end of life testing will be helpful in assuring the continued success of the GPS program.

  2. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate adequate lifetime and performance capabilities of a hollow cathode for use on the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system, life tests of multiple hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs) were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation. Three HCAs are presently being tested. These HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. Emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. As of July 1998, these HCAs have accumulated between 1 1,700 and 14,200 hours. While there have been changes in operatin, behavior the three HCAs continue to operate stably within ISS specifications and are expected to demonstrate the required lifetime.

  3. Accelerating molecular modeling applications with graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; Phillips, James C; Freddolino, Peter L; Hardy, David J; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    Molecular mechanics simulations offer a computational approach to study the behavior of biomolecules at atomic detail, but such simulations are limited in size and timescale by the available computing resources. State-of-the-art graphics processing units (GPUs) can perform over 500 billion arithmetic operations per second, a tremendous computational resource that can now be utilized for general purpose computing as a result of recent advances in GPU hardware and software architecture. In this article, an overview of recent advances in programmable GPUs is presented, with an emphasis on their application to molecular mechanics simulations and the programming techniques required to obtain optimal performance in these cases. We demonstrate the use of GPUs for the calculation of long-range electrostatics and nonbonded forces for molecular dynamics simulations, where GPU-based calculations are typically 10-100 times faster than heavily optimized CPU-based implementations. The application of GPU acceleration to biomolecular simulation is also demonstrated through the use of GPU-accelerated Coulomb-based ion placement and calculation of time-averaged potentials from molecular dynamics trajectories. A novel approximation to Coulomb potential calculation, the multilevel summation method, is introduced and compared with direct Coulomb summation. In light of the performance obtained for this set of calculations, future applications of graphics processors to molecular dynamics simulations are discussed.

  4. Theoretical and experimental modeling of a rail gun accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznyj, V. B.; Zagorskij, A. V.; Katsnel'Son, S. S.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Plekhanov, A. V.

    1993-04-01

    Results of a series of experiments in the acceleration of macrobodies are analyzed using an integral model of a current arc and a quasi-1D magnetic gasdynamic model. The integral model uses gasdynamic equations averaged by the size of a plasma pump and equations based on the second Kirchhoff's law for electrical current. The quasi-1D model is based on 1D magnetic gasdynamic equations for mean values of density, pressure, velocity, and internal power. Electromagnetic parameters are determined from Maxwell integral equations. It is concluded that the proposed models take into account the major mechanisms of momentum loss and are capable of adequately describing electromagnetic rail accelerators.

  5. Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyalasomayajula, S.; Warhaft, Z.; Collins, L. R.

    2008-09-01

    Our objective is to explain recent Lagrangian acceleration measurements of inertial particles in decaying, nearly isotropic turbulence [Ayyalasomayajula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)]. These experiments showed that as particle inertial effects increased, the variance in the particle acceleration fluctuations was reduced, and the tails of the normalized particle acceleration probability density function (PDF) became systematically attenuated. We model this phenomenon using a base flow that consists of a two-dimensional array of evenly spaced vortices with signs and intensities that vary randomly in time. We simulate a large sample of inertial particles moving through the fluid without disturbing the flow (one-way coupling). Consistent with Bec et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 349 (2006)], we find that our model exhibits preferential concentration or clustering of particles in regions located away from the vortex centers. That is, inertial particles selectively sample the flow field, oversampling regions with high strains and undersampling regions with high vorticities. At low Stokes numbers, this biased "sampling" of the flow is responsible for the reduction in the acceleration variance and partially explains the attenuation of the tails of the acceleration PDF. However, contrary to previous findings, we show that the tails of the PDF are also diminished by "filtering" induced by the attenuated response of the inertial particles to temporal variations in the fluid acceleration: Inertial particles do not respond to fluctuations with frequencies much higher than the inverse of the particle stopping time. We show that larger fluid acceleration events have higher frequencies and hence experience greater filtering by particle inertia. We contrast the vortex model with previous Lagrangian acceleration models by Sawford [Phys. Fluids A 3, 1577 (1991)] and Reynolds [Phys. Fluids 15, L1 (2003)] and show that although these models capture some aspects of the inertial

  6. Plasma gun pellet acceleration modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modifications to the electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS have been completed to allow for acceleration experiments using plastic pellets. Modifications have been implemented to the 1-D, time dependent code ODIN to include pellet friction, momentum, and kinetic energy with options of variable barrel length. The code results in the new version, POSEIDON, compare favorably with experimental data and with code results from ODIN. Predicted values show an increased pellet velocity along the barrel length, achieving 2 km/s exit velocity. Measured velocity, at three locations along the barrel length, showed good correlation with predicted values. The code has also been used to investigate the effectiveness of longer pulse length on pellet velocity using simulated ramp up and down currents with flat top, and triangular current pulses with early and late peaking. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the basic techniques and illustrative results of charged particle-modeling numerical codes suitable for particle acceleration at oblique, fast-mode collisionless shocks emphasizes the treatment of ions as test particles, calculating particle dynamics through numerical integration along exact phase-space orbits. Attention is given to the acceleration of particles at planar, infinitessimally thin shocks, as well as to plasma simulations in which low-energy ions are injected and accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks with internal structure.

  8. DETERMINATION OF STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION MODEL CHARACTERISTICS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahé

    2013-11-01

    Following our recent paper, we have developed an inversion method to determine the basic characteristics of the particle acceleration mechanism directly and non-parametrically from observations under the leaky box framework. Earlier, we demonstrated this method for obtaining the energy dependences of the escape time and pitch angle scattering time. Here, by converting the Fokker-Planck equation to its integral form, we derive the energy dependences of the energy diffusion coefficient and direct acceleration rate for stochastic acceleration in terms of the accelerated and escaping particle spectra. Combining the regularized inversion method of Piana et al. and our procedure, we relate the acceleration characteristics in solar flares directly to the count visibility data from RHESSI. We determine the timescales for electron escape, pitch angle scattering, energy diffusion, and direct acceleration at the loop top acceleration region for two intense solar flares based on the regularized electron flux spectral images. The X3.9 class event shows dramatically different energy dependences for the acceleration and scattering timescales, while the M2.1 class event shows a milder difference. The discrepancy between the M2.1 class event and the stochastic acceleration model could be alleviated by a turbulence spectrum that is much steeper than the Kolmogorov-type spectrum. A likely explanation of the X3.9 class event could be that the escape of electrons from the acceleration region is not governed by a random walk process, but instead is affected by magnetic mirroring, in which the scattering time is proportional to the escape time and has an energy dependence similar to the energy diffusion time.

  9. Vibration acceleration promotes bone formation in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Ryohei; Nakata, Ken; Kawano, Fuminori; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Ogasawara, Issei; Nakai, Naoya; Mae, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Tomohiko; Tachibana, Yuta; Yokoi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    All living tissues and cells on Earth are subject to gravitational acceleration, but no reports have verified whether acceleration mode influences bone formation and healing. Therefore, this study was to compare the effects of two acceleration modes, vibration and constant (centrifugal) accelerations, on bone formation and healing in the trunk using BMP 2-induced ectopic bone formation (EBF) mouse model and a rib fracture healing (RFH) rat model. Additionally, we tried to verify the difference in mechanism of effect on bone formation by accelerations between these two models. Three groups (low- and high-magnitude vibration and control-VA groups) were evaluated in the vibration acceleration study, and two groups (centrifuge acceleration and control-CA groups) were used in the constant acceleration study. In each model, the intervention was applied for ten minutes per day from three days after surgery for eleven days (EBF model) or nine days (RFH model). All animals were sacrificed the day after the intervention ended. In the EBF model, ectopic bone was evaluated by macroscopic and histological observations, wet weight, radiography and microfocus computed tomography (micro-CT). In the RFH model, whole fracture-repaired ribs were excised with removal of soft tissue, and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Ectopic bones in the low-magnitude group (EBF model) had significantly greater wet weight and were significantly larger (macroscopically and radiographically) than those in the other two groups, whereas the size and wet weight of ectopic bones in the centrifuge acceleration group showed no significant difference compared those in control-CA group. All ectopic bones showed calcified trabeculae and maturated bone marrow. Micro-CT showed that bone volume (BV) in the low-magnitude group of EBF model was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (3.1±1.2mm3 v.s. 1.8±1.2mm3 in high-magnitude group and 1.3±0.9mm3 in control-VA group), but BV in the

  10. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Zank, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  11. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andréassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  12. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew R.; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andreassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  13. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  14. A phenomenological cost model for high energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based facilities have enabled forefront research in high-energy physics for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of colliders has progressed immensely, while beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  15. VES100/140 Lithium-Ion Cells LEO Life-Test Results & Protheus Flight Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthomieu, Y.; Prevot, D.; Massot, J.; Tastet, P.; Simon, E.

    2011-10-01

    This paper assesses from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) life tests results the influence of the cycling parameters such as Depth Of Discharge (DOD), End Of Charge Voltage (EOCV) & charge current on VES100/140 cell electrical performances. It also demonstrates a good correlation between the cells ageing predicted by the Saft Li-Ion Model (SLIM) tool and the real behavior of these cells under life-tests or in flight on board "Calipso" satellite after more than 5 years in orbit.

  16. Using Corrosion Design Models to Accelerate the Transition of Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion Design Models • All moving to incorporate light metals, composites and other aviation materials • Maturation includes effect of...Using Corrosion Design Models to Accelerate the Transition of Alternatives Craig Matzdorf Materials Engineering Division Naval Air...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Air Warfare Center, Materials Engineering Division,22347

  17. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  18. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  19. TIME-DEPENDENT STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION MODEL FOR FERMI BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kento; Asano, Katsuaki; Terasawa, Toshio E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-12-01

    We study stochastic acceleration models for the Fermi bubbles. Turbulence is excited just behind the shock front via Kelvin–Helmholtz, Rayleigh–Taylor, or Richtmyer–Meshkov instabilities, and plasma particles are continuously accelerated by the interaction with the turbulence. The turbulence gradually decays as it goes away from the shock fronts. Adopting a phenomenological model for the stochastic acceleration, we explicitly solve the temporal evolution of the particle energy distribution in the turbulence. Our results show that the spatial distribution of high-energy particles is different from those for a steady solution. We also show that the contribution of electrons that escaped from the acceleration regions significantly softens the photon spectrum. The photon spectrum and surface brightness profile are reproduced by our models. If the escape efficiency is very high, the radio flux from the escaped low-energy electrons can be comparable to that of the WMAP haze. We also demonstrate hadronic models with the stochastic acceleration, but they are unlikely in the viewpoint of the energy budget.

  20. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Concepts to accelerate water balance model computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronz, Oliver; Casper, Markus; Gemmar, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Computation time of water balance models has decreased with the increasing performance of CPUs within the last decades. Often, these advantages have been used to enhance the models, e. g. by enlarging spatial resolution or by using smaller simulation time steps. During the last few years, CPU development tended to focus on strong multi core concepts rather than 'simply being generally faster'. Additionally, computer clusters or even computer clouds have become much more commonly available. All these facts again extend our degrees of freedom in simulating water balance models - if the models are able to efficiently use the computer infrastructure. In the following, we present concepts to optimize especially repeated runs and we generally discuss concepts of parallel computing opportunities. Surveyed model In our examinations, we focused on the water balance model LARSIM. In this model, the catchment is subdivided into elements, each of which representing a certain section of a river and its contributory area. Each element is again subdivided into single compartments of homogeneous land use. During the simulation, the relevant hydrological processes are simulated individually for each compartment. The simulated runoff of all compartments leads into the river channel of the corresponding element. Finally, channel routing is simulated for all elements. Optimizing repeated runs During a typical simulation, several input files have to be read before simulation starts: the model structure, the initial model state and meteorological input files. Furthermore, some calculations have to be solved, like interpolating meteorological values. Thus, e. g. the application of Monte Carlo methods will typically use the following algorithm: 1) choose parameters, 2) set parameters in control files, 3) run model, 4) save result, 5) repeat from step 1. Obviously, the third step always includes the previously mentioned steps of reading and preprocessing. Consequently, the model can be

  2. Precision cosmology defeats void models for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Zibin, James P.; Scott, Douglas

    2011-05-15

    The suggestion that we occupy a privileged position near the center of a large, nonlinear, and nearly spherical void has recently attracted much attention as an alternative to dark energy. Putting aside the philosophical problems with this scenario, we perform the most complete and up-to-date comparison with cosmological data. We use supernovae and the full cosmic microwave background spectrum as the basis of our analysis. We also include constraints from radial baryonic acoustic oscillations, the local Hubble rate, age, big bang nucleosynthesis, the Compton y distortion, and for the first time include the local amplitude of matter fluctuations, {sigma}{sub 8}. These all paint a consistent picture in which voids are in severe tension with the data. In particular, void models predict a very low local Hubble rate, suffer from an ''old age problem,'' and predict much less local structure than is observed.

  3. Modeling Nonlinear Change via Latent Change and Latent Acceleration Frameworks: Examining Velocity and Acceleration of Growth Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Mazzocco, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of the latent change and latent acceleration frameworks for modeling nonlinear growth in structural equation models. Moving to these frameworks allows for the direct identification of "rates of change" and "acceleration" in latent growth curves--information available indirectly through traditional growth…

  4. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  5. Progress in Modeling Electron Cloud Effects in HIF Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Azevedo, A.; Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M. A.; Stoltz, P. H.

    2003-10-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) from ionization of gas (ambient or released from walls), or via secondary emission. Their accumulation is affected by the beam potential and duration, and the accelerating and confining fields. We present electron orbit simulations which show the resultant e-cloud distribution; ion simulations with prescribed e-clouds which show the effect on ion beam quality; a gyro-averaged model for including electron dynamics in ion simulations, and its implementation status; and progress in merging the capabilities of WARP (3-D PIC code for HIF) (D.P. Grote, A. Friedman, I. Haber, Proc. 1996 Comp. Accel. Physics Conf., AIP Proc. 391), 51 (1996), with those of POSINST (e-clouds in high-energy accelerators) (M.A. Furman, LBNL-41482/CBP Note 247/LHC Project Report 180, May 20, 1998).

  6. Modeling electron cloud dynamics in high-frequency accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of electron cloud buildup, saturation, and dissipation represent a complex interaction between accelerator and beam parameters. In many accelerators bunch charges are large and beam frequencies are small. In this case electrons have a good probability of being accelerated to the opposite side of the beam pipe before the next bunch crossing. If the time for electrons to drift across the beam pipe is less than the time to the next bunch crossing the cloud density can build up rapidly under this scenario. However, in accelerators where buch charges are small and beam frequencies are large, electrons created by secondary electron emission will not be accelerated to the opposite wall before the next bunch crossing. In this case the time for a cloud to build up is larger, but the amount of electron cloud that exists close to the beam may be increased. In this paper, we report simulation results for modeling of electron cloud buildup and dynamics in high-frequency accelerators. We model parameters relevant to the JLab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) that is currently being designed. We consider beam frequencies up to 476 MHz for a variety of different ions, from protons up to Pb (82+), and with bunch charges ranging from 4.2 × 109 (p) to 0.05 × 109 (Pb) ions per bunch, and ion energies from 100 (p) - 40 (Pb) GeV/u. We compare simulations of electron cloud buildup and dynamics for these different cases, and contrast with similar simulations of proton-driven electron cloud buildup in the Fermilab recycler under the PIP-II upgrade scenario, with a frequency of 52.8 MHz, bunch charge of 80 × 109 p/bunch, and energies ranging from 8 - 20 GeV.

  7. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  8. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in Toyota Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Part of the US Department of Transportation investigation of Toyota sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) involved analysis of the throttle control software, JPL Laboratory for Reliable Software applied several techniques including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software; A handful of logic models were build, Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found; The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  9. Life test of the SCARAB instrument slipring units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondier, J. B.; Sirou, F.; Mäusli, P.

    2001-09-01

    The SCARAB instrument was designed by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique in the late 80's to study the radiation budget of the Earth from space. As part of the French-Soviet research program, the FM1 instrument was put into orbit, in February 1994, onboard a Russian platform for a 2-year mission. Unfortunately, the radiometer failed one year later. The CNES investigated the potential causes of the mission loss. This work was very difficult mainly because the onboard observable parameters were poor. However, the failure assumptions were all related to slipring units' performances. This is why a number of slipring changes were defined and implemented. A new qualification program was mandatory including vibration loads and a lifespan test. An optical head model was used in order to faithfully reproduce the flight environments and apply them to the sliprings. The life test was performed at the rated speed, that is to say a 3-year test, which included qualification margin. Meanwhile, the FM2 model was launched. It delivered only one year in-flight measurement data. The mission was stopped in April 1999 when the satellite data transmitters broke down. However, the FM2 instrument is still normaly working today. The life qualification test closed up in August 2000. The results recorded during the test showed the sliprings successfully performed except for the line electrical resistance increase over life and the end of life (EOL) noise level. The hardware inspection revealed no serious damage, but a normal material wear in the sliprings and the bearings. The life test has permitted us to build an engineering database that will be at designers and users disposal for future projects using this electrical contact technology.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Modeling Coming Of Age

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Hardy, David J.; Ufimtsev, Ivan S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have traditionally been used in molecular modeling solely for visualization of molecular structures and animation of trajectories resulting from molecular dynamics simulations. Modern GPUs have evolved into fully programmable, massively parallel co-processors that can now be exploited to accelerate many scientific computations, typically providing about one order of magnitude speedup over CPU code and in special cases providing speedups of two orders of magnitude. This paper surveys the development of molecular modeling algorithms that leverage GPU computing, the advances already made and remaining issues to be resolved, and the continuing evolution of GPU technology that promises to become even more useful to molecular modeling. Hardware acceleration with commodity GPUs is expected to benefit the overall computational biology community by bringing teraflops performance to desktop workstations and in some cases potentially changing what were formerly batch-mode computational jobs into interactive tasks. PMID:20675161

  11. Ice-sheet modelling accelerated by graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, Christian Fredborg; Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2014-11-01

    Studies of glaciers and ice sheets have increased the demand for high performance numerical ice flow models over the past decades. When exploring the highly non-linear dynamics of fast flowing glaciers and ice streams, or when coupling multiple flow processes for ice, water, and sediment, researchers are often forced to use super-computing clusters. As an alternative to conventional high-performance computing hardware, the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) is capable of massively parallel computing while retaining a compact design and low cost. In this study, we present a strategy for accelerating a higher-order ice flow model using a GPU. By applying the newest GPU hardware, we achieve up to 180× speedup compared to a similar but serial CPU implementation. Our results suggest that GPU acceleration is a competitive option for ice-flow modelling when compared to CPU-optimised algorithms parallelised by the OpenMP or Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocols.

  12. Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons: A Comparison of Two Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-12-01

    Observations of relativistic electron fluxes show order of magnitude increases during some geomagnetic storms. Many electron acceleration models have been proposed to explain the flux enhancements but attempts to validate these models have yielded ambiguous results. Here we examine two models of electron acceleration, radial diffusion via enhanced ULF wave activity [Elkington et al.,1999] and acceleration by resonant interaction with whistler waves[Summers,1998; Roth et al.,1999]. Two methods are used to compare observations with features predicted by the models. First, the evolution of phase space density as a function of L during flux enhancement events is evaluated. The phase space density (PSD) is calculated at constant first, second and third adiabatic invariants using data obtained by the CEPPAD-HIST instrument and the MFE instrument onboard the Polar spacecraft. Liouville's theorem states that PSD calculated at constant adiabatic invariants does not change with time unless some mechanism violates one of the invariants. The radial diffusion model predicts that only the flux invariant will be violated during the acceleration process while acceleration by whistler waves violates the first invariant. Therefore, the two models predict a different evolution of the PSD as a function of time and L. Previous examinations of the evolution of PSD have yielded ambiguous results because PSD calculations are highly dependent on the global accuracy of magnetic field models. We examine the PSD versus L profiles for a series of geomagnetic storms and in addition determine how errors in the Tsyganenko 96 field model affect the results by comparing the measured magnetic field to the model magnetic field used in the calculations. Second, the evolution of the relativistic electron pitch angle distributions is evaluated. Previous studies of pitch angle distributions were limited because few spacecraft have the necessary instrumentation and global coverage. The CEPPAD

  13. An Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Model for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 255, 690-692] presented a radioactive decay model 56N i --> 56Co --> 56Fe for the post-peak luminosity decay of Type I supernovae light curves, in which the two decay rates are both accelerated by a common factor. In 1976, Rust, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 262, 118-120] used sums of exponentials fitting to confirm the acceleration hypothesis, but their result was nevertheless rejected by the astronomical community. Here, we model Type Ia light curves with a system of ODEs (describing the nuclear decays) forced by a Ni-deposition pulse modelled by a 3-parameter Weibull pdf, with all of this occuring in the center of a pre-existing, optically thick, spherical shell which thermalizes the emitted gamma rays. Fitting this model to observed light curves routinely gives fits which account for 99.9+% of the total variance in the observed record. The accelerated decay rates are so stable, for such a long time, that they must occur in an almost unchanging environment -- not it a turbulent expanding atmosphere. The amplitude of the Ni-deposition pulse indicates that its source is the fusion of hydrogen. Carbon and oxygen could not supply the large energy/nucleon that is observed. The secondary peak in the infrared light curve can be easily modelled as a light echo from dust in the back side of the pre-existing shell, and the separation between the peaks indicates a radius of ≈15 light days for the shell. The long-term stability of the acceleration suggests that it is a kinematic effect arising because the nuclear reactions occur either on the surface of a very rapidly rotating condensed object, or in a very tight orbit around such an object, like the fusion pulse in a tokomak reactor.

  14. EOS--AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell Interim Life Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. W.; Keys, D. J.; Rao, G. M.; Wannemacher, H. E.; Vaidyanathan H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results of the Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of the tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-1 cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 18202 LEO cycles completed as of September 1, 1997. Each cycle consists of a 64 minute charge (VT at 1.507 volts per cell. 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5% DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60% DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 amperes (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.09 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three. 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battery, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (-5 C) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operatina at +30 C. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at +10 C. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements throuch the first 18

  15. An overview of ISS ECLSS life testing at NASA, MSFC.

    PubMed

    Tatara, J D; Roman, M C

    1998-01-01

    Numerous components have been developed for use in the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Although these components have performed admirably for short-duration subsystem tests, there is little long-range operational (life test) data available. It is important to know not only how long a subsystem is anticipated to perform, but also the problems that can be expected should subsystem components fail. For this reason, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed the ECLSS Life Test program. To date, assemblies and subassemblies that are being or have been tested include the Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS), the Vapor Compression Distillation Urine Processor Assembly (VCD-UPA), the Four-Bed Molecular Sieve Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (4BMS-CDRA), and the Solid Polymer Electrolyzer Oxygen Generation Assembly (SPE-OGA). Also included in life testing are noncomponent life test studies. These include the Water Degradation Study and the Biofilm Life Test. The Water Degradation Study looks at water quality changes after exposure to simulated ISS pre-Water Recovery Management (WRM) conditions. The Biofilm Life Test will examine microbial accumulation on surfaces in a simulated ISS water delivery system. This article will briefly review the objectives of each life test program, the results of completed tests, and the major problems observed during the tests.

  16. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  17. Re-Acceleration Model for the "Sausage" Radio Relic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung

    2016-08-01

    The Sausage radio relic is the arc-like radio structure in the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, whose observed properties can be best understood by synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated at a merger-driven shock.However, there remain a few puzzles that cannot be explained by the shock acceleration model with only in-situ injection. In particular, the Mach number inferred from the observed radio spectral index, M_{radio}≈ 4.6, while the Mach number estimated from X-ray observations, M_{X-ray}≈ 2.7. In an attempt to resolve such a discrepancy, here we consider the re-acceleration model in which a shock of M_s≈ 3 sweeps through the intracluster gas with a pre-existing population of relativistic electrons. We find that observed brightness profiles at multi frequencies provide strong constraints on the spectral shape of pre-existing electrons. The models with a power-law momentum spectrum with the slope, s≈ 4.1, and the cutoff Lorentz factor, γ_{e,c}≈ 3-5× 10^4, can reproduce reasonably well the observed spatial profiles of radio fluxes and integrated radio spectrum of the Sausage relic.The possible origins of such relativistic electrons in the intracluster medium remain to be investigated further.

  18. Re-Acceleration Model for the "Toothbrush" Radio Relic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung

    2016-06-01

    The Toothbrush radio relic associated with the merging cluster 1RXS J060303.3 is presumed to be produced by relativistic electrons accelerated at merger-driven shocks. Since the shock Mach number inferred from the observed radio spectral index, M_{radio}≈ 2.8, is larger than that estimated from X-ray observations, M_{X}≲ 1.5, we consider the re-acceleration model in which a weak shock of M_s≈ 1.2-1.5 sweeps through the intracluster plasma with a preshock population of relativistic electrons. We find the models with a power-law momentum spectrum with the slope, s≈ 4.6, and the cutoff Lorentz factor, γ_{e,c}≈ 7-8× 10^4 can reproduce reasonably well the observed profiles of radio fluxes and integrated radio spectrum of the head portion of the Toothbrush relic.This study confirms the strong connection between the ubiquitous presence of fossil relativistic plasma originated from AGNs and the shock-acceleration model of radio relics in the intracluster medium.

  19. Animal models of efficacy to accelerate drug discovery in malaria.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Fernández-Alvaro, Elena; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to artemisinins and the renewed efforts to eradicate malaria demand the urgent development of new drugs. In this endeavour, the evaluation of efficacy in animal models is often a go/no go decision assay in drug discovery. This important role relies on the capability of animal models to assess the disposition, toxicology and efficacy of drugs in a single test. Although the relative merits of each efficacy model of malaria as human surrogate have been extensively discussed, there are no critical analyses on the use of such models in current drug discovery. In this article, we intend to analyse how efficacy models are used to discover new antimalarial drugs. Our analysis indicates that testing drug efficacy is often the last assay in each discovery stage and the experimental designs utilized are not optimized to expedite decision-making and inform clinical development. In light of this analysis, we propose new ways to accelerate drug discovery using efficacy models.

  20. Case–Cohort Analysis with Accelerated Failure Time Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lan; Cai, Jianwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary In a case–cohort design, covariates are assembled only for a subcohort that is randomly selected from the entire cohort and any additional cases outside the subcohort. This design is appealing for large cohort studies of rare disease, especially when the exposures of interest are expensive to ascertain for all the subjects. We propose statistical methods for analyzing the case–cohort data with a semiparametric accelerated failure time model that interprets the covariates effects as to accelerate or decelerate the time to failure. Asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are developed. The finite sample properties of case–cohort estimator and its relative efficiency to full cohort estimator are assessed via simulation studies. A real example from a study of cardiovascular disease is provided to illustrate the estimating procedure. PMID:18537948

  1. Hardware acceleration of image recognition through a visual cortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Kenneth L.; Taha, Tarek M.; Vutsinas, Christopher N.

    2008-09-01

    Recent findings in neuroscience have led to the development of several new models describing the processes in the neocortex. These models excel at cognitive applications such as image analysis and movement control. This paper presents a hardware architecture to speed up image content recognition through a recently proposed model of the visual cortex. The system is based on a set of parallel computation nodes implemented in an FPGA. The design was optimized for hardware by reducing the data storage requirements, and removing the need for multiplies and divides. The reconfigurable logic hardware implementation running at 121 MHz provided a speedup of 148 times over a 2 GHz AMD Opteron processor. The results indicate the feasibility of specialized hardware to accelerate larger biological scale implementations of the model.

  2. Three Dimensional TEM Forward Modeling Using FDTD Accelerated by GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional inversion of transient electromagnetic (TEM) data is still challenging. The inversion speed mostly depends on the forward modeling. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the popular forward modeling scheme. In an explicit type, which is based on the Du Fort-Frankel scheme, the time step is under the constraint of quasi-static approximation. Often an upward-continuation boundary condition (UCBC) is applied on the earth-air surface to avoid time stepping in the model air. However, UCBC is not suitable for models with topography and has a low parallel efficiency. Modeling without UCBC may cause a much smaller time step because of the resistive attribute of the air and the quasi-static constraint, which may also low the efficiency greatly. Our recent research shows that the time step in the model air is not needed to be constrained by the quasi-static approximation, which can let the time step without UCBC much closer to that with UCBC. The parallel performance of FDTD is then largely released. On a computer with a 4-core CPU, this newly developed method is obviously faster than the method using UCBC. Besides, without UCBC, this method can be easily accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). On a computer with a CPU of 4790k@4.4GHz and a GPU of GTX 970, the speed accelerated by CUDA is almost 10 times of that using CPU only. For a model with a grid size of 140×140×130, if the conductivity of the model earth is 0.02S/m, and the minimal space interval is 15m, it takes only 80 seconds to evolve the field from excitation to 0.032s.

  3. Re-acceleration Model for Radio Relics with Spectral Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-05-01

    Most of the observed features of radio gischt relics, such as spectral steepening across the relic width and a power-law-like integrated spectrum, can be adequately explained by a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model in which relativistic electrons are (re-)accelerated at shock waves induced in the intracluster medium. However, the steep spectral curvature in the integrated spectrum above ˜2 GHz detected in some radio relics, such as the Sausage relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, may not be interpreted by the simple radiative cooling of postshock electrons. In order to understand such steepening, we consider here a model in which a spherical shock sweeps through and then exits out of a finite-size cloud with fossil relativistic electrons. The ensuing integrated radio spectrum is expected to steepen much more than predicted for aging postshock electrons, since the re-acceleration stops after the cloud-crossing time. Using DSA simulations that are intended to reproduce radio observations of the Sausage relic, we show that both the integrated radio spectrum and the surface brightness profile can be fitted reasonably well, if a shock of speed {u}s ˜ 2.5-2.8 × {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a sonic Mach number {M}s ˜ 2.7-3.0 traverses a fossil cloud for ˜45 Myr, and the postshock electrons cool further for another ˜10 Myr. This attempt illustrates that steep curved spectra of some radio gischt relics could be modeled by adjusting the shape of the fossil electron spectrum and adopting the specific configuration of the fossil cloud.

  4. A stochastic model of randomly accelerated walkers for human mobility

    PubMed Central

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Bazzani, Armando; Rambaldi, Sandro; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of human mobility largely focus on displacements patterns and power law fits of empirical long-tailed distributions of distances are usually associated to scale-free superdiffusive random walks called Lévy flights. However, drawing conclusions about a complex system from a fit, without any further knowledge of the underlying dynamics, might lead to erroneous interpretations. Here we show, on the basis of a data set describing the trajectories of 780,000 private vehicles in Italy, that the Lévy flight model cannot explain the behaviour of travel times and speeds. We therefore introduce a class of accelerated random walks, validated by empirical observations, where the velocity changes due to acceleration kicks at random times. Combining this mechanism with an exponentially decaying distribution of travel times leads to a short-tailed distribution of distances which could indeed be mistaken with a truncated power law. These results illustrate the limits of purely descriptive models and provide a mechanistic view of mobility. PMID:27573984

  5. Acceleration Model in the Heterogeneous Case of the General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    1995-01-01

    A new model, the acceleration model, is proposed in the framework of the heterogeneous case of the graded response model, based on processing functions defined for a finite or enumerable number of steps. The model is expected to be useful in cognitive assessment. (SLD)

  6. NSTAR Extended Life Test Discharge Chamber Flake Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Karniotis, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    The Extended Life Test (ELT) of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Readiness (NSTAR) ion thruster was concluded after 30,352 hours of operation. The ELT was conducted using the Deep Space 1 (DS1) back-up flight engine, a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster. Post-test inspection of the ELT engine revealed numerous contaminant flakes distributed over the bottom of the cylindrical section of the anode within the discharge chamber (DC). Extensive analyses were conducted to determine the source of the particles, which is critical to the understanding of degradation mechanisms of long life ion thruster operation. Analyses included: optical microscopy (OM) and particle length histograms, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and atomic oxygen plasma exposure tests. Analyses of the particles indicate that the majority of the DC flakes consist of a layered structure, typically with either two or three layers. The flakes comprising two layers were typically found to have a molybdenum-rich (Mo-rich) layer on one side and a carbon-rich (C-rich) layer on the other side. The flakes comprising three layers were found to be sandwich-like structures with Mo-rich exterior layers and a C-rich interior layer. The presence of the C-rich layers indicates that these particles were produced by sputter deposition build-up on a surface external to the discharge chamber from ion sputter erosion of the graphite target in the test chamber. This contaminant layer became thick enough that particles spalled off, and then were electro-statically attracted into the ion thruster interior, where they were coated with Mo from internal sputter erosion of the screen grid and cathode components. Atomic oxygen tests provided evidence that the DC chamber flakes are composed of a significant fraction of carbon. Particle size histograms further indicated that the source of the particles was spalling of carbon flakes from downstream

  7. EOS-AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell Interim Life Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. W.; Keys, D. J.; Rao, G. M.; Wannemacher, H. E.; Vaidyanathan, H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results of the Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of the tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-l cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 13000 LEO cycles completed as of September 2, 1996. Each cycle consists of a 64 minute charge (VT at 1.507 volts per cell, 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5% DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60% DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 ampercs (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.09 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three, 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battely, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (-5 C) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operating at +3 C. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at +10 C. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements through the first 13

  8. The Role of Bearing and Scan Mechanism Life Testing in Flight Qualification of the MODIS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyk, Steven G.; Dietz, Brian J.; Street, Kenneth W.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Dube, Michael J.; Sharma, Rajeev K.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of accelerated and operational life tests on bearings for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). It also describes the post test analysis of the disassembled bearings. Analysis was performed using micro-Raman, micro-FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In general, the three sets of bearings in each of three test stations were in very good condition after accumulating 68, 144, and 209 million cycles, respectively. Some of the bearings exhibited lubricant degradation, indicated by viscous lubricant deposits on the cage and raceways.

  9. Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) gas cell life test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, E. M.; Thompson, R. E.; Harvey, G. A.; Park, J. H.; Richardson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) will use gas filter correlation radiometry to measure the atmospheric concentration profiles of HCl, HF, NO, and CH4 from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The need to contain the gases for the gas filter measurements has resulted in the development of gas cells and the need for a life test program to demonstrate that the gas cells will perform their functions for extended periods (several years) of time. This report describes the tests in the life test program, the test apparatus used, and the analysis techniques developed. The report also presents data obtained during the first 14 months of the test program.

  10. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  11. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  12. Non-uniform drag force on the Fermi accelerator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Danila F.; Leonel, Edson D.; Costa Filho, R. N.

    2012-11-01

    Some dynamical properties of a particle suffering the action of a generic drag force are obtained for a dissipative Fermi Acceleration model. The dissipation is introduced via a viscous drag force, like a gas, and is assumed to be proportional to a power of the velocity: F∝-vγ. The dynamics is described by a two-dimensional nonlinear area-contracting mapping obtained via the solution of Newton’s second law of motion. We prove analytically that the decay of high energy is given by a continued fraction which recovers the following expressions: (i) linear for γ=1; (ii) exponential for γ=2; and (iii) second-degree polynomial type for γ=1.5. Our results are discussed for both the complete version and the simplified version. The procedure used in the present paper can be extended to many different kinds of system, including a class of billiards problems.

  13. A GPGPU accelerated modeling environment for quantitatively characterizing karst systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myre, J. M.; Covington, M. D.; Luhmann, A. J.; Saar, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to derive quantitative information on the geometry of karst aquifer systems is highly desirable. Knowing the geometric makeup of a karst aquifer system enables quantitative characterization of the systems response to hydraulic events. However, the relationship between flow path geometry and karst aquifer response is not well understood. One method to improve this understanding is the use of high speed modeling environments. High speed modeling environments offer great potential in this regard as they allow researchers to improve their understanding of the modeled karst aquifer through fast quantitative characterization. To that end, we have implemented a finite difference model using General Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs). GPGPUs are special purpose accelerators which are capable of high speed and highly parallel computation. The GPGPU architecture is a grid like structure, making it is a natural fit for structured systems like finite difference models. To characterize the highly complex nature of karst aquifer systems our modeling environment is designed to use an inverse method to conduct the parameter tuning. Using an inverse method reduces the total amount of parameter space needed to produce a set of parameters describing a system of good fit. Systems of good fit are determined with a comparison to reference storm responses. To obtain reference storm responses we have collected data from a series of data-loggers measuring water depth, temperature, and conductivity at locations along a cave stream with a known geometry in southeastern Minnesota. By comparing the modeled response to those of the reference responses the model parameters can be tuned to quantitatively characterize geometry, and thus, the response of the karst system.

  14. Accelerate Climate Models with the IBM Cell Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Duffy, D.; Clune, T.; Williams, S.; Suarez, M.; Halem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Ever increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate models demand continual computing power increases. The IBM Cell processor's order-of- magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive for fulfilling this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics: 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (~50% total computation time), (2) has a high computational load relative to data traffic to/from main memory, and (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran code) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20, manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns, and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process more than 3000 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is ~6.76x, ~8.91x, ~9.85x faster than a core on Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2 respectively. Our analysis shows that the Cell could also speed up the dynamics component (~25% total computation time). We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes the Cell processor very competitive, at least as an accelerator. We will report our experience in porting both the C and Fortran codes and will discuss our work in porting other climate model components.

  15. Magnetospheric models for electron acceleration and transport in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Baker, D. N.

    1993-01-01

    Electron transport and acceleration processes in the earth's magnetosphere have correspondences to analogous processes affecting electrons in the solar magnetosphere (i.e., heliosphere). Energetic electrons in planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere are test particles probing transport and acceleration dynamics with minimal effects on dominant magnetic field configurations. Parallels are discussed relating to electron entry into the magnetospheres from interplanetary and interstellar space, circulatory transport processes, and acceleration by electric fields in boundary regions including shocks and magnetotails.

  16. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases

    PubMed Central

    Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases. PMID:27875548

  17. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Ahmad; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  18. EOS-AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell Interim Life Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles W.; Keys, D. J.; Rao, G. M.; Wannemacher, H. E.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of the tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-1 cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 18202 LEO cycles completed as of September 1, 1997. Each cycle consists of a 64-minute charge (VT at 1,507 volts per cell, 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5 percent DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60 percent DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 amperes (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.90 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three, 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battery, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (minus 5 deg) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operating at plus 3 deg. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at plus 10 deg. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements

  19. Modeling of Particle Acceleration and Transport in Gradual SEP Events Using the PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O.; Li, G.; Zank, G.; Hu, Q.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere (PATH) numerical model developed at University of California at Riverside and present current progress on modeling of energetic particle acceleration at a traveling quasi-parallel CME-driven shock. We initiate the code by modeling a quiet-time solar wind background and then follow the propagation and evolution of an MHD shock from a distance of ~0.1 AU to the Earth's orbit. The model utilizes the solar wind parameters measured in situ by ACE. A semi-analytical approach is applied to simulate particle acceleration at the shock by injecting solar wind suprathermal ions locally. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism due to the ion scattering by Alfvenic turbulence in the vicinity of the shock is adopted in the code. Monte-Carlo approach is used to follow transport of the energetic particles after they escape from the shock. The output of the PATH model includes time-dependent energetic particle fluxes, spectra and compositional ratios (Fe/O) for proton and heavy ions. We model specific SEP events and compare our modeling results with ACE measurements.

  20. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  1. Data Acquisition and Control for Multiple Composite Life Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    filament surviving. If the load was continually increasecA until all filaments broke the curve would look like Figure 7. L d Figure 5 Simulated Life Curve ...acquisition and control system was developed for multiple life tests. 00 0L Time simulated Bundle Strength 13 Time F~igure 8, Simulated Total Life Curve ...life curve . From the starting point the load will decrease in time. The test load cannot be applied instantaneously. During the load application phase

  2. Nickel-hydrogen cell low-Earth life test update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.

    1991-01-01

    When individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) cells were selected as the energy storage system for the Space Station Freedom in March of 1986, a limited database existed on life and performance characteristics of these cells in a low earth orbit (LEO) regime. Therefore, NASA LeRC initiated a Ni/H2 cell test program with the primary objectives of building a test facility, procuring cells from existing NASA contracts, and screening several cell designs by life testing in a LEO 35 percent depth of discharge (DOD) scenario. A total of 40 cells incorporating 13 designs were purchased from Yardney, Hughes, and Eagle-Picher. Thirty-two of the cells purchased were 65 A-hr nameplate capacity and eight cells were 50 A-hr. Yardney and Eagle-Picher cells were built with both the Air Force recirculating and the advanced back-to-back electrode stack configurations and incorporated 31 and 26 percent KOH. Acceptance testing of the first delivered cells began in March of 1988, with life testing following in September of that year.Performance comparisons of these cells are made here while specifically addressing life test data relative to the design differences.

