Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated mouse prone

  1. Data on the optimization of behavioral tasks for senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shuichi; Endo, Shogo

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains the supporting information for the research article entitled "Early onset of behavioral alterations in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8)" [1]. Senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), which originally developed from AKR/J mice, shows learning and memory impairments at the age of 8-12 months. However, little information is still available on phenotypical characteristics of younger SAMP8. To fully understand the phenotype of younger SAMP8, we optimized two behavioral tasks for SAMP8. In the object recognition task, 4-month-old SAMP8 made significantly more contacts with the familiar objects compared to age-matched SAMR1, however, distance traveled for both strains of mice were comparable. In the fear conditioning task, conventionally-used CS-US combination failed to induce robust conditioned fear in both strains of mice. PMID:27331099

  2. Impaired motor function in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 1 (SAMP1).

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Yo; Kim, Tae Yeon; Yoshimoto, Takuro; Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki; Itakura, Chitoshi

    2013-06-17

    Senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) strains of mice show early onset of senescence, whereas senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) strains are resistant to early senescence and serve as controls. Although SAMP6 and SAMP8 are established models of central nervous system alterations, it is unclear whether SAMP1/Sku (SAMP1) is characterized by brain alterations and dysfunction related to behavioral functioning. In the present study, behavioral tests (i.e., locomotor activity, Y-maze, rotating rod, hind-limb extension, and traction), histochemistry, and Western blot analyses were employed to study this mouse model using 2- and 4-month-old SAMP1 and age-matched control SAMR1. Although 2-month-old SAMP1 and SAMR1 showed similar activity, 4-month-old SAMP1 exhibited less activity than age-matched SAMR1 in locomotor activity and Y-maze tests. In rotating rod test, 2- and 4-month-old SAMP1 showed motor-coordination dysfunction. An abnormal extension reflex in the hind-limb test was observed in 2- and 4-month-old SAMP1. There were no significant differences between SAMP1 and SAMR1 with respect to grip strength in the traction test or alternation behavior in the Y-maze test. Histochemistry and Western blot analyses exhibited that cerebellar Purkinje cells in 4-month-old SAMP1 mice persistently expressed tyrosine hydroxylase. These results suggest that SAMP1 is a useful model for examining mechanisms underlying motor dysfunction. PMID:23583482

  3. Early onset of behavioral alterations in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shuichi; Endo, Shogo

    2016-07-15

    Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is inbred lines of mice originally developed from AKR/J mice. Among the six SAM prone (SAMP) substrains, 8- to 12-month-old SAMP8 have long been used as a model of age-related cognitive impairments. However, little is still known for younger SAMP8 mice. Here, we examined the phenotypical characteristics of 4-month-old SAMP8 using a battery of behavioral tests. Four-month-old SAMP8 mice failed to recognize spatially displaced object in an object recognition task and performed poorly in the probe test of the Morris water maze task compared to SAMR1, suggesting that SAMP8 have impaired spatial memory. In addition, young SAMP8 exhibited enhanced anxiety-like behavior in an open field test and showed depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test. Their circadian rhythm was also disrupted. These abnormal behaviors of young SAMP8 are similar to behavioral alterations also observed in aged mice. In summary, age-related behavioral alterations occur in SAMP8 as young as 4 months old. PMID:27093926

  4. Systematic Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Brain Using RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Qin, Chunxia; Cao, Guoqiong; Xin, Wenfeng; Feng, Chengqiang; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, despite considerable research in this area, the comprehensive and systematic understanding of lncRNAs in AD is still limited. The emergence of RNA sequencing provides a predictor and has incomparable advantage compared with other methods, including microarray. In this study, we identified lncRNAs in a 7-month-old mouse brain through deep RNA sequencing using the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) models. A total of 599,985,802 clean reads and 23,334 lncRNA transcripts were obtained. Then, we identified 97 significantly upregulated and 114 significantly downregulated lncRNA transcripts from all cases in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1 mice. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that these significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were involved in regulating the development of AD from various angles, such as nerve growth factor term (GO: 1990089), mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, and AD pathway. Furthermore, the most probable AD-associated lncRNAs were predicted and listed in detail. Our study provided the systematic dissection of lncRNA profiling in SAMP8 mouse brain and accelerated the development of lncRNA biomarkers in AD. These attracting biomarkers could provide significant insights into AD therapy in the future. PMID:27483026

  5. Systematic Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Brain Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Qin, Chunxia; Cao, Guoqiong; Xin, Wenfeng; Feng, Chengqiang; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, despite considerable research in this area, the comprehensive and systematic understanding of lncRNAs in AD is still limited. The emergence of RNA sequencing provides a predictor and has incomparable advantage compared with other methods, including microarray. In this study, we identified lncRNAs in a 7-month-old mouse brain through deep RNA sequencing using the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) models. A total of 599,985,802 clean reads and 23,334 lncRNA transcripts were obtained. Then, we identified 97 significantly upregulated and 114 significantly downregulated lncRNA transcripts from all cases in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1 mice. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that these significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were involved in regulating the development of AD from various angles, such as nerve growth factor term (GO: 1990089), mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, and AD pathway. Furthermore, the most probable AD-associated lncRNAs were predicted and listed in detail. Our study provided the systematic dissection of lncRNA profiling in SAMP8 mouse brain and accelerated the development of lncRNA biomarkers in AD. These attracting biomarkers could provide significant insights into AD therapy in the future. PMID:27483026

  6. Characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 6 (SAMP6) as an animal model for brain research.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) was developed by selective breeding of the AKR/J strain, based on a graded score for senescence, which led to the development of both senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP), and senescence-accelerated resistant (SAMR) strains. Among the SAMP strains, SAMP6 is well characterized as a model of senile osteoporosis, but its brain and neuronal functions have not been well studied. We therefore decided to characterize the central nervous system of SAMP6, in combination with different behavioral tests and analysis of its biochemical and pharmacological properties. Multiple behavioral tests revealed higher motor activity, reduced anxiety, anti-depressant activity, motor coordination deficits, and enhanced learning and memory in SAMP6 compared with SAMR1. Biochemical and pharmacological analyses revealed several alterations in the dopamine and serotonin systems, and in long-term potentiation (LTP)-related molecules. In this review, we discuss the possibility of using SAMP6 as a model of brain function. PMID:24521858

  7. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model. PMID:25636741

  8. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model.