  3. Transient electromagnetic modeling of the ZR accelerator water convolute and stack.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehr, Jane Marie; Elizondo-Decanini, Juan Manuel; Turner, C. David; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Bohnhoff, William J.; Pointon, Timothy David; Pasik, Michael Francis; Johnson, William Arthur; Savage, Mark Edward

    2005-06-01

    The ZR accelerator is a refurbishment of Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator [1]. The ZR accelerator components were designed using electrostatic and circuit modeling tools. Transient electromagnetic modeling has played a complementary role in the analysis of ZR components [2]. In this paper we describe a 3D transient electromagnetic analysis of the ZR water convolute and stack using edge-based finite element techniques.

  4. Modeling Electron-Cloud Effects in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Lund, S M; Molvik, A W; Lee, E P; Azevedo, T; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-09-21

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary- electron emission. We summarize results from several studies undertaken in conjunction with an effort to develop a self-consistent modeling capability: (1) Calculation of the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls; (2) Simulation of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics; and (3) analysis of an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode and the electron perturbation. We also report first results from a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics. One conclusion from study (2) is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations.

  5. Predictive influence in the accelerated failure time model.

    PubMed

    Bedrick, Edward J; Exuzides, Alex; Johnson, Wesley O; Thurmond, Mark C

    2002-09-01

    We develop case deletion diagnostics for prediction of future observations in the accelerated failure time model. We view prediction to be an important inferential goal in a survival analysis and thus it is important to identify whether particular observations may be influencing the quality of predictions. We use the Kullback-Leibler divergence as a measure of the discrepancy between the estimated probability distributions for the full and the case-deleted samples. In particular, we focus on the effect of case deletion on estimated survival curves but where we regard the survival curve estimate as a vehicle for prediction. We also develop a diagnostic for assessing the effect of case deletion on inferences for the median time to failure. The estimated median can be used with both predictive and estimative purposes in mind. We also discuss the relationship between our suggested measures and the corresponding Cook distance measure, which was designed with the goal of assessing estimative influence. Several applications of the proposed diagnostics are presented.

  6. Modeling of UH-60A Hub Accelerations with Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2002-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, flight test hub accelerations and the corresponding three N/rev pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) are studied. The present quantitative effort on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations considers the lateral and longitudinal vibrations. An earlier study had considered the vertical vibration. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database is used. A physics based "maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)", derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, is used. Fundamentally, the lateral vibration data show high vibration levels (up to 0.3 g's) at low airspeeds (for example, during landing flares) and at high airspeeds (for example, during turns). The results show that the advance ratio and the gross weight together can predict the vertical and the longitudinal vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together cannot predict the lateral vibration. The hub accelerations and the advance ratio can be used to satisfactorily predict the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal vibration. The present study shows that neural network based representations of all three UH-60A pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) can be obtained using the hub accelerations along with the gross weight and the advance ratio. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot vibration. The present conclusions potentially allow for the identification of neural network relationships between the experimental hub accelerations obtained from wind tunnel testing and the experimental pilot vibration data obtained from flight testing. A successful establishment of the above neural network based link between the wind tunnel hub accelerations and the flight test vibration data can increase the value of wind tunnel testing.

  7. Bayesian accelerated failure time model for space-time dependency in a geographically augmented survival model

    PubMed Central

    Onicescu, Georgiana; Lawson, Andrew; Zhang, Jiajia; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Wallace, Kristin; Eberth, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the spatially explicit survival model for small area cancer data by allowing dependency between space and time and using accelerated failure time models. Spatial dependency is modeled directly in the definition of the survival, density, and hazard functions. The models are developed in the context of county level aggregated data. Two cases are considered: the first assumes that the spatial and temporal distributions are independent; the second allows for dependency between the spatial and temporal components. We apply the models to prostate cancer data from the Louisiana SEER cancer registry. PMID:26220537

  8. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  9. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  10. Life testing of secondary Ag-Zn cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1991-01-01

    Testing on a variety of secondary silver-zinc (Ag-Zn) cells has continued at MSFC for the past six years. The latest test involves a 350 amp/hr cell design that was cycled for 12 months and has undergone approximately 5400 low-earth-orbit cycles as well as 12 deep discharges. This test is not only a life test of these cells, but it also addresses different methods of storing the cells between deep discharges. Also, impedance measurements are made on one of the packs during periodic deep discharges. It is hoped that this will give a good correlation between the health of a cell and its impedance.

  11. Ni-MH storage test and cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dell, R. Dan; Klein, Glenn C.; Schmidt, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Gates Aerospace Batteries is conducting two long term test programs to fully characterize the NiMH cell technology for aerospace applications. The first program analyzes the effects of long term storage upon cell performance. The second program analyzes cycle life testing and preliminary production lot testing. This paper summarizes these approaches to testing the NiMH couple and culminates with initial storage and testing recommendations. Long term storage presents challenges to deter the adverse condition of capacity fade in NiMH cells. Elevated but stabilized pressures and elevated but stabilized end-of-charge voltages also appear to be a characteristic phenomenon of long term storage modes. However, the performance degradation is dependent upon specific characteristics of the metal-hydride alloy. To date, there is no objective evidence with which to recommend the proper method for storage and handling of NiMH cells upon shipment. This is particularly critical due to limited data points that indicate open circuit storage at room temperature for 60 to 90 days will result in irrecoverable capacity loss. Accordingly a test plan was developed to determine what method of mid-term to long-term storage will prevent irrecoverable capacity loss. The explicit assumption is that trickle charging at some rate above the self-discharge rate will prevent the irreversible chemical changes to the negative electrode that result in the irrecoverable capacity loss. Another premise is that lower storage temperatures, typically 0 C for aerospace customers, will impede any negative chemical reactions. Three different trickle charge rates are expected to yield a fairly flat response with respect to recoverable capacity versus baseline cells in two different modes of open circuit. Specific attributes monitored include: end-of-charge voltage, end-of-charge pressure, mid-point discharge voltage, capacity, and end-of-discharge pressure. Cycle life testing and preliminary production lot

  12. Computation of linear acceleration through an internal model in the macaque cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Jean; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    A combination of theory and behavioral findings has supported a role for internal models in the resolution of sensory ambiguities and sensorimotor processing. Although the cerebellum has been proposed as a candidate for implementation of internal models, concrete evidence from neural responses is lacking. Here we exploit un-natural motion stimuli, which induce incorrect self-motion perception and eye movements, to explore the neural correlates of an internal model proposed to compensate for Einstein’s equivalence principle and generate neural estimates of linear acceleration and gravity. We show that caudal cerebellar vermis Purkinje cells and cerebellar nuclei neurons selective for actual linear acceleration also encode erroneous linear acceleration, as expected from the internal model hypothesis, even when no actual linear acceleration occurs. These findings provide strong evidence that the cerebellum might be involved in the implementation of internal models that mimic physical principles to interpret sensory signals, as previously hypothesized by theorists. PMID:24077562

  13. Computation of linear acceleration through an internal model in the macaque cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E

    2013-11-01

    A combination of theory and behavioral findings support a role for internal models in the resolution of sensory ambiguities and sensorimotor processing. Although the cerebellum has been proposed as a candidate for implementation of internal models, concrete evidence from neural responses is lacking. Using unnatural motion stimuli, which induce incorrect self-motion perception and eye movements, we explored the neural correlates of an internal model that has been proposed to compensate for Einstein's equivalence principle and generate neural estimates of linear acceleration and gravity. We found that caudal cerebellar vermis Purkinje cells and cerebellar nuclei neurons selective for actual linear acceleration also encoded erroneous linear acceleration, as would be expected from the internal model hypothesis, even when no actual linear acceleration occurred. These findings provide strong evidence that the cerebellum might be involved in the implementation of internal models that mimic physical principles to interpret sensory signals, as previously hypothesized.

  14. Modeling of Electromagnetic Heating in RF Copper Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M. H.; Gonin, I.; Romanov, Romanov; Khabiboulline, T.; Yakovlev, V.

    2016-01-17

    Electromagnetic heating is a critical issue in normal conducting copper RF cavities that are employed in particle accelerators. With several tens to hundreds of kilowatts dissipated RF power, there must be an effective cooling scheme whether it is water or air based or even a combination of both. In this paper we investigate the electromagnetic heating in multiple cavities that were designed at Fermilab exploring how the electromagnetic and thermal analyses are coupled together to properly design the cooling of such cavities.

  15. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  16. The 50Ah NiH2 cell life test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamin, Thierry; Puig, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the 50 AhNiH2 cell life test results. Information is given on pressure vessel design, electrochemical/stack design, cell electrical characteristics, and cell life test results.

  17. Life testing of a nine-couple hybrid thermoelectric panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Life test data are presented for a nine couple thermoelectric panel of hybrid couples tested at an average hot junction temperature of 840 C (1113 K). In the hybrid couple, a hollow cylinder of p-type Si-Ge is used to encapsulate a segmented PbTe/Si-Ge n-leg. The output power and internal resistance of the panel as well as the resistances of the individual hybrid couples are presented as functions of test time covering a period of more than 4200 hours. Test results indicated improved stability relative to hybrid couples tested at higher temperatures. Thermal cycling of the panel resulted in an order of magnitude increase in room temperature resistance. However, very little change in resistance at operating temperatures was noted following the thermal cycles.

  18. Theoretical Performance Model and Initial Experimentation of a Baffled-Tube Ram Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glusman, Jeffrey F.

    The baffled-tube ram accelerator is an innovation in hypervelocity launch technology that allows the acceleration of axisymmetric projectiles in the velocity range of 500 to 3000 meters per second. This device has the potential to double the thrust performance of the conventional smooth-bore ram accelerator while reducing its minimum starting velocity. The baffled-tube ram accelerator utilizes a series of internal baffles to suppress the forward surge of a combustion driven shock wave, thus enabling operation in propellants having two to three times the energy release of those used with conventional smooth-bore ram accelerators. An experimental and theoretical investigation of this device is currently on-going at the University of Washington. Operation at velocities between 620 and 1220 meters per second has been demonstrated to date. Theoretical modeling indicates that momentum loss due to baffle interactions is a key factor in the baffled-tube ram accelerator, which reduces its performance. Nevertheless, baffled-tube experiments have demonstrated thrusts 30-100% greater than that of a smooth-bore ram accelerator operating at the same fill pressure. The design, modeling, and experimental results from a 38-mm-bore, two-meter-long baffled-tube ram accelerator apparatus are presented.

  19. RCA SATCOM Battery in Orbit Performance Update and Accelerated Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaston, S. J.; Schiffer, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    No significant degradation of nickel cadmium battery performance in SATCOM F1 and F2 after almost 8 and 7-3/4 years in orbit was shown. Battery minimum discharge voltage data are presented for these spacecraft. In addition, 2 groups of nickel cadmium cells which are representative of those in orbit are undergoing real time eclipse-reduced suntime cycling in the laboratory. These groups of cells, which are being cycled at a maximum of 53% and 62% depth of discharge (based on actual capacity), have completed 14 and 15 eclipse seasons, respectively. Data for these groups of cells are presented and are compared with the in-orbit battery data.

  20. Life test results for the advanced very high resolution radiometer scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenz, James

    1996-01-01

    The following paper reports the results obtained during a 3.33-year life test on the TIROS Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/3 (AVHRR/3) Scanner. The bearing drag torque and lubricant loss over life will be compared to predicted values developed through modeling. The condition of the lubricant at the end of the test will be described and a theory presented to explain the results obtained. The differences (if any) in the predicted and measured values of drag torque and lubricant loss will be discussed and possible reasons for these examined.

  1. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Modeling of accelerator systems and experimental verification of Quarter-Wave Resonator steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, Carla

    Increasingly complicated accelerator systems depend more and more on computing power and computer simulations for their operation as progress in the field has led to cutting-edge advances that require finer control and better understanding to achieve optimal performance. Greater ambitions coupled with the technical complexity of today's state-of-the-art accelerators necessitate corresponding advances in available accelerator modeling resources. Modeling is a critical component of any field of physics, accelerator physics being no exception. It is extremely important to not only understand the basic underlying physics principles but to implement this understanding through the development of relevant modeling tools that provide the ability to investigate and study various complex effects. Moreover, these tools can lead to new insight and applications that facilitate control room operations and enable advances in the field that would not otherwise be possible. The ability to accurately model accelerator systems aids in the successful operation of machines designed specifically to deliver beams to experiments across a wide variety of fields, ranging from material science research to nuclear astrophysics. One such accelerator discussed throughout this work is the ReA facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) which re-accelerates rare isotope beams for nuclear astrophysics experiments. A major component of the ReA facility, as well as the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) among other accelerators, is the Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR), a coaxial accelerating cavity convenient for efficient acceleration of low-velocity particles. This device is very important to model accurately as it operates in the critical low-velocity region where the beam's acceleration gains are proportionally larger than they are through the later stages of acceleration. Compounding this matter, QWRs defocus the beam, and are also asymmetric with respect to the

  3. Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

  4. Normalization and Implementation of Three Gravitational Acceleration Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.; Gottlieb, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the consequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the asphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of an aspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities that must be removed to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Samuel Pines, Bill Lear, and Robert Gottlieb developed three unique algorithms to eliminate these singularities. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear and Gottlieb algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre polynomials and Associated Legendre Functions (ALFs) for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  5. Simplified models for the evolution of supernova remnants including particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Voelk, H. J.

    1989-11-01

    A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is presented which models the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of the Galactic cosmic rays. In contrast to earlier two-fluid models the closure parameters needed for a hydrodynamic approximation of the cosmic ray 'gas' are not taken as prescribed constants but are estimated dynamically within the model. Diffusive coupling between the outer shock and the remnant interior is introduced; this is shown to be an important moderator of the acceleration as is heating of the thermal plasma by Alfven wave dissipation. For reasonable estimates of the suprathermal particle injection rate into the acceleration process, of the diffusion coefficient appropriate to the accelerated particles, of the coupling between interior and shock, and of wave heating, solutions are found which appear consistent both with observations of young remnants and the idea that the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays are produced in supernova remnants.

  6. Accelerating expansion or inhomogeneity? II. Mimicking acceleration with the energy function in the Lemaître-Tolman model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    This is a continuation of the paper published in Phys. Rev. D 89, 023520 (2014). Here we investigate how the luminosity distance-redshift relation DL(z) of the ΛCDM model is duplicated in the Lemaître-Tolman (L-T) model with Λ =0, constant bang-time function tB and the energy function E(r) mimicking accelerated expansion on the observer's past light cone (r is a uniquely defined comoving radial coordinate). Numerical experiments show that E>0 necessarily. The functions z(r) and E(r) are numerically calculated from the initial point at the observer's position, then backward from the initial point at the apparent horizon (AH). Reconciling the results of the two calculations allows one to determine the values of E/r2 at r=0 and at the AH. The problems connected with continuing the calculation through the AH are discussed in detail and solved. Then z(r) and E(r) are continued beyond the AH, up to the numerical crash that signals the contact of the light cone with the big bang. Similarly, the light cone of the L-T model is calculated by proceeding from the two initial points, and compared with the ΛCDM light cone. The model constructed here contains shell crossings, but they can be removed by matching the L-T region to a Friedmann background, without causing any conflict with the type Ia supernovae observations. The mechanism of imitating the accelerated expansion by the E(r) function is explained in a descriptive way.

  7. Accelerated rare event sampling: Refinement and Ising model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David; Lee, Yong Hwan

    In this paper, a recently introduced accelerated sampling technique [D. Yevick, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 27, 1650041 (2016)] for constructing transition matrices is further developed and applied to a two-dimensional 32×32 Ising spin system. By permitting backward displacements up to a certain limit for each forward step while evolving the system to first higher and then lower energies within a restricted interval that is steadily displaced toward zero temperature as the computation proceeds, accuracy can be greatly enhanced. Simultaneously, the elements obtained from numerous independent calculations are collected in a single transition matrix. The relative accuracy of this novel method is established through a comparison to a transition matrix procedure based on the Metropolis algorithm in which the temperature is appropriately varied during the calculation and the results interpreted in terms of the distribution of realizations over both energy and magnetization.

  8. A Stochastic Acceleration Model of Radio Emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Asano, K.

    2016-06-01

    The broadband emission of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) is well described by non-thermal emissions from accelerated electrons and positrons. However, the difference of spectral indices at radio and X-rays are not reproduced by the standard shock particle acceleration and cooling processes, and then, for example, the broken power-law spectrum for the particle energy distribution at the injection has been groundlessly adopted. Here, we propose a possible resolution for the particle distribution; the radio emitting particles are not accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock but are stochastically accelerated by turbulence inside the PWNe. The turbulence may be induced by the interaction of the pulsar wind with the supernova ejecta. We upgrade our one-zone spectral evolution model including the stochastic acceleration and apply it to the Crab Nebula. We consider both continuous and impulsive injections of particles to the stochastic acceleration process. The radio emission in the Crab Nebula is reproduced by our stochastic acceleration model. The required forms of the momentum diffusion coefficient will be discussed.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of an asymmetric Monte Carlo beam model of a Siemens Primus accelerator.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Eric C; Sawkey, Daren L; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2012-03-08

    The assumption of cylindrical symmetry in radiotherapy accelerator models can pose a challenge for precise Monte Carlo modeling. This assumption makes it difficult to account for measured asymmetries in clinical dose distributions. We have performed a sensitivity study examining the effect of varying symmetric and asymmetric beam and geometric parameters of a Monte Carlo model for a Siemens PRIMUS accelerator. The accelerator and dose output were simulated using modified versions of BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc that allow lateral offsets of accelerator components and lateral and angular offsets for the incident electron beam. Dose distributions were studied for 40 × 40 cm² fields. The resulting dose distributions were analyzed for changes in flatness, symmetry, and off-axis ratio (OAR). The electron beam parameters having the greatest effect on the resulting dose distributions were found to be electron energy and angle of incidence, as high as 5% for a 0.25° deflection. Electron spot size and lateral offset of the electron beam were found to have a smaller impact. Variations in photon target thickness were found to have a small effect. Small lateral offsets of the flattening filter caused significant variation to the OAR. In general, the greatest sensitivity to accelerator parameters could be observed for higher energies and off-axis ratios closer to the central axis. Lateral and angular offsets of beam and accelerator components have strong effects on dose distributions, and should be included in any high-accuracy beam model.

  10. Optics Elements for Modeling Electrostatic Lenses and Accelerator Components: III. Electrostatic Deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    1999-10-21

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code, which includes a linear space charge model, that was originally developed to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators. Several new optical models for a number of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns have been developed recently that allow the code to be used for modeling beamlines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) Einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic prisms, and (4) electrostatic quadrupoles. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the modeling of cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low energy beamline at CAMS.

  11. GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

  12. Life testing of secondary silver-zinc cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C.; Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1991-01-01

    Testing on a variety of secondary silver-zinc (Ag-Zn) cells has been in progress at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for over six years. The latest test involves a 350-Ah cell design that has been cycled at 10 C for 16 months. This design has achieved over 7200 low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycles as well as 17 deep discharges at an 85 percent depth of discharge. This test not only is a life test on these cells but also addresses different methods of storing these cells between the deep discharges. As the test is approaching completion, some interesting results are being seen. In particular, two of the four packs currently on test have failed to meet the 35-h (295-Ah) deep discharge requirement that was arbitrarily set at the beginning of the test. This capacity loss failure is likely a result of the storage method used on these two packs between deep discharges. The two packs are LEO cycled in such a way as to minimize overcharge in an attempt to prolong life.

  13. Life Test Approach for Refractory Metal/Sodium Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests described in the literature have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. This paper describes an approach to generate carefully controlled data that can conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. Approximately 10 years of operational life might be compressed into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. Two specific test series have been identified and include: investigation of long term corrosion rates based on the guidelines contained in ASTM G-68-80 (using 7 heat pipes); and investigation of corrosion trends in a cross correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a central composite test design (using 9 heat pipes). The heat pipes selected for demonstration purposes are fabricated from a Mo-44.5%Re alloy with a length of 0.3 meters and a diameter of 1.59 cm(to conserve material) with a condenser to evaporator length ratio of approximately 3. The wick is a crescent annular design formed from 400-mesh Mo-Re alloy material hot isostatically pressed to produce a final wick core of 20 microns or less.

  14. A mission profile life test facility. [for mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E.; Vetrone, R.; Bechtel, R.

    1978-01-01

    A test facility is being prepared for a 16,000 hour mission profile life test of multiple electric propulsion thrust subsystems. The facility will be capable of simultaneously operating three 2.7 kW, 30 cm mercury ion thrusters and their power processing. The facility will permit conduction of a program of long-term tests to document thruster characteristics as a function of time and operating point to allow prediction of thruster performance for any mission profile. The thruster will be tested in a 7m by 10m vacuum chamber. Each thruster will be installed in a separate lock chamber so that it can be extended into, or extracted from the main chamber without violating the vacuum integrity of the other thruster. The thrusters will exhaust into a 3m by 5m frozen mercury target. The target and an array of cryopanels to collect sputtered target material will be liquid nitrogen chilled. Power processor units will be tested in an adjacent 1.5m by 2m vacuum chamber and will be temperature controlled by simulated heat pipes.

  15. A MODEL OF ACCELERATION OF ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS BY RECONNECTION IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Opher, M. E-mail: mopher@gmu.ed

    2009-09-20

    We discuss a model of cosmic ray acceleration that accounts for the observations of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) by Voyager 1 and 2. The model appeals to fast magnetic reconnection rather than shocks as the driver of acceleration. The ultimate source of energy is associated with magnetic field reversals that occur in the heliosheath. It is expected that the magnetic field reversals will occur throughout the heliosheath, but especially near the heliopause where the flows slow down and diverge with respect to the interstellar wind and also in the boundary sector in the heliospheric current sheet. While the first-order Fermi acceleration theory within reconnection layers is in its infancy, the predictions do not contradict the available data on ACR spectra measured by the spacecraft. We argue that the Voyager data are one of the first pieces of evidence favoring the acceleration within regions of fast magnetic reconnection, which we believe to be a widely spread astrophysical process.

  16. Numerical design and model measurements for a 1.3 GHz microtron accelerating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeven, W. J. G. M.; Theeuwen, M. E. H. J.; Knoben, M. H. M.; Moerdijk, A. J.; Botman, J. I. M.; van der Heide, J. A.; Timmermans, C. J.; Hagedoorn, H. L.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the free electron laser project TEUFEL, a 25 MeV racetrack microtron is under construction at the Eindhoven University. The accelerating cavity of this microtron is a standing wave on axis coupled structure. It consists of three accelerating cells and two coupling cells. Numerical field calculations for this cavity were done with the computer codes SUPERFISH, URMEL-T and MAFIA. Not only the accelerating modes but also the dangerous beam breakup modes were calculated with MAFIA. An aluminium, scale 1:1 model of the structure was made in order to measure various cavity properties. Field profiles were measured with the perturbation ball method. An equivalent LC-circuit simulation of the accelerating structure was made, which serves as a model for the interpretation of the results.

  17. Symmetry breaking and onset of cosmic acceleration in scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Sadjadi, H.; Honardoost, M.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new scenario for the onset of positive acceleration of our Universe based on symmetry breaking in coupled dark energy scalar field model. In a symmetry breaking process where the scalar field rolls down its own potential, the potential reduction is not in favor of acceleration. In our model, when dark matter density becomes less than a critical value, the shape of the effective potential is changed and, the quintessence field climbs up along its own potential while rolls down the effective potential. We show that this procedure may establish the positivity of the potential required for the Universe to accelerate. In addition, we show that by choosing an appropriate interaction between dark sectors there is the possibility that the scalar field resides in a new vacuum giving rise to a positive cosmological constant which is responsible for a permanent late time acceleration.

  18. Particle acceleration model for gas--solid suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Garg, Rahul; Hrenya, Christine; Fox, Rodney; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2009-11-01

    Particle granular temperature plays an important role in the prediction of core annular structure in riser flows. The covariance of fluctuating particle acceleration and fluctuating particle velocity governs the evolution of the granular temperature in homogeneous suspensions undergoing elastic collisions. Koch and co--workers (Phys. Fluid. 1990, JFM 1999) showed that the granular temperature has a source term due to hydrodynamic interactions in gas--solid suspensions in the Stokes flow regime. We performed direct numerical simulations (DNS) of freely evolving suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers using the immersed boundary method (IBM). We found that simple extension of a class of mean particle acceleration models to their instantaneous counterparts does not predict the correct fluctuating particle acceleration--fluctuating velocity covariance that is obtained from DNS. The fluctuating particle velocity autocorrelation function decay and the Lagrangian structure function obtained from DNS motivate the use of a Langevin model for the instantaneous particle acceleration.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 prevents accelerated cardiac aging in a rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Blackmore, Heather L; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; McConnell, Josie M; Hargreaves, Iain P; Giussani, Dino A; Ozanne, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Studies in human and animals have demonstrated that nutritionally induced low birth-weight followed by rapid postnatal growth increases the risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms underlying such nutritional programming are not clearly defined, increased oxidative-stress leading to accelerated cellular aging has been proposed to play an important role. Using an established rodent model of low birth-weight and catch-up growth, we show here that post-weaning dietary supplementation with coenzyme Q10, a key component of the electron transport chain and a potent antioxidant rescued many of the detrimental effects of nutritional programming on cardiac aging. This included a reduction in nitrosative and oxidative-stress, telomere shortening, DNA damage, cellular senescence and apoptosis. These findings demonstrate the potential for postnatal antioxidant intervention to reverse deleterious phenotypes of developmental programming and therefore provide insight into a potential translatable therapy to prevent cardiovascular disease in at risk humans.

  20. Model Diagnostics for the Department of Energy's Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, eight Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, four academic institutions, one company, and the National Centre for Atmospheric Research combined forces in a project called Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) with the goal to speed Earth system model development for climate and energy. Over the planned 10-year span, the project will conduct simulations and modeling on DOE's most powerful high-performance computing systems at Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Berkeley Leadership Compute Facilities. A key component of the ACME project is the development of an interactive test bed for the advanced Earth system model. Its execution infrastructure will accelerate model development and testing cycles. The ACME Workflow Group is leading the efforts to automate labor-intensive tasks, provide intelligent support for complex tasks and reduce duplication of effort through collaboration support. As part of this new workflow environment, we have created a diagnostic, metric, and intercomparison Python framework, called UVCMetrics, to aid in the testing-to-production execution of the ACME model. The framework exploits similarities among different diagnostics to compactly support diagnosis of new models. It presently focuses on atmosphere and land but is designed to support ocean and sea ice model components as well. This framework is built on top of the existing open-source software framework known as the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT). Because of its flexible framework design, scientists and modelers now can generate thousands of possible diagnostic outputs. These diagnostics can compare model runs, compare model vs. observation, or simply verify a model is physically realistic. Additional diagnostics are easily integrated into the framework, and our users have already added several. Diagnostics can be generated, viewed, and manipulated from the UV-CDAT graphical user interface, Python command line scripts and programs

  1. Acceleration and Performance Modeling Workshop, Washington, DC, 14-17 May 79,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    disturbance of the muscular systems, perhaps changes in spindle fiber output, and changes in the perceived weight of the muscle because of the acceleration...at this point either. The output models which are determining performance are essentially tied to muscular systems, through manual control (hand and...feet), and through speech, another muscular output. In normal activities the pilot, who senses changes in the visual system, the acceleration vector

  2. Particle Acceleration at Oblique CME-driven Shock Using Improved PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, G.; Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    .Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are generally accepted to be caused by particle acceleration at coronal mass ejection(CME)-driven shocks. In this work we improved the PATH(Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere) model by initiating a 2D CME-driven shock to investigate particle acceleration at different locations of an oblique CME-drive shock, where the shock has different obliquity angle(θBN). Thus we can study problems like whether quasi-perpendicular or quasi-parallel shock is more efficient in particle acceleration.The PATH model is based on the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The core of the model consists of a 3D Zeus module, which computes numerically the background solar wind and the CME-drive shock as inputs; and a shell module where the convection and diffusion of accelerated particles within the shock complex are followed. The 2D CME-driven shock is generated by perturbing the boundary condition of a steady background solar wind in certain patterns.

  3. Life Test Approach for Refractory Metal/Sodium Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests described in the literature have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. The objective of this work was to establish an approach to generate carefully controlled data that can conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. Approximately 10 years of operational life might be compressed into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. To accomplish this goal test series have been identified, based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, to investigate long term corrosion rates. The heat pipes selected for demonstration purposes are fabricated from a Molybdenum-44.5%Rhenium refractory metal alloy and include an internal crescent annular wick design formed by hot isostatic pressing. A processing methodology has been devised that incorporates vacuum distillation filling with an integrated purity sampling technique for the sodium working fluid. Energy is supplied by radio frequency induction coils coupled to the heat pipe evaporator with an input range of 1 to 5 kW per unit while a static gas gap coupled water calorimeter provides condenser cooling for heat pipe temperatures ranging from 1123 to 1323 K. The test chamber's atmosphere would require active purification to maintain low oxygen concentrations at an operating pressure of approximately 75 torr. The test is designed to operate round-the-clock with 6-month non-destructive inspection intervals to identify the onset and level of corrosion. At longer intervals specific heat pipes are destructively evaluated to verify the non-destructive observations. Accomplishments prior to project cancellation included successful demonstration of the heat pipe wick fabrication technique, establishment of all engineering designs

  4. Design of Refractory Metal Life Test Heat Pipe and Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically, one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. Results are often reported describing the wall material, working fluid, test temperature, test duration, and occasionally the nature of any failure. Important information such as design details, processing procedures, material assay, power throughput, and radial power density are usually not mentioned. We propose to develop methods to generate carefully controlled data that conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. The test approach detailed in this Technical Publication will use 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipe units that have an approximate12-in length and 5/8-in diameter. Two specific test series have been identified: (1) Long-term corrosion rates based on ASTM-G-68-80 (G-series) and (2) corrosion trends in a cross-correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a Fisher multifactor design (F-series). Evaluation of the heat pipe hardware will be performed in test chambers purged with an inert purified gas (helium or helium/argon mixture) at low pressure (10-100 torr) to provide thermal coupling between the heat pipe condenser and calorimeter. The final pressure will be selected to minimize the potential for voltage breakdown between the heat pipe and radio frequency (RF) induction coil (RF heating is currently the planned method of powering the heat pipes). The proposed calorimeter is constructed from a copper alloy and relies on a laminar flow water-coolant channel design to absorb and transport energy

  5. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. Results: We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Availability and implementation: Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. Contact: seunghwa.kang@pnnl.gov PMID:25064572

  6. Microleakage of accelerated mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement in an in vitro apexification model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Tae; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, WooCheol

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of accelerated mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement by flow porometry analysis in an in vitro apexification model. Sixty-four single-rooted, extracted teeth were divided into 4 groups (group 1, MTA; group 2, MTA with accelerator; group 3, Portland cement; and group 4, Portland cement with accelerator). In an in vitro apexification model, MTA or Portland cement mixed with or without 10% CaCl2 was condensed to 2-mm thickness. The negative control group (n = 4) had the apical foramen sealed with epoxy resin. The maximum and mean flow pore diameters of the samples were tested by capillary flow porometry at 90 minutes and 48 hours after obturation. The addition of accelerator significantly reduced the maximum pore diameters of MTA and Portland cement at the initial setting phase. After 48 hours of obturation, the maximum and mean flow pore diameters of the accelerated samples were significantly reduced compared with the normal samples. There was no statistically significant difference in the maximum pore diameter of MTA and Portland cement between the measurements at 90 minutes and 48 hours. The results imply that the addition of accelerator into MTA or Portland cement can be useful in a one-visit apexification by reducing microleakage even in an early setting time.

  7. Accelerated Monte Carlo models to simulate fluorescence spectra from layered tissues.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Johannes; Pifferi, Antonio; Enejder, Annika M K; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2003-04-01

    Two efficient Monte Carlo models are described, facilitating predictions of complete time-resolved fluorescence spectra from a light-scattering and light-absorbing medium. These are compared with a third, conventional fluorescence Monte Carlo model in terms of accuracy, signal-to-noise statistics, and simulation time. The improved computation efficiency is achieved by means of a convolution technique, justified by the symmetry of the problem. Furthermore, the reciprocity principle for photon paths, employed in one of the accelerated models, is shown to simplify the computations of the distribution of the emitted fluorescence drastically. A so-called white Monte Carlo approach is finally suggested for efficient simulations of one excitation wavelength combined with a wide range of emission wavelengths. The fluorescence is simulated in a purely scattering medium, and the absorption properties are instead taken into account analytically afterward. This approach is applicable to the conventional model as well as to the two accelerated models. Essentially the same absolute values for the fluorescence integrated over the emitting surface and time are obtained for the three models within the accuracy of the simulations. The time-resolved and spatially resolved fluorescence exhibits a slight overestimation at short delay times close to the source corresponding to approximately two grid elements for the accelerated models, as a result of the discretization and the convolution. The improved efficiency is most prominent for the reverse-emission accelerated model, for which the simulation time can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude.

  8. SOLAR INTERACTING PROTONS VERSUS INTERPLANETARY PROTONS IN THE CORE PLUS HALO MODEL OF DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AND STOCHASTIC RE-ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, L.; Laitinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Afanasiev, A.; Mursula, K.; Ryan, J. M.

    2015-06-10

    With the first observations of solar γ-rays from the decay of pions, the relationship of protons producing ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the Earth to those of similar energies producing the γ-rays on the Sun has been debated. These two populations may be either independent and simply coincident in large flares, or they may be, in fact, the same population stemming from a single accelerating agent and jointly distributed at the Sun and also in space. Assuming the latter, we model a scenario in which particles are accelerated near the Sun in a shock wave with a fraction transported back to the solar surface to radiate, while the remainder is detected at Earth in the form of a GLE. Interplanetary ions versus ions interacting at the Sun are studied for a spherical shock wave propagating in a radial magnetic field through a highly turbulent radial ray (the acceleration core) and surrounding weakly turbulent sector in which the accelerated particles can propagate toward or away from the Sun. The model presented here accounts for both the first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock front and the second-order, stochastic re-acceleration by the turbulence enhanced behind the shock. We find that the re-acceleration is important in generating the γ-radiation and we also find that up to 10% of the particle population can find its way to the Sun as compared to particles escaping to the interplanetary space.

  9. Launch Pad Physics: Accelerate Interest With Model Rocketry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, LeRoy F.

    1982-01-01

    Student activities in an interdisciplinary, model rocket science program are described, including the construction of an Ohio Scientific computer system with graphic capabilities for use in the program and cooperative efforts with the Rocket Research Institute. (JN)

  10. New, More Authentic Model for AIDS Will Accelerate Studies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Researchers are working to develop a more authentic animal model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS that is expected to speed up studies of experimental treatments and vaccines.

  11. Modeling the Causal Regulation of Transversely Accelerated Ion (TAI) Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Zhang, B.; Schmitt, P.; Lotko, W.

    2013-12-01

    TAIs are generated by wave particle interactions driven by waves at temporal and spatial scales which are inaccessible in global coupled geospace models. So far attempts to include TAI outflows in global models have focused on the use of empirical correlations between observed outflow fluxes and various inputs such as DC Poynting flux, Alfvénic Poynting flux, and electron precipitation fluxes. These treatments ignore feedbacks between the outflow and the state of the ionosphere and assume the spatial and temporal distributions of the outflows are identical to those of their drivers. This work presents an alternative approach which can overcome these deficiencies while still being sufficiently computationally efficient to couple into a global modeling framework. TAIs are incorporated into a 3-D fluid model of the ionosphere and polar wind by modeling them as a separate fluid which obeys transport equations appropriate for monoenergetic conic distributions. The characteristics of the TAI outflow produced depend on the assumed transverse heating rates and the 'promotion rate' which connects the TAI fluid to the thermal O+ fluid. Using drivers extracted from runs of the Coupled Magnetosphere Ionosphere Thermosphere (CMIT) model, different strategies for causally regulating these free parameters are explored. The model can reproduce many of the observed features of TAI outflows but also exhibits physical attributes that empirical relationships alone miss. These characteristics include flux limiting of the outflow from below when intense outflow creates high-altitude cavities, time delays between the onset of transverse heating and the appearance of outflow, and spatial distributions of outflow which are different from the spatial distributions of the applied transverse heating and which depend on the ionospheric convection pattern.

  12. GPU accelerated numerical simulations of viscoelastic phase separation model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keda; Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-07-05

    We introduce a complete implementation of viscoelastic model for numerical simulations of the phase separation kinetics in dynamic asymmetry systems such as polymer blends and polymer solutions on a graphics processing unit (GPU) by CUDA language and discuss algorithms and optimizations in details. From studies of a polymer solution, we show that the GPU-based implementation can predict correctly the accepted results and provide about 190 times speedup over a single central processing unit (CPU). Further accuracy analysis demonstrates that both the single and the double precision calculations on the GPU are sufficient to produce high-quality results in numerical simulations of viscoelastic model. Therefore, the GPU-based viscoelastic model is very promising for studying many phase separation processes of experimental and theoretical interests that often take place on the large length and time scales and are not easily addressed by a conventional implementation running on a single CPU.

  13. Honors biomedical instrumentation--a course model for accelerated design.

    PubMed

    Madhok, Jai; Smith, Ryan J; Thakor, Nitish V

    2009-01-01

    A model for a 16-week Biomedical Instrumentation course is outlined. The course is modeled in such a way that students learn about medical devices and instrumentation through lecture and laboratory sessions while also learning basic design principles. Course material covers a broad range of topics from fundamentals of sensors and instrumentation, guided laboratory design experiments, design projects, and eventual protection of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and entry into the commercial market. Students eventually complete two design projects in the form of a 'Challenge' design project as well as an 'Honors' design project. Sample problems students solve during the Challenge project and examples of past Honors projects from the course are highlighted.

  14. Acceleration modeling of moderate to large earthquakes based on realistic fault models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidsson, R.; Toral, J.

    2003-04-01

    Strong motion is affected by distance to the earthquake, local crustal structure, focal mechanism, azimuth to the source. However, the faulting process is also of importance such as development of rupture, i.e., directivity, slip distribution on the fault, extent of fault, rupture velocity. We have modelled these parameters for earthquakes that occurred in three tectonic zones close to the Panama Canal. We included in the modeling directivity, distributed slip, discrete faulting, fault depth and expected focal mechanism. The distributed slip is based on previous fault models that we produced from the region of other earthquakes. Such previous examples show that maximum intensities in some cases coincides with areas of high slip on the fault. Our acceleration modeling also gives similar values to the few observations that have been made for moderate to small earthquakes in the range M=5-6.2. The modeling indicates that events located in the Caribbean might cause strong motion in the lower frequency spectra where high frequency Rayleigh waves dominates.

  15. Gravitational Acceleration Effects on Macrosegregation: Experiment and Computational Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon-Torres, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Sen, S.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were performed under terrestrial gravity (1g) and during parabolic flights (10-2 g) to study the solidification and macrosegregation patterns of Al-Cu alloys. Alloys having 2% and 5% Cu were solidified against a chill at two different cooling rates. Microscopic and Electron Microprobe characterization was used to produce microstructural and macrosegregation maps. In all cases positive segregation occurred next to the chill because shrinkage flow, as expected. This positive segregation was higher in the low-g samples, apparently because of the higher heat transfer coefficient. A 2-D computational model was used to explain the experimental results. The continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the solidification phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The solidification event was divided into two stages. In the first one, the liquid containing freely moving equiaxed grains was described through the relative viscosity concept. In the second stage, when a fixed dendritic network was formed after dendritic coherency, the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium. The macrosegregation maps and the cooling curves obtained during experiments were used for validation of the solidification and segregation model. The model can explain the solidification and macrosegregation patterns and the differences between low- and high-gravity results.