  9. Behavioral and omics analyses study on potential involvement of dipeptide balenine through supplementation in diet of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Yamanaka, Satoru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Hirako, Satoshi; Iizuka, Yuzuru; Kim, Hyounju; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Kimura, Ai; Takenoya, Fumiko; Yasunaga, Genta; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates effects of dipeptide balenine, as a major component of whale meat extract (hereafter, WME), supplementation on senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), an Alzheimer's disease (AD) model at level of learning and memory formation and brain expression profiles genome-wide in brain. Mice fed experimental balenine (+ WME) supplemented diet for 26 weeks were subjected to four behavioral tests - open field, Y-maze, new object recognition, and water-filled multiple T-maze - to examine effects on learning and memory. Brain transcriptome of SAMP8 mice-fed the WME diet over control low-safflower oil (LSO) diet-fed mice was delineated on a 4 × 44 K mouse whole genome DNA microarray chip. Results revealed the WME diet not only induced improvements in the learning and memory formation but also positively modulated changes in the brain of the SAMP8 mouse; the gene inventories are publically available for analysis by the scientific community. Interestingly, the SAMP8 mouse model presented many genetic characteristics of AD, and numerous novel molecules (Slc2a5, Treh, Fbp1, Aldob, Ppp1r1a, DNase1, Agxt2l1, Cyp2e1, Acsm1, Acsm2, and Pah) were revealed over the SAMR1 (senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1) mouse, to be oppositely regulated/recovered under the balenine (+ WME) supplemented diet regime by DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. Our present study demonstrates an experimental strategy to understand the effects of dipeptide balenine, prominetly contained in meat diet, on SAMP8, providing new insight into whole brain transcriptome changes genome-wide. The gene expression data has been deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE76459. The data will be a valuable resource in examining the effects of natural products, and which could also serve as a human model for further functional analysis and investigation. PMID:27672559

  10. The senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 is not a suitable model for the investigation of cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress and their modulation by dietary phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Schiborr, Christina; Schwamm, Dorothea; Kocher, Alexa; Rimbach, Gerald; Eckert, Gunter P; Frank, Jan

    2013-08-01

    Aging is associated with chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which both may promote age-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases. The cardiovascular system suffers from the life-long impact of stressors, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. A diet rich in vegetables and fruits, and thus phytochemicals, may extend healthy lifespan in humans, in part by improving heart health by lowering of oxidative stress and modulating signal transduction pathways. To investigate the potential impact of dietary anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract and curcumin on oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in the heart, two groups of senescence-accelerated mouse-resistant 1 (SAMR1) and senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, respectively, were fed a Western-type diet (normal control and aged control, respectively) and two groups of SAMP8 mice were fed either bilberry extract (20g/kg diet) or curcumin (500mg/kg diet) over a period of 5 months. An activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κ B (NFκB), but no differences in the gene and protein expression of NFκB-regulated pro-inflammatory mediators, was observed in the hearts of SAMP8 compared to SAMR1 control mice. Cardiac concentrations of protein and lipid oxidation parameters were similar in SAMR1 and SAMP8 control mice and the phytochemical-fed SAMP8 mice. Our data question the suitability of the SAMP8 and SAMR1 strains as a model for age-dependent changes of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in the heart.

  11. Reduction in NPY-positive neurons and dysregulation of excitability in young senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) hippocampus precede the onset of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Erika; Iwatani, Kanako; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Ogura, Akihiko; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) strain is considered a neurodegeneration model showing age-related cognitive deficits with little physical impairment. Young SAMP8 mice, however, exhibit signs of disturbances in development such as marked hyperactivity and reduced anxiety well before the onset of cognitive impairment. As the key enzyme in local regulation of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling, type 2 deiodinase, was significantly reduced in the SAMP8 hippocampus relative to that of the normally aging SAM-resistant 1 (SAMR1), we used these two strains to compare the development of the hippocampal GABAergic system, which is known to be strongly affected by hypothyroidism. Among GABAergic components, neuronal K+ /Cl- co-transporter 2 was down-regulated in SAMP8 transiently at 2 weeks. Although distribution of total GABAergic neurons was similar in both strains, 22-30% reduction was observed in the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-positive subpopulation of GABAergic neurons in SAMP8. Electrophysiological studies on hippocampal slices obtained at 4 weeks revealed that epileptiform activity, induced by high-frequency stimulation, lasted four times longer in SAMP8 compared with SAMR1, indicating a dysregulation of excitability that may be linked to the behavioral abnormalities of young SAMP8 and to neurodegeneration later on in life. Local attenuation of TH signaling may thus impact the normal development of the GABAergic system. PMID:26250996

  12. Accelerated senescence prone mouse-8 shows early onset of deficits in spatial learning and memory in the radial six-arm water maze.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yue-Ju; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2004-10-15

    Available data indicate that the senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is an appropriate model of brain aging, with impairments in nonspatial learning and memory beginning as early as 2 months of age, and spatial learning and memory deficiencies not becoming apparent until after 4 months of age. However, with other strains (e.g., C57BL mice), the impairment in spatial memory was found earlier than that in nonspatial memory. We considered the possibility that the observed differences could be due to strain-specific differences in the training equipment. In the present study, a new optimized testing apparatus-the radial six-arm water maze (RAWM)-for detecting spatial learning and memory in mice, was employed, to determine whether there is impairment of spatial learning and memory in young SAMP8. The relationship between the spatial learning measures observed with the RAWM and the Morris maze, a classic spatial learning and memory testing apparatus, was also explored. It was found that, in the RAWM, rather than in the Morris maze, the impairment in spatial learning could be measured in SAMP8 mice as early as 3 months old, and the impairment in spatial memory in SAMP8 mice aged 5 months. These results suggested that the spatial learning and memory deficiencies could be found in early life of SAMP8 mice, and that RAWM and Morris maze each detect different aspects of spatial learning and memory.

  13. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins improve memory and enhance phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young A; Cho, Eun Ju; Yokozawa, Takako

    2010-02-01

    Senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8), a murine model of accelerated senescence, shows age-related deficits in learning and memory. We investigated the effect of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (oligomers) on memory impairment using the SAMP8 model involving the oral administration of oligomers for 5 weeks. To analyse memory improvement in SAMP8, we performed Morris water maze, object location and object recognition tests. The oral administration of oligomers improved spatial and object recognition impairment in SAMP8. Expressions of phosphorylated neurofilament-H (P-NF-H, axon marker), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) 2a and 2b (MAP2; dendrite marker) and synaptophysin were increased in the brains of SAMP8-administered oligomers. In particular, the expression of P-NF-H was significantly elevated in the hippocampal CA1. This indicates that oligomers result in an increase in the densities of axons, dendrites and synapses. To investigate the protective mechanisms of oligomers against brain dysfunction with ageing, we carried out a receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation antibody array, and clarified that the administration of oligomers led to an increase in the phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, suggesting the neuroprotective role of oligomers. The phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 was more greatly increased in the hypothalamus and choroid plexus than in other brain regions of SAMP8. Memory in oligomer-treated mice was impaired by SU1498, a VEGFR-2-specific antagonist. Elucidating the relationship between memory impairment with ageing and VEGFR-2 signalling may provide new suggestions for protection against memory deficit in the ageing brain.

  14. The senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8): a model of age-related cognitive decline with relevance to alterations of the gene expression and protein abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Poon, H Fai

    2005-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is an accelerated aging model that was established through phenotypic selection from a common genetic pool of AKR/J strain of mice. The SAM model was established in 1981, including nine major senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) substrains and three major senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. Recently, SAMP8 have drawn attention in gerontological research due to its characteristic learning and memory deficits at old age. Many recent reports provide insight into mechanisms of the cognitive impairment and pathological changes in SAMP8. Therefore, this mini review examines the recent findings of SAMP8 mice abnormalities at the gene and protein levels. The genes and proteins described in this review are functionally categorized into neuroprotection, signal transduction, protein folding/degradation, cytoskeleton/transport, immune response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All of these processes are involved in learning and memory. Although these studies provide insight into the mechanisms that contribute to the learning and memory decline in aged SAMP8 mice, higher throughput techniques of proteomics and genomics are necessary to study the alterations of gene expression and protein abnormalities in SAMP8 mice brain in order to more completely understand the central nervous system dysfunction in this mouse model. The SAMP8 is a good animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of age-related learning and memory deficits at the gene and protein levels. PMID:16026957

  15. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  16. The Chinese traditional medicine 'Bushen Yinao Pian' increased the level of ageing-related gene LRPAP-1 expression in the cerebral tissue of accelerated senescence-prone mouse 8/Ta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Yang, Ting; Wang, Jingang; Liu, Guisheng; Chen, Qingxuan

    2005-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of the Chinese traditional medicine 'Bushen Yinao Pian' (a complex prescription used for clinical anti-ageing in China for over 20 years) is elusive. In this study, the cDNA of low-density lipoprotein related-receptor associated protein-1 (LRPAP-1), an ageing-related gene, which functions as a chaperon or escort protein in the intracellular transport of low-density lipoprotein related-receptor, a transporter of amyloid beta protein (AbetaP), had been cloned by screening cDNA library based on analyzing the gene expression in cerebral tissue between the test and the control accelerated senescence-prone mouse 8/Ta (SAMP8/Ta). The result shows that this complex prescription increased the expression level of LRPAP-1. It indicated that the Chinese traditional medicine 'Bushen Yinao Pian' plays an important role in anti-ageing by increasing LRPAP-1 expression level. PMID:15763364

  17. Shortened estrous cycle length, increased FSH levels, FSH variance, oocyte spindle aberrations, and early declining fertility in aging senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8) mice: concomitant characteristics of human midlife female reproductive aging.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lori R; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Kraemer, Duane C; Morley, John E; Farr, Susan; Chaffin, Charles L; Merchenthaler, István

    2014-06-01

    Women experience a series of specific transitions in their reproductive function with age. Shortening of the menstrual cycle begins in the mid to late 30s and is regarded as the first sign of reproductive aging. Other early changes include elevation and increased variance of serum FSH levels, increased incidences of oocyte spindle aberrations and aneuploidy, and declining fertility. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the mouse strain senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) is a suitable model for the study of these midlife reproductive aging characteristics. Midlife SAMP8 mice aged 6.5-7.85 months (midlife SAMP8) exhibited shortened estrous cycles compared with SAMP8 mice aged 2-3 months (young SAMP8, P = .0040). Midlife SAMP8 mice had high FSH levels compared with young SAMP8 mice, and mice with a single day of high FSH exhibited statistically elevated FSH throughout the cycle, ranging from 1.8- to 3.6-fold elevation on the days of proestrus, estrus, metestrus, and diestrus (P < .05). Midlife SAMP8 mice displayed more variance in FSH than young SAMP8 mice (P = .01). Midlife SAMP8 ovulated fewer oocytes (P = .0155). SAMP8 oocytes stained with fluorescently labeled antitubulin antibodies and scored in fluorescence microscopy exhibited increased incidence of meiotic spindle aberrations with age, from 2/126 (1.59%) in young SAMP8 to 38/139 (27.3%) in midlife SAMP8 (17.2-fold increase, P < .0001). Finally, SAMP8 exhibited declining fertility from 8.9 pups/litter in young SAMP8 to 3.5 pups/litter in midlife SAMP8 mice (P < .0001). The age at which these changes occur is younger than for most mouse strains, and their simultaneous occurrence within a single strain has not been described previously. We propose that SAMP8 mice are a model of midlife human female reproductive aging.