  16. A computer model of the energy-current loss instabilities in a recirculating accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edighoffer, J. A.; Kim, K.-J.

    1995-04-01

    The computer program called ESRA (energy stability in a recirculating accelerator FELs) has been written to model bunches of particles in longitudinal phase space traversing a recirculating accelerator and the associated rf changes and aperture current losses. This code addresses stability issues and determines the transport, noise, feedback and other parameters for which these FEL systems are stable or unstable. A representative system is modeled, the Novosibirisk high power FEL race-track microtron for photochemical research. The system is stable with prudent choice of parameters.

  17. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  18. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1986-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undersirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  19. Fermi acceleration in the randomized driven Lorentz gas and the Fermi-Ulam model.

    PubMed

    Karlis, A K; Papachristou, P K; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V; Schmelcher, P

    2007-07-01

    Fermi acceleration of an ensemble of noninteracting particles evolving in a stochastic two-moving wall variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) and the phase randomized harmonically driven periodic Lorentz gas is investigated. As shown in [A. K. Karlis, P. K. Papachristou, F. K. Diakonos, V. Constantoudis, and P. Schmelcher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 194102 (2006)], the static wall approximation, which ignores scatterer displacement upon collision, leads to a substantial underestimation of the mean energy gain per collision. In this paper, we clarify the mechanism leading to the increased acceleration. Furthermore, the recently introduced hopping wall approximation is generalized for application in the randomized driven Lorentz gas. Utilizing the hopping approximation the asymptotic probability distribution function of the particle velocity is derived. Moreover, it is shown that, for harmonic driving, scatterer displacement upon collision increases the acceleration in both the driven Lorentz gas and the FUM by the same amount. On the other hand, the investigation of a randomized FUM, comprising one fixed and one moving wall driven by a sawtooth force function, reveals that the presence of a particular asymmetry of the driving function leads to an increase of acceleration that is different from that gained when symmetrical force functions are considered, for all finite number of collisions. This fact helps open up the prospect of designing accelerator devices by combining driving laws with specific symmetries to acquire a desired acceleration behavior for the ensemble of particles.

  20. Test-particle acceleration in a hierarchical three-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Dalena, S.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.; Greco, A.

    2014-03-10

    The acceleration of charged particles is relevant to the solar corona over a broad range of scales and energies. High-energy particles are usually detected in concomitance with large energy release events like solar eruptions and flares. Nevertheless, acceleration can occur at smaller scales, characterized by dynamical activity near current sheets. To gain insight into the complex scenario of coronal charged particle acceleration, we investigate the properties of acceleration with a test-particle approach using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. These are obtained from direct solutions of the reduced MHD equations, well suited for a plasma embedded in a strong axial magnetic field, relevant to the inner heliosphere. A multi-box, multiscale technique is used to solve the equations of motion for protons. This method allows us to resolve an extended range of scales present in the system, namely, from the ion inertial scale of the order of a meter up to macroscopic scales of the order of 10 km (1/100th of the outer scale of the system). This new technique is useful to identify the mechanisms that, acting at different scales, are responsible for acceleration to high energies of a small fraction of the particles in the coronal plasma. We report results that describe acceleration at different stages over a broad range of time, length, and energy scales.

  1. Mainstreaming Modeling and Simulation to Accelerate Public Health Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Martin-J.; Mabry, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic modeling and simulation are systems science tools that examine behaviors and outcomes resulting from interactions among multiple system components over time. Although there are excellent examples of their application, they have not been adopted as mainstream tools in population health planning and policymaking. Impediments to their use include the legacy and ease of use of statistical approaches that produce estimates with confidence intervals, the difficulty of multidisciplinary collaboration for modeling and simulation, systems scientists’ inability to communicate effectively the added value of the tools, and low funding for population health systems science. Proposed remedies include aggregation of diverse data sets, systems science training for public health and other health professionals, changing research incentives toward collaboration, and increased funding for population health systems science projects. PMID:24832426

  2. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    employ a team science , systems biology based approach to rapidly identify novel anti-cancer agents and individualize therapeutic strategies in...Trapnell, C., Williams, B.A., Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly...patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However

  3. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach to rapidly identify novel anti-cancer agents and...RNAseq. Bioinformatics 25:1105-1111. Trapnell, C., Williams, B.A., Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J...Preclinical models such as cancer cell lines and patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and

  4. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    and receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based...Bioinformatics 25:1105-1111. Trapnell, C., Williams, B.A., Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L...Preclinical models such as cancer cell lines and patient- derived tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development

  5. Accelerating thermal deposition modeling at terahertz frequencies using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroski, Michael; Knight, Michael; Payne, Jason; Grundt, Jessica E.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Thomas, Robert; Roach, William P.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2011-03-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods are widely used to model the propagation of electromagnetic radiation in biological tissues. High-performance central processing units (CPUs) can execute FDTD simulations for complex problems using 3-D geometries and heterogeneous tissue material properties. However, when FDTD simulations are employed at terahertz (THz) frequencies excessively long processing times are required to account for finer resolution voxels and larger computational modeling domains. In this study, we developed and tested the performance of 2-D and 3-D FDTD thermal propagation code executed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) device, which was coded using an extension of the C language referred to as CUDA. In order to examine the speedup provided by GPUs, we compared the performance (speed, accuracy) for simulations executed on a GPU (Tesla C2050), a high-performance CPU (Intel Xeon 5504), and supercomputer. Simulations were conducted to model the propagation and thermal deposition of THz radiation in biological materials for several in vitro and in vivo THz exposure scenarios. For both the 2-D and 3-D in vitro simulations, we found that the GPU performed 100 times faster than runs executed on a CPU, and maintained comparable accuracy to that provided by the supercomputer. For the in vivo tissue damage studies, we found that the GPU executed simulations 87x times faster than the CPU. Interestingly, for all exposure duration tested, the CPU, GPU, and supercomputer provided comparable predictions for tissue damage thresholds (ED50). Overall, these results suggest that GPUs can provide performance comparable to a supercomputer and at speeds significantly faster than those possible with a CPU. Therefore, GPUs are an affordable tool for conducting accurate and fast simulations for computationally intensive modeling problems.

  6. The Role of Bearing and Scan Mechanism Life Testing in Flight Qualification of the MODIS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyk, Steven G.; Street, Kenneth W.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Sharma, Rajeev; Predmore, Roamer E.; Dietz, Brian J.; Dube, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM-11) satellite and has been operating successfully since December 1999. MODIS has been viewing the entire Earth's surface and gathering data to better understand the global dynamics and processes occurring on land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. All observations are made through an extremely high resolution, optically and mechanically precise, scan mirror motor/encoder assembly. The reliable performance of this assembly depends on two duplex bearing pairs lubricated with Pennzane, a synthetic hydrocarbon, formulated with lead napthanate. This paper describes the results of accelerated and operational life tests. It also describes the post-test analyses of the disassembled bearings. Analyses were performed using micro-Raman, micro-FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In general, the three sets of bearings in each of the test stations were in very good condition after accumulating 68, 144, and 209 million revolutions, respectively. Some of the bearings exhibited lubricant degradation, indicated by viscous lubricant deposits on the cage and raceways.

  7. The Role of Bearing and Scan Mechanism Life Testing in Flight Qualification of the MODIS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyk, Steven G.; Dietz, Brian J.; Street, Kenneth W.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Dube, Michael; Sharma, Rajeev; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM-1) satellite and has been operating successfully since December 1999. MODIS has been viewing the entire Earth's surface and gathering data to better understand the global dynamics and processes occurring on land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. All observations are made through an extremely high resolution, optically and mechanically precise, scan mirror motor/encoder assembly. The reliable performance of this assembly depends on two duplex bearing pairs lubricated with Pennzane, a synthetic hydrocarbon, formulated with lead napthanate. This paper describes the results of accelerated and operational life tests. It also describes the post-test analyses of the disassembled bearings. Analyses were performed using micro-Raman, micro-FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In general, the three sets of bearings in each of the test stations were in very good condition after accumulating 68, 144, and 209 million revolutions, respectively. Some of the bearings exhibited lubricant degradation, indicated by viscous lubricant deposits on the cage and raceways.

  8. Incorporation of an energy equation into a pulsed inductive plasma acceleration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneau, Jarred

    Electric propulsion systems utilize electrical energy to produce thrust for spacecraft propulsion. These systems have multiple applications ranging from Earth orbit North-South station keeping to solar system exploratory missions such as NASA's Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship class missions that focus on exploring scientifically interesting targets. In an electromagnetic thruster, a magnetic field interacting with current in an ionized gas (plasma) accelerates the propellant to produce thrust. Pulsed inductive thrusters rely on an electrodeless discharge where both the magnetic field in the plasma and the plasma current are induced by a time-varying current in an external circuit. The multi-dimensional acceleration model for a pulsed inductive plasma thruster consists of a set of circuit equations describing the electrical behavior of the thruster coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation that allow for estimating thruster performance. Current models lack a method to account for the time-varying energy distribution in an inductive plasma accelerator.

  9. Modeling the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA): an algorithm for quasi-static field solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Briggs, R J; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Waldron, W L

    2007-06-18

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a helical distributed transmission line. A rising pulse applied to the upstream end appears as a moving spatial voltage ramp, on which an ion pulse can be accelerated. This is a promising approach to acceleration and longitudinal compression of an ion beam at high line charge density. In most of the studies carried out to date, using both a simple code for longitudinal beam dynamics and the Warp PIC code, a circuit model for the wave behavior was employed; in Warp, the helix I and V are source terms in elliptic equations for E and B. However, it appears possible to obtain improved fidelity using a ''sheath helix'' model in the quasi-static limit. Here we describe an algorithmic approach that may be used to effect such a solution.

  10. Computer Modeling of Acceleration Effects on Cerebral Oxygen Saturation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    a significant physiological threat to etrate the cranium and enter the cerebral cortex. Hongo high-performance aircraft pilots since the development...et al. and Hongo et al. (7,8). blackened out and all that could be seen was the target, The primary focus of this effort was to build a model i.e...O6GInduced.html. 87:402. 12. Tripp LD, Arnold A, Bagian J, et al. Psychophysiological effects 8. Hongo K, Kobayashi S, Okudera H, et al. Noninvasive cerebral of

  11. A two-fluid model for black-hole accretion flows: particle acceleration and disc structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason P.; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-02-01

    Hot, tenuous advection-dominated accretion flows around black holes are ideal sites for the Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles at standing shock waves in the accretion disc. Previous work has demonstrated that the shock-acceleration process can be efficient enough to power the observed, strong outflows in radio-loud active galaxies such as M87. However, the dynamical effect (back-reaction) on the flow, exerted by the pressure of the relativistic particles, has not been previously considered, and this effect can have a significant influence on the disc structure. We reexamine the problem by developing a new, two-fluid model for the structure of the accretion disc that includes the dynamical effect of the relativistic particle pressure, combined with the pressure of the background (thermal) gas. The new model is analogous to the two-fluid model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova-driven shock waves. As part of the model, we also develop a new set of shock jump conditions, which are solved along with the hydrodynamic conservation equations to determine the structure of the accretion disc. The solutions include the formation of a mildly relativistic outflow (jet) at the shock radius, driven by the relativistic particles accelerated in the disc. One of our main conclusions is that in the context of the new two-fluid accretion model, global smooth (shock-free) solutions do not exist, and the disc must always contain a standing shock wave, at least in the inviscid case considered here.

  12. Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-03-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

  13. Impact of SciDAC on accelerator projects across the office of science through electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Ivanov, V.; Kabel, A.; Kowalski, M.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; Collaborators, ISICs/SAPP

    2005-01-01

    Electromagnetic Modelling led by SLAC is a principal component of the "Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology" SciDAC project funded through the Office of High Energy Physics. This large team effort comprises three other national laboratories (LBNL, LLNL, SNL) and six universities (CMU, Columbia, RPI, Stanford, UC Davis and U of Wisconsin) with the goal to develop a set of parallel electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids to target challenging problems in accelerators, and solve them to unprecedented realism and accuracy. Essential to the code development are the collaborations with the ISICs/SAPP in eigensolvers, meshing, adaptive refinement, shape optimization and visualization (see "Achievements in ISICs/SAPP Collaborations for Electromagnetic Modelling of Accelerators"). Supported by these advances in computational science, we have successfully performed the large-scale simulations that have impacted important accelerator projects across the Office of Science (SC) including the Positron Electron Project (PEP) -II, Next Linear Collider (NLC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in High Energy Physics (HEP), the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) in Nuclear Physics (NP) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Basic Energy Science (BES).

  14. Accelerated gravitational wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling.

    PubMed

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ∼30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ∼70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  15. Accelerated Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation with Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E.; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ˜30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ˜70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  16. Nonlaminar multicomponent models for electron flow in positive polarity multigap accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Church, B.W.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    Electron flow in multigap positive-polarity inductive accelerators is studied by numerical simulation and modeling. The objective of this work is to determine the operating principles of the electron flow such that an optimally efficient design of such machines can be achieved for intense ion beam generation. Because the electrons emitted in different gaps have different energies and canonical momenta, the theory of single-component magnetic insulation has to be extended in order to describe such multicomponent electron flows. A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code is used to simulate multicomponent electron flow in multigap accelerators with two, three, and four gaps. Observations from these simulations lead to new one-dimensional, time-independent models for these flows that incorporate the time-averaged effects of diamagnetic electron vortices. Equivalent circuits are constructed for simulated accelerators using voltage{endash}current relations predicted by the models. These circuit models are incorporated into a software package to aid in the design of multigap inductive accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Perceptions of Tennessee School Principals about the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (Team)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carmen Belcher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze the perceptions of Tennessee principals about the implementation of the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM) and the impact of TEAM on teachers' instructional practice and professional growth. Participants in this study were PK-12 public school principals from 12 districts in the First…

  18. Some Cosmological Models for Poincare Gauge Gravity and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    Two cosmological Models for the Poincare Gauge Gravity theory with a non vanishing torsion are proposed. It is shown that the torsion plays an important role in explaining the accelerated expansion of the universe. Some of the cosmological parameters are also expressed in terms of the redshift and the dark energy scenarios are discussed.

  19. Evolving an Accelerated School Model through Student Perceptions and Student Outcome Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Donna L.; Gable, Robert K.; Billups, Felice D.; Vieira, Mary; Blasczak, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    A mixed methods convergent evaluation informed the redesign of an innovative public school that uses an accelerated model to serve grades 7-9 students who have been retained in grade level and are at risk for dropping out of school. After over 25 years in operation, a shift of practices/policies away from grade retention and toward social…

  20. On the Location of the Acceleration Site for Energetic Helium-3 and Implications for Flare Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The wide variation in the 3He/4He ratio in solar energetic particle events is most plausibly interpreted in terms of two distinct acceleration mechanisms for helium nuclei, one of which favors 3He. 3He-rich events are associated with impulsive energetic electron events which have (at least) two distinct acceleration mechanisms. Logically one of these should accelerate both 3He and electrons. Based on the electron energy spectrum from 3He-rich events Kahler et al (1987) proposed that the acceleration region should be the high corona, possibly as high as 2 solar radii. Two further observations provide information on where the 3He acceleration might occur. First is the remarkable upper limit on the total 3He fluence (Ho et al, 2005, 2008) which strongly suggests a model where the acceleration process accelerates the majority of 3He ions within a finite reservoir, which can only be a high coronal loop structure. The second is that at quiet times, at 1AU, the 3He/4He ratio is 6-60 times enhanced over the corresponding slow solar wind value (Desai et al, 2006). Both observations indicate that the acceleration, which favors 3He, is occurring quasi-continuously in the high coronal structure, with some leakage into the interplanetary medium. Eventually the coronal structure is disrupted and the trapped population is either released into the interplanetary medium or dumped into the "flare" site to provide both energy and seed particles for further acceleration, but by a different process which does not preferentially accelerate 3He. In the former case there will not be a significant flare, but a 3He-rich event, an impulsive electron event, and perhaps a fast jet from one of the footpoints of the trapping structure. In the latter case there will be a significant flare, with a major coronal mass ejection, probably driving a shock, which produces a non-3He-rich event and a much longer and larger energetic particle event.

  1. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2014-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  2. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V. Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2014-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  3. Monte Carlo Modeling of Electronuclear Processes in Experimental Accelerator Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Aleksander

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of an experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. The mix of oxides (PuO2 + UO2) MOX fuel designed for the reactor will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly in Dubna is based on the core with a nominal unit capacity of 30 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff= 0.945 and the accelerator beam power of 1 kW.

  4. An OpenACC-Based Unified Programming Model for Multi-accelerator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungwon; Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel SPMD programming model of OpenACC. Our model integrates the different granularities of parallelism from vector-level parallelism to node-level parallelism into a single, unified model based on OpenACC. It allows programmers to write programs for multiple accelerators using a uniform programming model whether they are in shared or distributed memory systems. We implement a prototype of our model and evaluate its performance with a GPU-based supercomputer using three benchmark applications.

  5. Theoretical analysis of acceleration measurements in a model of an operating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jonathan R.; Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark A.

    2010-04-01

    Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines. These unsteady loads and the resulting damage initiation and propagation are difficult to predict. Unsteady loads enter at the rotor and are transmitted to the drivetrain. The current generation of wind turbine has drivetrain-mounted vibration and bearing temperature sensors, a nacelle-mounted inertial measurement unit, and a nacelle-mounted anemometer and wind vane. Some advanced wind turbines are also equipped with strain measurements at the root of the rotor. This paper analyzes additional measurements in a rotor blade to investigate the complexity of these unsteady loads. By identifying the spatial distribution, amplitude, and frequency bandwidth of these loads, design improvements could be facilitated to reduce uncertainties in reliability predictions. In addition, dynamic load estimates could be used in the future to control high-bandwidth aerodynamic actuators distributed along the rotor blade to reduce the saturation of slower pitch actuators currently used for wind turbine blades. Local acceleration measurements are made along a rotor blade to infer operational rotor states including deflection and dynamic modal contributions. Previous work has demonstrated that acceleration measurements can be experimentally acquired on an operating wind turbine. Simulations on simplified rotor blades have also been used to demonstrate that mean blade loading can be estimated based on deflection estimates. To successfully apply accelerometers in wind turbine applications for load identification, the spectral and spatial characteristics of each excitation source must be understood so that the total acceleration measurement can be decomposed into contributions from each source. To demonstrate the decomposition of acceleration measurements in conjunction with load estimation methods, a flexible body model has been created with MSC.ADAMSThe benefit of using a simulation model as opposed

  6. Theoretical analysis of acceleration measurements in a model of an operating wind turbine.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark Allen; White, Jonathan Randall

    2010-04-01

    Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines. These unsteady loads and the resulting damage initiation and propagation are difficult to predict. Unsteady loads enter at the rotor and are transmitted to the drivetrain. The current generation of wind turbine has drivetrain-mounted vibration and bearing temperature sensors, a nacelle-mounted inertial measurement unit, and a nacelle-mounted anemometer and wind vane. Some advanced wind turbines are also equipped with strain measurements at the root of the rotor. This paper analyzes additional measurements in a rotor blade to investigate the complexity of these unsteady loads. By identifying the spatial distribution, amplitude, and frequency bandwidth of these loads, design improvements could be facilitated to reduce uncertainties in reliability predictions. In addition, dynamic load estimates could be used in the future to control high-bandwidth aerodynamic actuators distributed along the rotor blade to reduce the saturation of slower pitch actuators currently used for wind turbine blades. Local acceleration measurements are made along a rotor blade to infer operational rotor states including deflection and dynamic modal contributions. Previous work has demonstrated that acceleration measurements can be experimentally acquired on an operating wind turbine. Simulations on simplified rotor blades have also been used to demonstrate that mean blade loading can be estimated based on deflection estimates. To successfully apply accelerometers in wind turbine applications for load identification, the spectral and spatial characteristics of each excitation source must be understood so that the total acceleration measurement can be decomposed into contributions from each source. To demonstrate the decomposition of acceleration measurements in conjunction with load estimation methods, a flexible body model has been created with MSC.ADAMS{copyright} The benefit of using a simulation model

  7. Synthesis of GEMS from Shock-accelerated Crystalline Dust in Superbubbles: Model and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Bradley, John P.

    2005-01-01

    GEMS (Glass Embedded with Metals and Sulfides) are highly enigmatic yet common components of anhydrous IDPs. We have recently proposed a model of GEMS formation from shock-accelerated crystalline dust in superbubbles[1] which explains the three most perplexing properties of GEMS: pseudomorphism[2], their chemistry[3], and their size range. In this Abstract, we briefly review the main points of the model, and suggest tests that will either prove or rule out this hypothesis.

  8. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  9. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate themore » evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.« less

  10. Mean-state acceleration of cloud-resolving models and large eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-10-29

    In this study, large eddy simulations and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are routinely used to simulate boundary layer and deep convective cloud processes, aid in the development of moist physical parameterization for global models, study cloud-climate feedbacks and cloud-aerosol interaction, and as the heart of superparameterized climate models. These models are computationally demanding, placing practical constraints on their use in these applications, especially for long, climate-relevant simulations. In many situations, the horizontal-mean atmospheric structure evolves slowly compared to the turnover time of the most energetic turbulent eddies. We develop a simple scheme to reduce this time scale separation to accelerate the evolution of the mean state. Using this approach we are able to accelerate the model evolution by a factor of 2–16 or more in idealized stratocumulus, shallow and deep cumulus convection without substantial loss of accuracy in simulating mean cloud statistics and their sensitivity to climate change perturbations. As a culminating test, we apply this technique to accelerate the embedded CRMs in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model by a factor of 2, thereby showing that the method is robust and stable to realistic perturbations across spatial and temporal scales typical in a GCM.

  11. ON THE DISTRIBUTION THEORY FOR SOME CONSTRAINED LIFE TESTING EXPERIMENTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RELIABILITY, *TEST METHODS, * DISTRIBUTION THEORY , MATHEMATICAL MODELS, STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS, MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS, DECISION THEORY, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS, THESES.

  12. Particle spectra and efficiency in nonlinear relativistic shock acceleration - survey of scattering models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2016-03-01

    We include a general form for the scattering mean free path, λmfp(p), in a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of relativistic shock formation and Fermi acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations, as well as analytic work, suggest that relativistic shocks tend to produce short-scale, self-generated magnetic turbulence that leads to a scattering mean free path with a stronger momentum dependence than the λmfp ∝ p dependence for Bohm diffusion. In unmagnetized shocks, this turbulence is strong enough to dominate the background magnetic field so the shock can be treated as parallel regardless of the initial magnetic field orientation, making application to γ-ray bursts, pulsar winds, type Ibc supernovae, and extragalactic radio sources more straightforward and realistic. In addition to changing the scale of the shock precursor, we show that, when nonlinear effects from efficient Fermi acceleration are taken into account, the momentum dependence of λmfp(p) has an important influence on the efficiency of cosmic ray production as well as the accelerated particle spectral shape. These effects are absent in non-relativistic shocks and do not appear in relativistic shock models unless nonlinear effects are self-consistently described. We show, for limited examples, how the changes in Fermi acceleration translate to changes in the intensity and spectral shape of γ-ray emission from proton-proton interactions and pion-decay radiation.

  13. Accelerated longitudinal designs: An overview of modelling, power, costs and handling missing data

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Sally; Bowden, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal studies are often used to investigate age-related developmental change. Whereas a single cohort design takes a group of individuals at the same initial age and follows them over time, an accelerated longitudinal design takes multiple single cohorts, each one starting at a different age. The main advantage of an accelerated longitudinal design is its ability to span the age range of interest in a shorter period of time than would be possible with a single cohort longitudinal design. This paper considers design issues for accelerated longitudinal studies. A linear mixed effect model is considered to describe the responses over age with random effects for intercept and slope parameters. Random and fixed cohort effects are used to cope with the potential bias accelerated longitudinal designs have due to multiple cohorts. The impact of other factors such as costs and the impact of dropouts on the power of testing or the precision of estimating parameters are examined. As duration-related costs increase relative to recruitment costs the best designs shift towards shorter duration and eventually cross-sectional design being best. For designs with the same duration but differing interval between measurements, we found there was a cutoff point for measurement costs relative to recruitment costs relating to frequency of measurements. Under our model of 30% dropout there was a maximum power loss of 7%. PMID:25147228

  14. Random error model andexperiment of fiber Bragg grating acceleration sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinpeng; Fu, Haiwei; Jia, Zhen'an; Yu, Dakuan; Hong, Gao

    2016-10-01

    The random error model for evaluating FBG dynamic sensing system is proposed and established by using Allan variance, and the error recognition is experimentally demonstrated. The composition of the FBG sensing system, the characteristic of random error and error source for FBG acceleration sensing system are analyzed. The random error theoretical model based on the FBG acceleration sensing system is proposed and analyzed. In order to experimentally perform stability characterization of the system, the static output signal is achieved, and Allan variance curve is obtained by data processing, and the main coefficients of the error source can be further obtained. The model based on the Allan variance adequately demonstrates that it is feasible to evaluate the FBG system, which provides the basis for further designing, improvements and developing.

  15. Tradeoffs in Acceleration and Initialization of Superparameterized Global Atmospheric Models for MJO and Climate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. S.; Bretherton, C. S.; DeMott, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    New trade-offs are discussed in the cloud superparameterization approach to explicitly representing deep convection in global climate models. Intrinsic predictability tests show that the memory of cloud-resolving-scale organization is not critical for producing desired modes of organized convection such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). This has implications for the feasibility of data assimilation and real-world initialization for superparameterized weather forecasting. Climate simulation sensitivity tests demonstrate that 400% acceleration of cloud superparameterization is possible by restricting the 32-128 km scale regime without deteriorating the realism of the simulated MJO but the number of cloud resolving model grid columns is discovered to constrain the efficiency of vertical mixing, with consequences for the simulated liquid cloud climatology. Tuning opportunities for next generation accelerated superparameterized climate models are discussed.

  16. A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2013-07-10

    We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

  17. Acceleration of low-energy ions at parallel shocks with a focused transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-03-19

    Here we present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by parallel shocks with a focused transport model. The focused transport equation contains all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoids the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) that requires a small pitch angle anisotropy. This simulation verifies that the particles with speeds of a fraction of to a few times the shock speed can indeed be directly injected and accelerated into the DSA regime by parallel shocks. At higher energies starting from a few times the shock speed, the energy spectrum of accelerated particles is a power law with the same spectral index as the solution of standard DSA theory, although the particles are highly anisotropic in the upstream region. The intensity, however, is different from that predicted by DSA theory, indicating a different level of injection efficiency. It is found that the shock strength, the injection speed, and the intensity of an electric cross-shock potential (CSP) jump can affect the injection efficiency of the low-energy particles. A stronger shock has a higher injection efficiency. In addition, if the speed of injected particles is above a few times the shock speed, the produced power-law spectrum is consistent with the prediction of standard DSA theory in both its intensity and spectrum index with an injection efficiency of 1. CSP can increase the injection efficiency through direct particle reflection back upstream, but it has little effect on the energetic particle acceleration once the speed of injected particles is beyond a few times the shock speed. Finally, this test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection.

  18. A model for the magnetic cores of linear induction accelerator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.G.; Rose, E.A.

    1995-08-01

    Linear induction cells are used in the electron beam accelerator for the proposed Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility that would be built at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Ferrite cores are used in each cell to produce 250 kV, flat to within {plus_minus}1% for 70 ns. In the course of operating a prototype test stand for the full accelerator, circuit models have been developed for the pulsed power system and the induction cells that have been useful in achieving the {plus_minus}1% flatness requirement. The circuit models use the MicroCap IV{trademark} electronic circuit analysis program, which includes a Jiles-Atherton model for magnetic materials. In addition, the coaxial, ferrite-filled geometry of the cell is modelled by a multiple-section lumped-element transmission line. Propagation of a voltage pulse through the ferrite cores, including saturation effects, can be reproduced. The model has been compared to actual waveforms obtained from prototype operations, and good results have been obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Interest in possible future applications have led the authors to use the model to predict the behavior of accelerator cells driven by multiple voltage pulses without an intervening magnetic reset of the ferrite cores. Results show that multiple pulses can be applied to the accelerator cells without a magnetic reset, but with some degradation of later pulses. The degradation appears as a droop on the flat portion of the second (and subsequent) pulses. The droop can be corrected by shaping the waveform of the incident pulses.

  19. Clouds and Precipitation Simulated by the US DOE Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Lin, W.; Yoon, J. H.; Ma, P. L.; Rasch, P. J.; Ghan, S.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Bogenschutz, P.; Gettelman, A.; Larson, V. E.; Neale, R. B.; Park, S.; Zhang, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new US Department of Energy (DOE) climate modeling effort is to develop an Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) to accelerate the development and application of fully coupled, state-of-the-art Earth system models for scientific and energy application. ACME is a high-resolution climate model with a 0.25 degree in horizontal and more than 60 levels in the vertical. It starts from the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with notable changes to its physical parameterizations and other components. This presentation provides an overview on the ACME model's capability in simulating clouds and precipitation and its sensitivity to convection schemes. Results with using several state-of-the-art cumulus convection schemes, including those unified parameterizations that are being developed in the climate community, will be presented. These convection schemes are evaluated in a multi-scale framework including both short-range hindcasts and free-running climate simulations with both satellite data and ground-based measurements. Running climate model in short-range hindcasts has been proven to be an efficient way to understand model deficiencies. The analysis is focused on those systematic errors in clouds and precipitation simulations that are shared in many climate models. The goal is to understand what model deficiencies might be primarily responsible for these systematic errors.

  20. A Nonlinear Model for Dynamics in the Expanding Accelerating Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, A.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the outstanding problems in astrophysics is the origin of stellar coronae, winds, and, more generally, the ubiquitous existence in the universe of hot million degree (or more) plasmas. The solar corona and wind provide an accessible environment to understand plasma heating and acceleration, and this is one of the main goals of the upcoming NASA mission Solar Probe Plus, which will arrive closer to the Sun (10 Rs), within the acceleration region than any previous spacecraft. Alfvén waves, which can easily propagate along magnetic field lines from the cooler photosphere to the hot corona and above, are thought to provide a possible mechanism to supply the energy required to heat and boost the solar wind, through turbulent dissipation and pressure. In-situ observations show that a nonlinear cascade of Alfvén waves, mainly propagating outward, is taking place, and that it evolves with heliocentric distance. In spite of the well defined observational signatures, the evolution of such Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind is still a matter under debate, as neither linear theory nor numerical simulations can account for the observed properties. In particular, the effects of the expansion of the underlying solar atmosphere are a crucial element which must be taken into account, since the observed decrease in overall rms energies is best accounted for by expansion effects. Here we present a model to study the dynamics of a plasma parcel embedded in a radially accelerating solar wind, all the way from the acceleration region to the inner heliosphere, called the Accelerating Expanding Box. This model takes describes the radial evolution of turbulence and structures as they are observed in the expanding solar wind in a relatively simple way. As a first application, we show how expansion affects the onset and the radial evolution of the decay of large amplitude Alfvén waves through interaction with magnetoacoustic waves, the parametric decay instability.

  1. Life test result of Ricor K529N 1watt linear cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Ilan; Veprik, Alexander; Pundak, Nachman

    2007-04-01

    The authors summarize the results of the accelerated life testing of the Ricor type K529N 1 Watt linear split Stirling cooler. The test was conducted in the period 2003-2006, during which the cooler accumulated in excess of 27,500 working hours at an elevated ambient temperature, which is equivalent to 45,000 hours at normal ambient conditions, and performed about 7,500 operational cycles including cooldown and steady-state phases. The cryocooler performances were assessed through the cooldown time and power consumption; no visible degradation in performances was observed. After the cooler failure and the compressor disassembling, an electrical short was discovered in the driving coil. The analysis has shown that the wire insulating varnish was not suitable for such elevated temperatures. It is important to note that the cooler under test was taken from the earliest engineering series; in the later manufacturing line military grade wire with high temperature insulation was used, no customer complaints have been recorded in this instance Special attention was paid to the thorough examination of the technical condition of the critical components of the cooler interior. In particular, dynamic piston-cylinder seal, flying leads, internal O-rings and driving coil were examined in the compressor. As to the cold head, we focused on studying the conditions of the dynamic bushing-plunger seal, O-rings and displacer-regenerator. In addition, a leak test was performed to assess the condition of the metallic crushed seals. From the analysis, the authors draw the conclusion that the cooler design is adequate for long life performance (in excess of 20,000 working hours) applications.

  2. A transient MHD model applicable for the source of solar cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic model is used to describe the possible mechanisms for the source of solar cosmic ray acceleration following a solar flare. The hypothesis is based on the propagation of fast mode MHD shocks following a sudden release of energy. In this presentation, the effects of initial magnetic topology and strength on the formation of MHD shocks have been studied. The plasma beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) is considered as a measure of the initial, relative strength of the field. During dynamic mass motion, the Alfven Mach number is the more appropriate measure of the magnetic field's ability to control the outward motion. It is suggested that this model (computed self-consistently) provides the shock waves and the disturbed mass motion behind it as likely sources for solar cosmic ray acceleration.

  3. Error-Rate Estimation Based on Multi-Signal Flow Graph Model and Accelerated Radiation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueke; Xing, Kefei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Zelong

    2016-01-01

    A method of evaluating the single-event effect soft-error vulnerability of space instruments before launched has been an active research topic in recent years. In this paper, a multi-signal flow graph model is introduced to analyze the fault diagnosis and meantime to failure (MTTF) for space instruments. A model for the system functional error rate (SFER) is proposed. In addition, an experimental method and accelerated radiation testing system for a signal processing platform based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA) is presented. Based on experimental results of different ions (O, Si, Cl, Ti) under the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, the SFER of the signal processing platform is approximately 10−3(error/particle/cm2), while the MTTF is approximately 110.7 h. PMID:27583533

  4. Diffusive shock acceleration - comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, D.C.; Moebius, E.

    1987-07-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind. 68 references.

  5. Experimental Validation of a Branched Solution Model for Magnetosonic Ionization Waves in Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Thomas; Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermodynamic and electrodynamic plasma state variables within the plume of a pulsed plasma accelerator are presented. A quadruple Langmuir probe operating in current-saturation mode is used to obtain time resolved measurements of the plasma density, temperature, potential, and velocity along the central axis of the accelerator. This data is used in conjunction with a fast-framing, intensified CCD camera to develop and validate a model predicting the existence of two distinct types of ionization waves corresponding to the upper and lower solution branches of the Hugoniot curve. A deviation of less than 8% is observed between the quasi-steady, one-dimensional theoretical model and the experimentally measured plume velocity. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program in addition to the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  6. Diffusive shock acceleration - Comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Moebius, Eberhard

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind.

  7. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  8. Statistical model for field emitter activation on metallic surfaces used in high-gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagotzky, S.; Müller, G.

    2016-01-01

    Both super- and normal-conducting high-gradient linear accelerators are limited by enhanced field emission (EFE) in the accelerating structures, e.g. due to power loss or ignition of discharges. We discuss the dependence of the number density of typical emitters, i.e. particulates and surface defects, on the electric field level at which they are activated for naturally oxidized metallic surfaces. This activation is explained by the transition of a metal-insulator interface into geometric features that enhance the EFE process. A statistical model is successfully compared to systematic studies of niobium and copper relevant for recent and future linear accelerators. Our results show that the achievable surface quality of Nb might be sufficient for the suppression of EFE in the superconducting accelerating structures for the actual European XFEL but not for the planned International Linear Collider. Moreover, some effort will be required to reduce EFE and thus the breakdown rate of the normal conducting Cu structures for the Compact Linear Collider.

  9. Acceleration of PIC and CR algorithms for High Fidelity In-Space Propulsion Modeling (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-29

    RQRS M&S FUTURE WORK Integrate R&D w/ Production TODO: High-Order Fluid/ MHD GPU Models (Le/Cole*/Bilyeu PhD Research) GPU Accelerated Chemical Kinetics...propulsion modeling (Briefing Charts) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) R. Martin, H. Le, C...August 2013. 14. ABSTRACT We describe enhancements under development for multi-scale methods to be applied to the high-fidelity modeling of spacecraft

  10. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling for Accelerated Design of EV Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Kim, Gi-Heon; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2015-05-03

    This presentation provides an overview of the mechanical electrochemical-thermal (M-ECT) modeling efforts. The physical phenomena occurring in a battery are many and complex and operate at different scales (particle, electrodes, cell, and pack). A better understanding of the interplay between different physics occurring at different scales through modeling could provide insight to design improved batteries for electric vehicles. Work funded by the U.S. DOE has resulted in development of computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools to accelerate electrochemical and thermal design of batteries; mechanical modeling is under way. Three competitive CAE tools are now commercially available.

  11. Characterizing a Model of Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Based on Wave Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is a key goal in solar and heliospheric research. While there have been many theoretical advances in both topics, including suggestions that they may be intimately related, the inherent scale coupling and complexity of these phenomena limits our ability to construct models that test them on a fundamental level for realistic solar conditions. At the same time, there is an ever increasing impetus to improve our spaceweather models, and incorporating treatments for these processes that capture their basic features while remaining tractable is an important goal. With this in mind, I will give an overview of our exploration of a wave-turbulence driven (WTD) model for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration based on low-frequency Alfvénic turbulence. Here we attempt to bridge the gap between theory and practical modeling by exploring this model in 1D HD and multi-dimensional MHD contexts. The key questions that we explore are: What properties must the model possess to be a viable model for coronal heating? What is the influence of the magnetic field topology (open, closed, rapidly expanding)? And can we simultaneously capture coronal heating and solar wind acceleration with such a quasi-steady formulation? Our initial results suggest that a WTD based formulation performs adequately for a variety of solar and heliospheric conditions, while significantly reducing the number of free parameters when compared to empirical heating and solar wind models. The challenges, applications, and future prospects of this type of approach will also be discussed.

  12. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  13. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale target: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Hegelich, Bjoorn M; Bowers, Kevin J; Huang, Chengkun; Fernandez, Juan C; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine; Kwan, Thomas J T; Henig, Andreas; Yan, Xue Q; Tajima, Toshi; Habs, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for the expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness), solid-density target driven by an u.ltraintense laser. In this regime, new ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1], emerge with the potential to dramatically improve energy, efficiency, and energy spread of laser-driven ion beams. Such beams have been proposed [2] as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion [3]. Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows two dislinct times that bound the period of enhanced acceleration: t{sub 1}, when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t{sub 2}, when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A silllple dynamical model for target expansion has been derived that contains both the early, one-dimensional (lD) expansion of the target as well as three-dimensional (3D) expansion of the plasma at late times, The model assumes that expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  14. Estimation of temporal gait parameters using Bayesian models on acceleration signals.

    PubMed

    López-Nava, I H; Muñoz-Meléndez, A; Pérez Sanpablo, A I; Alessi Montero, A; Quiñones Urióstegui, I; Núñez Carrera, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system capable of performing calculation of temporal gait parameters using two low-cost wireless accelerometers and artificial intelligence-based techniques as part of a larger research project for conducting human gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects of different ages participated in this study and performed controlled walking tests. Two wireless accelerometers were placed on their ankles. Raw acceleration signals were processed in order to obtain gait patterns from characteristic peaks related to steps. A Bayesian model was implemented to classify the characteristic peaks into steps or nonsteps. The acceleration signals were segmented based on gait events, such as heel strike and toe-off, of actual steps. Temporal gait parameters, such as cadence, ambulation time, step time, gait cycle time, stance and swing phase time, simple and double support time, were estimated from segmented acceleration signals. Gait data-sets were divided into two groups of ages to test Bayesian models in order to classify the characteristic peaks. The mean error obtained from calculating the temporal gait parameters was 4.6%. Bayesian models are useful techniques that can be applied to classification of gait data of subjects at different ages with promising results.