  18. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  19. Chronic stress impairs learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in senescence-accelerated prone mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weihong; Zhang, Ting; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Xiaojiang; Liu, Xueyuan

    2011-02-25

    Chronic stress can induce cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether a higher susceptibility to chronic stress is associated with the progression of pathological brain aging. Senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is a naturally occurring animal model of accelerated brain aging. Senescence-accelerated resistant mouse 1 (SAMR1) is usually used as the normal control. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS) on learning in the Y-maze, hippocampal cell proliferation, and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of 4-month-old SAMP8 and SAMR1. The results showed that exposure to CRS impaired learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in SAMP8 and SAMR1 but to a much greater extent in SAMP8. Furthermore, CRS significantly decreased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. These data indicated that SAMP8 is more sensitive to the deleterious effects of CRS on learning than SAMR1. A greater decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation caused by chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for the more severe learning deficit observed in SAMP8. In addition, our findings suggested a role of BDNF in the stress-induced impairment of learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in both strains.

  20. Lupus-prone mice as models to study xenobiotic-induced acceleration of systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K M; Pearson, D L; Hultman, P; Hildebrandt, B; Kono, D H

    1999-01-01

    The linkage between xenobiotic exposures and autoimmune diseases remains to be clearly defined. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that both genetic and environmental factors act synergistically at several stages or checkpoints to influence disease pathogenesis in susceptible populations. These observations predict that individuals susceptible to spontaneous autoimmunity should be more susceptible following xenobiotic exposure by virtue of the presence of predisposing background genes. To test this possibility, mouse strains with differing genetic susceptibility to murine lupus were examined for acceleration of autoimmune features characteristic of spontaneous systemic autoimmune disease following exposure to the immunostimulatory metals nickel and mercury. Although NiCl(2) exposure did not exacerbate autoimmunity, HgCl(2) significantly accelerated systemic disease in a strain-dependent manner. Mercury-exposed (NZB X NZW)F1 mice had accelerated lymphoid hyperplasia, hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, and immune complex deposits. Mercury also exacerbated immunopathologic manifestations in MRL+/+ and MR -lpr mice. However, there was less disease acceleration in lpr mice compared with MRL+/+ mice, likely due to the fact that environmental factors are less critical for disease induction when there is strong genetic susceptibility. Non-major histocompatibility complex genes also contributed to mercury-exacerbated disease, as the nonautoimmune AKR mice, which are H-2 identical with the MRL, showed less immunopathology than either the MRL/lpr or MRL+/+ strains. This study demonstrates that genetic susceptibility to spontaneous systemic autoimmunity can be a predisposing factor for HgCl(2)-induced exacerbation of autoimmunity. Such genetic predisposition may have to be considered when assessing the immunotoxicity of xenobiotics. Additional comparative studies using autoimmune-prone and nonautoimmune mice strains with different genetic backgrounds will

  1. Lupus nephritis reoccurs following transplantation in the lupus prone mouse.

    PubMed

    Hamar, P; Wang, M; Godo, M; Kokeny, G; Rosivall, L; Ouyang, N; Heemann, U

    2010-02-01

    The incidence and pathomechanism of recurrent lupus nephritis (RLN) after transplantation is not clearly understood. Burning out of the autoimmune process or local immunoregulatory mechanisms in the kidney may be responsible for the low incidence of recurrence. These mechanisms cannot be investigated in human subjects, due to post-transplant immunosuppression. To investigate the pathomechanisms of RLN, male and female kidneys were transplanted from FAS deficient lupus prone (LPR) or control (FAS intact) MRL mice into either LPR or MRL recipients. Urinary protein and blood urea were assessed. Double negative (DN) lymphocyte proliferation was determined by flow cytometry. Two months after transplantation inflammatory infiltration of the glomerular, vascular and interstitial compartments were determined. Renal function as demonstrated by blood urea levels was normal in MRL recipients, but elevated in LPR recipients, independent of the donor strain. Paralleling functional results, inflammatory infiltration was mild or absent in MRL recipients of MRL grafts, and mild to moderate in MRL recipients of LPR grafts, suggesting that kidney removal from the autoimmune (LPR) environment significantly reduced inflammation. Graft infiltration was most severe in LPR recipients: grafts were similarly inflamed independent of the donor. All LPR recipients had significantly less CD4+ Th cells versus MRL mice. Transplantation of LPR grafts into MRL recipients reduced CD4+ Th cell percentage, accompanied by a slight induction of lupus autoantibody production. Our results demonstrate that lupus nephritis is not kidney specific in the LPR model with recurrence after transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression.

  2. Accelerated Whole Breast Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to the Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Wu, Abraham J.; McCormick, Beryl; Beal, Kathryn P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation (WBI) is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer who opt for breast conservation. After a randomized trial demonstrated equivalent cosmesis and disease control with accelerated WBI (AWBI), our institution began to offer AWBI to appropriate patients. The aim of this study was to examine our unique experience with AWBI using prone positioning and simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning with a sequential boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: We identified 356 patients who had been treated with prone WBI using IMRT in our department between January 2004 and December 2006. Of these, 128 (36%) patients had received AWBI (representing 131 treated breasts), consisting of 16 daily fractions of 265 cGy to a total dose of 4,240 cGy followed by a conventionally fractionated boost. Results: Patients who opted for AWBI were similar demographically to the patients undergoing conventional WBI. In the AWBI cohort, 83% of the patients had Stage T1 disease and 22% had nodal involvement (N1). The tumors were estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive and Her-2/Neu-amplified in 82%, 69%, and 11%, respectively. The median duration of AWBI plus a boost was 29 days, and no patient required a toxicity-related treatment break. No Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity developed. At a median follow-up of 18 months, one ipsilateral breast recurrence developed that was salvaged with mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Conclusion: AWBI to the prone breast using simplified IMRT with a sequential boost offers women requiring breast-only adjuvant radiotherapy an abbreviated treatment with early tumor control and cosmesis comparable to that with standard fractionation.

  3. Continual Gram-negative bacterial challenge accelerates stroke onset in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hideki; Tabuchi, Masaki; Ooshima, Kana; Nakai, Kumiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Maeno, Masao

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of continual Gram-negative bacterial challenge on stroke onset. Stroke onset occurred significantly earlier in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) injected with a bacterial cell suspension of Gram-negative rods or lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) than in uninjected controls. Paralysis of the hindlimb, piloerection, hypokinesis, and hyperkinesis were observed in LPS-injected SHRSP but not in uninjected controls during stroke onset. The serum levels of NOx, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine increased in LPS-injected SHRSP. These results suggest that continual Gram-negative bacterial challenge induces accelerated stroke onset in SHRSP, probably caused by oxidative stress responses derived from LPSs. PMID:22630606

  4. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a biogerontological resource in aging research.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1999-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), consisting of 14 senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) and 4 senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) has been under development since 1970 through the selective inbreeding of AKR/J strain mice donated by the Jackson laboratory in 1968, based on the data of the grading score of senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotypes. The characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP and SAMR mice is accelerated senescence and normal aging, respectively. Furthermore, SAMP and SAMR strains manifest various pathobiological phenotypes which include such neurobiological phenotypes as deficits in learning and memory, emotional disorders, abnormal circadian rhythms, brain atrophy, hearing impairment, etc., and are often characteristic enough to differentiate the strains. Various efforts are currently being made using the SAM model to clarify the underlying mechanisms in accelerated senescence as well as the etiopathogenic mechanisms in age-associated pathobiologies. Genetic background and significance of SAM development are discussed. PMID:10537019

  5. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  6. Relationship of impaired brain glucose metabolism to learning deficit in the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Nishikawa, H; Hirai, K; Kato, K; Miyamoto, M

    1996-10-11

    The relationship between brain glucose metabolism and learning deficit was examined in the senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, which has been proven to be a useful murine model of age-related behavioral disorders. SAMP8, 7 months old, exhibited marked learning impairment in the passive avoidance task, as compared with the control strain, senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1. SAMP8 also exhibited a reduction in brain glucose metabolism, as indicated by a reduction in [14C]2-deoxyglucose accumulation in the brain following the intravenous injection impaired glucose metabolism correlated significantly with the learning impairment in all brain regions in SAMR1 and SAMP8. In the SAMP8, a significant correlation was observed in the posterior half of the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that the SAMP8 strain is a useful model of not only age-related behavioral disorders, but also glucose hypometabolism observed in aging and dementias. PMID:8905734

  7. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  8. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  9. Assessment of social interaction and anxiety-like behavior in senescence-accelerated-prone and -resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Harry C; Chadman, Kathryn K; Heaney, Agnes T; Carp, Richard I

    2013-06-13

    Two members of the senescence-accelerated mouse group, SAMP8 and SAMP10, are characterized by learning and memory deficits, while the SAMR1 strain is not. In this study, we used two behavioral tests, social approach and object recognition and compared the results observed for the SAMP strains with those seen in the control strain, SAMR1. In social approach experiments, the 2 SAMP strains showed decreased sociability compared to SAMR1 as shown by their reluctance to spend time near a stranger mouse and increased immobility. In object recognition experiments, SAMP strains spent more time in the thigmotaxis zone and less time in the more exposed central zone than SAMR1 mice. From a behavioral standpoint, SAMP mice were less interactive and showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to SAMR1. PMID:23672852

  10. Characteristics of age-related behavioral changes in senescence-accelerated mouse SAMP8 and SAMP10.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M

    1997-01-01

    Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM), a murine model of accelerated senescence, has been established by Takeda et al. (1981). SAM consists of senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) and senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR), the latter of which shows normal aging characteristics. In 1991 there were eight different substrains in the P-series, which commonly exhibited accelerated aging with a shortened life span (Takeda et al., 1991). Among the P-series, we have found that SAMP8 mice show significant impairments in a variety of learning tasks when compared with SAMR1 mice (Miyamoto et al., 1986). Further studies suggest that SAMP8 exhibits an age-related emotional disorder characterized by reduced anxiety-like behavior (Miyamoto et al., 1992). On the other hand, it has been shown that SAMP10 exhibits brain atrophy and learning impairments in an avoidance task (Shimada et al., 1992, 1993). Here, characteristics of age-related deficits in learning and memory, changes in emotional behavior, and abnormality of circadian rhythms in SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice are described. In the experiments, SAMP8/Ta (SAMP8), SAMP10/(/)Ta (SAMP10) and SAMR1TA (SAMR1) reared under specific pathogen-free conditions at Takeda Chemical Industries were used. PMID:9088911

  11. Mutagenic safety and fatty liver improvement of nanonized black soybeans in senescence-accelerated prone-8 mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, J-W; Hong, L-Z; Wang, M-F; Tsai, S-C; Lin, Y-J; Chan, Y-C

    2010-06-01

    Nanotechnology, as a new enabling technology, has the potential to revolutionize food systems. However, much attention has been focused on nanoparticle foods due to their potential physiological properties. This study was aimed to evaluate the mutagenic safety and fatty liver improvement of black soybean in senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP8). The mutagenic activity of black soybeans was investigated using the Ames test (Salmonella Typhimurium TA98, 100, 102, and 1535). Furthermore, senescence-accelerated prone-8 mice (SAMP8) have been reported to display spontaneous fatty liver. Male SAMP8 mice were divided into control and supplemented with 10% micronized or nanonized black soybeans diet and fed for 12 wk. The results revealed that the Ames test of micronized and nanonized black soybeans exhibited no mutagenicity. Administration of black soybeans to mice showed no effects on food intake and body and organ weights. The nanonized black soybean group had a lower degree of spontaneous fatty liver, alanine aminotransferase, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance concentrations, and had enhanced superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities of livers when compared with the SAMP8 control and micronized black soybean groups. The mice fed with black soybeans had significantly lower triglyceride concentrations than the SAMP8 control group. The results of this study suggest that nanonized black soybeans have no side effects and, moreover, may minimize liver lesions in SAMP8 mice.