  15. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating physiological systems modeling based on Laguerre-Volterra networks.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kostoglou, Kyriaki; Mitsis, Georgios D; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    The use of a GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in biomedical engineering and biology-related applications have shown promising results. GPU acceleration can be used to speedup computation-intensive models, such as the mathematical modeling of biological systems, which often requires the use of nonlinear modeling approaches with a large number of free parameters. In this context, we developed a CUDA-enabled version of a model which implements a nonlinear identification approach that combines basis expansions and polynomial-type networks, termed Laguerre-Volterra networks and can be used in diverse biological applications. The proposed software implementation uses the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the aforementioned modeling approach to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The initial results of the GPU-based model presented in this work, show performance improvements over the original MATLAB model.

  16. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  17. Acceleration of low-energy ions at parallel shocks with a focused transport model

    DOE PAGES

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-03-19

    Here we present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by parallel shocks with a focused transport model. The focused transport equation contains all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoids the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) that requires a small pitch angle anisotropy. This simulation verifies that the particles with speeds of a fraction of to a few times the shock speed can indeed be directly injected and accelerated into the DSA regime by parallel shocks. At higher energies starting from a few times the shock speed, the energy spectrum of acceleratedmore » particles is a power law with the same spectral index as the solution of standard DSA theory, although the particles are highly anisotropic in the upstream region. The intensity, however, is different from that predicted by DSA theory, indicating a different level of injection efficiency. It is found that the shock strength, the injection speed, and the intensity of an electric cross-shock potential (CSP) jump can affect the injection efficiency of the low-energy particles. A stronger shock has a higher injection efficiency. In addition, if the speed of injected particles is above a few times the shock speed, the produced power-law spectrum is consistent with the prediction of standard DSA theory in both its intensity and spectrum index with an injection efficiency of 1. CSP can increase the injection efficiency through direct particle reflection back upstream, but it has little effect on the energetic particle acceleration once the speed of injected particles is beyond a few times the shock speed. Finally, this test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection.« less

  18. A model to calculate the induced dose rate around an 18 MV ELEKTA linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bruce; Walker, Anne; Mackay, Ranald

    2003-03-07

    The dose rate due to activity induced by (gamma, n) reactions around an ELEKTA Precise accelerator running at 18 MV is reported. A model to calculate the induced dose rate for a variety of working practices has been derived and compared to the measured values. From this model, the dose received by the staff using the machine can be estimated. From measured dose rates at the face of the linear accelerator for a 10 x 10 cm2 jaw setting at 18 MV an activation coefficient per MU was derived for each of the major activation products. The relative dose rates at points around the linac head, for different energy and jaw settings, were measured. Dose rates adjacent to the patient support system and portal imager were also measured. A model to calculate the dose rate at these points was derived, and compared to those measured over a typical working week. The model was then used to estimate the maximum dose to therapists for the current working schedule on this machine. Calculated dose rates at the linac face agreed to within +/- 12% of those measured over a week, with a typical dose rate of 4.5 microSv h(-1) 2 min after the beam has stopped. The estimated maximum annual whole body dose for a treatment therapist, with the machine treating at only 18 MV, for 60000 MUs per week was 2.5 mSv. This compares well with value of 2.9 mSv published for a Clinac 21EX. A model has been derived to calculate the dose from the four dominant activation products of an ELEKTA Precise 18 MV linear accelerator. This model is a useful tool to calculate the induced dose rate around the treatment head. The model can be used to estimate the dose to the staff for typical working patterns.

  19. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  20. The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A: Antenna Number 2 Bearing Assembly Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Four bearing assemblies, lubricated with Apiezon C oil with 5% lead naphthenate (PbNp), were life tested in support of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). These assemblies were tested continuously for five to six years using the scanning pattern of the flight instrument. A post-life-test analysis was performed on two of the assemblies to evaluate the lubricant behavior and wear in the bearings.

  1. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1992-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds stress model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method to be obtained with both turbulence models. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equation in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared to experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement for the mean flow velocity, but RSM yields better predictions of the Reynolds stresses.

  2. Acceleration for microflow simulations of high-order moment models by using lower-order model correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhicheng; Li, Ruo; Qiao, Zhonghua

    2016-12-01

    We study the acceleration of steady-state computation for microflow, which is modeled by the high-order moment models derived recently from the steady-state Boltzmann equation with BGK-type collision term. By using the lower-order model correction, a novel nonlinear multi-level moment solver is developed. Numerical examples verify that the resulting solver improves the convergence significantly thus is able to accelerate the steady-state computation greatly. The behavior of the solver is also numerically investigated. It is shown that the convergence rate increases, indicating the solver would be more efficient, as the total levels increases. Three order reduction strategies of the solver are considered. Numerical results show that the most efficient order reduction strategy would be ml-1 = ⌈ml / 2 ⌉.

  3. Using a dedicated education unit clinical education model with second-degree accelerated nursing program students.

    PubMed

    Sharpnack, Patricia A; Koppelman, Catherine; Fellows, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    Rising health care costs have underscored the need for new graduates to effectively transition to professional practice. Effective academic-practice partnerships, such as dedicated education units (DEUs), can be useful in facilitating the transfer of knowledge from the classroom to the clinical setting. This randomized experimental study found the DEU clinical model to be valuable in facilitating the transfer of knowledge in second-degree accelerated program students as evaluated by course, simulation, and standardized assessment scores and self-evaluations. Successful transition to clinical practice is reported by practice partners; time allotted for orientation program requirements was reduced and retention on the unit of hire was improved. Additional research is needed to understand the effectiveness of second-degree accelerated nursing programs and how to revise the clinical education element of the program to meet the unique needs of these students.

  4. New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

    2005-11-01

    For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

  5. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  6. Efficient modeling of laser-plasma accelerator staging experiments using INF&RNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    The computational framework INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid & paRticle simulatioN cOde) allows for fast and accurate modeling, in 2D cylindrical geometry, of several aspects of laser-plasma accelerator physics. In this paper, we present some of the new features of the code, including the quasistatic Particle-In-Cell (PIC)/fluid modality, and describe using different computational grids and time steps for the laser envelope and the plasma wake. These and other features allow for a speedup of several orders of magnitude compared to standard full 3D PIC simulations while still retaining physical fidelity. INF&RNO is used to support the experimental activity at the BELLA Center, and we will present an example of the application of the code to the laser-plasma accelerator staging experiment.

  7. Solving large-scale sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems of equations for accelerator modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gene Golub; Kwok Ko

    2009-03-30

    The solutions of sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems constitute one of the key computational kernels in the discretization of partial differential equations for the modeling of linear accelerators. The computational challenges faced by existing techniques for solving those sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems call for continuing research to improve on the algorithms so that ever increasing problem size as required by the physics application can be tackled. Under the support of this award, the filter algorithm for solving large sparse eigenvalue problems was developed at Stanford to address the computational difficulties in the previous methods with the goal to enable accelerator simulations on then the world largest unclassified supercomputer at NERSC for this class of problems. Specifically, a new method, the Hemitian skew-Hemitian splitting method, was proposed and researched as an improved method for solving linear systems with non-Hermitian positive definite and semidefinite matrices.

  8. Electron Fermi acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps: Computational and analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Gisler, G. ); Lemons, D. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors consider the heating and acceleration of electrons trapped on magnetic field lines between approaching magnetic mirrors. Such a collapsing magnetic trap and consequent electron energization can occur whenever a curved (or straight) flux tube drifts into a relatively straight (or curved) perpendicular shock. The relativistic, three-dimensional, collisionless test particle simulations show that an initial thermal electron distribution is bulk heated while a few individual electrons are accelerated to many times their original energy before they escape the trap. Upstream field-aligned beams and downstream pancake distributions perpendicular to the field are predicted. In the appropriate limit the simulation results agree well with a nonrelativistic analytic model of the distribution of escaping electrons which is based on the first adiabatic invariant and energy conservation between collisions with the mirrors. Space science and astrophysical applications are discussed.

  9. Effect of driver over-acceleration on traffic breakdown in three-phase cellular automaton traffic flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hermanns, Gerhard; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Based on simulations with cellular automaton (CA) traffic flow models, a generic physical feature of the three-phase models studied in the paper is disclosed. The generic feature is a discontinuous character of driver over-acceleration caused by a combination of two qualitatively different mechanisms of over-acceleration: (i) Over-acceleration through lane changing to a faster lane, (ii) over-acceleration occurring in car-following without lane changing. Based on this generic feature a new three-phase CA traffic flow model is developed. This CA model explains the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown in real heterogeneous traffic flow consisting of passenger vehicles and trucks. The model simulates also quantitative traffic pattern characteristics as measured in real heterogeneous flow.

  10. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds Stress Model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equations in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared with experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement with mean flow velocity but RSM yields better prediction of the Reynolds stresses.

  11. Computational models reduce complexity and accelerate insight into cardiac signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jason H; Saucerman, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-07

    Cardiac signaling networks exhibit considerable complexity in size and connectivity. The intrinsic complexity of these networks complicates the interpretation of experimental findings. This motivates new methods for investigating the mechanisms regulating cardiac signaling networks and the consequences these networks have on cardiac physiology and disease. Next-generation experimental techniques are also generating a wealth of genomic and proteomic data that can be difficult to analyze or interpret. Computational models are poised to play a key role in addressing these challenges. Computational models have a long history in contributing to the understanding of cardiac physiology and are useful for identifying biological mechanisms, inferring multiscale consequences to cell signaling activities and reducing the complexity of large data sets. Models also integrate well with experimental studies to explain experimental observations and generate new hypotheses. Here, we review the contributions computational modeling approaches have made to the analysis of cardiac signaling networks and forecast opportunities for computational models to accelerate cardiac signaling research.

  12. Higher-order ice-sheet modelling accelerated by multigrid on graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, Christian; Egholm, David

    2013-04-01

    Higher-order ice flow modelling is a very computer intensive process owing primarily to the nonlinear influence of the horizontal stress coupling. When applied for simulating long-term glacial landscape evolution, the ice-sheet models must consider very long time series, while both high temporal and spatial resolution is needed to resolve small effects. The use of higher-order and full stokes models have therefore seen very limited usage in this field. However, recent advances in graphics card (GPU) technology for high performance computing have proven extremely efficient in accelerating many large-scale scientific computations. The general purpose GPU (GPGPU) technology is cheap, has a low power consumption and fits into a normal desktop computer. It could therefore provide a powerful tool for many glaciologists working on ice flow models. Our current research focuses on utilising the GPU as a tool in ice-sheet and glacier modelling. To this extent we have implemented the Integrated Second-Order Shallow Ice Approximation (iSOSIA) equations on the device using the finite difference method. To accelerate the computations, the GPU solver uses a non-linear Red-Black Gauss-Seidel iterator coupled with a Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) multigrid setup to further aid convergence. The GPU finite difference implementation provides the inherent parallelization that scales from hundreds to several thousands of cores on newer cards. We demonstrate the efficiency of the GPU multigrid solver using benchmark experiments.

  13. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  14. Particle acceleration and gamma rays in solar flares: Recent observations and new modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Gan, W. Q.

    2012-09-01

    Experiments on SMM, GAMMA, Yohkoh, GRANAT, Compton GRO, INTEGRAL, RHESSI and CORONAS-F satellites over the past three decades have provided copious data for fundamental research relating to particle acceleration, transport and energetics of flares and to the ambient abundance of the solar corona, chromosphere and photosphere. We summarize main results of solar gamma-astronomy (including some results of several joint Russian-Chinese projects) and try to appraise critically a real contribution of those results into modern understanding of solar flares, particle acceleration at the Sun and some properties of the solar atmosphere. Recent findings based on the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS-F measurements (source locations, spectrum peculiarities, 3He abundance etc.) are especially discussed. Some unusual features of extreme solar events (e.g., 28 October 2003 and 20 January 2005) have been found in gamma-ray production and generation of relativistic particles (solar cosmic rays, or SCR). A number of different plausible assumptions are considered concerning the details of underlying physical processes during large flares: (1) existence of a steeper distribution of surrounding medium density as compared to a standard astrophysical model (HSRA) for the solar atmosphere; (2) enhanced content of the 3He isotope; (3) formation of magnetic trap with specific properties; (4) prevailing non-uniform (e.g., fan-like) velocity (angular) distributions of secondary neutrons, etc. It is emphasized that real progress in this field may be achieved only by combination of gamma-ray data in different energy ranges with multi-wave and energetic particle observations during the same event. We especially note several promising lines for the further studies: (1) resonant acceleration of the 3He ions in the corona; (2) timing of the flare evolution by gamma-ray fluxes in energy range above 90 MeV; (3) separation of gamma-ray fluxes from different sources at/near the Sun (e.g., different

  15. Particle optics and accelerator modeling software for industrial and laboratory beamline design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.

    1998-04-01

    The expanding variety of accelerator applications in research and industry places increased demands upon scientists and engineers involved in developing new accelerator and beamline designs. Computer codes for particle optics simulation have always played an important role in the design process and enhanced software tools offer the promise of improved productivity for beamline designers. This paper summarizes recent work on the development of advanced graphic user interface (GUI) software components, that can be linked directly to many of the standard particle optics programs used in the accelerator community, and which are aimed at turning that promise of improved productivity into a reality. An object oriented programming (OOP) approach has been adopted and a number of GUI components have been developed that run on several different operating systems. The emphasis is on assisting users in the setup and running of the optics programs without requiring any knowledge of the format, syntax, or similar requirements of the input. The components are being linked with several popular optics programs, including TRANSPORT, TURTLE, TRACE 3-D and PARMILA, to form integrated easy-to-use applications. Several advanced applications linking the GUI components with Lie algebra and other high-order simulation codes, as well as system level and facility modeling codes, are also under development. An overview of the work completed to date is presented, and examples of the new tools running on the Windows 95 operating system are illustrated.

  16. KINETIC MODELING OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN A SOLAR NULL-POINT RECONNECTION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, G.; Haugbolle, T.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-07-10

    The primary focus of this paper is on the particle acceleration mechanism in solar coronal three-dimensional reconnection null-point regions. Starting from a potential field extrapolation of a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) magnetogram taken on 2002 November 16, we first performed magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with horizontal motions observed by SOHO applied to the photospheric boundary of the computational box. After a build-up of electric current in the fan plane of the null point, a sub-section of the evolved MHD data was used as initial and boundary conditions for a kinetic particle-in-cell model of the plasma. We find that sub-relativistic electron acceleration is mainly driven by a systematic electric field in the current sheet. A non-thermal population of electrons with a power-law distribution in energy forms in the simulated pre-flare phase, featuring a power-law index of about -1.78. This work provides a first step toward bridging the gap between macroscopic scales on the order of hundreds of Mm and kinetic scales on the order of centimeter in the solar corona, and explains how to achieve such a cross-scale coupling by utilizing either physical modifications or (equivalent) modifications of the constants of nature. With their exceptionally high resolution-up to 135 billion particles and 3.5 billion grid cells of size 17.5 km-these simulations offer a new opportunity to study particle acceleration in solar-like settings.

  17. Exploiting multi-scale parallelism for large scale numerical modelling of laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Vieira, J.; Fiuza, F.; Davidson, A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modelling to further understand the underlying physics and identify optimal regimes, but large scale modelling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires the efficient use of state-of-the-art petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed/shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modelling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magnitude on the same hardware. Finally, scalability to over ˜106 cores and sustained performance over ˜2 P Flops is demonstrated, opening the way for large scale modelling of LWFA scenarios.

  18. Bayesian framework for parametric bivariate accelerated lifetime modeling and its application to hospital acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, D; Ryu, D; Ergönül, Ö; Ebrahimi, N

    2016-03-01

    Infectious diseases that can be spread directly or indirectly from one person to another are caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. Infectious diseases remain one of the greatest threats to human health and the analysis of infectious disease data is among the most important application of statistics. In this article, we develop Bayesian methodology using parametric bivariate accelerated lifetime model to study dependency between the colonization and infection times for Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria which is leading cause of infection among the hospital infection agents. We also study their associations with covariates such as age, gender, apache score, antibiotics use 3 months before admission and invasive mechanical ventilation use. To account for singularity, we use Singular Bivariate Extreme Value distribution to model residuals in Bivariate Accelerated lifetime model under the fully Bayesian framework. We analyze a censored data related to the colonization and infection collected in five major hospitals in Turkey using our methodology. The data analysis done in this article is for illustration of our proposed method and can be applied to any situation that our model can be used.

  19. Observation and Modeling of a Termination Shock in a Solar Eruption as a Possible Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Dale E.; Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S.; Shen, Chengcai; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Solar eruptions and their associated solar flares are the most energetic particle accelerators in our solar system. Yet the acceleration mechanism remains uncertain. A possible candidate often invoked in the standard picture of solar eruptions is a termination shock, produced by fast reconnection outflows impinging upon dense, closed loops in a helmet-type geometry. However, the importance of termination shocks in solar particle acceleration remains controversial, mainly because there has been no direct detection of such shocks. Here we report direct imaging of the location and evolution of a termination shock during the rise phase of a solar eruption. The shock appears at radio wavelengths as a narrow surface sandwiched between multitudes of downward-moving plasma blobs and the underlying, newly-reconnected flaring loops, and evolves coherently with a loop-top hard X-ray source in the shock downstream region. The shock produces many short-lived, point-like radio sources, each interpreted as emission from a turbulence cell interacting with fast (nonthermal) electrons. These point-like radio sources clearly outline the termination shock front and their positions change in reaction to the arrival of the fast plasma blobs, which are well-reproduced by our numerical simulations based on a resistive magnetohydrodynamics reconnection model in a standard two-ribbon flare geometry. We further show that a temporary disruption of the shock coincides with a reduction of radio and hard X-ray emission associated with the energetic electron population. Our observations strongly favor a scenario in which the termination shock is responsible for accelerating electrons to high energies.

  20. A new PMHS model for lumbar spine injuries during vertical acceleration.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Storvik, Steven G; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Fijalkowski, Ronald J; Pintar, Frank A; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2011-08-01

    Ejection from military aircraft exerts substantial loads on the lumbar spine. Fractures remain common, although the overall survivability of the event has considerably increased over recent decades. The present study was performed to develop and validate a biomechanically accurate experimental model for the high vertical acceleration loading to the lumbar spine that occurs during the catapult phase of aircraft ejection. The model consisted of a vertical drop tower with two horizontal platforms attached to a monorail using low friction linear bearings. A total of four human cadaveric spine specimens (T12-L5) were tested. Each lumbar column was attached to the lower platform through a load cell. Weights were added to the upper platform to match the thorax, head-neck, and upper extremity mass of a 50th percentile male. Both platforms were raised to the drop height and released in unison. Deceleration characteristics of the lower platform were modulated by foam at the bottom of the drop tower. The upper platform applied compressive inertial loads to the top of the specimen during deceleration. All specimens demonstrated complex bending during ejection simulations, with the pattern dependent upon the anterior-posterior location of load application. The model demonstrated adequate inter-specimen kinematic repeatability on a spinal level-by-level basis under different subfailure loading scenarios. One specimen was then exposed to additional tests of increasing acceleration to induce identifiable injury and validate the model as an injury-producing system. Multiple noncontiguous vertebral fractures were obtained at an acceleration of 21 g with 488 g/s rate of onset. This clinically relevant trauma consisted of burst fracture at L1 and wedge fracture at L4. Compression of the vertebral body approached 60% during the failure test, with -6,106 N axial force and 168 Nm flexion moment. Future applications of this model include developing a better understanding of the vertebral

  1. SPFP: Speed without compromise—A mixed precision model for GPU accelerated molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Grand, Scott; Götz, Andreas W.; Walker, Ross C.

    2013-02-01

    A new precision model is proposed for the acceleration of all-atom classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). This precision model replaces double precision arithmetic with fixed point integer arithmetic for the accumulation of force components as compared to a previously introduced model that uses mixed single/double precision arithmetic. This significantly boosts performance on modern GPU hardware without sacrificing numerical accuracy. We present an implementation for NVIDIA GPUs of both generalized Born implicit solvent simulations as well as explicit solvent simulations using the particle mesh Ewald (PME) algorithm for long-range electrostatics using this precision model. Tests demonstrate both the performance of this implementation as well as its numerical stability for constant energy and constant temperature biomolecular MD as compared to a double precision CPU implementation and double and mixed single/double precision GPU implementations.

  2. The ACCEL model for accelerating the detoxification kinetics of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, Elizabeth P; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2006-06-01

    The two-tank accelerator/aerator modification of activated sludge significantly increases the biodegradation of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenation reactions, such as phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP). The small accelerator tank has a controlled low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration that can enrich the biomass in NADH + H+. It also has a very high specific growth rate (mu acc) that up-regulates the biomass's content of the monooxygenase enzyme. Here, we develop and test the ACCEL model, which quantifies all key phenomena taking place when the accelerator/aerator system is used to enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenations. Monooxygenation kinetics follow a multiplicative relationship in which the organic substrates (phenol or DCP) and DO have separate Monod terms, while the biomass's content of NADH + H+ has a first-order term. The monooxygenase enzyme has different affinities (K values) for phenol and DCP. The biomass's NADH + H+ content is based on a proportioning of NAD(H) according to the relative rates of NADH + H+ sources and sinks. Biomass synthesis occurs simultaneously through utilization of acetate, phenol, and DCP, but each has its own true yield. The ACCEL model accurately simulates all trends for one-tank and two-tank experiments in which acetate, phenol, and DCP are biodegraded together. In particular, DCP removal is affected most by DOacc and the retention-time ratio, Theta acc/Theta total. Adding an accelerator tank dramatically increases DCP removal, and the best DCP removal occurs for 0.2 < DOacc < 0.5 mg/l and 0.08 < Theta acc/Theta total < 0.2. The rates of phenol and DCP utilization follow the multiplicative relationship with a maximum specific rate coefficient proportional to mu acc. Finally, mu acc increases rapidly for Theta acc/Theta total < 0.25, acetate removal in the accelerator fuels the high mu acc, and the biomass's NADH + H+ content increases very dramatically for DO acc < 0.25 mg/l.

  3. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1. The Numerical Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-10

    The Astrophysical Journal, 702:1553–1566, 2009 September 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/702/2/1553 C© 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights...to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas. Key words: acceleration of particles – hydrodynamics...and can be viewed as an elementary process of sequential excitation of multiple loops. Evolution on longer timescales (say, !100 s) involves multiple

  4. A technique for modeling the Earth's gravity field on the basis of satellite accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; Sluijs, A. A. Van Eck Van Der

    2004-09-01

    A technique is proposed for Earth’s gravity field modeling on the basis of satellite accelerations that are derived from precise orbit data. The functional model rests on Newton’s second law. The computational procedure is based on the pre-conditioned conjugate-gradient (PCCG) method. The data are treated as weighted average accelerations rather than as point-wise ones. As a result, a simple three-point numerical differentiation scheme can be used to derive them. Noise in the orbit-derived accelerations is strongly dependent on frequency. Therefore, the key element of the proposed technique is frequency-dependent data weighting. Fast convergence of the PCCG procedure is ensured by a block-diagonal pre-conditioner (approximation of the normal matrix), which is derived under the so-called Colombo assumptions. Both uninterrupted data sets and data with gaps can be handled. The developed technique is compared with other approaches: (1) the energy balance approach (based on the energy conservation law) and (2) the traditional approach (based on the integration of variational equations). Theoretical considerations, supported by a numerical study, show that the proposed technique is more accurate than the energy balance approach and leads to approximately the same results as the traditional one. The former finding is explained by the fact that the energy balance approach is only sensitive to the along-track force component. Information about the cross-track and the radial component of the gravitational potential gradient is lost because the corresponding force components do no work and do not contribute to the energy balance. Furthermore, it is shown that the proposed technique is much (possibly, orders of magnitude) faster than the traditional one because it does not require the computation of the normal matrix. Hints are given on how the proposed technique can be adapted to the explicit assembling of the normal matrix if the latter is needed for the computation of

  5. Kernel Smoothed Profile Likelihood Estimation in the Accelerated Failure Time Frailty Model for Clustered Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Lu, Wenbin; Zhang, Jiajia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Clustered survival data frequently arise in biomedical applications, where event times of interest are clustered into groups such as families. In this article we consider an accelerated failure time frailty model for clustered survival data and develop nonparametric maximum likelihood estimation for it via a kernel smoother aided EM algorithm. We show that the proposed estimator for the regression coefficients is consistent, asymptotically normal and semiparametric efficient when the kernel bandwidth is properly chosen. An EM-aided numerical differentiation method is derived for estimating its variance. Simulation studies evaluate the finite sample performance of the estimator, and it is applied to the Diabetic Retinopathy data set. PMID:24443587

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of ionospheric oxygen acceleration by cyclotron resonance with broad-band electromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retterer, John M.; Chang, Tom; Crew, G. B.; Jasperse, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated that cyclotron resonance with observed electric field fluctuations is responsible for production of the oxygen-ion conics that are observed by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the central plasma-sheet region of the earth's magnetosphere. The ion-velocity distribution is described by a quasi-linear diffusion equation which is solved by the Monte Carlo technique. The acceleration produced by the observed wave spectrum agrees well with the ion observations, in both form and magnitude. This is believed to represent the first successful comparison of an observed conic with any theoretical model.

  7. Microwave accelerated synthesis of isoxazole hydrazide inhibitors of the system xc− transporter: Initial homology model

    PubMed Central

    Matti, Afnan A.; Mirzaei, Joseph; Rudolph, John; Smith, Stephen A.; Newell, Jayme L.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.; Braden, Michael R.; Bridges, Richard J.; Natale, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) technology provided a good method to obtain selective and open isoxazole ligands that bind to and inhibit the Sxc− antiporter. The MARS provided numerous advantages, including: shorter time, better yield and higher purity of the product. Of the newly synthesized series of isoxazoles the salicyl hydrazide 6 exhibited the highest level of inhibitory activity in the transport assay. A homology model has been developed to summarize the SAR results to date, and provide a working hypothesis for future studies. PMID:24042010

  8. Nuclear modeling for applications in medical radiation therapy and accelerator-driven technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1995-06-01

    An understanding of the interactions of neutrons and protons below a few hundred MeV with nuclei is important for a number of applications. In this paper, two new applications are discussed: radiation transport calculations of energy deposition in fast neutron and proton cancer radiotherapy to optimize the dose given to a tumor; and intermediate-energy proton accelerators which are currently being designed for a range of applications including the destruction of long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. We describe nuclear theory calculations of direct, preequilibrium, and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms important for the modeling of these systems.

  9. Microwave accelerated synthesis of isoxazole hydrazide inhibitors of the system xc- transporter: Initial homology model.

    PubMed

    Matti, Afnan A; Mirzaei, Joseph; Rudolph, John; Smith, Stephen A; Newell, Jayme L; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Braden, Michael R; Bridges, Richard J; Natale, Nicholas R

    2013-11-01

    Microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) technology provided a good method to obtain selective and open isoxazole ligands that bind to and inhibit the Sxc- antiporter. The MARS provided numerous advantages, including: shorter time, better yield and higher purity of the product. Of the newly synthesized series of isoxazoles the salicyl hydrazide 6 exhibited the highest level of inhibitory activity in the transport assay. A homology model has been developed to summarize the SAR results to date, and provide a working hypothesis for future studies.

  10. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  11. Bioactive peptides released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under accelerated autolysis in a wine model system.

    PubMed

    Alcaide-Hidalgo, J M; Pueyo, E; Polo, M C; Martínez-Rodríguez, A J

    2007-09-01

    The ACE inhibitory activity (IACE) and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC-FL) values of yeast peptides isolated from a model wine during accelerated autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. Samples were taken at 6, 24, 48, 121, and 144 h of autolysis. Peptide concentration increased throughout autolysis process. Peptides were fractionated into 2 fractions: F1, constituted by hydrophilic peptides, and F2, containing hydrophobic peptides. Both IACE activity and ORAC-FL values increased during 121 h of autolysis, then decreased afterward. Peptide fraction F2 was the main fraction involved in IACE activity and ORAC-FL.

  12. Time-dependent Models for Blazar Emission with the Second-order Fermi Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Kusunose, Masaaki; Toma, Kenji; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101-232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 1038 erg s-1, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  13. HSP70i Accelerates Depigmentation in a Mouse Model of Autoimmune Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Cecele J.; McCracken, James; Hariharan, Vidhya; Klarquist, Jared; Oyarbide-Valencia, Kepa; Guevara-Patiño, José A.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the skin. Progressive depigmentation accelerates in response to stress. Personal trauma, contact with bleaching phenols, overexposure to UV, and mechanical injury can lead to progressive loss of melanocytes. This study was focused on the role of stress protein heat shock protein (HSP)70 for translating stress into an autoimmune disease to melanocytes. Intracellular HSP70 can act as a cytoprotectant, preventing apoptosis in cells under stress. Isoform HSP70i can be secreted by live cells, and in prior in vitro studies, HSP70 has been shown to activate dendritic cells and elicit an immune response to chaperoned proteins and peptides. Here, the role of HSP70 in precipitating and perpetuating vitiligo was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of autoimmune vitiligo. In this model, depigmentation was introduced by gene gun vaccination with eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding melanocyte differentiation antigens. Inclusion of human and mouse-derived inducible HSP70 in the vaccination protocol significantly increased and accelerated depigmentation in this model, accompanied by the induction of prolonged humoral responses to HSP70. Cytotoxicity toward targets loaded with a K(b)-restricted tyrosinase-related protein 2-derived peptide correlated with depigmentation. The data presented strongly support a role for HSP70i in progressive depigmentation in vivo. PMID:18337834

  14. Time-dependent models for blazar emission with the second-order Fermi acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101–232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1}, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  15. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  16. Generalized accelerated failure time spatial frailty model for arbitrarily censored data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiming; Hanson, Timothy; Zhang, Jiajia

    2016-03-18

    Flexible incorporation of both geographical patterning and risk effects in cancer survival models is becoming increasingly important, due in part to the recent availability of large cancer registries. Most spatial survival models stochastically order survival curves from different subpopulations. However, it is common for survival curves from two subpopulations to cross in epidemiological cancer studies and thus interpretable standard survival models can not be used without some modification. Common fixes are the inclusion of time-varying regression effects in the proportional hazards model or fully nonparametric modeling, either of which destroys any easy interpretability from the fitted model. To address this issue, we develop a generalized accelerated failure time model which allows stratification on continuous or categorical covariates, as well as providing per-variable tests for whether stratification is necessary via novel approximate Bayes factors. The model is interpretable in terms of how median survival changes and is able to capture crossing survival curves in the presence of spatial correlation. A detailed Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is presented for posterior inference and a freely available function frailtyGAFT is provided to fit the model in the R package spBayesSurv. We apply our approach to a subset of the prostate cancer data gathered for Louisiana by the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program of the National Cancer Institute.

  17. A cellular automata traffic flow model considering the heterogeneity of acceleration and delay probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Lang; Wong, S. C.; Min, Jie; Tian, Shuo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the cellular automata traffic flow model, which considers the heterogeneity of vehicle acceleration and the delay probability of vehicles. Computer simulations are used to identify three typical phases in the model: free-flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving traffic jam. In the synchronized flow region of the fundamental diagram, the low and high velocity vehicles compete with each other and play an important role in the evolution of the system. The analysis shows that there are two types of bistable phases. However, in the original Nagel and Schreckenberg cellular automata traffic model, there are only two kinds of traffic conditions, namely, free-flow and traffic jams. The synchronized flow phase and bistable phase have not been found.

  18. A proximity algorithm accelerated by Gauss-Seidel iterations for L1/TV denoising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qia; Micchelli, Charles A.; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-09-01

    Our goal in this paper is to improve the computational performance of the proximity algorithms for the L1/TV denoising model. This leads us to a new characterization of all solutions to the L1/TV model via fixed-point equations expressed in terms of the proximity operators. Based upon this observation we develop an algorithm for solving the model and establish its convergence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can be accelerated through the use of the componentwise Gauss-Seidel iteration so that the CPU time consumed is significantly reduced. Numerical experiments using the proposed algorithm for impulsive noise removal are included, with a comparison to three recently developed algorithms. The numerical results show that while the proposed algorithm enjoys a high quality of the restored images, as the other three known algorithms do, it performs significantly better in terms of computational efficiency measured in the CPU time consumed.

  19. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  20. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  1. Microgrooved Polymer Substrates Promote Collective Cell Migration To Accelerate Fracture Healing in an in Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Dong, Hua; Li, Yuli; Zhu, Ye; Zeng, Lei; Gao, Huichang; Yuan, Bo; Chen, Xiaofeng; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-10-21

    Surface topography can affect cell adhesion, morphology, polarity, cytoskeleton organization, and osteogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of topography on the fracture healing in repairing nonunion and large bone defects. Microgrooved topography on the surface of bone implants may promote cell migration into the fracture gap to accelerate fracture healing. To prove this hypothesis, we used an in vitro fracture (wound) healing assay on the microgrooved polycaprolactone substrates to study the effect of microgroove widths and depths on the osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) migration and the subsequent healing. We found that the microgrooved substrates promoted MG-63 cells to migrate collectively into the wound gap, which serves as a fracture model, along the grooves and ridges as compared with the flat substrates. Moreover, the groove widths did not show obvious influence on the wound healing whereas the smaller groove depths tended to favor the collective cell migration and thus subsequent healing. The microgrooved substrates accelerated the wound healing by facilitating the collective cell migration into the wound gaps but not by promoting the cell proliferation. Furthermore, microgrooves were also found to promote the migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to heal the fracture model. Though osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was not improved on the microgrooved substrate, collagen I and minerals deposited by hMSCs were organized in a way similar to those in the extracellular matrix of natural bone. These findings suggest the necessity in using microgrooved implants in enhancing fracture healing in bone repair.

  2. Monte Carlo model of the female RANDO phantom irradiation with an Elekta Precise linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, V.; Miró, R.; Juste, B.; Santos, A.; Verdú, G.

    2010-07-01

    Anthropomorphic laboratory phantoms are a very useful aid in radiotherapy treatment planning. Such phantoms allow estimating detailed mapping of dose distribution. The phantom utilized in this work is the female RANDO ® Phantom, which represents a 163 cm tall and 54 kg figure that does not have arms or legs. It is constructed with a natural human skeleton which is cast inside soft tissue-simulating material and lung-simulating material. A set of computer tomography images of the RANDO ® Phantom was obtained and segmented. Once the slices were segmented and the pixel intensities related with the phantom materials, they were input to a Matlab algorithm developed by the authors and validated in previous works, which uses the CT slices to build up a three-dimensional numerical voxelized phantom by pixel and material identification, and writes it in the MCNP5 input deck format utilizing the lattice card, together with an MCNP5 model for the Elekta Precise Linear Accelerator. The Linear Accelerator model has also been also validated in previous works. The simulation results in mapping of dose distribution inside the phantom, utilizing the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which allows registering the results over the problem geometry.

  3. A Model-based Prognostics Methodology for Electrolytic Capacitors Based on Electrical Overstress Accelerated Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Kulkarni, Chetan; Biswas, Gautam; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A remaining useful life prediction methodology for electrolytic capacitors is presented. This methodology is based on the Kalman filter framework and an empirical degradation model. Electrolytic capacitors are used in several applications ranging from power supplies on critical avionics equipment to power drivers for electro-mechanical actuators. These devices are known for their comparatively low reliability and given their criticality in electronics subsystems they are a good candidate for component level prognostics and health management. Prognostics provides a way to assess remaining useful life of a capacitor based on its current state of health and its anticipated future usage and operational conditions. We present here also, experimental results of an accelerated aging test under electrical stresses. The data obtained in this test form the basis for a remaining life prediction algorithm where a model of the degradation process is suggested. This preliminary remaining life prediction algorithm serves as a demonstration of how prognostics methodologies could be used for electrolytic capacitors. In addition, the use degradation progression data from accelerated aging, provides an avenue for validation of applications of the Kalman filter based prognostics methods typically used for remaining useful life predictions in other applications.

  4. Unphysical kinetic effects in particle-in-cell modeling of laser wakefield accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Shadwick, B A; Geddes, C G R; Esarey, E; Schroeder, C B; Leemans, W P

    2008-07-01

    Unphysical heating and macroparticle trapping that arise in the numerical modeling of laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell codes are investigated. A dark current free laser wakefield accelerator stage, in which no trapping of background plasma electrons into the plasma wave should occur, and a highly nonlinear cavitated wake with self-trapping, are modeled. Numerical errors can lead to errors in the macroparticle orbits in both phase and momentum. These errors grow as a function of distance behind the drive laser and can be large enough to result in unphysical trapping in the plasma wake. The resulting numerical heating in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions grows much faster and to a higher level than the known numerical grid heating of an initially warm plasma in an undriven system. The amount of heating, at least in the region immediately behind the laser pulse, can, in general, be decreased by decreasing the grid size, increasing the number of particles per cell, or using smoother interpolation methods. The effect of numerical heating on macroparticle trapping is less severe in a highly nonlinear cavitated wake, since trapping occurs in the first plasma wave period immediately behind the laser pulse.

  5. A Highly-Parallelized Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) Model Using GPU Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Sudip; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-11-01

    Perfectly stirred reactors (PSR), which are idealized systems, where species undergoing chemical reactions have high rate of mixing, have been found to be very useful in testing and developing chemical reaction mechanisms for combustion research. The PSR model requires solving systems of nonlinear algebraic equations governing the chemical reactions, which typically are of the order of hundreds for realistic engineering systems and also involve multiple time scales ranging over a few orders of magnitude. As a result, the equations are stiff and the solution is highly compute-intensive. In spite of dramatic improvements in central processing units (CPUs) made during the past several decades, PSR solutions, while they remain feasible are computationally very expensive. An alternative approach is the application of accelerator technologies, such as graphics processing units (GPUs) that can improve the performance of such algorithms. A highly parallelized GPU implementation is presented for the PSR model, using a robust and efficient non-linear solver. Parallel performance metrics are presented to demonstrate the capability of GPUs to accelerate chemical kinetics calculations.

  6. Dynamic inversion method based on the time-staggered stereo-modeling scheme and its acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hao; Yang, Dinghui; Wu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    A set of second-order differential equations describing the space-time behaviour of derivatives of displacement with respect to model parameters (i.e. waveform sensitivities) is obtained via taking the derivative of the original wave equations. The dynamic inversion method obtains sensitivities of the seismic displacement field with respect to earth properties directly by solving differential equations for them instead of constructing sensitivities from the displacement field itself. In this study, we have taken a new perspective on the dynamic inversion method and used acceleration approaches to reduce the computational time and memory usage to improve its ability of performing high-resolution imaging. The dynamic inversion method, which can simultaneously use different waves and multicomponent observation data, is appropriate for directly inverting elastic parameters, medium density or wave velocities. Full wavefield information is utilized as much as possible at the expense of a larger amount of calculations. To mitigate the computational burden, two ways are proposed to accelerate the method from a computer-implementation point of view. One is source encoding which uses a linear combination of all shots, and the other is to reduce the amount of calculations on forward modeling. We applied a new finite-difference (FD) method to the dynamic inversion to improve the computational accuracy and speed up the performance. Numerical experiments indicated that the new FD method can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion caused by the discretization of wave equations, resulting in enhanced computational efficiency with less memory cost for seismic modeling and inversion based on the full wave equations. We present some inversion results to demonstrate the validity of this method through both checkerboard and Marmousi models. It shows that this method is also convergent even with big deviations for the initial model. Besides, parallel calculations can be easily

  7. Accelerated failure time models provide a useful statistical framework for aging research.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R

    2009-03-01

    Survivorship experiments play a central role in aging research and are performed to evaluate whether interventions alter the rate of aging and increase lifespan. The accelerated failure time (AFT) model is seldom used to analyze survivorship data, but offers a potentially useful statistical approach that is based upon the survival curve rather than the hazard function. In this study, AFT models were used to analyze data from 16 survivorship experiments that evaluated the effects of one or more genetic manipulations on mouse lifespan. Most genetic manipulations were found to have a multiplicative effect on survivorship that is independent of age and well-characterized by the AFT model "deceleration factor". AFT model deceleration factors also provided a more intuitive measure of treatment effect than the hazard ratio, and were robust to departures from modeling assumptions. Age-dependent treatment effects, when present, were investigated using quantile regression modeling. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survivorship data associated with currently known long-lived mouse models. In addition, from the standpoint of aging research, these statistical approaches have appealing properties and provide valuable tools for the analysis of survivorship data.