  12. Comparative studies of early liver dysfunction in senescence-accelerated mouse using mitochondrial proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yashu; He, Jintang; Ji, Shaoyi; Wang, Qingsong; Pu, Hai; Jiang, Tingting; Meng, Lingyao; Yang, Xiuwei; Ji, Jianguo

    2008-09-01

    The liver is a complex and unique organ responsible for a breadth of functions crucial to sustaining life, especially for various metabolic processes in its mitochondria. Senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8), a widely used aging model, exhibits an oxidative stress-induced aging phenotype and severe mitochondria-related liver pathology that are not seen in senescence-accelerated mouse resistant/1 (SAMR1). Here we used both two-dimensional electrophoresis- and ICAT-based mitochondrial proteomics analysis to view the liver mitochondrial protein alterations between SAMP8 and SAMR1. Compared with SAMR1, decreased expression and activity of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase were detected in SAMP8 at 6 months old (SAMP8-6m). As the key enzyme of ketogenesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase is well known to be transcriptionally regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, which was also expressed at lower levels in SAMP8-6m livers. In addition, down-regulation of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target gene products (acyl-CoA oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase), elevation of triglyceride, and reduction of acetyl-CoA were observed, indicating abnormal fatty acid metabolism in SAMP8-6m livers. In addition eight proteins (NDUAA, NDUBA, NDUB7, NDUS1, NDUS3, NDUV1, ETFA, and UCRI) of mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated in SAMP8-6m, resulting in mitochondria-related liver dysfunction characterized by enhanced oxidative stress-induced molecular damage (lipid peroxide and oxidized protein) and depressed energy production (ATP). Glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase involved in glutamine synthesis were up-regulated in SAMP8 livers at both 1 and 6 months old that may be related to the accumulation of glutamate and glutamine. Our work provided useful clues to understanding the molecular mechanism underlying liver dysfunction in senescence-accelerated mouse.

  13. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  14. Genetic typing of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Higuchi, K; Shimizu, M; Matsushita, T; Kogishi, K; Wang, J; Chiba, T; Festing, M F; Hosokawa, M

    1999-03-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains constitute a murine model of accelerated senescence originating from the ancestral AKR/J strains and consist of nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and four senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. The chromosomes (Chrs) of the SAM strains were typed with 581 microsatellite markers amplified by PCR, and the fundamental genetic information of the SAM strains was obtained. One-third of the examined markers displayed polymorphism among the strains, and only two alleles were detected in almost all loci among the SAM and AKR/J strains. However, in 12 loci (5.6% of total 215 polymorphic markers), the third allele was detected among the SAM strains. The genetic typing and developmental history suggested that the SAM strains were related inbred strains developed by the accidental crossing between the AKR/J strain and other unknown strain(s). Comparison of the distribution of the loci in the SAMP and the SAMR series revealed notable differences in the four regions on Chrs 4, 14, 16, and 17. This indicated that some of these chromosomal sites might contain the genes responsible for accelerated senescence in the SAMP series. PMID:10051317

  15. [Anti-aging studies on the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) strains].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryoya

    2010-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse (SAM), a murine model of accelerated senescence, was established by Toshio Takeda and colleagues. SAM consists of series of SAMP (prone) and SAMR (resistant) lines. All SAMP lines (from SAMP1 to SAMP11) are characterized by accelerated accumulation of senile features, earlier onset and faster progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes, such as amyloidosis, impaired immune response, senile osteoporosis and deficits in learning and memory. These SAMP lines are useful for evaluation of putative anti-aging therapies. For example, SAMP1 line is used to study the anti-aging effect of the antioxidant containing foods and various anti-oxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, vitamin C, lycopene. SAMP8 line exhibiting an early onset of impaired learning and memory is often used for test strategies for therapeutic intervention of dementia of early onset. SAMP6 is used as an animal model for developing new strategies for the treatment of osteoporosis in humans. Various lines of SAM (P1, P6, P8, P10 and R1) are now commercially available for research. In this review, I will briefly introduce various usages of SAM in anti-aging research. PMID:20046059

  16. Environmental Enrichment Improves Behavior, Cognition, and Brain Functional Markers in Young Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Gutiérrez-Zetina, Sofía Martínez; Camins, Antoni; Palomera-Avalos, Verónica; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M Teresa; Pallàs, M

    2016-05-01

    The environment in which organisms live can greatly influence their development. Consequently, environmental enrichment (EE) is progressively recognized as an important component in the improvement of brain function and development. It has been demonstrated that rodents raised under EE conditions exhibit favorable neuroanatomical effects that improve their learning, spatial memory, and behavioral performance. Here, by using senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) and these as a model of adverse genetic conditions for brain development, we determined the effect of EE by raising these mice during early life under favorable conditions. We found a better generalized performance of SAMP8 under EE in the results of four behavioral and learning tests. In addition, we demonstrated broad molecular correlation in the hippocampus by an increase in NeuN and Ki67 expression, as well as an increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as pleiotrophin (PTN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with a parallel decrease in neurodegenerative markers such as GSK3, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and phosphorylated beta-catenin, and a reduction of SBDP120, Bax, GFAP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), resulting in a neuroprotective panorama. Globally, it can be concluded that EE applied to SAMP8 at young ages resulted in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give rise to significant beneficial effects at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels during brain development, particularly in the hippocampus.