  8. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time.

  9. Highly accelerated cardiac cine parallel MRI using low-rank matrix completion and partial separability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jingyuan; Nakarmi, Ukash; Zhang, Chaoyi; Ying, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach to highly accelerated dynamic parallel MRI using low rank matrix completion, partial separability (PS) model. In data acquisition, k-space data is moderately randomly undersampled at the center kspace navigator locations, but highly undersampled at the outer k-space for each temporal frame. In reconstruction, the navigator data is reconstructed from undersampled data using structured low-rank matrix completion. After all the unacquired navigator data is estimated, the partial separable model is used to obtain partial k-t data. Then the parallel imaging method is used to acquire the entire dynamic image series from highly undersampled data. The proposed method has shown to achieve high quality reconstructions with reduction factors up to 31, and temporal resolution of 29ms, when the conventional PS method fails.

  10. Late time acceleration in a non-commutative model of modified cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekolkalami, B.; Atazadeh, K.; Vakili, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of non-commutativity between the position-position, position-momentum and momentum-momentum of a phase space corresponding to a modified cosmological model. We show that the existence of such non-commutativity results in a Moyal Poisson algebra between the phase space variables in which the product law between the functions is of the kind of an α-deformed product. We then transform the variables in such a way that the Poisson brackets between the dynamical variables take the form of a usual Poisson bracket but this time with a noncommutative structure. For a power law expression for the function of the Ricci scalar with which the action of the gravity model is modified, the exact solutions in the commutative and noncommutative cases are presented and compared. In terms of these solutions we address the issue of the late time acceleration in cosmic evolution.

  11. Subsample ignorable likelihood for accelerated failure time models with missing predictors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanhua; Little, Roderick J

    2015-07-01

    Missing values in predictors are a common problem in survival analysis. In this paper, we review estimation methods for accelerated failure time models with missing predictors, and apply a new method called subsample ignorable likelihood (IL) Little and Zhang (J R Stat Soc 60:591-605, 2011) to this class of models. The approach applies a likelihood-based method to a subsample of observations that are complete on a subset of the covariates, chosen based on assumptions about the missing data mechanism. We give conditions on the missing data mechanism under which the subsample IL method is consistent, while both complete-case analysis and ignorable maximum likelihood are inconsistent. We illustrate the properties of the proposed method by simulation and apply the method to a real dataset.

  12. Beneficial effects of melatonin on cardiological alterations in a murine model of accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Forman, Katherine; Vara, Elena; García, Cruz; Kireev, Roman; Cuesta, Sara; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Tresguerres, J A F

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of aging-related parameters such as inflammation, oxidative stress and cell death in the heart in an animal model of accelerated senescence and analyzed the effects of chronic administration of melatonin on these markers. Thirty male mice of senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and 30 senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR1) at 2 and 10 months of age were used. Animals were divided into eight experimental groups, four from each strain: two young control groups, two old untreated control groups, and four melatonin-treated groups. Melatonin was provided at two different dosages (1 and 10 mg/kg/day) in the drinking water. After 30 days of treatment, the expression of inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1 and 10, NFkBp50 and NFkBp52), apoptosis markers (BAD, BAX and Bcl2) and parameters related to oxidative stress (heme oxygenases 1 and 2, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases) were determined in the heart by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Inflammation, as well as, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers was increased in old SAMP8 males, when compared to its young controls. SAMR1 mice showed significantly lower basal levels of the measured parameters and smaller increases with age or no increases at all. After treatment with melatonin, these age-altered parameters were partially reversed, especially in SAMP8 mice. The results suggest that oxidative stress and inflammation increase with aging and that chronic treatment with melatonin, a potent antioxidant, reduces these parameters. The effects were more marked in the SAMP8 animals.

  13. Physics-Based Fragment Acceleration Modeling for Pressurized Tank Burst Risk Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Ted A.; Lawrence, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of comprehensive efforts to develop physics-based risk assessment techniques for space systems at NASA, coupled computational fluid and rigid body dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the flow mechanisms that accelerate tank fragments in bursting pressurized vessels. Simulations of several configurations were compared to analyses based on the industry-standard Baker explosion model, and were used to formulate an improved version of the model. The standard model, which neglects an external fluid, was found to agree best with simulation results only in configurations where the internal-to-external pressure ratio is very high and fragment curvature is small. The improved model introduces terms that accommodate an external fluid and better account for variations based on circumferential fragment count. Physics-based analysis was critical in increasing the model's range of applicability. The improved tank burst model can be used to produce more accurate risk assessments of space vehicle failure modes that involve high-speed debris, such as exploding propellant tanks and bursting rocket engines.

  14. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Acceleration of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Williama

    2011-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System 5 (GEOS-5) is the atmospheric model used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) for a variety of applications, from long-term climate prediction at relatively coarse resolution, to data assimilation and numerical weather prediction, to very high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations. GEOS-5 is being ported to a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS). By utilizing GPU co-processor technology, we expect to increase the throughput of GEOS-5 by at least an order of magnitude, and accelerate the process of scientific exploration across all scales of global modeling, including: The large-scale, high-end application of non-hydrostatic, global, cloud-resolving modeling at 10- to I-kilometer (km) global resolutions Intermediate-resolution seasonal climate and weather prediction at 50- to 25-km on small clusters of GPUs Long-range, coarse-resolution climate modeling, enabled on a small box of GPUs for the individual researcher After being ported to the GPU cluster, the primary physics components and the dynamical core of GEOS-5 have demonstrated a potential speedup of 15-40 times over conventional processor cores. Performance improvements of this magnitude reduce the required scalability of 1-km, global, cloud-resolving models from an unfathomable 6 million cores to an attainable 200,000 GPU-enabled cores.

  15. Investigation of Accelerated Life Prediction Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    1974, AD 784 188. 2. Rabinowicz , E., McEntire, R. H., and Shwalkar, B., A TECHNIQUE FOR ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING, Trans. ASME, August 1970, pp...706-710. 3. Rabinowicz , E., FRICTION AND WEAR OF MATERIALS, New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1966. 4. MacGregor, C. W. (ed), HANDBOOK OF

  16. Validity of four gait models to estimate walked distance from vertical COG acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Antonio M; Alvarez, Diego; Gonzalez, Rafael C; Alvarez, Juan C

    2008-11-01

    Pedometers are basically step counters usually used to estimate the distance walked by a pedestrian. Although their precision to compute the number of steps is quite accurate (about 1%), their feasibility to estimate the walked distance is very poor, as they do not consider the intrinsic variability of human gait. Reported results show values of 10% of precision in optimal conditions, increasing to 50% when conditions differ. Electronic accelerometer-based pedometers base their functioning on a basic processing of the vertical acceleration of the waist. Recently, different approaches have been proposed to relate such signals to the step length. This can lead to an improvement of the performance of this kind of device for estimating the walked distance. In this article, we analyze four gait models applied to the vertical accelerations of the body's center of gravity, three biomechanical and one empirical. We compare their precision and accuracy. Results support the superior performance of three of them over an ideal pedometer. We also analyze their feasibility to be implemented in pedometer-like devices.

  17. Reduction of Synaptojanin 1 Accelerates Aβ Clearance and Attenuates Cognitive Deterioration in an Alzheimer Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhong, Minghao; Zhao, Jiaying; Rhee, Hannah; Caesar, Ina; Knight, Elysse M.; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Bustos, Victor; Netzer, William; Liu, Lijuan; Lucast, Louise; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Robakis, Nikolaos K.; Gandy, Samuel E.; Cai, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies link synaptojanin 1 (synj1), the main phosphoinositol (4,5)-biphosphate phosphatase (PI(4,5)P2-degrading enzyme) in the brain and synapses, to Alzheimer disease. Here we report a novel mechanism by which synj1 reversely regulates cellular clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ). Genetic down-regulation of synj1 reduces both extracellular and intracellular Aβ levels in N2a cells stably expressing the Swedish mutant of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Moreover, synj1 haploinsufficiency in an Alzheimer disease transgenic mouse model expressing the Swedish mutant APP and the presenilin-1 mutant ΔE9 reduces amyloid plaque load, as well as Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in hippocampus of 9-month-old animals. Reduced expression of synj1 attenuates cognitive deficits in these transgenic mice. However, reduction of synj1 does not affect levels of full-length APP and the C-terminal fragment, suggesting that Aβ generation by β- and γ-secretase cleavage is not affected. Instead, synj1 knockdown increases Aβ uptake and cellular degradation through accelerated delivery to lysosomes. These effects are partially dependent upon elevated PI(4,5)P2 with synj1 down-regulation. In summary, our data suggest a novel mechanism by which reduction of a PI(4,5)P2-degrading enzyme, synj1, improves amyloid-induced neuropathology and behavior deficits through accelerating cellular Aβ clearance. PMID:24052255

  18. Neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development: an ideal model in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chism, David D; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been shown to confer a survival advantage in two randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis. Despite level 1 evidence supporting its benefit, utilization remains dismal with nearly one-half of patients ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy because of renal dysfunction, impaired performance status, and/or coexisting medical problems. This situation highlights the need for the development of novel therapies for the management of MIBC, a disease with a lethal phenotype. The neoadjuvant paradigm in bladder cancer offers many advantages for accelerated drug development. First, there is a greater likelihood of successful therapy at an earlier disease state that may be characterized by less genomic instability compared with the metastatic setting, with an early readout of activity with results determined in months rather than years. Second, pre- and post-treatment tumor tissue collection in patients with MIBC is performed as the standard of care without the need for research-directed biopsies, allowing for the ability to perform important correlative studies and to monitor tumor response to therapy in "real time." Third, pathological complete response (pT0) predicts for improved outcome in patients with MIBC. Fourth, there is a strong biological rationale with rapidly accumulating evidence for actionable targets in bladder cancer. This review focuses on the neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development using bladder cancer as the ideal model.

  19. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test 'Control Rod Withdrawal' with the ERANOS code

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, V.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. Neutronic studies step in the safety assessment from different points of view among which the core design and its protection system. They are necessary to evaluate the core behavior in case of accident in order to assess the integrity of the first barrier and the absence of a prompt criticality risk. To reach this objective one main physical quantity has to be evaluated accurately: the neutronic power distribution in core during whole reactor lifetime. Phenix end of life tests, carried out in 2009, aim at increasing the experience feedback on sodium cooled fast reactors. These experiments have been done in the framework of the development of the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. Ten tests have been carried out: 6 on neutronic and fuel aspects, 2 on thermal hydraulics and 2 for the emergency shutdown. Two of them have been chosen for an international exercise on thermal hydraulics and neutronics in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project. Concerning neutronics, the Control Rod Withdrawal test is relevant for safety because it allows evaluating the capability of calculation tools to compute the radial power distribution on fast reactors core configurations in which the flux field is very deformed. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the ERANOS code developed by CEA for fast reactors studies. This paper presents the results obtained in the framework of the benchmark activity. A relatively good agreement was found with available measures considering the approximations done in the modeling. The work underlines the importance of burn-up calculations in order to have a fine

  20. Accelerated search for biomolecular network models to interpret high-throughput experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Suman; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A

    2007-01-01

    Background The functions of human cells are carried out by biomolecular networks, which include proteins, genes, and regulatory sites within DNA that encode and control protein expression. Models of biomolecular network structure and dynamics can be inferred from high-throughput measurements of gene and protein expression. We build on our previously developed fuzzy logic method for bridging quantitative and qualitative biological data to address the challenges of noisy, low resolution high-throughput measurements, i.e., from gene expression microarrays. We employ an evolutionary search algorithm to accelerate the search for hypothetical fuzzy biomolecular network models consistent with a biological data set. We also develop a method to estimate the probability of a potential network model fitting a set of data by chance. The resulting metric provides an estimate of both model quality and dataset quality, identifying data that are too noisy to identify meaningful correlations between the measured variables. Results Optimal parameters for the evolutionary search were identified based on artificial data, and the algorithm showed scalable and consistent performance for as many as 150 variables. The method was tested on previously published human cell cycle gene expression microarray data sets. The evolutionary search method was found to converge to the results of exhaustive search. The randomized evolutionary search was able to converge on a set of similar best-fitting network models on different training data sets after 30 generations running 30 models per generation. Consistent results were found regardless of which of the published data sets were used to train or verify the quantitative predictions of the best-fitting models for cell cycle gene dynamics. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the capability of scalable evolutionary search for fuzzy network models to address the problem of inferring models based on complex, noisy biomolecular data sets. This approach

  1. Calculating Nozzle Side Loads using Acceleration Measurements of Test-Based Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joe

    2007-01-01

    As part of a NASA/MSFC research program to evaluate the effect of different nozzle contours on the well-known but poorly characterized "side load" phenomena, we attempt to back out the net force on a sub-scale nozzle during cold-flow testing using acceleration measurements. Because modeling the test facility dynamics is problematic, new techniques for creating a "pseudo-model" of the facility and nozzle directly from modal test results are applied. Extensive verification procedures were undertaken, resulting in a loading scale factor necessary for agreement between test and model based frequency response functions. Side loads are then obtained by applying a wide-band random load onto the system model, obtaining nozzle response PSD's, and iterating both the amplitude and frequency of the input until a good comparison of the response with the measured response PSD for a specific time point is obtained. The final calculated loading can be used to compare different nozzle profiles for assessment during rocket engine nozzle development and as a basis for accurate design of the nozzle and engine structure to withstand these loads. The techniques applied within this procedure have extensive applicability to timely and accurate characterization of all test fixtures used for modal test.A viewgraph presentation on a model-test based pseudo-model used to calculate side loads on rocket engine nozzles is included. The topics include: 1) Side Loads in Rocket Nozzles; 2) Present Side Loads Research at NASA/MSFC; 3) Structural Dynamic Model Generation; 4) Pseudo-Model Generation; 5) Implementation; 6) Calibration of Pseudo-Model Response; 7) Pseudo-Model Response Verification; 8) Inverse Force Determination; 9) Results; and 10) Recent Work.

  2. Post-Test Analysis of a 10-Year Sodium Heat Pipe Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Locci, Ivan E.; Sanzi, James L.; Hull, David R.; Geng, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 years) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described. Lessons learned and future life test plans are also discussed.

  3. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  4. A COMPARISON OF CONFIDENCE INTERVAL PROCEDURES IN CENSORED LIFE TESTING PROBLEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Obtaining a confidence interval for a parameter lambda of an exponential distribution is a frequent occurrence in life testing problems. Oftentimes...the test plan used is one in which all the observations are censored at the same time point. Several approximate confidence interval procedures are

  5. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  6. Real-time dose computation: GPU-accelerated source modeling and superposition/convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, Robert; Wong, John; Taylor, Russell; McNutt, Todd

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To accelerate dose calculation to interactive rates using highly parallel graphics processing units (GPUs). Methods: The authors have extended their prior work in GPU-accelerated superposition/convolution with a modern dual-source model and have enhanced performance. The primary source algorithm supports both focused leaf ends and asymmetric rounded leaf ends. The extra-focal algorithm uses a discretized, isotropic area source and models multileaf collimator leaf height effects. The spectral and attenuation effects of static beam modifiers were integrated into each source's spectral function. The authors introduce the concepts of arc superposition and delta superposition. Arc superposition utilizes separate angular sampling for the total energy released per unit mass (TERMA) and superposition computations to increase accuracy and performance. Delta superposition allows single beamlet changes to be computed efficiently. The authors extended their concept of multi-resolution superposition to include kernel tilting. Multi-resolution superposition approximates solid angle ray-tracing, improving performance and scalability with a minor loss in accuracy. Superposition/convolution was implemented using the inverse cumulative-cumulative kernel and exact radiological path ray-tracing. The accuracy analyses were performed using multiple kernel ray samplings, both with and without kernel tilting and multi-resolution superposition. Results: Source model performance was <9 ms (data dependent) for a high resolution (400{sup 2}) field using an NVIDIA (Santa Clara, CA) GeForce GTX 280. Computation of the physically correct multispectral TERMA attenuation was improved by a material centric approach, which increased performance by over 80%. Superposition performance was improved by {approx}24% to 0.058 and 0.94 s for 64{sup 3} and 128{sup 3} water phantoms; a speed-up of 101-144x over the highly optimized Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips, Madison, WI) implementation. Pinnacle{sup 3

  7. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  8. Late cosmic acceleration in a vector-Gauss-Bonnet gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, A.; Solis, Enzo L.; Acero, Mario A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we study a general vector-tensor model of dark energy (DE) with a Gauss-Bonnet term coupled to a vector field and without explicit potential terms. Considering a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) type universe and a vector field without spatial components, the cosmological evolution is analyzed from the field equations of this model considering two sets of parameters. In this context, we have shown that it is possible to obtain an accelerated expansion phase of the universe since the equation state parameter w satisfies the restriction - 1 < w < -1/3 (for suitable values of model parameters). Further, analytical expressions for the Hubble parameter H, equation state parameter w and the invariant scalar ϕ are obtained. We also find that the square of the speed of sound is negative for all values of redshift, therefore, the model presented here shows a sign of instability under small perturbations. We finally perform an analysis using H(z) observational data and we find that for the free parameter ξ in the interval (-23.9,-3.46) × 10-5, at 99.73% C.L. (and fixing η = -1 and ω = 1/4), the model has a good fit to the data.

  9. Accelerated parameter identification in a 3D marine biogeochemical model using surrogate-based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieß, M.; Piwonski, J.; Koziel, S.; Oschlies, A.; Slawig, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present the application of the Surrogate-based Optimization (SBO) method on a parameter identification problem for a 3-D biogeochemical model. SBO is a method for acceleration of optimization processes when the underlying model itself is of very high computational complexity. In these cases, coupled simulation runs require large amounts of computer time, where optimization runs may become unfeasible even with high-performance hardware. As a consequence, the key idea of SBO is to replace the original and computationally expensive (high-fidelity) model by a so-called surrogate, which is created from a less accurate but computationally cheaper (low-fidelity) model and a suitable correction approach to increase its accuracy. To date, the SBO approach has been widely and successfully used in engineering applications and also for parameter identification in a 1-D marine ecosystem model of NPZD type. In this paper, we apply the approach onto a two-component biogeochemical model. The model is spun-up into a steady seasonal cycle via the Transport Matrix Approach. The low-fidelity model we use consists of a reduced number of spin-up iterations (several decades instead of millennia used for the original model). A multiplicative correction operator is further exploited to extrapolate the rather inaccurate low-fidelity model onto the original one. This corrected model builds our surrogate. We validate this SBO method by twin-experiments that use synthetic observations generated by the original model. We motivate our choice of the low-fidelity model and the multiplicative correction and discuss the computational advantage of SBO in comparison to an expensive parameter optimization in the context of the high-fidelity model. The proposed SBO technique is shown to yield a solution close to the target at a significant gain of computational efficiency. Without further regularization techniques, the method is able to identify most model parameters. The method is simple to

  10. Simulation of Life Testing Procedures for Estimating Long-Term Degradation and Lifetime of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    failure region. Overestimating the activation energy for failure leads to overly optimistic operating lifetime predictions . II. MODEL To model these effects...in general, will be much less for smaller devices. It is shown that the error in E′a and A ′ becomes a much greater problem for lifetime prediction ...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4331 SIMULATION OF LIFE TESTING PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING LONG-TERM DEGRADATION AND LIFETIME OF AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

  11. Early inflation to late-time acceleration in f(G) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Malay Krishna; Sarkar, Kaushik; Modak, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present some solutions in Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime in the modified theory of gravity with a general Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term f(G) and R2 including an ideal fluid. We present evolution of the universe introducing an ansatz without a prior choice of f(G) in one approach, while in other class of model, the solutions are obtained assuming few simple forms of f(G). Some of the solutions show early inflationary expansion, further in one solution the fluctuation of the deceleration parameter q is evident at the end of inflation. In all cases, late-time transition to accelerating universe at redshift z ˜ 0.7 is realizable.

  12. 3-D Modeling of Modifications to the Z Accelerator for Generating Shaped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointon, Timothy D.; Savage, Mark E.; Harjes, Henry C.

    2002-12-01

    One option to temporally shape the power pulse at the load on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories is timing delays between the 36 pulse-forming lines. However, this can lead to the formation of magnetic nulls in the vacuum section, with the potential for greatly increasing electron losses to—and possibly damaging—the anode. Three-dimensional computer simulations are now being conducted to study this concern. The simulation geometry models a single level of Z, with a radial transmission line driven by nine parallel-plate lines. Every third line is driven early relative to the other six. Results from preliminary runs without particle emission are presented. Voltage and current diagnostics agree quite well with circuit simulations, and spatial field profiles illustrate the evolution of the magnetic nulls in detail.

  13. Test by JANZOS of the Standard Model of Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.

    1999-08-01

    A search for ultra-high energy gamma-rays emitted by the young, nearby supernova remnant that was discovered recently by the COMPTEL and ROSAT satellites was made using the JANZOS database for the period 1987-1993. A 95% confidence upper limit on the flux above 100 TeV of 3 2 10013 cm02 sec01 was obtained. This is an order of magnitude below the expected flux based on the standard model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova shocks. An optical survey of the region that has been commenced is also reported. This uses UK and ESO Schmidt plates, and CCD images by a NZ/Japan microlensing group.

  14. Developing a Model of Compulsory Basic Education Completion Acceleration in Support of Millennium Development Goals in Magelang, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukarno; Haryati, Sri

    2015-01-01

    This article reports Year One of a two-year study to develop a model to accelerate compulsory basic education completion toward Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Magelang, Indonesia. The study focuses on five issues: (1) profile of MDGs in Magelang, (2) achievement of MDGs, (3) problems in MDGs implementation, (4) model of compulsary basic…

  15. 78 FR 60998 - Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS) Financing Models

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS) Financing Models AGENCY: Office of...: If you mail or deliver your comments, address them to Cara Camacho, Attention: Pay for Success... pay for success? PFS is an innovative financing model that offers new ways for the government...

  16. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  17. Kilovision: thermal modeling of a kilovoltage x-ray source integrated into a medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngbin; Munro, P

    2002-09-01

    The thermal and thermo-mechanical (fatigue) properties of a stationary-anode kilovoltage x-ray source that can be integrated into the head of a medical linear accelerator have been modeled. A finite element program has been used to model two new target designs. The first design makes minor modifications to the existing target assembly of a Varian medical linear accelerator, while the second design adds an additional cooling tube, changes the target angle, and uses a tungsten-rhenium alloy rather than tungsten as the kilovoltage target material. The thermal calculations have been used to generate cyclic stress/strain values from which estimates of fatigue in the target designs have been made. Both kilovoltage and megavoltage operation have been studied. Analysis of the megavoltage operation shows that there are only small differences in the thermal and fatigue characteristics after the target assembly is modified to include a kilovoltage target. Thus, megavoltage operation should not be compromised. The first kilovoltage target design can handle a 900 W heat load (e.g., 120 kVp, 7.5 mA, 2 x 2 mm2 source size); the heat load being limited by the temperature at the surface of the cooling tubes and mechanical fatigue at the surface of the target. The second design can handle a 1250 W heat load (e.g., 120 kVp, approximately 10.4 mA, 2 x 2 mm2 source size). Our calculations show that installation of a kilovoltage x-ray target is practical from thermal and thermo-mechanical perspectives.

  18. Physics models in the MARS15 code for accelerator and space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Mashnik, S. G.; Rakhno, I. L.; Sierk, A. J.; Striganov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The MARS code system, developed over 30 years, is a set of Monte Carlo programs for detailed simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in an arbitrary geometry of accelerator, detector and spacecraft components with particle energy ranging from a fraction of an electron volt up to 100 TeV. The new MARS15 (2004) version is described with an emphasis on modeling physics processes. This includes an extended list of elementary particles and arbitrary heavy ions, their interaction cross-sections, inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, photo - hadron production, correlated ionization energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering, nuclide production and residual activation, and radiation damage (DPA). In particular, the details of a new model for leading baryon production and implementation of advanced versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM03), and the Los Alamos version of Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM03) are given. The applications that are motivating these developments, needs for better nuclear data, and future physics improvements are described.

  19. Splicing-directed therapy in a new mouse model of human accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Navarro, Claire L; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Mejía, Isabel C; Quirós, Pedro M; Bartoli, Catherine; Rivera, José; Tazi, Jamal; Guzmán, Gabriela; Varela, Ignacio; Depetris, Danielle; de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Andrés, Vicente; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Freije, José M P; Lévy, Nicolas; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-10-26

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a point mutation in the LMNA gene that activates a cryptic donor splice site and yields a truncated form of prelamin A called progerin. Small amounts of progerin are also produced during normal aging. Studies with mouse models of HGPS have allowed the recent development of the first therapeutic approaches for this disease. However, none of these earlier works have addressed the aberrant and pathogenic LMNA splicing observed in HGPS patients because of the lack of an appropriate mouse model. Here, we report a genetically modified mouse strain that carries the HGPS mutation. These mice accumulate progerin, present histological and transcriptional alterations characteristic of progeroid models, and phenocopy the main clinical manifestations of human HGPS, including shortened life span and bone and cardiovascular aberrations. Using this animal model, we have developed an antisense morpholino-based therapy that prevents the pathogenic Lmna splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of progerin and its associated nuclear defects. Treatment of mutant mice with these morpholinos led to a marked amelioration of their progeroid phenotype and substantially extended their life span, supporting the effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotide-based therapies for treating human diseases of accelerated aging.

  20. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  1. A feasibility study on porting the community land model onto accelerators using OpenACC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Wu, Wei; Winkler, Frank; Ding, Wei; Hernandez, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    As environmental models (such as Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model (PFLOTRAN), Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), etc.) became more and more complicated, we are facing enormous challenges regarding to porting those applications onto hybrid computing architecture. OpenACC appears as a very promising technology, therefore, we have conducted a feasibility analysis on porting the Community Land Model (CLM), a terrestrial ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM)). Specifically, we used automatic function testing platform to extract a small computing kernel out of CLM, then we apply this kernel into the actually CLM dataflow procedure, and investigate the strategy of data parallelization and the benefit of data movement provided by current implementation of OpenACC. Even it is a non-intensive kernel, on a single 16-core computing node, the performance (based on the actual computation time using one GPU) of OpenACC implementation is 2.3 time faster than that of OpenMP implementation using single OpenMP thread, but it is 2.8 times slower than the performance of OpenMP implementation using 16 threads. On multiple nodes, MPI_OpenACC implementation demonstrated very good scalability on up to 128 GPUs on 128 computing nodes. This study also provides useful information for us to look into the potential benefits of “deep copy” capability and “routine” feature of OpenACC standards. In conclusion, we believe that our experience on the environmental model, CLM, can be beneficial to many other scientific research programs who are interested to porting their large scale scientific code using OpenACC onto high-end computers, empowered by hybrid computing architecture.

  2. A feasibility study on porting the community land model onto accelerators using OpenACC

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dali; Wu, Wei; Winkler, Frank; ...

    2014-01-01

    As environmental models (such as Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model (PFLOTRAN), Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), etc.) became more and more complicated, we are facing enormous challenges regarding to porting those applications onto hybrid computing architecture. OpenACC appears as a very promising technology, therefore, we have conducted a feasibility analysis on porting the Community Land Model (CLM), a terrestrial ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM)). Specifically, we used automatic function testing platform to extract a small computing kernel out of CLM, then we apply this kernel into the actually CLM dataflowmore » procedure, and investigate the strategy of data parallelization and the benefit of data movement provided by current implementation of OpenACC. Even it is a non-intensive kernel, on a single 16-core computing node, the performance (based on the actual computation time using one GPU) of OpenACC implementation is 2.3 time faster than that of OpenMP implementation using single OpenMP thread, but it is 2.8 times slower than the performance of OpenMP implementation using 16 threads. On multiple nodes, MPI_OpenACC implementation demonstrated very good scalability on up to 128 GPUs on 128 computing nodes. This study also provides useful information for us to look into the potential benefits of “deep copy” capability and “routine” feature of OpenACC standards. In conclusion, we believe that our experience on the environmental model, CLM, can be beneficial to many other scientific research programs who are interested to porting their large scale scientific code using OpenACC onto high-end computers, empowered by hybrid computing architecture.« less

  3. Modeling particle acceleration and transport during high-energy solar gamma-ray events: Results from the HESPERIA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; Rouillard, Alexis; Aran, Angels; Sipola, Robert; Pomoell, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The EU/H2020 project "High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis" (HESPERIA) has an objective to gain improved understanding of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration, release and transport related to long-duration gamma-ray emissions recently observed by Fermi/LAT. We have performed simulation studies for particle acceleration and transport for the 17 May 2012 event, which is also a Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cosmic rays. The particle event is modeled assuming that it is accelerated by the shock wave driven by the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME). We first analyze the 3-dimensional propagation of the shock through the corona using imaging observations from SDO, SOHO and STEREO spacecraft. The derived kinematics of the shock is combined with magnetohydrodynamic and potential field modeling of the ambient corona to derive the evolution of the shock parameters on a large set of field lines. We then employ the self-consistent Coronal Shock Acceleration (CSA) simulation model of the University of Turku to study the acceleration process on selected field lines and combine it with a new model of downstream particle transport to assess the energy spectrum and time profile of accelerated particles precipitating in the dense surface regions below the corona. We also employ the Shock and Particle (SaP) simulation model of the University of Barcelona to analyze the interplanetary counterpart of the Fermi event. In this paper, we will present the observations of the event, our approach to the modeling and the first results of the analysis. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  4. Field ionization model implemented in Particle In Cell code and applied to laser-accelerated carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nuter, R.; Gremillet, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Levy, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Martin, P.

    2011-03-15

    A novel numerical modeling of field ionization in PIC (Particle In Cell) codes is presented. Based on the quasistatic approximation of the ADK (Ammosov Delone Krainov) theory and implemented through a Monte Carlo scheme, this model allows for multiple ionization processes. Two-dimensional PIC simulations are performed to analyze the cut-off energies of the laser-accelerated carbon ions measured on the UHI 10 Saclay facility. The influence of the target and the hydrocarbon pollutant composition on laser-accelerated carbon ion energies is demonstrated.

  5. A late time accelerated FRW model with scalar and vector fields via Noether symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Babak

    2014-11-01

    We study the evolution of a three-dimensional minisuperspace cosmological model by the Noether symmetry approach. The phase space variables turn out to correspond to the scale factor of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model, a scalar field with potential function V (ϕ) with which the gravity part of the action is minimally coupled and a vector field of its kinetic energy is coupled with the scalar field by a coupling function f (ϕ). Then, the Noether symmetry of such a cosmological model is investigated by utilizing the behavior of the corresponding Lagrangian under the infinitesimal generator of the desired symmetry. We explicitly calculate the form of the coupling function between the scalar and the vector fields and also the scalar field potential function for which such symmetry exists. Finally, by means of the corresponding Noether current, we integrate the equations of motion and obtain exact solutions for the scale factor, scalar and vector fields. It is shown that the resulting cosmology is an accelerated expansion universe for which its expansion is due to the presence of the vector field in the early times, while the scalar field is responsible of its late time expansion.

  6. Life Testing of the Vapor Compression Distillation Urine Processing Assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul O.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station will be processed to recover pure water. The method selected is vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processing Assembly (UPA), accelerated life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPAS, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have an operating life of approximately 4800 hours. Precise alignment of the flex-spline of the fluids pump is essential to avoid failure of the pump after about 400 hours of operation. Also, leakage around the seals of the drive shaft of the fluids pump and purge pump must be eliminated for continued good performance. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  7. Mediation Analysis with Survival Outcomes: Accelerated Failure Time vs. Proportional Hazards Models

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Lois A.; MacKinnon, David P.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Baraldi, Amanda N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Survival time is an important type of outcome variable in treatment research. Currently, limited guidance is available regarding performing mediation analyses with survival outcomes, which generally do not have normally distributed errors, and contain unobserved (censored) events. We present considerations for choosing an approach, using a comparison of semi-parametric proportional hazards (PH) and fully parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) approaches for illustration. Method: We compare PH and AFT models and procedures in their integration into mediation models and review their ability to produce coefficients that estimate causal effects. Using simulation studies modeling Weibull-distributed survival times, we compare statistical properties of mediation analyses incorporating PH and AFT approaches (employing SAS procedures PHREG and LIFEREG, respectively) under varied data conditions, some including censoring. A simulated data set illustrates the findings. Results: AFT models integrate more easily than PH models into mediation models. Furthermore, mediation analyses incorporating LIFEREG produce coefficients that can estimate causal effects, and demonstrate superior statistical properties. Censoring introduces bias in the coefficient estimate representing the treatment effect on outcome—underestimation in LIFEREG, and overestimation in PHREG. With LIFEREG, this bias can be addressed using an alternative estimate obtained from combining other coefficients, whereas this is not possible with PHREG. Conclusions: When Weibull assumptions are not violated, there are compelling advantages to using LIFEREG over PHREG for mediation analyses involving survival-time outcomes. Irrespective of the procedures used, the interpretation of coefficients, effects of censoring on coefficient estimates, and statistical properties should be taken into account when reporting results. PMID:27065906

  8. Marked Acceleration of Atherosclerosis following Lactobacillus casei induced Coronary Arteritis in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Lee, Young Ho; Crother, Timothy R.; Fishbein, Michael; Zhang, Wenxuan; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Schulte, Danica J; Lehman, Thomas J.A.; Shah, Prediman K.; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate if Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced Kawasaki Disease (KD) accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Method and Resuslts Apoe−/− or Ldlr−/− mice were injected with LCWE (KD mice) or PBS, fed high fat diet for 8 weeks, and atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinuses (AS), arch (AC) and whole aorta were assessed. KD mice had larger, more complex aortic lesions with abundant collagen, and both extracellular and intracellular lipid and foam cells, compared to lesions in control mice despite similar cholesterol levels. Both Apoe−/− KD and Ldlr−/− KD mice showed dramatic acceleration in atherosclerosis vs. controls, with increases in en face aortic atherosclerosis and plaque size in both the AS and AC plaques. Accelerated atherosclerosis was associated with increased circulating IL-12p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased macrophage, DC, and T cell recruitment in lesions. Furthermore, daily injections of the IL-1Ra, which inhibits LCWE induced KD vasculitis, prevented the acceleration of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest an important pathophysiologic link between coronary arteritis/vasculitis in the KD mouse model and subsequent atherosclerotic acceleration, supporting the concept that a similar relation may also be present in KD patients. These results also suggest that KD in childhood may predispose to accelerated and early atherosclerosis as adults. PMID:22628430

  9. Chronic kidney disease accelerates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor in the development of cognitive decline. However, the exact role of CKD in cognitive impairment or dementia is unclear. This work was performed to examine the potential impact of CKD on cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on angiotensin II. (1) CKD was induced in 5XFAD mice, an AD model mouse, and wild-type mice by feeding an adenine-containing diet and the effect on cognitive function was compared between both strains. There was no significant difference regarding the severity of CKD induced by adenine between the strains. In 5XFAD mice, the CKD group exhibited significant cognitive impairment while the control group (control diet-fed group) did not, as evidenced by a passive avoidance test. On the other hand, in wild-type mice, neither the CKD group nor the control group showed cognitive impairment. Thus, CKD itself appears to accelerate cognitive impairment in AD mice. (2) We also examined the effect of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, on 5XFAD mice with CKD to elucidate the potential involvement of angiotensin II. As evidenced by the findings of the water maze test, olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated the impairment of spatial learning and memory function induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Furthermore, olmesartan reduced hippocampal oxidative stress in 5XFAD with CKD to similar levels to the control group of 5XFAD fed standard diet. Hence, the amelioration of CKD-induced cognitive impairment in 5XFAD mice by olmesartan appears to be mediated by the suppression of BBB disruption or oxidative stress. In conclusion, we obtained the evidence suggesting that CKD itself accelerates cognitive impairment in AD mice, through angiotensin II. Thus, our work provides a novel insight into the underlying mechanism of the link

  10. Accelerated failure time models for semi-competing risks data in the presence of complex censoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Ha; Rondeau, Virginie; Haneuse, Sebastien

    2017-04-10

    Statistical analyses that investigate risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often subject to a number of challenges. Some of these challenges arise due to practical considerations regarding data collection such that the observation of AD events is subject to complex censoring including left-truncation and either interval or right-censoring. Additional challenges arise due to the fact that study participants under investigation are often subject to competing forces, most notably death, that may not be independent of AD. Towards resolving the latter, researchers may choose to embed the study of AD within the "semi-competing risks" framework for which the recent statistical literature has seen a number of advances including for the so-called illness-death model. To the best of our knowledge, however, the semi-competing risks literature has not fully considered analyses in contexts with complex censoring, as in studies of AD. This is particularly the case when interest lies with the accelerated failure time (AFT) model, an alternative to the traditional multiplicative Cox model that places emphasis away from the hazard function. In this article, we outline a new Bayesian framework for estimation/inference of an AFT illness-death model for semi-competing risks data subject to complex censoring. An efficient computational algorithm that gives researchers the flexibility to adopt either a fully parametric or a semi-parametric model specification is developed and implemented. The proposed methods are motivated by and illustrated with an analysis of data from the Adult Changes in Thought study, an on-going community-based prospective study of incident AD in western Washington State.

  11. Performance Characterization of a Microchannel Liquid/Liquid Heat Exchanger Throughout an Extended Duration Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Liquid/Liquid Heat Exchangers (L/L HX) are an integral portion of any spacecraft active thermal control system. For this study the X-38 L/L HX was used as a baseline. As detailed in a previous ICES manuscript, NASA paired with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a Microchannel L/L HX (MHX). This microchannel HX was designed to meet the same performance characteristics as the aforementioned X-38 HX. The as designed Microchannel HX has a 26% and 60% reduction in mass and volume, respectively. Due to the inherently smaller flow passages the design team was concerned about fouling affecting performance during extended missions. To address this concern, NASA has developed a test stand and is currently performing an 18 month life test on the MHX. This report will detail the up-to-date performance of the MHX during life testing.

  12. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-07-13

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms.

  13. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  14. Space-flight experience and life test performance of a synthetic hydrocarbon lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialke, Bill

    1995-01-01

    An alternative wet lubricant known as Pennzane(TM) SHF X-2000 is recommended for some spaceflight bearing systems. The performance characteristics between Pennzane(TM) SHF X-2000 and Bray 815Z were compared. The life tests showed excellent performances with continuous operation approaching three years in conservative operating environments. Space flight performance data are provided for several of the tested mechanisms which are operating in-orbit since February 1994.

  15. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Jim

    2010-10-06

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  16. Cycle life testing of a 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vutetakis, D.G.; Viswanathan, V.V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of cycle life testing of 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid batteries intended for use in the B-1B aircraft. Test samples were procured from two different manufacturers and subjected to cycle testing at 33% and 100% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The cycle life at 33% DOD ranged from 500 to 750 cycles. The cycle life at 100% DOD ranged from 160 to 260 cycles.

  17. Accelerated microglial pathology is associated with Aβ plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Rona; Babcock, Alicia A; Nemirovsky, Anna; Finsen, Bente; Monsonego, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Microglia integrate within the neural tissue with a distinct ramified morphology through which they scan the surrounding neuronal network. Here, we used a digital tool for the quantitative morphometric characterization of fine cortical microglial structures in mice, and the changes they undergo with aging and in Alzheimer’s-like disease. We show that, compared with microglia in young mice, microglia in old mice are less ramified and possess fewer branches and fine processes along with a slightly increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. A similar microglial pathology appeared 6–12 months earlier in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), along with a significant increase in brain parenchyma lacking coverage by microglial processes. We further demonstrate that microglia near amyloid plaques acquire unique activated phenotypes with impaired process complexity. We thus show that along with a chronic proinflammatory reaction in the brain, aging causes a significant reduction in the capacity of microglia to scan their environment. This type of pathology is markedly accelerated in mouse models of AD, resulting in a severe microglial process deficiency, and possibly contributing to enhanced cognitive decline. PMID:24641683

  18. Focal spot estimation of an Elekta dedicated stereotactic linear accelerator Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwiningsih, S.; Fielding, A.

    2016-03-01

    The most challenging task in the Monte Carlo modelling of linear accelerators (linacs) is an accurate determination of the electron beam parameters striking the target which are characterised by the mean energy of incident electron beam and the electron beam shape, referred to as the focal spot. This work aims to determine the optimum focal spot size and shape of Elekta Axesse linac equipped with the Beam Modulator. A BEAMnrc Monte-Carlo linac model has been developed to produce a 6 MV photon beam. Different square field sizes of 2.4 cm, 4 cm and 10.4 cm were simulated in a simple water phantom with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. The simulation was performed with the incident electron beam energy of 6.2 MeV with the focal spot size varied between 0.1 and 0.3 cm with an increment of 0.05 cm. The field width (50% relative dose) and penumbra width (distance between 80% - 20% relative dose) of the simulated profiles were compared with the measured profiles. This work found that an elliptical shape of the focal spot results in a better match with the measured data with the size of 0.2 cm in X-axis and 0.3 cm in Y-axis direction.

  19. Kelvin wave packets and flow acceleration - A comparison of modeling and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, L.; Hitchman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric Kelvin waves, as revealed by temperatures obtained from the recent Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment, commonly occur in packets. A simple two-dimensional gravity-wave model is used to study the upward propagation of these packets through different zonal mean wind profiles derived from the LIMS data. The observed prevalence of high frequency waves in the lower mesosphere and low frequency waves in the lower stratosphere can be exlained by dispersion of energy associated with the range of frequencies comprising a packet. Dominant wave frequencies at upper and lower levels are more distinctly separated if the packet propagates through a layer of westerly winds. Due to dispersion and shear effects, a packet of short temporal length at low levels will have a considerably extended impact on a layer of westerly winds at higher levels. Observed and modeled westerly accelerations resulting from packet absorption occur in the same layer, and are similar in magnitude and duration. These results support the theory that Kelvin waves are responsible for the westerly phase of the semiannual oscillation.

  20. Detailed Modeling of Physical Processes in Electron Sources for Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubenko, Oksana; Afanasev, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    At present, electron sources are essential in a wide range of applications - from common technical use to exploring the nature of matter. Depending on the application requirements, different methods and materials are used to generate electrons. State-of-the-art accelerator applications set a number of often-conflicting requirements for electron sources (e.g., quantum efficiency vs. polarization, current density vs. lifetime, etc). Development of advanced electron sources includes modeling and design of cathodes, material growth, fabrication of cathodes, and cathode testing. The detailed simulation and modeling of physical processes is required in order to shed light on the exact mechanisms of electron emission and to develop new-generation electron sources with optimized efficiency. The purpose of the present work is to study physical processes in advanced electron sources and develop scientific tools, which could be used to predict electron emission from novel nano-structured materials. In particular, the area of interest includes bulk/superlattice gallium arsenide (bulk/SL GaAs) photo-emitters and nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond ((N)UNCD) photo/field-emitters. Work supported by The George Washington University and Euclid TechLabs LLC.

  1. Senescence-accelerated Mice (SAMs) as a Model for Brain Aging and Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2011-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) represents a group of inbred mouse strains developed as a model for the study of human aging and age-related diseases. Senescence-prone (SAMP) strains exhibit an early onset of age-related decline in the peripheral immunity such as thymic involution, loss of CD4+ T cells, impaired helper T cell function, decreased antibody-forming capacity, dysfunction of antigen-presenting cells, decreased natural killer activity, increased auto-antibodies, and susceptibility to virus infection. Senescence-prone SAMP10 mice undergo age-related changes in the brain such as brain atrophy, shrinkage and loss of cortical neurons, retraction of cortical neuronal dendrites, loss of dendritic spines, loss of synapses, impaired learning and memory, depressive behavior, accumulation of neuronal DNA damage, neuronal ubiquitinated inclusions, reduced hippocampal cholinergic receptors, decreased neurotrophic factors, decreased hippocampal zinc and zinc transporters, increased sphyngomyelinase, and elevated oxidative-nitrative stress. Recent data indicating increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain of SAMP10 mice are directing investigators toward an integration of immune and neural abnormalities to enhance understanding of the principles of brain aging. We highlight how mouse brain cells adopt cytokine-mediated responses and how SAMP10 mice are defective in these responses. SAMP10 model would be useful to study how age-related disturbances in peripheral immunity have an impact on dysregulation of brain tissue homeostasis, resulting in age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:22396891

  2. Stochastic Modeling and Analysis of Multiple Nonlinear Accelerated Degradation Processes through Information Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fuqiang; Liu, Le; Li, Xiaoyang; Liao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated degradation testing (ADT) is an efficient technique for evaluating the lifetime of a highly reliable product whose underlying failure process may be traced by the degradation of the product’s performance parameters with time. However, most research on ADT mainly focuses on a single performance parameter. In reality, the performance of a modern product is usually characterized by multiple parameters, and the degradation paths are usually nonlinear. To address such problems, this paper develops a new s-dependent nonlinear ADT model for products with multiple performance parameters using a general Wiener process and copulas. The general Wiener process models the nonlinear ADT data, and the dependency among different degradation measures is analyzed using the copula method. An engineering case study on a tuner’s ADT data is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results illustrate that the proposed method is quite effective in estimating the lifetime of a product with s-dependent performance parameters. PMID:27509499

  3. Parallel acceleration of diffuse scattering model for indoor radio prediction by CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiao; Guo, Li-xin; Tao, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Radio wave propagation prediction is very important for the design of the mobile communication network. The raytracing algorithm is a commonly used computational method for site-specific prediction of the radio channel characteristics of wireless communication systems. However, it does not consider the diffuse scattering. Therefore, an indoor diffuse scattering model which based on diffuse scattering theory and FDTD is established. The diffuse scattering of indoor walls and ceiling and floor is calculated at a series of discrete time instance in this method. In recent years, the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) of NVIDIA takes advantage of the GPU for parallel computing, and greatly improve the speed of computation. Because there is a large number of data to deal with, in order to reduce the computation time, a GPU-based diffuse scattering model for indoor radio prediction is introduced in this paper, which fully utilizes the parallel processing capabilities of CUDA to further improve the computational efficiency. It can be found that good acceleration effect has been achieved.

  4. ACLT 052: Academic Literacy--An Integrated, Accelerated Model for Developmental Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Sharon Moran; Williams, Jeanine L.

    2016-01-01

    The current trend in postsecondary literacy is to offer developmental reading and writing coursework in an integrated, (and in most cases) accelerated, format. This move toward integration and acceleration is definitely in line with the research literature; however, many of these new courses do not reflect the curricular and pedagogical reforms…

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. Analytic model of electron self-injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator in the strongly nonlinear bubble regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    Self-injection of background electrons in plasma wakefield accelerators in the highly nonlinear bubble regime is analyzed using particle-in-cell and semi-analytic modeling. It is shown that the return current in the bubble sheath layer is crucial for accurate determination of the trapped particle trajectories.

  8. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-11-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present results from simulations that couple particle kinetics with hydrodynamics (HD) of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration and transport with the RADYN HD code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by accelerated electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using two different electron spectra, one an ad hoc power law and the other predicted by the model of stochastic acceleration by turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, the later model, even with energy flux \\ll {10}10 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, can cause “explosive” chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- and downflows (and HD shocks). This is partly because our acceleration model, like many others, produces a spectrum consisting of a quasi-thermal component plus a power-law tail. We synthesize emission-line profiles covering different heights in the lower atmosphere, including Hα 6563 Å, He ii 304 Å, Ca ii K 3934 Å, and Si iv 1393 Å. One interesting result is the unusual high temperature (up to a few times 105 K) of the formation site of He ii 304 Å, which is expected owing to photoionization-recombination under flare conditions, compared to those in the quiet Sun dominated by collisional excitation. When compared with observations, our results can constrain the properties of nonthermal electrons and thus the poorly understood particle acceleration mechanism.

  9. An Analytic Particle Acceleration Model in Pulsar Wind Termination Shocks Applied to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Justin, Finke; Dermer, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The Crab nebula is a persistent source of gamma-rays up to about 100 MeV due to synchrotron radiation from electrons/positrons emitting in an ambient magnetic field thought to be of magnitude B~200 μG. The radiating electrons are limited by radiation-reaction forces which place an upper limit of about 100 MeV on the gamma-ray photons it can produce. This normally quiescent nebula has been observed by AGILE and Fermi to undergo bright transients lasting about a week and characterized by a significant increase in gamma-ray flux far above the classical radiation-reaction limit, with energies often reaching 3 GeV. The flares imply a population of PeV electrons accelerated on sub-day timescales. The very short acceleration timescales and the observed emission above the radiation-reaction limit place severe constraints on contemporary shock acceleration models such as diffusive shock acceleration which cannot account for the temporal and energetic properties of the gamma-ray flares. In this component of my dissertation research, I revisit the problem and find an analytic solution to the Fokker-Planck equation which incorporates a variety of acceleration and loss terms. I find that the model can reproduce the various Fermi-LAT flare spectra well and that electrostatic acceleration is the most significant contributor to the underlying mechanisms responsible for the most energetic astrophysical particle population ever observed. I find that the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT flares from the Crab nebula can be reproduced with this model using magnetic fields that are in agreement with multi-wavelength observations.

  10. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus "conventional" protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. Methods KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. Results KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm3. The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. Conclusion A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the

  11. Multiple model approach to evaluation of accelerated carbonation for steelmaking slag in a slurry reactor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Hsing-Lu; Chang, E-E; Kim, Hyunook; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2016-07-01

    Basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) exhibits highly alkaline properties due to its high calcium content, which is beneficial to carbonation reaction. In this study, accelerated carbonation of BOFS was evaluated under different reaction times, temperatures, and liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios in a slurry reactor. CO2 mass balance within the slurry reactor was carried out to validate the technical feasibility of fixing gaseous CO2 into solid precipitates. After that, a multiple model approach, i.e., theoretical kinetics and empirical surface model, for carbonation reaction was presented to determine the maximal carbonation conversion of BOFS in a slurry reactor. On one hand, the reaction kinetics of BOFS carbonation was evaluated by the shrinking core model (SCM). Calcite (CaCO3) was identified as a reaction product through the scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses, which provided the rationale of applying the SCM in this study. The rate-limiting step of carbonation was found to be ash-diffusion controlled, and the effective diffusivity for carbonation of BOFS in a slurry reactor were determined accordingly. On the other hand, the carbonation conversion of BOFS was predicted by the response surface methodology (RSM) via a nonlinear mathematical programming. According to the experimental data, the highest carbonation conversion of BOFS achieved was 57% under an L/S ratio of 20 mL g(-1), a CO2 flow rate of 0.1 L min(-1), and a pressure of 101.3 kPa at 50 °C for 120 min. Furthermore, the applications and limitations of SCM and RSM were examined and exemplified by the carbonation of steelmaking slags.

  12. Modeling the Impact and Costs of Semiannual Mass Drug Administration for Accelerated Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    de Vlas, Sake J.; Fischer, Peter U.; Weil, Gary J.; Goldman, Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA) programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020. PMID:23301115

  13. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-21

    Recently, there has been a lot of research interest in developing fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods on graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. A good linear accelerator (linac) source model is critical for both accuracy and efficiency considerations. In principle, an analytical source model should be more preferred for GPU-based MC dose engines than a phase-space file-based model, in that data loading and CPU-GPU data transfer can be avoided. In this paper, we presented an analytical field-independent source model specifically developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations, associated with a GPU-friendly sampling scheme. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. Each PSR contained a group of particles that were of the same type, close in energy and reside in a narrow ring on the phase-space plane located just above the upper jaws. The model parameterized the probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. Models of one 2D Gaussian distribution or multiple Gaussian components were employed to represent the particle direction distributions of these PSRs. A method was developed to analyze a reference phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To efficiently use our model in MC dose calculations on GPU, we proposed a GPU-friendly sampling strategy, which ensured that the particles sampled and transported simultaneously are of the same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergences. To test the accuracy of our model, dose distributions of a set of open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those calculated using the reference phase-space files. For the high dose gradient regions, the average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm and the maximum DTA within 2 mm. For relatively low dose gradient regions, the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% and the maximum

  14. [The use of biological age on mental work capacity model in accelerated aging assessment of professional lorry-drivers].

    PubMed

    Bashkireva, A S

    2012-01-01

    The studies of biological age, aging rate, mental work capacity in professional drivers were conducted. The examination revealed peculiarities of system organization of functions determining the mental work capacity levels. Dynamics of the aging process of professional driver's organism in relation with calendar age and driving experience were shown using the biological age model. The results point at the premature decrease of the mental work capacity in professional drivers. It was proved, that premature age-related changes of physiologic and psychophysiologic indices in drivers are just "risk indicators", while long driving experience is a real risk factor, accelerating the aging process. The "risk group" with manifestations of accelerating aging was observed in 40-49-year old drivers with 15-19 years of professional experience. The expediency of using the following methods for the age rate estimation according to biologic age indices and necessity of prophylactic measures for premature and accelerated aging prevention among working population was demonstrated.

  15. Recent advances in high-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration using the full PIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Lehe, R.; Vincenti, H.; Godfrey, B. B.; Haber, I.; Lee, P.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical simulations have been critical in the recent rapid developments of plasma-based acceleration concepts. Among the various available numerical techniques, the particle-in-cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago, but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC-related algorithms that are of interest for application to plasma-based accelerators, including (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation for the modeling of plasma accelerators in laboratory and Lorentz boosted frames, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, and (c) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of perfectly matched layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers.

  16. INITIAL TEST OF A FAST RAMPED SUPERCONDUCTING MODEL DIPOLE FOR GSIS PROPOSED SIS200 ACCELERATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ANERELLA,M.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; JOSHI,P.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; SCHMALZLE,J.; SOIKA,R.; THOMAS,R.; KAUGERTS,J.; MORITZ,G.; HASSENZAHL,W.; WILSON,N.M.

    2003-05-12

    Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI) has proposed a large expansion of the existing facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The proposal includes an accelerator, SIS200, with rigidity of 200 Tam that utilizes 4 T superconducting dipoles ramped at 1 T/s. An R&D program including both the superconductor and the magnet is directed at achieving the desired ramp rate with minimal energy loss. The RHIC arc dipoles, with 8 cm aperture, possess adequate aperture and field strength but are ramped at only 1/20 of the desired rate. However, for reasons of speed and economy, the RHIC dipole is being used as the basis for this work. The superconductor R&D has progressed far enough to permit the manufacture of an initial cable with satisfactory properties. This cable has been used in the construction of a I m model magnet, appropriately modified from the RHIC design. The magnet has been tested successfully at 2 T/s to 4.38 T.

  17. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state.

  18. Magnetic and Structural Design of a 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ Accelerator Depole Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Hadron Colliders (HC) are the most powerful discovery tools in modern high energy physics. A 100 TeV scale HC with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era. The choice of a 15 T nominal field requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance. The experience gained during the 11-T dipole R&D campaign is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model.

  19. Modeling of Blood Lead Levels in Astronauts Exposed to Lead from Microgravity-Accelerated Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, H.; James, J.; Tsuji, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to lead has been associated with toxicity to multiple organ systems. Studies of various population groups with relatively low blood lead concentrations (<10 µg/dL) have indicated associations of blood lead level with lower cognitive test scores in children, later onset of puberty in girls, and increased blood pressure and cardiovascular mortality rates in adults. Cognitive effects are considered by regulatory agencies to be the most sensitive endpoint at low doses. Although 95% of the body burden of lead is stored in the bones, the adverse effects of lead correlate with the concentration of lead in the blood better than with that in the bones. NASA has found that prolonged exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in a significant loss of bone minerals, the extent of which varies from individual to individual and from bone to bone, but generally averages about 0.5% per month. During such bone loss, lead that had been stored in bones would be released along with calcium. The effects on the concentration of lead in the blood (PbB) of various concentrations of lead in drinking water (PbW) and of lead released from bones due to accelerated osteoporosis in microgravity, as well as changes in exposure to environmental lead before, during, and after spaceflight were evaluated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model that incorporated exposure to environmental lead both on earth and in flight and included temporarily increased rates of osteoporosis during spaceflight.

  20. A review of trend models applied to sea level data with reference to the "acceleration-deceleration debate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Hans; Dangendorf, Sönke; Petersen, Arthur C.

    2015-06-01

    Global sea levels have been rising through the past century and are projected to rise at an accelerated rate throughout the 21st century. This has motivated a number of authors to search for already existing accelerations in observations, which would be, if present, vital for coastal protection planning purposes. No scientific consensus has been reached yet as to how a possible acceleration could be separated from intrinsic climate variability in sea level records. This has led to an intensive debate on its existence and, if absent, also on the general validity of current future projections. Here we shed light on the controversial discussion from a methodological point of view. To do so, we provide a comprehensive review of trend methods used in the community so far. This resulted in an overview of 30 methods, each having its individual mathematical formulation, flexibilities, and characteristics. We illustrate that varying trend approaches may lead to contradictory acceleration-deceleration inferences. As for statistics-oriented trend methods, we argue that checks on model assumptions and model selection techniques yield a way out. However, since these selection methods all have implicit assumptions, we show that good modeling practices are of importance too. We conclude at this point that (i) several differently characterized methods should be applied and discussed simultaneously, (ii) uncertainties should be taken into account to prevent biased or wrong conclusions, and (iii) removing internally generated climate variability by incorporating atmospheric or oceanographic information helps to uncover externally forced climate change signals.

  1. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Schroeder

    2011-11-13

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II, Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling at Kitware Inc. in collaboration with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The goal of the work was to develop collaborative visualization tools for large-scale data as illustrated in the figure below. The solutions we proposed address the typical problems faced by geographicallyand organizationally-separated research and engineering teams, who produce large data (either through simulation or experimental measurement) and wish to work together to analyze and understand their data. Because the data is large, we expect that it cannot be easily transported to each team member's work site, and that the visualization server must reside near the data. Further, we also expect that each work site has heterogeneous resources: some with large computing clients, tiled (or large) displays and high bandwidth; others sites as simple as a team member on a laptop computer. Our solution is based on the open-source, widely used ParaView large-data visualization application. We extended this tool to support multiple collaborative clients who may locally visualize data, and then periodically rejoin and synchronize with the group to discuss their findings. Options for managing session control, adding annotation, and defining the visualization pipeline, among others, were incorporated. We also developed and deployed a Web visualization framework based on ParaView that enables the Web browser to act as a participating client in a collaborative session. The ParaView Web Visualization framework leverages various Web technologies including WebGL, JavaScript, Java and Flash to enable interactive 3D visualization over the web using ParaView as the visualization server. We steered the development of this technology by teaming with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC has a computationally-intensive problem

  2. Development of an Accelerated Test Design for Predicting the Service Life of the Solar Array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, G. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Noel, G. T.; Shilliday, T. S.; Wood, V. E.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    An accelerated life test is described which was developed to predict the life of the 25 kW photovoltaic array installed near Mead, Nebraska. A quantitative model for accelerating testing using multiple environmental stresses was used to develop the test design. The model accounts for the effects of thermal stress by a relation of the Arrhenius form. This relation was then corrected for the effects of nonthermal environmental stresses, such as relative humidity, atmospheric pollutants, and ultraviolet radiation. The correction factors for the nonthermal stresses included temperature-dependent exponents to account for the effects of interactions between thermal and nonthermal stresses on the rate of degradation of power output. The test conditions, measurements, and data analyses for the accelerated tests are presented. Constant-temperature, cyclic-temperature, and UV types of tests are specified, incorporating selected levels of relative humidity and chemical contamination and an imposed forward-bias current and static electric field.

  3. An object-oriented, coprocessor-accelerated model for ice sheet simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, numerous models capable of modeling the thermo-dynamics of ice sheets have been developed within the ice sheet modeling community. Their capabilities have been characterized by a wide range of features with different numerical methods (finite difference or finite element), different implementations of the ice flow mechanics (shallow-ice, higher-order, full Stokes) and different treatments for the basal and coastal areas (basal hydrology, basal sliding, ice shelves). Shallow-ice models (SICOPOLIS, IcIES, PISM, etc) have been widely used for modeling whole ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica) due to the relatively low computational cost of the shallow-ice approximation but higher order (ISSM, AIF) and full Stokes (Elmer/Ice) models have been recently used to model the Greenland ice sheet. The advance in processor speed and the decrease in cost for accessing large amount of memory and storage have undoubtedly been the driving force in the commoditization of models with higher capabilities, and the popularity of Elmer/Ice (http://elmerice.elmerfem.com) with an active user base is a notable representation of this trend. Elmer/Ice is a full Stokes model built on top of the multi-physics package Elmer (http://www.csc.fi/english/pages/elmer) which provides the full machinery for the complex finite element procedure and is fully parallel (mesh partitioning with OpenMPI communication). Elmer is mainly written in Fortran 90 and targets essentially traditional processors as the code base was not initially written to run on modern coprocessors (yet adding support for the recently introduced x86 based coprocessors is possible). Furthermore, a truly modular and object-oriented implementation is required for quick adaptation to fast evolving capabilities in hardware (Fortran 2003 provides an object-oriented programming model while not being clean and requiring a tricky refactoring of Elmer code). In this work, the object-oriented, coprocessor-accelerated finite element

  4. Modifications of thick-target model: re-acceleration of electron beams by static and stochastic electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Karlický, M.; Moravec, Z.; Kašparová, J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The collisional thick-target model (CTTM) of the impulsive phase of solar flares, together with the famous Carmichael, Sturrock, Hirayama, and Kopp-Pneuman (CSHKP) model, presented for many years a "standard" model, which straightforwardly explained many observational aspects of flares. On the other hand, many critical issues appear when the concept is scrutinised theoretically or with the new generation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations. The famous "electron number problem" or problems related to transport of enormous particle fluxes though the corona represent only two of them. To resolve the discrepancies, several modifications of the CTTM appeared. Aims: We study two of them based on the global and local re-acceleration of non-thermal electrons by static and stochastic electric fields during their transport from the coronal acceleration site to the thick-target region in the chromosphere. We concentrate on a comparison of the non-thermal electron distribution functions, chromospheric energy deposits, and HXR spectra obtained for both considered modifications with the CTTM itself. Methods: The results were obtained using a relativistic test-particle approach. We simulated the transport of non-thermal electrons with a power-law spectrum including the influence of scattering, energy losses, magnetic mirroring, and also the effects of the electric fields corresponding to both modifications of the CTTM. Results: We show that both modifications of the CTTM change the outcome of the chromospheric bombardment in several aspects. The modifications lead to an increase in chromospheric energy deposit, change of its spatial distribution, and a substantial increase in the corresponding HXR spectrum intensity. Conclusions: The re-acceleration in both models reduces the demands on the efficiency of the primary coronal accelerator, on the electron fluxes transported from the corona downwards, and on the total number of accelerated coronal electrons during flares.

  5. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  6. Numerical Modelling of Intense Electron Beam Transport in the Spiral Line Induction Accelerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-28

    arising in the context of the spiral line induction accelerator (SLIA), a device in which the beam is transported along an open-ended beam pipe ...field. Because the field coils are wound directly onto the spiral beam pipe , and because each bend is magnetically shielded from its neighbors, each... Spiral Line Induction Accelerator J. KRALL, S. SLINKER, M. LAMPE AND G. JOYCE Beam Physics Branch Plasma Physics Division August 28, 1992 _pw DTIC U)lz E

  7. Modeling and Visualizing the Particle Beam in the Rare Isotope Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Christopher; Erdelyi, Bela

    2006-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is actively pursuing research and design for a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility that will aid basic research in nuclear physics by creating beams of unstable isotopes. Such a facility has been labeled as a high priority by the joint Department of Energy and National Science Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee because it will allow more study on the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of the elements, the Standard Model, and nuclear medicine. An important part of this research is computer simulations that model the behavior of the particle beam, specifically in the Fragment Separator. The Fragment Separator selects isotopes based on their trajectory in electromagnetic fields and then uses absorbers to separate particles with a certain mass and charge from the rest of the beam. This project focused on the development of a multivariate, correlated Gaussian distribution to model the distribution of particles in the beam as well as visualizations and analysis to view how this distribution changed when passing through an absorber. The distribution was developed in the COSY INFINITY programming language. The user inputs a covariance matrix and a vector of means for the six phase space variables, and the program outputs a vector of correlated, Gaussian random variables. A variety of random test cases were conducted in two, three and six variables. In each case, the expectation values, variances and covariances were calculated and they converged to the input values. The output of the absorber code is a large data set that stores all of the variables for each particle in the distribution. It is impossible to analyze such a large data set by hand, so visualizations and summary statistics had to be developed. The first visualization is a three-dimensional graph that shows the number of each isotope present after each slice of the absorber. A second graph plots any of the six phase space variables against any of the others to see

  8. Modeling the Gamma-Ray Emission in the GALACTIC CENTER with a Fading Cosmic-ray Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  9. Advanced Failure Determination Measurement Techniques Used in Thermal Fatigue Life Testing of Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, A. P.; Cornford, S. L.; Gross, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal fatigue life testing of various electronic packaging technologies is being performed by the Reliability Technology Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These testing efforts are in progress to improve uderstanding of the reliability issues associated with low volume packaging technologies for space applications and to develop qualification and acceptance approaches for these technologies. The work described here outlines the electrical failure detection techniques used during testing by documenting the circuits and components used to make these measurements, the sensitivity of the measurements, and the applicability of each specific measurement.

  10. Continued life test results for an ensemble of CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U. E.

    1981-01-01

    The life test results of five 16 low pressure CW CO2 lasers with a nominal output of 1 watt are presented. One laser quickly died while the remaining four lasers reached half power output at 38,000, 40,000, 40,000 and 40,000 hours respectively. These results show the potential for a 50,000 hour laser while the average life of the 16 tested lasers was 22,500 hours. It is further indicated that the cathode sputtering products, which settle on the glass walls of the cathode sleeve, form an increasingly heavy film as the laser ages.

  11. ESP - Data From Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicone Materials - 2009

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Schneider

    2010-02-24

    Enhanced Surveillance Project (ESP) funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until ESP funding allowed the restart in FY97. This report will provide data on materials used on various programs and on experimental materials not used in production. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  12. Traveling-wave tube reliability estimates, life tests, and space flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Speck, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Infant mortality, useful life, and wearout phase of twt life are considered. The performance of existing developmental tubes, flight experience, and sequential hardware testing are evaluated. The reliability history of twt's in space applications is documented by considering: (1) the generic parts of the tube in light of the manner in which their design and operation affect the ultimate reliability of the device, (2) the flight experience of medium power tubes, and (3) the available life test data for existing space-qualified twt's in addition to those of high power devices.

  13. Vapor Compression Distillation Urine Processor Lessons Learned from Development and Life Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Cindy F.; Long, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is the chosen technology for urine processing aboard the International Space Station (155). Development and life testing over the past several years have brought to the forefront problems and solutions for the VCD technology. Testing between 1992 and 1998 has been instrumental in developing estimates of hardware life and reliability. It has also helped improve the hardware design in ways that either correct existing problems or enhance the existing design of the hardware. The testing has increased the confidence in the VCD technology and reduced technical and programmatic risks. This paper summarizes the test results and changes that have been made to the VCD design.

  14. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicone Materials - 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Schneider

    2011-12-31

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. This report will provide data on materials used in production and on experimental materials not used in production. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  15. Curcumin ameliorates autoimmune diabetes. Evidence in accelerated murine models of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C N; Barcala Tabarrozzi, A E; Winnewisser, J; Gimeno, M L; Antunica Noguerol, M; Liberman, A C; Paz, D A; Dewey, R A; Perone, M J

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that selectively destroys pancreatic β cells. The only possible cure for T1DM is to control autoimmunity against β cell-specific antigens. We explored whether the natural compound curcumin, with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might down-regulate the T cell response that destroys pancreatic β cells to improve disease outcome in autoimmune diabetes. We employed two accelerated autoimmune diabetes models: (i) cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration to non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and (ii) adoptive transfer of diabetogenic splenocytes into NODscid mice. Curcumin treatment led to significant delay of disease onset, and in some instances prevented autoimmune diabetes by inhibiting pancreatic leucocyte infiltration and preserving insulin-expressing cells. To investigate the mechanisms of protection we studied the effect of curcumin on key immune cell populations involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Curcumin modulates the T lymphocyte response impairing proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ production through modulation of T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet), a key transcription factor for proinflammatory T helper type 1 (Th1) lymphocyte differentiation, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Also, curcumin reduces nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated NOD lymphocytes. In addition, curcumin impairs the T cell stimulatory function of dendritic cells with reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) and low surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules, leading to an overall diminished antigen-presenting cell activity. These in-vitro effects correlated with ex-vivo analysis of cells obtained from curcumin-treated mice during the course of autoimmune diabetes. These findings reveal an effective therapeutic effect of curcumin in autoimmune diabetes by its actions on key immune cells responsible for β cell death. PMID

  16. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  17. Accelerated 20-year sunlight exposure simulation of a photochromic foldable intraocular lens in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Liliana; Abdel-Aziz, Salwa; Peck, Carolee Cutler; Monson, Bryan; Espandar, Ladan; Zaugg, Brian; Stringham, Jack; Wilcox, Chris; Mamalis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the long-term biocompatibility and photochromic stability of a new photochromic hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lens (IOL) under extended ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. SETTING John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. DESIGN Experimental study. METHODS A Matrix Aurium photochromic IOL was implanted in right eyes and a Matrix Acrylic IOL without photochromic properties (n = 6) or a single-piece AcrySof Natural SN60AT (N = 5) IOL in left eyes of 11 New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were exposed to a UV light source of 5 mW/cm2 for 3 hours during every 8-hour period, equivalent to 9 hours a day, and followed for up to 12 months. The photochromic changes were evaluated during slitlamp examination by shining a penlight UV source in the right eye. After the rabbits were humanely killed and the eyes enucleated, study and control IOLs were explanted and evaluated in vitro on UV exposure and studied histopathologically. RESULTS The photochromic IOL was as biocompatible as the control IOLs after 12 months under conditions simulating at least 20 years of UV exposure. In vitro evaluation confirmed the retained optical properties, with photochromic changes observed within 7 seconds of UV exposure. The rabbit eyes had clinical and histopathological changes expected in this model with a 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The new photochromic IOL turned yellow only on exposure to UV light. The photochromic changes were reversible, reproducible, and stable over time. The IOL was biocompatible with up to 12 months of accelerated UV exposure simulation. PMID:21241924

  18. Hypertension accelerates the progression of Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Dere, Ekrem; Broquères-You, Dong; Bonnin, Philippe; Benessiano, Joëlle; Pocard, Marc; Mariani, Jean; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular impairment is frequent in patients with Alzheimer disease and is believed to influence clinical manifestation and severity of the disease. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially hypertension, have been associated with higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypertension, Alzheimer disease cross talk, we established a mouse model of dual pathology by infusing hypertensive doses of angiotensin II into transgenic APPPS1 mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor and presenilin 1 proteins. At 4.5 months, at the early stage of disease progression, only hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented impairment of temporal order memory performance in the episodic-like memory task. This cognitive deficit was associated with an increased number of cortical amyloid deposits (223±5 versus 207±5 plaques/mm(2); P<0.05) and a 2-fold increase in soluble amyloid levels in the brain and in plasma. Hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented several cerebrovascular alterations, including a 25% reduction in cerebral microvessel density and a 30% to 40% increase in cerebral vascular amyloid deposits, as well as a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the brain, compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice. Moreover, the brain levels of nitric oxide synthase 1 and 3 and the nitrite/nitrate levels were reduced in hypertensive APPPS1 mice (by 49%, 34%, and 33%, respectively, compared with wild-type mice; P<0.05). Our results indicate that hypertension accelerates the development of Alzheimer disease-related structural and functional alterations, partially through cerebral vasculature impairment and reduced nitric oxide production.

  19. Acceleration of the chemistry solver for modeling DI engine combustion using dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Liang, Long; Ge, Hai-Wen; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-03-01

    Acceleration of the chemistry solver for engine combustion is of much interest due to the fact that in practical engine simulations extensive computational time is spent solving the fuel oxidation and emission formation chemistry. A dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme based on a directed relation graph error propagation (DRGEP) method has been applied to study homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion with detailed chemistry (over 500 species) previously using an R-value-based breadth-first search (RBFS) algorithm, which significantly reduced computational times (by as much as 30-fold). The present paper extends the use of this on-the-fly kinetic mechanism reduction scheme to model combustion in direct-injection (DI) engines. It was found that the DAC scheme becomes less efficient when applied to DI engine simulations using a kinetic mechanism of relatively small size and the accuracy of the original DAC scheme decreases for conventional non-premixed combustion engine. The present study also focuses on determination of search-initiating species, involvement of the NOx chemistry, selection of a proper error tolerance, as well as treatment of the interaction of chemical heat release and the fuel spray. Both the DAC schemes were integrated into the ERC KIVA-3v2 code, and simulations were conducted to compare the two schemes. In general, the present DAC scheme has better efficiency and similar accuracy compared to the previous DAC scheme. The efficiency depends on the size of the chemical kinetics mechanism used and the engine operating conditions. For cases using a small n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 34 species, 30% of the computational time is saved, and 50% for a larger n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 61 species. The paper also demonstrates that by combining the present DAC scheme with an adaptive multi-grid chemistry (AMC) solver, it is feasible to simulate a direct-injection engine using a detailed n-heptane mechanism with 543 species

  20. Parabens Accelerate Ovarian Dysfunction in a 4-Vinylcyclohexene Diepoxide-Induced Ovarian Failure Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Myeongho; Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Hee Young; Tran, Dinh Nam; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2017-01-01

    Parabens are widely used preservatives in basic necessities such as cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. In previous studies, xenoestrogenic actions of parabens were reported in an immature rat model and a rat pituitary cell line (GH3 cells). The relationship between parabens and ovarian failure has not been described. In the present study, the influence of parabens on ovarian folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis was investigated. A disruptor of ovarian small pre-antral follicles, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD, 40 mg/kg), was used to induce premature ovarian failure (POF). Methylparaben (MP, 100 mg/kg), propylparaben (PP, 100 mg/kg), and butylparaben (BP, 100 mg/kg) dissolved in corn oil were treated in female 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rat for 5 weeks. Estrus cycle status was checked daily by vaginal smear test. Ovarian follicle development and steroid synthesis were investigated through real-time PCR and histological analyses. Diestrus phases in the VCD, PP, and BP groups were longer than that in the vehicle group. VCD significantly decreased mRNA level of folliculogenesis-related genes (Foxl2, Kitl and Amh). All parabens significantly increased the Amh mRNA level but unchanged Foxl2 and Kitlg acting in primordial follicles. VCD and MP slightly increased Star and Cyp11a1 levels, which are related to an initial step in steroidogenesis. VCD and parabens induced an increase in FSH levels in serum and significantly decreased the total number of follicles. Increased FSH implies impairment in ovarian function due to VCD or parabens. These results suggest that VCD may suppress both formation and development of follicles. In particular, combined administration of VCD and parabens accelerated inhibition of the follicle-developmental process through elevated AMH level in small antral follicles. PMID:28208728

  1. Parabens Accelerate Ovarian Dysfunction in a 4-Vinylcyclohexene Diepoxide-Induced Ovarian Failure Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Myeongho; Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Hee Young; Tran, Dinh Nam; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2017-02-08

    Parabens are widely used preservatives in basic necessities such as cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. In previous studies, xenoestrogenic actions of parabens were reported in an immature rat model and a rat pituitary cell line (GH3 cells). The relationship between parabens and ovarian failure has not been described. In the present study, the influence of parabens on ovarian folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis was investigated. A disruptor of ovarian small pre-antral follicles, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD, 40 mg/kg), was used to induce premature ovarian failure (POF). Methylparaben (MP, 100 mg/kg), propylparaben (PP, 100 mg/kg), and butylparaben (BP, 100 mg/kg) dissolved in corn oil were treated in female 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rat for 5 weeks. Estrus cycle status was checked daily by vaginal smear test. Ovarian follicle development and steroid synthesis were investigated through real-time PCR and histological analyses. Diestrus phases in the VCD, PP, and BP groups were longer than that in the vehicle group. VCD significantly decreased mRNA level of folliculogenesis-related genes (Foxl2, Kitl and Amh). All parabens significantly increased the Amh mRNA level but unchanged Foxl2 and Kitlg acting in primordial follicles. VCD and MP slightly increased Star and Cyp11a1 levels, which are related to an initial step in steroidogenesis. VCD and parabens induced an increase in FSH levels in serum and significantly decreased the total number of follicles. Increased FSH implies impairment in ovarian function due to VCD or parabens. These results suggest that VCD may suppress both formation and development of follicles. In particular, combined administration of VCD and parabens accelerated inhibition of the follicle-developmental process through elevated AMH level in small antral follicles.

  2. The 1.06 micrometer wideband laser modulator: Fabrication and life testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, testing and delivery of an optical modulator which will operate with a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 micrometers were performed. The system transfers data at a nominal rate of 400 Mbps. This wideband laser modulator can transmit either Pulse Gated Binary Modulation (PGBM) or Pulse Polarization Binary Modulation (PPBM) formats. The laser beam enters the modulator and passes through both crystals; approximately 1% of the transmitted beam is split from the main beam and analyzed for the AEC signal; the remaining part of the beam exits the modulator. The delivered modulator when initially aligned and integrated with laser and electronics performed very well. The optical transmission was 69.5%. The static extinction ratio was 69:1. A 1000 hour life test was conducted with the delivered modulator. A 63 bit pseudorandom code signal was used as a driver input. At the conclusion of the life test the modulator optical transmission was 71.5% and the static extinction ratio 65:1.

  3. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  4. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature.

  5. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-06-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The authors confine themselves to the test particle approximation and oversimplify adiabatic losses, but include unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum. Monoenergetic (T0 = 1 keV) protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law αT-μ, (T = kinetic energy), 2.1 ≤ μ ≤ 2.3 over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  6. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  7. Component Selection, Accelerated Testing, and Improved Modeling of AMTEC Systems for Space Power (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Suitor, J.; O'Connor, D.

    1993-01-01

    Alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) designs for space power are numerous, but selection of materials for construction of long-lived AMTEC devices has been limited to electrodes, current collectors, and the solid electrolyte. AMTEC devices with lifetimes greater than 5 years require careful selection and life testing of all hot-side components. The likely selection of a remote condensed design for initial flight test and probable use with a GPHS in AMTEC powered outer planet probes requires the device to be constructed to tolerate T greater than 1150K, as well as exposure to Na(sub (g)), and Na(sub (liq)) on the high pressure side. The temperatures involved make critical high strength and chemical resistance to Na containing Na(sub 2)O. Selection among materials which can be worked should not be driven by ease of fabricability, as high temperature stability is the critical issue. These concepts drive the selection of Mo alloys for Na(sub (liq)) containment in AMTEC cells for T to 1150K operation, as they are significantly stronger than comparable NB or Ta alloys, are less soluble in Na(sub (liq)) containing dissolved Na(sub 2)O, are workable compared to W alloys (which might be used for certain components), and are ductile at the T greater than 500K of proposed AMTEC modules in space applications.