  17. Environmental Enrichment Improves Behavior, Cognition, and Brain Functional Markers in Young Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Gutiérrez-Zetina, Sofía Martínez; Camins, Antoni; Palomera-Avalos, Verónica; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M Teresa; Pallàs, M

    2016-05-01

    The environment in which organisms live can greatly influence their development. Consequently, environmental enrichment (EE) is progressively recognized as an important component in the improvement of brain function and development. It has been demonstrated that rodents raised under EE conditions exhibit favorable neuroanatomical effects that improve their learning, spatial memory, and behavioral performance. Here, by using senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) and these as a model of adverse genetic conditions for brain development, we determined the effect of EE by raising these mice during early life under favorable conditions. We found a better generalized performance of SAMP8 under EE in the results of four behavioral and learning tests. In addition, we demonstrated broad molecular correlation in the hippocampus by an increase in NeuN and Ki67 expression, as well as an increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as pleiotrophin (PTN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with a parallel decrease in neurodegenerative markers such as GSK3, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and phosphorylated beta-catenin, and a reduction of SBDP120, Bax, GFAP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), resulting in a neuroprotective panorama. Globally, it can be concluded that EE applied to SAMP8 at young ages resulted in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give rise to significant beneficial effects at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels during brain development, particularly in the hippocampus. PMID:26014386

  18. Genetic characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains are unique and appropriate models for genetic studies on aging because the SAMP strains have an "accelerated senescence" phenotype for which the SAMR strains are controls, and each SAMP strain has a strain-specific age-associated disorder. Furthermore, because they have gone through sufficient generations of sister-brother mating, they can be considered inbred strains, which can be analyzed genetically. There are now 11 SAMP strains and 3 SAMR strains descended from the progenitor litters. Analysis with the Gompertz function shows that the SAMP strains have the same initial mortality rate (IMR) as the SAMR strains but a shorter mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), presumably due to genes that accelerated the rate of senescence in the SAMP strains. This accelerated senescence may also occur in cultured fibroblast-like cells. We performed molecular genetic characterization of all the SAM strains to acquire a base of genetic information from which we could develop hypotheses on the mechanism of development of SAM strains and genetic factors that contribute to accelerated senescence. PMID:9088910

  19. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a novel murine model of senescence.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T; Hosokawa, M; Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) has been under development by our research team at Kyoto University since 1970 through the selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson Laboratory in 1968, based on a graded score for senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotype. At present, there are 12 lines of SAM: nine senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) including SAMP1, SAMP2, SAMP3, SAMP6, SAMP7, SAMP8, SAMP9, SAMP10, and SAMP11; and three senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) including SAMR1, SAMR4, and SAMR5. Data from survival curves, Gompertzian function, and grading score of senescence, together with growth patterns of body weight of these SAMP and SAMR, revealed that the characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP mice is "accelerated senescence;" early onset and irreversible advance of senescence manifested by several signs and gross lesions such as the loss of normal behavior, various skin lesions, increased lordokyphosis, etc., after a period of normal development. In the course of SAM development, it became evident that SAMP strains manifest various pathologic phenotypes that are characteristic enough to differentiate the SAM strains. The genetic background and significance of SAM development are discussed. PMID:9088907

  20. Quantitative proteomics analysis of specific protein expression and oxidative modification in aged senescence-accelerated-prone 8 mice brain.

    PubMed

    Poon, H F; Castegna, A; Farr, S A; Thongboonkerd, V; Lynn, B C; Banks, W A; Morley, J E; Klein, J B; Butterfield, D A

    2004-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is a murine model of accelerated senescence that was established using phenotypic selection. The SAMP series includes nine substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. SAMP8 is known to exhibit age-dependent learning and memory deficits. In our previous study, we reported that brains from 12-month-old SAMP8 have greater protein oxidation, as well as lipid peroxidation, compared with brains from 4-month-old SAMP8 mice. In order to investigate the relation between age-associated oxidative stress on specific protein oxidation and age-related learning and memory deficits in SAMP8, we used proteomics to identify proteins that are expressed differently and/or modified oxidatively in aged SAMP8 brains. We report here that in 12 month SAMP8 mice brains the expressions of neurofilament triplet L protein, lactate dehydrogenase 2 (LDH-2), heat shock protein 86, and alpha-spectrin are significantly decreased, while the expression of triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is increased compared with 4-month-old SAMP8 brains. We also report that the specific protein carbonyl levels of LDH-2, dihydropyrimidinase-like protein 2, alpha-spectrin and creatine kinase, are significantly increased in the brain of 12-month-old SAMP8 mice when compared with the 4-month-old SAMP8 brain. These findings are discussed in reference to the effect of specific protein oxidation and changes of expression on potential mechanisms of abnormal alterations in metabolism and neurochemicals, as well as to the learning and memory deficits in aged SAMP8 mice.

  1. Evidence that glucose metabolism is decreased in the cerebrum of aged female senescence-accelerated mouse; possible involvement of a low hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, T; Sato, E; Inoue, A; Ishibashi, S

    1996-08-16

    d-Glucose metabolism in cerebral cells prepared from aged senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), was investigated in consideration of a sex difference. The production of 14CO2 from 6-[14C]D-glucose was reduced in female senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, a prone substrain, in comparison with that in female senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR) 2, a control substrain, whereas there was no difference in males. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into cerebral cells from female SAMP8 was also lower than that of control mice. But, the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in SAMP8 was higher than that of SAMR2, suggesting that the low hexokinase activity was involved in the decreased glucose metabolism in cerebrum of SAMP8 females irrespective of glucose transporter. This possibility was supported by the finding that the contents of glucose 6-phosphate produced from glucose added to cerebral cells from SAMP8 was lower than that in ICR mice. PMID:8873128

  2. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) as an animal model of senile dementia: pharmacological, neurochemical and molecular biological approach.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Y; Nomura, Y

    1998-12-01

    To elucidate the fundamental mechanism of age-related deficiencies of learning and to develop effective drugs for intervention in age-related diseases such as learning dysfunctions, pertinent animal models that have characteristics closely similar to human dysfunctions should be established. SAM (senescence-accelerated mouse) has been established as a murine model of the SAM strains, groups of related inbred strains including nine strains of accelerated senescence-prone, short-lived mice (SAMP) and three strains of accelerated senescence-resistant, long-lived mice (SAMR). SAMP-strain mice show relatively strain-specific age-associated phenotypic pathologies such as shortened life span and early manifestation of senescence. Among the SAMP-strain mice, SAMP8 mice show an age-related deterioration in learning ability. Here, the neuropathological, neurochemical and pharmacological features of SAM are reported, especially for SAMP8. Moreover, the effects of several drugs on the biochemical and behavioral alterations in SAMP8 and the etiologic manifestation of accelerated senescence are also discussed. PMID:9920195

  3. Critical Role and Therapeutic Control of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in an Abortion-Prone Mouse Mating.