  8. SU-E-T-384: Experimental Verification of a Monte Carlo Linear Accelerator Model Using a Radiochromic Film Stack Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    McCaw, T; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To experimentally verify a Monte Carlo (MC) linear accelerator model for the simulation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments of moving targets. Methods: A Varian Clinac™ 21EX linear accelerator was modeled using the EGSnrc user code BEAMnrc. The mean energy, radial-intensity distribution, and divergence of the electron beam incident on the bremsstrahlung target were adjusted to achieve agreement between simulated and measured percentage-depth-dose and transverse field profiles for a 6 MV beam. A seven-field step-and-shoot IMRT lung procedure was prepared using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning software. The plan was delivered using a Clinac™ 21EX linear accelerator and measured with a Gafchromic™ EBT2 film stack dosimeter (FSD) in two separate static geometries: within a cylindrical water-equivalent-plastic phantom and within an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Two measurements were completed in each setup. The dose distribution for each geometry was simulated using the EGSnrc user code DOSXYZnrc. MC geometries of the treatment couch, cylindrical phantom, and chest phantom were developed by thresholding CT data sets using MATLAB™. The FSD was modeled as water. The measured and simulated dose distributions were normalized to the median dose within the FSD. Results: Using an electron beam with a mean energy of 6.05 MeV, a Gaussian radial-intensity distribution with a full width at half maximum of 1.5 mm, and a divergence of 0°, the measured and simulated dose profiles agree within 1.75% and 1 mm. Measured and simulated dose distributions within both the cylindrical and chest phantoms agree within 3% over 94% of the FSD volume. The overall uncertainty in the FSD measurements is 3.1% (k=1). Conclusion: MC simulations agree with FSD measurements within measurement uncertainty, thereby verifying the accuracy of the linear accelerator model for the simulation of IMRT treatments of static geometries. The experimental verification

  9. Head impact accelerations for brain strain-related responses in contact sports: a model-based investigation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Songbai; Zhao, Wei; Li, Zhigang; McAllister, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Both linear [Formula: see text] and rotational [Formula: see text] accelerations contribute to head impacts on the field in contact sports; however, they are often isolated in injury studies. It is critical to evaluate the feasibility of estimating brain responses using isolated instead of full degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) accelerations. In this study, we investigated the sensitivities of regional brain strain-related responses to resultant [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as well as the relative contributions of these acceleration components to the responses via random sampling and linear regression using parameterized, triangulated head impacts with kinematic variable values based on on-field measurements. Two independently established and validated finite element models of the human head were employed to evaluate model-consistency and dependency in results: the Dartmouth Head Injury Model and Simulated Injury Monitor. For the majority of the brain, volume-weighted regional peak strain, strain rate, and von Mises stress accumulated from the simulation significantly correlated with the product of the magnitude and duration of [Formula: see text], or effectively, the rotational velocity, but not to [Formula: see text]. Responses from [Formula: see text]-only were comparable to the full-DOF counterparts especially when normalized by injury-causing thresholds (e.g., volume fractions of large differences virtually diminished (i.e., [Formula: see text]1 %) at typical difference percentage levels of 1-4 % on average). These model-consistent results support the inclusion of both rotational acceleration magnitude and duration into kinematics-based injury metrics and demonstrate the feasibility of estimating strain-related responses from isolated [Formula: see text] for analyses of strain-induced injury relevant to contact sports without significant loss of accuracy, especially for the cerebrum.

  10. Solar Flares as Natural Particle Accelerators: A High-energy View from X-ray Observations and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2008-07-01

    Solar flares, which have significant space weather consequences, are natural particle accelerators and one of the most spectacular phenomena of solar activity. RHESSI is the most advanced solar X-ray and gamma-ray mission ever flown and has opened a new era in solar flare research following its launch in 2002. This book offers a glimpse of this active research area from a high-energy perspective and contains a comprehensive guideline for RHESSI data analysis. Its main theme is the investigation of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. The strength of this book lies in its well-balanced account of the latest X-ray observations and theoretical models. The observational focus is on the morphology and spectra of imaged X-ray sources produced by nonthermal electrons or hot plasma. The modeling takes the novel approach of combining the Fokker-Planck treatment of the accelerated particles with the hydrodynamic treatment of the heated atmosphere. Applications of this modeling technique reach beyond the Sun to other exotic environments in the universe, such as extrasolar planetary auroras, stellar flares, and flares on accretion disks around neutron stars and black holes.

  11. How can accelerated development of bioenergy contribute to the future UK energy mix? Insights from a MARKAL modelling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Donna; Jablonski, Sophie; Moran, Brighid; Anandarajah, Gabrial; Taylor, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Background This work explores the potential contribution of bioenergy technologies to 60% and 80% carbon reductions in the UK energy system by 2050, by outlining the potential for accelerated technological development of bioenergy chains. The investigation was based on insights from MARKAL modelling, detailed literature reviews and expert consultations. Due to the number and complexity of bioenergy pathways and technologies in the model, three chains and two underpinning technologies were selected for detailed investigation: (1) lignocellulosic hydrolysis for the production of bioethanol, (2) gasification technologies for heat and power, (3) fast pyrolysis of biomass for bio-oil production, (4) biotechnological advances for second generation bioenergy crops, and (5) the development of agro-machinery for growing and harvesting bioenergy crops. Detailed literature searches and expert consultations (looking inter alia at research and development needs and economic projections) led to the development of an 'accelerated' dataset of modelling parameters for each of the selected bioenergy pathways, which were included in five different scenario runs with UK-MARKAL (MED). The results of the 'accelerated runs' were compared with a low-carbon (LC-Core) scenario, which assesses the cheapest way to decarbonise the energy sector. Results Bioenergy was deployed in larger quantities in the bioenergy accelerated technological development scenario compared with the LC-Core scenario. In the electricity sector, solid biomass was highly utilised for energy crop gasification, displacing some deployment of wind power, and nuclear and marine to a lesser extent. Solid biomass was also deployed for heat in the residential sector from 2040 in much higher quantities in the bioenergy accelerated technological development scenario compared with LC-Core. Although lignocellulosic ethanol increased, overall ethanol decreased in the transport sector in the bioenergy accelerated technological

  12. Medical linear accelerator x-ray sources: variation with make, model, and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffray, David A.; Battista, Jerry J.; Fenster, Aaron; Munro, Peter

    1992-06-01

    One difficulty in radiation therapy is ensuring the correct placement of the radiation field so that the radiation is delivered to the diseased regions while healthy tissues are spared. Currently, field placement is assessed by producing a transmission radiograph (portal image) using the high-energy treatment beam. Often the quality of these images is poor. One factor which influences image quality is the size of the x-ray source found in medical linear accelerators. These sources can be large and thus reduce the spatial resolution of the portal images, thereby reducing our ability to detect bony anatomical landmarks. The high energy of the x rays generated in these accelerators make it impossible to measure the x-ray source using standard techniques (e.g., pin-hole camera or star-patterns). We have developed a reconstruction technique which allows quantitative measurement of these sources. Using this technique, we have investigated and compared the size and shape of x-ray sources on a total of seven accelerators. These include: (1) two Varian Clinac 2100cs, (2) two Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) Therac 6s, (3) a Varian Clinac 600c, (4) an AECL Therac 25, and (5) a Therac 20. The comparisons also include monitoring the size and shape of the sources over a two year period. For each of these measured sources the source MTF has been calculated at typical magnifications. It has been found that (1) the size and shape of the source spot varies greatly between accelerators of different design; (2) for accelerators of the same design, however, the source spots were similar; and (3) the spatial resolution of currently available on-line verification imaging systems is only marginally reduced by the size and shape these source spots.

  13. The impact-acceleration model of head injury: injury severity predicts motor and cognitive performance after trauma.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, A; Marmarou, A; Czigner, A; Yamamoto, M; Demetriadou, K; Shirotani, T; Marmarou, C; Dunbar, J

    1999-12-01

    This study examines neuropsychological dysfunction after varying severities of the Impact Acceleration Model of diffuse traumatic brain injury. Adult rats (340 g-400 g) were divided into five groups, and exposed to varying degrees of Impact Acceleration Injury (1 m, 2 m, 2.1 m/500 g and second insult). After injury, animals were allowed to recover; acute neurological reflexes, beam walk score, beam balance score, inclined plane score, and Morris Water Maze score were then assessed at multiple time points. Injury of all severities caused significant motor and cognitive deficits. With milder injuries these effects were transient; however, with more severe injuries no recovery in function was seen. The addition of hypoxia and hypotension made a moderate injury worse than a severe injury. The acute neurological reflexes, the beam balance test and the inclined plane test distinguished between the more severely injured groups, but were affected less by mild injury. The beam walk test was sensitive to mild injury, but appeared unable to distinguish between the severe groups. The Morris Water Maze was sensitive for all injury groups, but appeared to adopt a different response profile with secondary insult. This study has for the first time characterized the degree of motor and cognitive deficits in rodents exposed to differing severities of Impact Acceleration Injury. These data confirm that the tests considered, and the Injury Model used, provide a useful system for the consideration of potential therapies which might ameliorate neuropsychological deficits in diffuse brain injury.

  14. Validation of Finite-Element Models of Persistent-Current Effects in Nb3Sn Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; ...

    2015-01-06

    Persistent magnetization currents are induced in superconducting filaments during the current ramping in magnets. The resulting perturbation to the design magnetic field leads to field quality degradation, in particular at low field where the effect is stronger relative to the main field. The effects observed in NbTi accelerator magnets were reproduced well with the critical-state model. However, this approach becomes less accurate for the calculation of the persistent-current effects observed in Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. Here a finite-element method based on the measured strand magnetization is validated against three state-of-art Nb3Sn accelerator magnets featuring different subelement diameters, critical currents, magnet designsmore » and measurement temperatures. The temperature dependence of the persistent-current effects is reproduced. Based on the validated model, the impact of conductor design on the persistent current effects is discussed. The performance, limitations and possible improvements of the approach are also discussed.« less

  15. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms. PMID:26184215

  16. Transport of Sputtered Carbon During Ground-Based Life Testing of Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marker, Colin L.; Clemons, Lucas A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon; Snyder, Aaron; Hung, Ching-Cheh; Karniotis, Christina A.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    High voltage, high power electron bombardment ion thrusters needed for deep space missions will be required to be operated for long durations in space as well as during ground laboratory life testing. Carbon based ion optics are being considered for such thrusters. The sputter deposition of carbon and arc vaporized carbon flakes from long duration operation of ion thrusters can result in deposition on insulating surfaces, causing them to become conducting. Because the sticking coefficient is less than one, secondary deposition needs to be considered to assure that shorting of critical components does not occur. The sticking coefficient for sputtered carbon and arc vaporized carbon is measured as well as directional ejection distribution data for carbon that does not stick upon first impact.

  17. Results of the mission profile life test. [for J-series mercury ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.; Trump, G. E.; James, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Seven J series 30-cm diameter thrusters have been tested in segments of up to 5,070 hr, for 14,541 hr in the Mission Profile Life Test facility. Test results have indicated the basic thruster design to be consistent with the lifetime goal of 15,000 hr at 2-A beam. The only areas of concern identified which appear to require additional verification testing involve contamination of mercury propellant isolators, which may be due to facility constituents, and the ability of specially covered surfaces to contain sputtered material and prevent flake formation. The ability of the SCR, series resonant inverter power processor to operate the J series thruster and autonomous computer control of the thruster/processor system were demonstrated.

  18. Life test performance of a Philips rhombic-drive refrigerator with bellows seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindale, E.; Lehrfeld, D.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1979, tour Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerators, developed by Philips Laboratories for the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory, were launched into orbit aboard the P78-1 spacecraft. The refrigerators were designed to cool the detectors of two identical gamma-ray spectrometers to 77 K reliably for one year. Since launch, the refrigerators, still in orbit, have individually accumulated from 5,000 to over 20,000 hours of operation. As part of those efforts, a refrigerator identical to those in orbit was built, with one significant modification: flexible metal bellows between the crankcase and the working volume to prevent possible contaminants from migrating into the cold region. During the life test of the modified refrigerator, the temperature increase during the first three month run was 0.022 k/day, a negligible level. As of October 1982, the unit has accumulated over 12,300 hours of operation.

  19. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  20. Extended temperature-accelerated dynamics: enabling long-time full-scale modeling of large rare-event systems.

    PubMed

    Bochenkov, Vladimir; Suetin, Nikolay; Shankar, Sadasivan

    2014-09-07

    A new method, the Extended Temperature-Accelerated Dynamics (XTAD), is introduced for modeling long-timescale evolution of large rare-event systems. The method is based on the Temperature-Accelerated Dynamics approach [M. Sørensen and A. Voter, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 9599 (2000)], but uses full-scale parallel molecular dynamics simulations to probe a potential energy surface of an entire system, combined with the adaptive on-the-fly system decomposition for analyzing the energetics of rare events. The method removes limitations on a feasible system size and enables to handle simultaneous diffusion events, including both large-scale concerted and local transitions. Due to the intrinsically parallel algorithm, XTAD not only allows studies of various diffusion mechanisms in solid state physics, but also opens the avenue for atomistic simulations of a range of technologically relevant processes in material science, such as thin film growth on nano- and microstructured surfaces.

  1. Rank-based inference for the accelerated failure time model in the presence of interval censored data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Mostafa; Ibrahim, Noor Akma; Bakar, Mohd. Rizam Abu; Arasan, Jayanthi

    2016-06-01

    Semiparametric analysis and rank-based inference for the accelerated failure time model are complicated in the presence of interval censored data. The main difficulty with the existing rank-based methods is that they involve estimating functions with the possibility of multiple roots. In this paper a class of asymptotically normal rank estimators is developed which can be aquired via linear programming for estimating the parameters of the model, and a two-step iterative algorithm is introduce for solving the estimating equations. The proposed inference procedures are assessed through a real example.

  2. Using MMS measurements to validate models of reconnection-driven magnetotail reconfiguration and particle acceleration during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    New data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission confirms and greatly extends the view that substorms are a configurational instability driven by magnetic reconnection. We have studied in detail a powerful storm period in June 2015 which shows that substorm events seen sequentially by the four MMS spacecraft subsequently feed the powerful enhancement of the radiation belts observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. Several sequences of significant southward IMF along with a period of high (VSW≥500 km/s) solar wind speed occurred following a strong interplanetary shock wave impact on the magnetosphere. We see that substorms provide a "seed" population, while high-speed solar wind drives the acceleration to relativistic energies in this two-step geomagnetic activity scenario. Thus, MMS data help validate models that invoke reconnection as a fundamental driver of magnetospheric particle acceleration. The data for several separate events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progresses through a specific, well-observed sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigures. Energetic electron fluxes measured by the several MMS spacecraft reveal the clear temporal occurrence characteristics and the obvious relationships to concurrently measured solar wind drivers. This shows that enhancements in substorms are a key first step in the acceleration of radiation belt electrons to high energies as observed subsequently by the Van Allen Probes instrumentation. Thus, this high-resolution observational evidence along with the accompanying modeling has demonstrated that magnetospheric substorms are an important acceleration component within the coupled near-Earth system.

  3. Experiments assigned to determine the acceleration of 8000kN shear laboratory model elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiul Berghian, A.; Vasiu, T.; Abrudean, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper presents an experimental kinetics study by measuring accelerations using a bi-axial accelerometer constructed in the basis of a miniature integrated circuit, included in the class of micro-electrical and mechanical systems - MMA6261Q on the experimental installation reduced to the 1:5 dividing rule by comparison with the shear existent in exploitation, conceived and projected at the Faculty of Engineering in Hunedoara.

  4. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    figures a complete picture of the non -linear effect of polymeric coatings on peak acceleration can be determined. It is seen that as charge mass...Final recovered height of the blast loaded cylinder versus charge mass Looking at the previous two figures a complete picture of the non -linear...is that they provide evidence from non -invasive measurements that exposure of rats to underbody blasts results in both neurochemical and

  5. Characterization, Modeling, and Accelerating Emulation of Aircraft Coating Exposure and Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    Maocheng Yan Stuart Croll Jun Nie Jinhai Wang Dennis Tallman Quan Su Yechung Wang Kerry Allahar Andrew Huovinen Duhua Wang Brian Hinderliter...than may natural weathering. Thus coating failure due to adhesion loss or hydrolysis can be very different between accelerated testing protocols... Kerry Allahar and Brian Hinderliter. Some of the results are discussed above. The results of these studies are also discussed in detail in the

  6. Analysis of Orbit Prediction Sensitivity to Thermal Emissions Acceleration Modeling for High Area-to-mass Ratio Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelecy, T.; Jah, M.

    High area-to-mass ratio (A/m) inactive resident space objects (RSOs) in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) regime pose a hazard to active GEO RSOs. The combination of solar radiation pressure (SRP) and solar and lunar gravitational perturbations causes perturbations in the orbits of these RSOs. The high A/m nature of these RSOs results in greater sensitivity to SRP forces resulting in the perturbation of mean motion, inclination and eccentricity. The subsequent drift with respect to the Earth, combined with time varying orientation with respect to the sun and transitions into and out of Earth's shadow, results in many of these RSOs being "lost" after initial acquisition as they transition through periods of days to weeks out of view of observing sites. This work examines the sensitivity of the prediction accuracies to inadequate modeling of the thermal emissions component of the SRP acceleration in the force models. The simplest models treat the thermal emission term either implicitly, or as a term that is a function of a fixed surface temperature and area. In reality, the temperature can vary with time for inert objects (e.g. orbital debris) transitioning in to and out of Earth shadow. Additionally, the orientation dynamics result in thermal acceleration components that vary relative to the inertial reference frame, and in general, have components orthogonal to the sun-object line. The prediction uncertainties associated with thermal modeling, orientation dynamics and materials uncertainties are examined in terms of the SRP acceleration perturbations for a range of representative high A/m object characteristics. Results indicate that significant prediction errors result from inadequate accounting for the thermal emissions component when compared to the standard SRP models used. These errors need to be addressed in the orbit determination and prediction to allow for more accurate re-acquisition and tracking.

  7. Validation of a simple analytical model for in-air outputfactor calculation for SL-15 Philips-Elekta linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ali, Maha A; Emam, Ismail

    A simple aralytical approach to model extrafocal radiation (EFR) and monitor chamber backscatter (MBS)-and consequently collimator scattar factor-is investigated. The model has been applied to 6 and 10 MV photon beams produced by a Philips-Elekta SL-15 medical linear accelerator. Both EFR and MBS are determined simultaneously using conventional measured data at the isocenter and the calculated in-air output factors (S(c)) were in good agreement with the measured values. When the square field size changes from 4x4 to 40x40 cm(2), the total intensities of EFR were 17.6% and 13%, while the MBS contributions to S(c) were 0.1% and 0.2% for 6 and 10 mv, respectively. The model was also used to calculate S(c) for symmetric or asymmetric rectangular jaws-defined fields with an accuracy of less than 0.2% at extended or shortened source detector distances Moreover, the model was verified for both very small field sizes (2x2 cm(2) down to 0.6x0.6 cm(2)) and for field sizes defined by micro multi-leaf collimator to check its applicability for stereotactic radiotherapy dose calculations. A simple programme is designed to facilitate the calculation process of S(c) for a medical linear accelerator at different situations either for commissioning or verification of the model at different energies.

  8. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  9. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  10. Direct measurement of the positive acceleration of the universe and testing inhomogeneous models under gravitational wave cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Yoo, Chul-Moon E-mail: anishi@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-04-01

    One possibility for explaining the apparent accelerating expansion of the universe is that we live in the center of a spherically inhomogeneous universe. Although current observations cannot fully distinguish ΛCDM and these inhomogeneous models, direct measurement of the acceleration of the universe can be a powerful tool in probing them. We have shown that, if ΛCDM is the correct model, DECIGO/BBO would be able to detect the positive redshift drift (which is the time evolution of the source redshift z) in 3–5 year gravitational wave (GW) observations from neutron-star binaries, which enables us to rule out any Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void model with monotonically increasing density profile. We may even be able to rule out any LTB model unless we allow unrealistically steep density profile at z ∼ 0. This test can be performed with GW observations alone, without any reference to electromagnetic observations, and is more powerful than the redshift drift measurement using Lyman α forest.

  11. Modeling of 10 GeV-1 TeV laser-plasma accelerators using Lorentz boosted simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D. P.

    2011-12-13

    We study modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [J.-L. Vay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 130405 (2007)] that allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted and beam loaded laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV (parameters not computationally accessible otherwise). This verifies the scaling of plasmaaccelerators to very high energies and accurately models the laser evolution and the accelerated electron beam transverse dynamics and energy spread. Over 4, 5, and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV, and 1 TeV class stages, respectively. Agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference for a 0.1 GeV class stage. In addition, obtaining these speedups and levels of accuracy was permitted by solutions for handling data input (in particular, particle and laser beams injection) and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference, as well as mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness.

  12. Estimation of focal and extra-focal radiation profiles based on Gaussian modeling in medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Anai, Shigeo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Araki, Fujio; Matsuki, Takaomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Nobuo

    2011-07-01

    The X-ray source or focal radiation is one of the factors that can degrade the conformal field edge in stereotactic body radiotherapy. For that reason, it is very important to estimate the total focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators, which consists of X-ray focal-spot radiation and extra-focal radiation profiles. Our purpose in this study was to propose an experimental method for estimating the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators based on triple Gaussian functions. We measured the total X-ray focal radiation profiles of the accelerators by moving a slit in conjunction with a photon field p-type silicon diode. The slit width was changed so that the extra-focal radiation could be optimally included in the total focal radiation. The total focal radiation profiles of an accelerator at 4-MV and 10-MV energies were approximated with a combination of triple Gaussian functions, which correspond to the focal-spot radiation, extra-focal radiation, and radiation transmitted through the slit assembly. As a result, the ratios of the Gaussian peak value of the extra-focal radiation to that of the focal spot for 4 and 10 MV were 0.077 and 0.159, respectively. The peak widths of the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles were 0.57 and 25.0 mm for 4 MV, respectively, and 0.60 and 22.0 mm for 10 MV, respectively. We concluded that the proposed focal radiation profile model based on the triple Gaussian functions may be feasible for estimating the X-ray focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles.

  13. Three-grid accelerator system for an ion propulsion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for an ion engine comprising a three-grid accelerator system with the decelerator grid biased negative of the beam plasma. This arrangement substantially reduces the charge-exchange ion current reaching the accelerator grid at high tank pressures, which minimizes erosion of the accelerator grid due to charge exchange ion sputtering, known to be the major accelerator grid wear mechanism. An improved method for life testing ion engines is also provided using the disclosed apparatus. In addition, the invention can also be applied in materials processing.

  14. A Model for Accelerating Academic Success of Community College Remedial English Students: Is the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) Effective and Affordable? CCRC Working Paper No. 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Speroni, Cecilia; Belfield, Clive; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Edgecombe, Nikki

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a quantitative analysis of the Community College of Baltimore County's Accelerated Learning Program (ALP). Under ALP, students placed into upper-level developmental writing are "mainstreamed" into English 101 classes and simultaneously enrolled in a companion ALP course (taught by the same…

  15. A numerical model of 2-D sloshing of pseudo-viscous liquids in horizontally accelerated rectangular containers

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.; Ingber, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical model for simulating the transient nonlinear behavior of 2-D viscous sloshing flows in rectangular containers subjected to arbitrary horizontal accelerations is presented. The potential-flow formulation uses Rayleigh damping to approximate the effects of viscosity, and Lagrangian node movement is used to accommodate violent sloshing motions. A boundary element approach is used to efficiently handle the time-changing fluid geometry. Additionally, a corrected equation is presented for the constraint condition relating normal and tangential derivatives of the velocity potential where the fluid free surface meets the rigid container wall. The numerical model appears to be more accurate than previous sloshing models, as determined by comparison against exact analytic solutions and results of previously published models.

  16. Prediction of PM 10 concentrations at urban traffic intersections using semi-empirical box modelling with instantaneous velocity and acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-di; Lu, Wei-Zhen; Xue, Yu

    2009-12-01

    At urban traffic intersections, vehicles frequently stop with idling engines during the red-light period and speed up rapidly during the green-light period. The changes of driving patterns (i.e., idle, acceleration, deceleration and cruising patterns) generally produce uncertain emission. Additionally, the movement of pedestrians and the influence of wind further result in the random dispersion of pollutants. It is, therefore, too complex to simulate the effects of such dynamics on the resulting emission using conventional deterministic causal models. For this reason, a modified semi-empirical box model for predicting the PM 10 concentrations on roadsides is proposed in this paper. The model constitutes three parts, i.e., traffic, emission and dispersion components. The traffic component is developed using a generalized force traffic model to obtain the instantaneous velocity and acceleration when vehicles move through intersections. Hence the distribution of vehicle emission in street canyon during the green-light period is calculated. Then the dispersion component is investigated using a semi-empirical box model combining average wind speed, box height and background concentrations. With these considerations, the proposed model is applied and evaluated using measured data at a busy traffic intersection in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. In order to test the performance of the model, two situations, i.e., the data sets within a sunny day and between two sunny days, were selected to examine the model performance. The predicted values are generally well coincident with the observed data during different time slots except several values are overestimated or underestimated. Moreover, two types of vehicles, i.e., buses and petrol cars, are separately taken into account in the study. Buses are verified to contribute most to the emission in street canyons, which may be useful in evaluating the impact of vehicle emissions on the ambient air quality when there is a significant change

  17. S-BRANE Solutions with Acceleration in Models with Exponential Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchuk, V. D.; Melnikov, V. N.

    2006-02-01

    A family of generalized S-brane solutions with orthogonal intersection rules and n Ricciflat factor spaces in the theory with several scalar fields, antisymmetric forms and multiple scalar potential is considered. Two subclasses of solutions with power-law and exponential behaviour of scale factors are singled out. These subclasses contain sub-families of solutions with accelerated expansion of certain factor spaces. The solutions depend on charge densities of branes, their dimensions and intersections, dilatonic couplings and the number of dilatonic fields. Certain examples of solutions with exponential dependence of one scale factor and constant scale factors of "internal" spaces (e.g. "Freund-Rubin" type solutions) are also considered.

  18. Life testing of reflowed and reworked advanced CCGA surface mount packages in harsh thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2013-03-01

    Life testing/qualification of reflowed (1st reflow) and reworked (1st reflow, 1st removal, and then 1st rework) advanced ceramic column grid array (CCGA) surface mount interconnect electronic packaging technologies for future flight projects has been studied to enhance the mission assurance of JPL-NASA projects. The reliability of reworked/reflowed surface mount technology (SMT) packages is very important for short-duration and long-duration deep space harsh extreme thermal environmental missions. The life testing of CCGA electronic packages under extreme thermal environments (for example: -185°C to +125°C) has been performed with reference to various JPL/NASA project requirements which encompass the temperature range studied. The test boards of reflowed and reworked CCGA packages (717 Xilinx package, 624, 1152, and 1272 column Actel Packages) were selected for the study to survive three times the total number of expected temperature cycles resulting from all environmental and operational exposures occurring over the life of the flight hardware including all relevant manufacturing, ground operations, and mission phases or cycles to failure to assess the life of the hardware. Qualification/life testing was performed by subjecting test boards to the environmental harsh temperature extremes and assessing any structural failures, mechanical failures or degradation in electrical performance solder-joint failures due to either overstress or thermal cycle fatigue. The large, high density, high input/output (I/O) electronic interconnect SMT packages such as CCGA have increased usage in avionics hardware of NASA projects during the last two decades. The test boards built with CCGA packages are expensive and often require a rework to replace a reflowed, reprogrammed, failed, redesigned, etc., CCGA packages. Theoretically speaking, a good rework process should have similar temperature-time profile as that used for the original manufacturing process of solder reflow. A

  19. Theory and numerical modeling of the accelerated expansion of laser-ablated materials near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. R.; King, T. C.; Hes, J. H.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Geohegan, D. B.; Wood, R. F.; Puretzky, A. A.; Donato, J. M.

    1999-09-01

    A self-similar theory and numerical hydrodynamic modeling is developed to investigate the effects of dynamic source and partial ionization on the acceleration of the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material near a solid target surface. The dynamic source effect accelerates the expansion in the direction perpendicular to the target surface, while the dynamic partial ionization effect accelerates the expansion in all directions. The vaporized material during laser ablation provides a nonadiabatic dynamic source at the target surface into the unsteady expanding fluid. For studying the dynamic source effect, the self-similar theory begins with an assumed profile of plume velocity, u=v/vm=α+(1-α)ξ, where vm is the maximum expansion velocity, α is a constant, and ξ=x/vmt. The resultant profiles of plume density and plume temperature are derived. The relations obtained from the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy, respectively, all show that the maximum expansion velocity is inversely proportional to α, where 1-α is the slope of plume velocity profile. The numerical hydrodynamic simulation is performed with the Rusanov method and the Newton Raphson method. The profiles and scalings obtained from numerical hydrodynamic modeling are in good agreement with the theory. The dynamic partial ionization requires ionization energy from the heat at the expansion front, and thus reduces the increase of front temperature. The reduction of thermal motion would increase the flow velocity to conserve the momentum. This dynamic partial ionization effect is studied with the numerical hydrodynamic simulation including the Saha equation. With these effects, α is reduced from its value of conventional free expansion. This reduction on α increases the flow velocity slope, decreases the flow velocity near the surface, and reduces the thermal motion of plume, such that the maximum expansion velocity is significantly increased over that found from conventional models. The

  20. Turbulent Heating and Wave Pressure in Solar Wind Acceleration Modeling: New Insights to Empirical Forecasting of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of solar wind acceleration has made several important advances recently due to improvements in modeling techniques. Existing code and simulations test the competing theories for coronal heating, which include reconnection/loop-opening (RLO) models and wave/turbulence-driven (WTD) models. In order to compare and contrast the validity of these theories, we need flexible tools that predict the emergent solar wind properties from a wide range of coronal magnetic field structures such as coronal holes, pseudostreamers, and helmet streamers. ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code that includes Alfven wave generation and reflection and the resulting turbulent heating to accelerate solar wind in open flux tubes. We present the ZEPHYR output for a wide range of magnetic field geometries to show the effect of the magnetic field profiles on wind properties. We also investigate the competing acceleration mechanisms found in ZEPHYR to determine the relative importance of increased gas pressure from turbulent heating and the separate pressure source from the Alfven waves. To do so, we developed a code that will become publicly available for solar wind prediction. This code, TEMPEST, provides an outflow solution based on only one input: the magnetic field strength as a function of height above the photosphere. It uses correlations found in ZEPHYR between the magnetic field strength at the source surface and the temperature profile of the outflow solution to compute the wind speed profile based on the increased gas pressure from turbulent heating. With this initial solution, TEMPEST then adds in the Alfven wave pressure term to the modified Parker equation and iterates to find a stable solution for the wind speed. This code, therefore, can make predictions of the wind speeds that will be observed at 1 AU based on extrapolations from magnetogram data, providing a useful tool for empirical forecasting of the sol! ar wind.

  1. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  2. Long-term mechanical life testing of polymeric post insulators for distribution and a comparison to porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A. )

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the results and analyses of long-term cantilever strength tests on polymeric line post insulators. The time-to-failure data for static cantilever loads are represented by the Weibull distribution. The life distribution, obtained from the maximum likelihood estimates of the accelerated failure times, fits an exponential model. An extrapolation of the life distribution to normal loads provides an estimate of the strength rating and mechanical equivalence to porcelain line post insulators.

  3. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  4. Expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations that induce an anomalous acceleration into the Standard Model of Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Temple, Blake; Smoller, Joel

    2009-08-25

    We derive a system of three coupled equations that implicitly defines a continuous one-parameter family of expanding wave solutions of the Einstein equations, such that the Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology is embedded as a single point in this family. By approximating solutions near the center to leading order in the Hubble length, the family reduces to an explicit one-parameter family of expanding spacetimes, given in closed form, that represents a perturbation of the Standard Model. By introducing a comoving coordinate system, we calculate the correction to the Hubble constant as well as the exact leading order quadratic correction to the redshift vs. luminosity relation for an observer at the center. The correction to redshift vs. luminosity entails an adjustable free parameter that introduces an anomalous acceleration. We conclude (by continuity) that corrections to the redshift vs. luminosity relation observed after the radiation phase of the Big Bang can be accounted for, at the leading order quadratic level, by adjustment of this free parameter. The next order correction is then a prediction. Since nonlinearities alone could actuate dissipation and decay in the conservation laws associated with the highly nonlinear radiation phase and since noninteracting expanding waves represent possible time-asymptotic wave patterns that could result, we propose to further investigate the possibility that these corrections to the Standard Model might be the source of the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies, an explanation not requiring the cosmological constant or dark energy.

  5. A Framework for 3D Model-Based Visual Tracking Using a GPU-Accelerated Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Capson, D W

    2012-01-01

    A novel framework for acceleration of particle filtering approaches to 3D model-based, markerless visual tracking in monocular video is described. Specifically, we present a methodology for partitioning and mapping the computationally expensive weight-update stage of a particle filter to a graphics processing unit (GPU) to achieve particle- and pixel-level parallelism. Nvidia CUDA and Direct3D are employed to harness the massively parallel computational power of modern GPUs for simulation (3D model rendering) and evaluation (segmentation, feature extraction, and weight calculation) of hundreds of particles at high speeds. The proposed framework addresses the computational intensity that is intrinsic to all particle filter approaches, including those that have been modified to minimize the number of particles required for a particular task. Performance and tracking quality results for rigid object and articulated hand tracking experiments demonstrate markerless, model-based visual tracking on consumer-grade graphics hardware with pixel-level accuracy up to 95 percent at 60+ frames per second. The framework accelerates particle evaluation up to 49 times over a comparable CPU-only implementation, providing an increased particle count while maintaining real-time frame rates.

  6. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for a Nickel-hydrogen Cell: Cycle Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, cycle life tests of nickel electrodes were carried out in Hi/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45-minute low earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. The results show that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength did not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. The best plaque type appears to be one which is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has a median pore size of 13 micron.

  7. Displacement measurement on specimens subjected to non-Gaussian random vibrations in fatigue life tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2014-05-01

    High-cycle fatigue life tests conducted using controlled random vibrations are commonly used to evaluate failure in components and structures. In most cases, a Gaussian distribution of both the input vibration and the stress response is assumed, while real-life loads may be non-Gaussian causing the response to be non-Gaussian as well. Generating non-Gaussian drive signals with high kurtosis and a given power spectral density, however, does not always guarantee that the stress response will actually be non-Gaussian, because this depends on the adherence of the tested system to the Central Limit Theorem. On the other side, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations, and therefore to evaluate and select input loads. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and non-stationary non-Gaussian excitation signals. The Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) technique was used for the first time in this type of test, to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response in terms of differential displacement at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal drops occurring during the experiment is described and the results are discussed with respect to the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal.

  8. Destructive Evaluation of a Xenon Hollow Cathode after a 28,000 Hour Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system requires a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) with a lifetime of at least 18,000 hours. In order to demonstrate the lifetime capability of the HCA, a series of hollow cathode wear tests was performed which included a life test operated at the maximum current of the HCA. This test sought to verify hollow cathode lifetime capability and contamination control protocols. This hollow cathode accumulated 27,800 hours of operation before it failed during a restart attempt. The cathode was subsequently destructively analyzed in order to determine the failure mechanism. Microscopic examination of the cathode interior determined that relatively small changes in the cathode physical geometry had occurred and barium tungstates, which are known to limit the emission process, had formed over a majority of the electron emitter surface. Because the final state of the insert was consistent with expected impregnate chemistry, the hollow cathode was believed to have reached the end of its usable life under the test conditions.

  9. Vacuum thermal cycle life testing of high temperature thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnappan, Rengasamy; Beam, Jerry E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the corrosion compatibility of the high temperature thermal energy storage (TES) salts with Inconel-617 container was initiated at the Thermal Laboratory of the Wright Research and Development Center (WRDC) in 1985. Three fluoride eutectic mixtures: LiF-MgF2-KF, LiF-MgF2-NaF, and LiF-MgF2 having melting points in the neighborhood of 1000 K and heats of fusion above 750 kJ/kg were chosen. High purity analytical grade component salts were processed in oxygen and moisture-free inert atmosphere, and melted in situ in the Inconel-617 containers. The containers were sealed by electron beam-welding of the end caps thereby evacuating the void volume. The TES capsules thus formed were placed in a tubular vacuum furnace for continuous thermal cycle life testing by cycling them ±100 K from the eutectic temperature every 2 hours. The capsules have successfully undergone 40,000 hours and 10,000 cycles of testing as of April 1990 and continuing on the test. This is believed to be the longest record available on the TES corrosion compatibility data. The present results clearly indicate that careful processing and proper welding are key factors in obtaining a longlife TES salt-containment system.

  10. Development of PUNDA (Parametric Universal Nonlinear Dynamics Approximator) Models for Self-Validating Knowledge-Guided Modelling of Nonlinear Processes in Particle Accelerators \\& Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, Bijan; Schweiger, Carl; Hartman, Eric

    2007-10-07

    The difficult problems being tackled in the accelerator community are those that are nonlinear, substantially unmodeled, and vary over time. Such problems are ideal candidates for model-based optimization and control if representative models of the problem can be developed that capture the necessary mathematical relations and remain valid throughout the operation region of the system, and through variations in system dynamics. The goal of this proposal is to develop the methodology and the algorithms for building high-fidelity mathematical representations of complex nonlinear systems via constrained training of combined first-principles and neural network models.

  11. A prediction model of the depth-of-discharge effect on the cycle life of a storage cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Lim, Hong S.

    1987-01-01

    Cycle life requirements are very high for batteries used in aerospace applications in low Earth orbit. The data base required to establish confidence in a particular cell design is thus both extensive and expensive. Reliable accelerated cycle life testing and performance decay modeling represent attractive alternatives to real-time tests of cycle life. In light of certain long-term cycle life test results, this paper examines a very simple performance decay model developed earlier. Application of that model to available data demonstrates a rigid relationship between a battery's expected cycle life and the depth of discharge of cycling. Further, modeling analysis of the data suggests that a significantly improved cycle life can be obtained with advanced components, materials, and designs; and that cycle life can be reliably predicted from the results of accelerated testing.

  12. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.H.; Michelotti, M.D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M.T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  13. Pten Inactivation Accelerates Oncogenic K-ras-Initiated Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Yang, Yanan; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Ma, Lijiang; Hanna, Amy E.; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Moghaddam, Seyed; Evans, Christopher M.; Li, Huaiguang; Cai, Wei-Wen; Sato, Mitsuo; Minna, John D.; Wu, Hong; Creighton, Chad J.; Demayo, Francesco J.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) is expressed aberrantly in non-small cell lung cancer cells, but the role of Pten in lung neoplasia has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a genetic approach to inactivate Pten in the bronchial epithelium of mice. Although, by itself, Pten inactivation had no discernible effect on bronchial epithelial histology, it accelerated lung tumorigenesis initiated by oncogenic K-ras, causing more rapid lethality than that induced by oncogenic K-ras alone (8 weeks versus 24 weeks of median duration of survival, respectively). Lung tumors arose in K-ras mutant, Pten-deficient mice that rapidly obstructed bronchial lumina and replaced alveolar spaces. Relative to K-ras mutant tumors, the K-ras mutant, Pten-deficient tumors exhibited more advanced histologic severity and more prominent inflammation and vascularity. Thus, Pten inactivation cooperated with oncogenic K-ras in promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:18281487

  14. Stringent restriction from the growth of large-scale structure on apparent acceleration in inhomogeneous cosmological models.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin; Troxel, M A

    2013-12-20

    Probes of cosmic expansion constitute the main basis for arguments to support or refute a possible apparent acceleration due to different expansion rates in the Universe as described by inhomogeneous cosmological models. We present in this Letter a separate argument based on results from an analysis of the growth rate of large-scale structure in the Universe as modeled by the inhomogeneous cosmological models of Szekeres. We use the models with no assumptions of spherical or axial symmetries. We find that while the Szekeres models can fit very well the observed expansion history without a Λ, they fail to produce the observed late-time suppression in the growth unless Λ is added to the dynamics. A simultaneous fit to the supernova and growth factor data shows that the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM) provides consistency with the data at a confidence level of 99.65%, while the Szekeres model without Λ achieves only a 60.46% level. When the data sets are considered separately, the Szekeres with no Λ fits the supernova data as well as the ΛCDM does, but provides a very poor fit to the growth data with only 31.31% consistency level compared to 99.99% for the ΛCDM. This absence of late-time growth suppression in inhomogeneous models without a Λ is consolidated by a physical explanation.

  15. Accelerated senescence in skin in a murine model of radiation-induced multi-organ injury.

    PubMed

    McCart, Elizabeth A; Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Lombardini, Eric D; Mog, Steven R; Panganiban, Ronald Allan M; Dickson, Kelley M; Mansur, Rihab A; Nagy, Vitaly; Kim, Sung-Yop; Selwyn, Reed; Landauer, Michael R; Darling, Thomas N; Day, Regina M

    2017-03-18

    Accidental high-dose radiation exposures can lead to multi-organ injuries, including radiation dermatitis. The types of cellular damage leading to radiation dermatitis are not completely understood. To identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie radiation-induced skin injury in vivo, we evaluated the time-course of cellular effects of radiation (14, 16 or 17 Gy X-rays; 0.5 Gy/min) in the skin of C57BL/6 mice. Irradiation of 14 Gy induced mild inflammation, observed histologically, but no visible hair loss or erythema. However, 16 or 17 Gy radiation induced dry desquamation, erythema and mild ulceration, detectable within 14 days post-irradiation. Histological evaluation revealed inflammation with mast cell infiltration within 14 days. Fibrosis occurred 80 days following 17 Gy irradiation, with collagen deposition, admixed with neutrophilic dermatitis, and necrotic debris. We found that in cultures of normal human keratinocytes, exposure to 17.9 Gy irradiation caused the upregulation of p21/waf1, a marker of senescence. Using western blot analysis of 17.9 Gy-irradiated mice skin samples, we also detected a marker of accelerated senescence (p21/waf1) 7 days post-irradiation, and a marker of cellular apoptosis (activated caspase-3) at 30 days, both preceding histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced epithelial stem cells from hair follicles 14-30 days post-irradiation. Furthermore, p21/waf1 expression was increased in the region of the hair follicle stem cells at 14 days post 17 Gy irradiation. These data indicate that radiation induces accelerated cellular senescence in the region of the stem cell population of the skin.

  16. Oxidative stress accelerates amyloid deposition and memory impairment in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-02-05

    Oxidative stress is known to play a prominent role in the onset and early stage progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels are increased in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Here, we created a double-transgenic mouse model of AD to explore the pathological and behavioral effects of oxidative stress. Double transgenic (APP/DAL) mice were constructed by crossing Tg2576 (APP) mice, which express a mutant form of human amyloid precursor protein (APP), with DAL mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), in which oxidative stress is enhanced. Y-maze and object recognition tests were performed at 3 and 6 months of age to evaluate learning and memory. The accumulation of amyloid plaques, deposition of phosphorylated-tau protein, and number of astrocytes in the brain were assessed histopathologically at 3, 6, 9, and 12-15 months of age. The life span of APP/DAL mice was significantly shorter than that of APP or DAL mice. In addition, they showed accelerated amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, and gliosis. Furthermore, these mice showed impaired performance on Y-maze and object recognition tests at 3 months of age. These data suggest that oxidative stress accelerates cognitive dysfunction and pathological insults in the brain. APP/DAL mice could be a useful model for exploring new approaches to AD treatment.

  17. Towards A Model-Based Prognostics Methodology for Electrolytic Capacitors: A Case Study Based on Electrical Overstress Accelerated Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    A remaining useful life prediction methodology for electrolytic capacitors is presented. This methodology is based on the Kalman filter framework and an empirical degradation model. Electrolytic capacitors are used in several applications ranging from power supplies on critical avionics equipment to power drivers for electro-mechanical actuators. These devices are known for their comparatively low reliability and given their criticality in electronics subsystems they are a good candidate for component level prognostics and health management. Prognostics provides a way to assess remaining useful life of a capacitor based on its current state of health and its anticipated future usage and operational conditions. We present here also, experimental results of an accelerated aging test under electrical stresses. The data obtained in this test form the basis for a remaining life prediction algorithm where a model of the degradation process is suggested. This preliminary remaining life prediction algorithm serves as a demonstration of how prognostics methodologies could be used for electrolytic capacitors. In addition, the use degradation progression data from accelerated aging, provides an avenue for validation of applications of the Kalman filter based prognostics methods typically used for remaining useful life predictions in other applications.

  18. "Leading Blob" Model in a Stochastic Acceleration Scenario: The Case of the 2009 Flare of Mkn 501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefa, E.; Aharonian, F. A.; Rieger, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Evidence for very hard, intrinsic γ-ray source spectra, as inferred after correction for absorption in the extragalactic background light (EBL), has interesting implications for the acceleration and radiation mechanisms acting in blazars. A key issue so far has been the dependence of the hardness of the γ-ray spectrum on different existing EBL models. The recent Fermi observations of Mkn 501 now provide additional evidence for the presence of hard intrinsic γ-ray spectra independent of EBL uncertainties. Relativistic Maxwellian-type electron energy distributions that are formed in stochastic acceleration scenarios offer a plausible interpretation for such hard source spectra. Here, we show that the combined emission from different components with Maxwellian-type distributions could in principle also account for much softer and broader power-law-like emission spectra. We introduce a "leading blob" scenario, applicable to active flaring episodes, when one (or a few) of these components become distinct over the "background" emission, producing hard spectral features and/or hardening of the observed spectra. We show that this model can explain the peculiar high-energy characteristics of Mkn 501 in 2009, with evidence for flaring activity and strong spectral hardening at the highest γ-ray energies.

  19. The 10 sheath-accelerated electrons and ions. [atmospheric models of plasma sheaths and ionospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A model is presented that suggests that plasma sheaths form between the ionospheric plasma moving with Io and the ambient plasma corotating with Jupiter. Potentials across these sheaths could be as high as 580 kV which is the motional emf across Io's ionosphere. Electrons and ions can be accelerated across these sheaths. The sheaths may exist at the top of the Io ionosphere with characteristic thicknesses of 1/4 kilometers. The model is consistent with the Pioneer observations of 0.15 MeV electrons at the inner edge of Io's L-shell and the enhanced number density of low-energy protons at the outer edge. Ion sputtering of the Io surface is discussed and may explain the presence of atomic hydrogen and sodium in the vicinity of Io. Also these accelerated particles may be important to the formation of the Io ionosphere. High electron flux which may lead to decametric radio emissions, Jovian atmospheric heating and optical and X-ray emissions is also discussed.

  20. Optimal Model-Based Fault Estimation and Correction for Particle Accelerators and Industrial Plants Using Combined Support Vector Machines and First Principles Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, Bijan; Schweiger, Carl; /SLAC /Pavilion Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX

    2010-08-25

    parameters of the beam lifetime model) are physically meaningful. (3) Numerical Efficiency of the Training - We investigated the numerical efficiency of the SVM training. More specifically, for the primal formulation of the training, we have developed a problem formulation that avoids the linear increase in the number of the constraints as a function of the number of data points. (4) Flexibility of Software Architecture - The software framework for the training of the support vector machines was designed to enable experimentation with different solvers. We experimented with two commonly used nonlinear solvers for our simulations. The primary application of interest for this project has been the sustained optimal operation of particle accelerators at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Particle storage rings are used for a variety of applications ranging from 'colliding beam' systems for high-energy physics research to highly collimated x-ray generators for synchrotron radiation science. Linear accelerators are also used for collider research such as International Linear Collider (ILC), as well as for free electron lasers, such as the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. One common theme in the operation of storage rings and linear accelerators is the need to precisely control the particle beams over long periods of time with minimum beam loss and stable, yet challenging, beam parameters. We strongly believe that beyond applications in particle accelerators, the high fidelity and cost benefits of a combined model-based fault estimation/correction system will attract customers from a wide variety of commercial and scientific industries. Even though the acquisition of Pavilion Technologies, Inc. by Rockwell Automation Inc. in 2007 has altered the small business status of the Pavilion and it no longer qualifies for a Phase II funding, our findings in the course of the Phase I research have convinced us that further research will render a workable model

  1. Design and Critical Appraisal of an Accelerated Integration Procedure for Atmospheric GCM/Mixed-Layer Ocean Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, Michael E.; Zhao, Zong-Cl; Vickers, Dean

    1989-07-01

    An accelerated integration procedure (AIP) is developed for the OSU atmospheric GCM/mixed-layer ocean model. In this AIP the depth of the mixed-layer ocean is reduced by an acceleration factor fe=12 from 60 m to 5 m and the length of a solar cycle is correspondingly reduced to eliminate the increase in the amplitude of the annual cycle of oceanic temperature which would otherwise occur. Furthermore, the ground bulk heat capacity, ground water field capacity and heat of fusion for sea ice and for snow on sea ice are reduced by fa to accelerate the equilibration of the ground temperature, soil water and sea ice, respectively.The AIP was used for 1 × CO2 and 2 × CO2 simulations with the OSU AGCM/mixed-layer Oman model. The AIP attained the equilibrium climates in these simulations with the computer-time equivalent of about 2.5 unaccelerated solar cycles, but after the switch from the AIP to the normal unaccelerated integration procedure (NIP), the temperatures increased to new equilibrium values. Although additional computer time was required to achieve these new equilibria, the overall 1 × CO2 and 2 × CO2 simulations with the AIP/NIP required respectively only 55% and 28% of the computer time which would have been required with the NIP alone. Thus the AIP was successful in saying a significant amount of computer time.The success of the AIP notwithstanding, an analysis was undertakes to determine the cause of the change in the equilibrium climate following the AIP/NIP switch. Diagnosis of the 1 × CO2 simulation by the OSU AGCM/mixed-layer. ocean model and tests with a latitudinally dependent energy balance model show that it is the increase in the amplitude of the annual cycle of atmospheric temperature from the AIP to the NIP which, acting through the ice-albedo/temperature feedback mechanism, causes the change in the equilibrium climate following the AIP/NIP switch.It is therefore concluded that while the AIP can save a significant amount of computer time in

  2. Development of a lifetime prediction model for lithium-ion batteries based on extended accelerated aging test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecker, Madeleine; Gerschler, Jochen B.; Vogel, Jan; Käbitz, Stefan; Hust, Friedrich; Dechent, Philipp; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Battery lifetime prognosis is a key requirement for successful market introduction of electric and hybrid vehicles. This work aims at the development of a lifetime prediction approach based on an aging model for lithium-ion batteries. A multivariable analysis of a detailed series of accelerated lifetime experiments representing typical operating conditions in hybrid electric vehicle is presented. The impact of temperature and state of charge on impedance rise and capacity loss is quantified. The investigations are based on a high-power NMC/graphite lithium-ion battery with good cycle lifetime. The resulting mathematical functions are physically motivated by the occurring aging effects and are used for the parameterization of a semi-empirical aging model. An impedance-based electric-thermal model is coupled to the aging model to simulate the dynamic interaction between aging of the battery and the thermal as well as electric behavior. Based on these models different drive cycles and management strategies can be analyzed with regard to their impact on lifetime. It is an important tool for vehicle designers and for the implementation of business models. A key contribution of the paper is the parameterization of the aging model by experimental data, while aging simulation in the literature usually lacks a robust empirical foundation.

  3. Classical and quantum localization and delocalization in the Fermi accelerator, kicked rotor and two-sided kicked rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, M.

    1996-06-01

    The phenomena of dynamical localization, both classical and quantum, are studied in the Fermi accelerator model. The model consists of two vertical oscillating walls and a ball bouncing between them. The classical localization boundary is calculated in the case of ``sinusoidal velocity transfer'' [A. J. Lichtenberg and M. A. Lieberman, Regular and Stochastic Motion (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1983)] on the basis of the analysis of resonances. In the case of the ``sawtooth'' wall velocity we show that the quantum localization is determined by the analytical properties of the canonical transformations to the action and angle coordinates of the unperturbed Hamiltonian, while the existence of the classical localization is determined by the number of continuous derivatives of the distance between the walls with respect to time.

  4. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  5. Leaky magnetohydrodynamic waveguide model for the acceleration of high-speed solar wind streams in coronal holes

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    It is well established observationally that high-speed solar wind streams originate in coronal hole regions in the solor corona. Models of the solar wind flow based on this observation indicate that heat conduction alone cannot account for the observed properties of the wind and that other sources of heat and/or momentum must be sought. One suggested source for this additional momentum is ''wave pressure'' generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Theories of wave-driven winds exist, but they are not consistent with the observed fact that high-speed streams originate in discrete magnetic structures in the solar corona. The waves assumed responsible for acceleration of the high-speed solar wind streams should have periods of approximately a hundred seconds if they are driven by photospheric turbulence. But MHD waves with periods this large have wavelengths lambda> or approx. =d, where d is the characteristic tranverse size of the coronal hole. Current theories for the acceleration of the solar wind by MHD waves are valid only if the wavelength of the disturbance is much smaller than the characteristic transverse size of the coronal structure. This limit is not appropriate for the propagation of disturbances with periods Proughly-equal100 s in the acceleration region of the solar wind. In this paper the effect of coronal hole magnetic structure on the propagation of MHD waves of all periods is considered. It is found that for the wave-period range discussed above the coronal hole structure acts as a ''leaky'' MHD waveguide, i.e., wave flux which enters at the base of the coronal hole is only weakly guided by the coronal hole structure. A significant amount of wave energy leaks through the side of the coronal hole into the surrounding corona.

  6. Accelerated wound healing in a diabetic rat model using decellularized dermal matrix and human umbilical cord perivascular cells.

    PubMed

    Milan, P Brouki; Lotfibakhshaiesh, N; Joghataie, M T; Ai, J; Pazouki, A; Kaplan, D L; Kargozar, S; Amini, N; Hamblin, M R; Mozafari, M; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2016-11-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for novel wound healing strategies to treat full thickness skin defects, especially in diabetic patients. We hypothesized that a scaffold could perform dual roles of a biomechanical support and a favorable biochemical environment for stem cells. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) have been recently reported as a type of mesenchymal stem cell that can accelerate early wound healing in skin defects. However, there are only a limited number of studies that have incorporated these cells into natural scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to promote angiogenesis and accelerate wound healing by using HUCPVCs and decellularized dermal matrix (DDM) in a rat model of diabetic wounds. The DDM scaffolds were prepared from harvested human skin samples and histological, ultrastructural, molecular and mechanical assessments were carried out. In comparison with the control (without any treatment) and DDM alone group, full thickness excisional wounds treated with HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffolds demonstrated an accelerated wound closure rate, faster re-epithelization, more granulation tissue formation and decreased collagen deposition. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis showed that the VEGFR-2 expression and vascular density in the HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffold treated group were also significantly higher than the other groups at 7days post implantation. Since the rates of angiogenesis, re-epithelization and formation of granulation tissue are directly correlated with full thickness wound healing in patients, the proposed HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffolds may fulfil a role neglected by current treatment strategies. This pre-clinical proof-of-concept study warrants further clinical evaluation.

  7. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose Ramon; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions. Electrolytic capacitors have higher failure rates than other components in electronic systems like power drives, power converters etc. Our current work focuses on developing first-principles-based degradation models for electrolytic capacitors under varying electrical and thermal stress conditions. Prognostics and health management for electronic systems aims to predict the onset of faults, study causes for system degradation, and accurately compute remaining useful life. Accelerated life test methods are often used in prognostics research as a way to model multiple causes and assess the effects of the degradation process through time. It also allows for the identification and study of different failure mechanisms and their relationships under different operating conditions. Experiments are designed for aging of the capacitors such that the degradation pattern induced by the aging can be monitored and analyzed. Experimental setups and data collection methods are presented to demonstrate this approach.

  8. Minimum acceleration with constraints of center of mass: a unified model for arm movements and object manipulation.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir

    2012-09-01

    Daily interaction with the environment consists of moving with or without objects. Increasing interest in both types of movements drove the creation of computational models to describe reaching movements and, later, to describe a simplified version of object manipulation. The previously suggested models for object manipulation rely on the same optimization criteria as models for reaching movements, yet there is no single model accounting for both tasks that does not require reminimization of the criterion for each environment. We suggest a unified model for both cases: minimum acceleration with constraints for the center of mass (MACM). For point-to-point reaching movement, the model predicts the typical rectilinear path and bell-shaped speed profile as previous criteria. We have derived the predicted trajectories for the case of manipulating a mass-on-spring and show that the predicted trajectories match the observations of a few independent previous experimental studies of human arm movement during a mass-on-spring manipulation. Moreover, the previously reported "unusual" trajectories are also well accounted for by the proposed MACM. We have tested the predictions of the MACM model in 3 experiments with 12 subjects, where we demonstrated that the MACM model is equal or better (Wilcoxon sign-rank test, P < 0.001) in accounting for the data than three other previously proposed models in the conditions tested. Altogether, the MACM model is currently the only model accounting for reaching movements with or without external degrees of freedom. Moreover, it provides predictions about the intermittent nature of the neural control of movements and about the dominant control variable.

  9. Preclinical imaging and translational animal models of cancer for accelerated clinical implementation of nanotechnologies and macromolecular agents.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Raquel; Spence, Tara; Huang, Huang; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-10

    The majority of animal models of cancer have performed poorly in terms of predicting clinical performance of new therapeutics, which are most often first evaluated in patients with advanced, metastatic disease. The development and use of metastatic models of cancer may enhance clinical translatability of preclinical studies focused on the development of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and macromolecular therapeutics, potentially accelerating their clinical implementation. It is recognized that the development and use of such models are not without challenge. Preclinical imaging tools offer a solution by allowing temporal and spatial characterization of metastatic lesions. This paper provides a review of imaging methods applicable for evaluation of novel therapeutics in clinically relevant models of advanced cancer. An overview of currently utilized models of oncology in small animals is followed by image-based development and characterization of visceral metastatic cancer models. Examples of imaging tools employed for metastatic lesion detection, evaluation of anti-tumor and anti-metastatic potential and biodistribution of novel therapies, as well as the co-development and/or use of imageable surrogates of response, are also discussed. While the focus is on development of macromolecular and nanotechnology-based therapeutics, examples with small molecules are included in some cases to illustrate concepts and approaches that can be applied in the assessment of nanotechnologies or macromolecules.

  10. Evidence for Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Models of Type I Supernova Lightcurves in the Low Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2014-06-01

    Forty years ago Van Hise [ApJ 192 (1974) 657-659] observed that the post peak light curve for the Type I supernova SN1937C is well represented by a sum of two exponentials with half lives which are ~ 0.75 of the terrestrial half lives of 56Ni and 56Co in the beta decay chain 56Ni → 56Co → 56Fe. Thirty nine years ago Leventhal and McCall [Nature 255 (1975) 690-692] proposed a fully convective, radioactive white dwarf model to account for the observed accelerated decay. Thirty eight years ago ARD models were tested by Rust, et al. [Nature 262 (1976) 118-120] on the data from the 15 fragmentary light curves available at that time. The results offered significant but not overwhelming support for ARD models. In this paper we present a new mathematical model for Type I lightcurves and fit that model, using only 6 free parameters, to an extensive collection of higher quality lightcurves that have been measured over the last 38 years. The fits all capture more than 99% of the total variance in the measured data, thus establishing the reality of an ARD lightcurve model. These new results provide a much improved Phillips relation for calibrating the extragalactic distance scale and testing other cosmological relations.

  11. GPU-accelerated model for fast, three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computations.

    PubMed

    Nita, Cosmin; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Rapaka, Saikiran

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a methodology for performing one-way Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI), i.e. where the motion of the wall boundaries is imposed. We use a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) implementation and present an efficient workflow for embedding the moving geometry, given as a set of polygonal meshes, in the LBM computation. The proposed method is first validated in a synthetic experiment: a vessel which is periodically expanding and contracting. Next, the evaluation focuses on the 3D Peristaltic flow problem: a fluid flows inside a flexible tube, where a periodic wave-like deformation produces a fluid motion along the centerline of the tube. Different geometry configurations are used and results are compared against previously published solutions. The efficient approach leads to an average execution time of approx. one hour per computation, whereas 50% of it is required for the geometry update operations. Finally, we also analyse the effect of changing the Reynolds number on the flow streamlines: the flow regime is significantly affected by the Reynolds number.

  12. Supplementary vitamin C does not accelerate bone healing in a rat tibia fracture model

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Chame, Cristiano Curcio; de Souza, Fabio; Apfel, Mara Íbis Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of ascorbic acid supplementation on bone healing after rat tibia fracture. Methods Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into Vitamin C (Group A) and sham (Group B) groups (15 rats each). Group A received 200 mg intraperitoneally per kg per day of ascorbic acid and Group B was given saline 5 ml per kg per day intraperitoneally once a day. The animals were caged in pairs and allowed free access to tap water and a standard rodent chow ad libitum. Fractures were produced manually, they were not stabilized, and unprotected weight-bearing was allowed. At two, four, and six weeks post-fracture, the rats in both groups were anesthetized and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Callus tissue was dissected, prepared, and analyzed histologically. Histomorphological analysis was performed at six weeks post-fracture and the extent of fracture healing was determined using a five-point scale. Results There were no histological and histomorphological differences between drug-treated animals and the sham in the three different stages studied. By six weeks post-fracture, the five animals of each group had a complete bone union. Conclusion Under the studied conditions, intraperitoneal Vitamin C supplementation does not accelerate the fracture healing process after experimental tibia fracture in rats. Level of evidence: Level 2, individual study with experimental design. PMID:24453572

  13. A cold plasma jet accelerates wound healing in a murine model of full-thickness skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anke; Bekeschus, Sander; Wende, Kristian; Vollmar, Brigitte; von Woedtke, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Cold plasma has been successfully applied in several fields of medicine that require, for example, pathogen inactivation, implant functionalization or alteration of cellular activity. Previous studies have provided evidence that plasma supports the healing of wounds owing to its beneficial mixtures of reactive species and modulation of inflammation in cells and tissues. To investigate the wound healing activity of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet in vivo, we examined the cold plasma's efficacy on dermal regeneration in a murine model of dermal full-thickness ear wound. Over 14 days, female mice received daily plasma treatment. Quantitative analysis by transmitted light microscopy demonstrated a significantly accelerated wound re-epithelialization at days 3-9 in comparison with untreated controls. In vitro, cold plasma altered keratinocyte and fibroblast migration, while both cell types showed significant stimulation resulting in accelerated closure of gaps in scratch assays. This plasma effect correlated with the downregulation of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 which is thought to be important in the regulation of wound healing. In addition, plasma induced profound changes in adherence junctions and cytoskeletal dynamics as shown by downregulation of E-cadherin and several integrins as well as actin reorganization. Our results theorize cold plasma to be a beneficial treatment option supplementing existing wound therapies.

  14. RAMI modeling of selected balance of plant systems for the proposed Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Radder, J.A.; Cramer, D.S.

    1997-06-01

    In order to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program requirements for tritium in the 2005-2007 time frame, new production capability must be made available. The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Plant is being considered as an alternative to nuclear reactor production of tritium, which has been the preferred method in the past. The proposed APT plant will use a high-power proton accelerator to generate thermal neutrons that will be captured in {sup 3}He to produce tritium (3H). It is expected that the APT Plant will be built and operated at the DOE`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. Discussion is focused on Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Inspectability (RAMI) modeling of recent conceptual designs for balance of plant (BOP) systems in the proposed APT Plant. In the conceptual designs for balance of plant (BOP) systems in the proposed APT Plant. In the conceptual design phase, system RAMI estimates are necessary to identify the best possible system alternative and to provide a valid picture of the cost effectiveness of the proposed system for comparison with other system alternatives. RAMI estimates in the phase must necessarily be based on generic data. The objective of the RAMI analyses at the conceptual design stage is to assist the designers in achieving an optimum design which balances the reliability and maintainability requirements among the subsystems and components.

  15. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  16. Accelerating the connection between experiments and models: The FACE-MDS experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Medlyn, B. E.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Zaehle, S.; Walker, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mandate is clear for improving communication between models and experiments to better evaluate terrestrial responses to atmospheric and climatic change. Unfortunately, progress in linking experimental and modeling approaches has been slow and sometimes frustrating. Recent successes in linking results from the Duke and Oak Ridge free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments with ecosystem and land surface models - the FACE Model-Data Synthesis (FACE-MDS) project - came only after a period of slow progress, but the experience points the way to future model-experiment interactions. As the FACE experiments were approaching their termination, the FACE research community made an explicit attempt to work together with the modeling community to synthesize and deliver experimental data to benchmark models and to use models to supply appropriate context for the experimental results. Initial problems that impeded progress were: measurement protocols were not consistent across different experiments; data were not well organized for model input; and parameterizing and spinning up models that were not designed for simulating a specific site was difficult. Once these problems were worked out, the FACE-MDS project has been very successful in using data from the Duke and ORNL FACE experiment to test critical assumptions in the models. The project showed, for example, that the stomatal conductance model most widely used in models was supported by experimental data, but models did not capture important responses such as increased leaf mass per unit area in elevated CO2, and did not appropriately represent foliar nitrogen allocation. We now have an opportunity to learn from this experience. New FACE experiments that have recently been initiated, or are about to be initiated, include a eucalyptus forest in Australia; the AmazonFACE experiment in a primary, tropical forest in Brazil; and a mature oak woodland in England. Cross-site science questions are being developed that will have a

  17. Influence of phospholipid types and animal models on the accelerated blood clearance phenomenon of PEGylated liposomes upon repeated injection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Ye, Feifei; Hu, Meina; Yin, Pengpeng; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yan; Yu, Xiu; Deng, Yihui

    2015-01-01

    When polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated liposomes were repeatedly injected into the same animal, the second dose of liposomes would rapidly clear from the bloodstream and enhance accumulation in the liver and spleen, and this phenomenon is called "accelerated blood clearance (ABC)". There are many factors known to influence ABC phenomenon, in this study, we mainly focused on the effects of different phospholipids (PL) types and animal models. The effects of PL types on ABC phenomenon were examined by repeating injection of PEGylated liposomes prepared by five different types of PL (hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine, egg sphingomyelin, soybean phosphatidycholin, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and egg phosphatidycholin) in rats. Dramatically, repeated injection of different types of PL could induce ABC phenomenon altogether. Both t1/2 and AUC of experimental group (EG) were lower significantly than those of control group (CG). Our results also showed that the liver accumulation of second dose increased significantly (p < 0.01) in all EG as compared that of CG. Interestingly, ABC phenomenon of liposomes prepared by unsaturated PL was more obvious than that of saturated PL. All the first dose could induce the antibody (anti-PEG IgM) level increasing significantly (p < 0.01). For different animal models, we found that after repeated injection of PEGylated liposomes, rats, mice, rabbits and guinea pigs could produce ABC phenomenon. Various PL types and animal models could all produce the ABC phenomenon. However, their extent of accelerated clearance differed. ABC phenomenon is possibly a ubiquitous immune phenomenon in life.

  18. Low-level laser treatment accelerated hair regrowth in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA).

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Villasante, Alexandra C; Mauro, Lucia M; Nouri, Keyvan; Schachner, Lawrence A; Perez, Carmen I; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2013-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the most distressing side effects of antineoplastic chemotherapy for which there is no effective interventional approach. A low-level laser (LLL) device, the HairMax LaserComb®, has been cleared by the FDA to treat androgenetic alopecia. Its effects may be extended to other settings; we have demonstrated that LaserComb treatment induced hair regrowth in a mouse model for alopecia areata. In the current study, we tested whether LLL treatment could promote hair regrowth in a rat model for CIA. Chemotherapy agents cyclophosphamide, etoposide, or a combination of cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin were administered in young rats to induce alopecia, with or without LLL treatment. As expected, 7-10 days later, all the rats developed full body alopecia. However, rats receiving laser treatment regrew hair 5 days earlier than rats receiving chemotherapy alone or sham laser treatment (with the laser turned off). The accelerated hair regrowth in laser-treated rats was confirmed by histology. In addition, LLL treatment did not provide local protection to subcutaneously injected Shay chloroleukemic cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that LLL treatment significantly accelerated hair regrowth after CIA without compromising the efficacy of chemotherapy in our rat model. Our results suggest that LLL should be explored for the treatment of CIA in clinical trials because LLL devices for home use (such as the HairMax LaserComb®) provide a user-friendly and noninvasive approach that could be translated to increased patient compliance and improved efficacy.

  19. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  20. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling for Accelerated Design of EV Batteries; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad; Zhang, Chao; Kim, Gi-heon; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2015-06-10

    The physical and chemical phenomena occurring in a battery are many and complex and in many different scales. Without a better knowledge of the interplay among the multi-physics occurring across the varied scales, it is very challenging and time consuming to design long-lasting, high-performing, safe, affordable large battery systems, enabling electrification of the vehicles and modernization of the grid. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory, has been developing thermal and electrochemical models for cells and battery packs. Working with software producers, carmakers, and battery developers, computer-aided engineering tools have been developed that can accelerate the electrochemical and thermal design of batteries, reducing time to develop and optimize them and thus reducing the cost of the system. In the past couple of years, we initiated a project to model the mechanical response of batteries to stress, strain, fracture, deformation, puncture, and crush and then link them to electrochemical and thermal models to predict the response of a battery. This modeling is particularly important for understanding the physics and processes that happen in a battery during a crush-inducing vehicle crash. In this paper, we provide an overview of electrochemical-thermal-mechanical models for battery system understanding and designing.

  1. Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, I; Parkinson, L G; Shen, Y; Toro, A; Brown, T; Zhao, H; Bleackley, R C; Granville, D J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. Although once thought to function primarily as a pro-apoptotic serine protease, granzyme B (GzmB) can also accumulate in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during chronic inflammation and cleave ECM proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing through excessive ECM degradation. In the present study, the murine serine protease inhibitor, serpina3n (SA3N), was administered to excisional wounds created on the dorsum of genetically induced type-II diabetic mice. Wound closure was monitored and skin wound samples were collected for analyses. Wound closure, including both re-epithelialization and contraction, were significantly increased in SA3N-treated wounds. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of SA3N-treated wounds revealed a more mature, proliferative granulation tissue phenotype as indicated by increased cell proliferation, vascularization, fibroblast maturation and differentiation, and collagen deposition. Skin homogenates from SA3N-treated wounds also exhibited greater levels of full-length intact fibronectin compared with that of vehicle wounds. In addition, GzmB-induced detachment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts correlated with a rounded and clustered phenotype that was prevented by SA3N. In summary, topical administration of SA3N accelerated wound healing. Our findings suggest that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing through the proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin that is essential for normal wound closure, and that SA3N promotes granulation tissue maturation and collagen deposition. PMID:25299783

  2. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in the 2005 Toyota Camry Electronic Throttle Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed; Holzmann, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Part of the US DOT investigation of Toyota SUA involved analysis of the throttle control software. JPL LaRS applied several techniques, including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software. A handful of logic models were built. Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found. The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  3. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  4. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  5. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  6. Beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress on pancreas of a senescence accelerated mice model.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; García, Cruz; Forman, Katherine; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of aging on parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pancreas obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and resistant mice (SAMR1). Animals of 2 (young) and 10 months of age (old) were used (n = 64). The influence of the administration of melatonin in the drinking water for one month at two different dosages (1 and 10mg/(kg day) on old SAMP8 mice on these parameters was also studied. SAMP8 mice showed with age a significant increase in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Furthermore the protein expression of several NFκB subunits was also enhanced. On the contrary aged SAMR1 mice did not show significant increases in these parameters. Melatonin administration to SAMP8 mice was able to reduce these age related alterations at the two used dosages.

  7. Test by JANZOS of the Standard Model of Cosmic Ray Acceleration in the COMPTEL/ROSAT Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.

    1999-08-01

    A search for ultra-high energy gamma-rays emitted by the young, nearby supernova remnant that was discovered recently by the COMPTEL and ROSAT satellites was made using the JANZOS database for the period 1987-1993. A 95% confidence upper limit on the flux above 100 TeV of 3 2 10013 cm02 sec01 was obtained. This is an order of magnitude below the expected flux based on the standard model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova shocks. An optical survey of the region that has been commenced is also reported. This uses UK and ESO Schmidt plates, and CCD images by a NZ/Japan microlensing group.

  8. Astrocytes show reduced support of motor neurons with aging that is accelerated in a rodent model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Das, Melanie M; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes play a crucial role in supporting motor neurons in health and disease. However, there have been few attempts to understand how aging may influence this effect. Here, we report that rat astrocytes show an age-dependent senescence phenotype and a significant reduction in their ability to support motor neurons. In a rodent model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) overexpressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), the rate of astrocytes acquiring a senescent phenotype is accelerated and they subsequently provide less support to motor neurons. This can be partially reversed by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Replacing aging astrocytes with young ones producing GDNF may therefore have a significant survival promoting affect on aging motor neurons and those lost through diseases such as ALS.

  9. The 2nd Order Focusing by Energy for TOF Sector Field Mass Analyzer with an Orthogonal Acceleration: Theory, Modeling, Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteshin, S. S.; Chernyshev, D. M.; Sysoev, Alexey A.; Sysoev, Alexander A.

    Currently axially symmetric type of analyzer with an electrostatic sector fields (AESF) is rarely used to construct time-of-flight mass spectrometers. The main drawback, hindering the wider use of the analyzers of this type, is the lack of chromatic second-order focusing by energy. However, the configuration of AESF in combination with orthogonal accelerator (OA) allows to achieved it through compensation of energy aberrations of the analyzer in the system of orthogonal input of the ion beam. In the presented work the results of theoretical calculation, simulation and experimentally obtained data are compared. Characteristics of the analyzer with OA in a large extent depend on the parameters of the incoming ion beam. Data of modeling the 2nd stage of gas-dynamic interface, which have the greatest influence on the parameters of the ion beam, is provided.

  10. Phase-space moment-equation model of highly relativistic electron-beams in plasma-wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, R.E.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.

    2015-05-15

    We formulate a new procedure for modelling the transverse dynamics of relativistic electron beams with significant energy spread when injected into plasma-based accelerators operated in the blow-out regime. Quantities of physical interest, such as the emittance, are furnished directly from solution of phase space moment equations formed from the relativistic Vlasov equation. The moment equations are closed by an Ansatz, and solved analytically for prescribed wakefields. The accuracy of the analytic formulas is established by benchmarking against the results of a semi-analytic/numerical procedure which is described within the scope of this work, and results from a simulation with the 3D quasi-static PIC code HiPACE.

  11. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  12. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  13. Model for Initiation of Quality Factor Degradation at High Accelerating Fields in Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavaties

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-13

    A model for the onset of the reduction in SRF cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration H{sub pen}. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens, [1998 Physica C 294 257], whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa}. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of H{sub pen} when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower H{sub pen} was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice-versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of {kappa}. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by {approx}20%, and that that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model

  14. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  15. Efficient Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with INF&RNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    The numerical modeling code INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid & paRticle simulatioN cOde, pronounced "inferno") is presented. INF&RNO is an efficient 2D cylindrical code to model the interaction of a short laser pulse with an underdense plasma. The code is based on an envelope model for the laser while either a PIC or a fluid description can be used for the plasma. The effect of the laser pulse on the plasma is modeled with the time-averaged poderomotive force. These and other features allow for a speedup of 2-4 orders of magnitude compared to standard full PIC simulations while still retaining physical fidelity. The code has been benchmarked against analytical solutions and 3D PIC simulations and here a set of validation tests together with a discussion of the performances are presented.

  16. Comparing proportional hazards and accelerated failure time models for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Jesus; Ferreira, Eva; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2002-11-30

    This paper describes a method proposed for a censored linear regression model that can be used in the context of survival analysis. The method has the important characteristic of allowing estimation and inference without knowing the distribution of the duration variable. Moreover, it does not need the assumption of proportional hazards. Therefore, it can be an interesting alternative to the Cox proportional hazards models when this assumption does not hold. In addition, implementation and interpretation of the results is simple. In order to analyse the performance of this methodology, we apply it to two real examples and we carry out a simulation study. We present its results together with those obtained with the traditional Cox model and AFT parametric models. The new proposal seems to lead to more precise results.

  17. Acceleration and Deceleration Capacity of Fetal Heart Rate in an In-Vivo Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rivolta, Massimo W.; Stampalija, Tamara; Casati, Daniela; Richardson, Bryan S.; Ross, Michael G.; Frasch, Martin G.; Bauer, Axel; Ferrazzi, Enrico; Sassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal heart rate (FHR) variability is an indirect index of fetal autonomic nervous system (ANS) integrity. FHR variability analysis in labor fails to detect early hypoxia and acidemia. Phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA) is a new method of complex biological signals analysis that is more resistant to non-stationarities, signal loss and artifacts. It quantifies the average cardiac acceleration and deceleration (AC/DC) capacity. Objective The aims of the study were: (1) to investigate AC/DC in ovine fetuses exposed to acute hypoxic-acidemic insult; (2) to explore the relation between AC/DC and acid-base balance; and (3) to evaluate the influence of FHR decelerations and specific PRSA parameters on AC/DC computation. Methods Repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs) were applied in 9 pregnant near-term sheep to obtain three phases of MILD, MODERATE, and SEVERE hypoxic-acidemic insult. Acid-base balance was sampled and fetal ECGs continuously recorded. AC/DC were calculated: (1) for a spectrum of T values (T = 1÷50 beats; the parameter limits the range of oscillations detected by PRSA); (2) on entire series of fetal RR intervals or on “stable” series that excluded FHR decelerations caused by UCOs. Results AC and DC progressively increased with UCOs phases (MILD vs. MODERATE and MODERATE vs. SEVERE, p<0.05 for DC  = 2–5, and AC  = 1–3). The time evolution of AC/DC correlated to acid-base balance (0.4<<0.9, p<0.05) with the highest for . PRSA was not independent from FHR decelerations caused by UCOs. Conclusions This is the first in-vivo evaluation of PRSA on FHR analysis. In the presence of acute hypoxic-acidemia we found increasing values of AC/DC suggesting an activation of ANS. This correlation was strongest on time scale dominated by parasympathetic modulations. We identified the best performing parameters (), and found that AC/DC computation is not independent from FHR decelerations. These findings establish the basis for

  18. A Pedagogical Model for the Doppler Effect with Application to Sources with Constant Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaura, Lakshya P. S.; Pathak, Praveen

    2017-01-01

    Kinematic models are often very useful. The back and forth throw of a ball between two ice skaters may help us appreciate the meson exchange theory of Yukawa. If the skaters throw the balls at each other, they move backward, which is equivalent to a repulsive force between them. On the other hand, if they snatch the ball from each other, the result will be akin to an equivalent attractive force between them. Such illustrative models may help us understand advanced concepts.

  19. Transient simulations of the present and the last interglacial climate using the Community Climate System Model version 3: effects of orbital acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vidya; Prange, Matthias; Schulz, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations provide a considerable aid in studying past climates. Out of the various approaches taken in designing numerical climate experiments, transient simulations have been found to be the most optimal when it comes to comparison with proxy data. However, multi-millennial or longer simulations using fully coupled general circulation models are computationally very expensive such that acceleration techniques are frequently applied. In this study, we compare the results from transient simulations of the present and the last interglacial with and without acceleration of the orbital forcing, using the comprehensive coupled climate model CCSM3 (Community Climate System Model version 3). Our study shows that in low-latitude regions, the simulation of long-term variations in interglacial surface climate is not significantly affected by the use of the acceleration technique (with an acceleration factor of 10) and hence, large-scale model-data comparison of surface variables is not hampered. However, in high-latitude regions where the surface climate has a direct connection to the deep ocean, e.g. in the Southern Ocean or the Nordic Seas, acceleration-induced biases in sea-surface temperature evolution may occur with potential influence on the dynamics of the overlying atmosphere.

  20. Accelerated Testing and Modeling of Potential-Induced Degradation as a Function of Temperature and Relative Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Terwilliger, Kent; Perrin, Greg; Glick, Stephen; Kurtz, Sarah; Wohlgemuth, John

    2015-06-14

    An acceleration model based on the Peck equation was applied to power performance of crystalline silicon cell modules as a function of time and of temperature and humidity, the two main environmental stress factors that promote potential-induced degradation. This model was derived from module power degradation data obtained semi-continuously and statistically by in-situ dark current-voltage measurements in an environmental chamber. The modeling enables prediction of degradation rates and times as functions of temperature and humidity. Power degradation could be modeled linearly as a function of time to the second power; additionally, we found that coulombs transferred from the active cell circuit to ground during the stress test is approximately linear with time. Therefore, the power loss could be linearized as a function of coulombs squared. With this result, we observed that when the module face was completely grounded with a condensed phase conductor, leakage current exceeded the anticipated corresponding degradation rate relative to the other tests performed in damp heat.