    PubMed

    Petitbarat, Marie; Durigutto, Paolo; Macor, Paolo; Bulla, Roberta; Palmioli, Alessandro; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Ledee, Nathalie; Chaouat, Gerard; Tedesco, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    The abortion-prone mating combination CBA/J × DBA/2 has been recognized as a model of preeclampsia, and complement activation has been implicated in the high rate of pregnancy loss observed in CBA/J mice. We have analyzed the implantation sites collected from DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice for the deposition of the complement recognition molecules using CBA/J mated with BALB/c mice as a control group. MBL-A was observed in the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2 combination in the absence of MBL-C and was undetectable in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice. Conversely, C1q was present in both mating combinations. Searching for other complement components localized at the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2, we found C4 and C3, but we failed to reveal C1r. These data suggest that complement is activated through the lectin pathway and proceeds to completion of the activation sequence as revealed by C9 deposition. MBL-A was detected as early as 3.5 d of pregnancy, and MBL-A deficiency prevented pregnancy loss in the abortion-prone mating combination. The contribution of the terminal complex to miscarriage was supported by the finding that pregnancy failure was largely inhibited by the administration of neutralizing Ab to C5. Treatment of DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice with Polyman2 that binds to MBL-A with high affinity proved to be highly effective in controlling the activation of the lectin pathway and in preventing fetal loss. PMID:26561549

  4. [Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): with special reference to age-associated pathologies and their modulation].

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1996-07-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) has been under development by our research team at Kyoto University since 1970 through selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson Laboratory in 1968, based on the data of the grading score of senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotypes. At present, there are 12 lines of SAM; the 9 senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) include SAMP1, SAMP2, SAMP3, SAMP6, SAMP7, SAMP8, SAMP9, SAMP10 and SAMP11, and the 3 senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) SAMR1, SANR4 and SAMR5. Data from survival curves, the Gompertzian function and the grading score of senescence, together with growth patterns of body weight of these SAMP and SAMR mice revealed that the characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP mice is "accelerated senescence": early onset and irreversible advance of senescence manifested by several signs and gross lesions such as the loss of normal behavior, various skin lesions, increased lordokyphosis, etc., after a period of normal development. Routine postmortem examinations and the pathobiological features revealed by systematically designed studies have shown several pathologic phenotypes, which are often characteristic enough to differentiate among the various SAM strains: senile amyloidosis in SAMP1, -P2, -P7, -P9, -P10 and -P11, secondary amyloidosis in SAMP2 and -P6, contracted kidney in SAMP1, -P2, -P10, -P11, immunoblastic lymphoma in SAMR1 and -R4, histiocytic sarcoma in SAMR1 and -R4, ovarian cysts in SAMR1, impaired immune response in SAMP1, -P2 and -P8, hyperinflation of the lungs in SAMP1, hearing impairment in SAMP1, degenerative temporomandibular joint disease in SAMP3, senile osteoporosis in SAMP6, deficits in learning and memory in SAMP8 and -P10, emotional disorders in SAMP8 and -P10, cataracts in SAMP9, and brain atrophy in SAMP10. These are all age-associated pathologies, the incidence and severity of which increase with advancing age. The SAM model in which these

  5. Depressive behavior and alterations in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM)-P10.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Watanabe, R; Tha, K K; Hayashi, Y; Murayama, T; Okuma, Y; Ono, C; Oketani, Y; Hosokawa, M; Nomura, Y

    2000-08-01

    The senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) is known as a murine model of aging. SAM consists of senescence accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) and senescence accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR). Previous studies reported that SAMP10 exhibits age-related learning impairments and behavioral depression in a tail suspension test after 7 months. We investigated the changes in emotional behavior in a forced swimming test and in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in SAMP10. SAMP10 at 8 months showed an increase of immobility in the test compared with SAMR1. Treatment with desipramine (25 mg/kg, i.p., 3 days) in SAMP10 caused a decrease in immobility. In the cortex from SAMP10, [3H]quinpirole binding to D2/D3 dopamine receptors increased significantly compared with control SAMR1. In the hippocampus from SAMP10, [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT binding to 5-HT1A receptor increased. In midbrains from SAMP10, bindings of [3H]quinpirole and [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT increased. [3H]SCH23390 binding to D1/D5 receptors and [3H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2 receptor in brain regions examined in SAMP10 were similar to those in SAMR1. The present findings represent the first neurochemical evidence of an increase of D2/D3 and 5-HT1A receptors in SAMP10. SAMP10 may be a useful model of aging associated depressive behavior. PMID:11001177

  6. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  7. Expression and localization of collectins in feto-maternal tissues of human first trimester spontaneous abortion and abortion prone mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, A K; Chaudhari, H; Shah, P K; Madan, T

    2016-02-01

    Dysregulation of immune response at the feto-maternal interface during first trimester of pregnancy is one of the leading causes of spontaneous abortion. Previously, we reported differential expression of collectins, soluble pattern recognition molecules involved in immunoregulation, in placental and decidual tissues during spontaneous labor. In the present pilot study, the expression of collectins was analyzed in the inflamed human gestational tissues of spontaneous abortion ('SA') and in 13.5 dpc placental tissues from resorption survived embryos of murine model (CBA/J X DBA/2J). Transcripts of SP-A were significantly down-regulated and SP-D were significantly up-regulated in placental and decidual tissues of 'SA' group compared to that of 'normal' group. Immunostaining for SP-D and MBL proteins was positive in placental and decidual tissues. However, levels of SP-D and MBL proteins were not significantly altered in placental as well as in decidual tissues of 'SA' group in comparison to the 'normal' group. Placental tissues of viable embryos from the abortion prone mouse model showed significantly enhanced expression of mSP-A and mSP-D transcripts at 13.5 day post coitus (dpc) and 14.5 dpc compared to the control group (CBA/J X Balb/c). Mouse collectins were localized in placental tissues (13.5 dpc), with increased staining in murine model compared to control. Human and murine data together indicate that SP-A, SP-D and MBL are synthesised in early gestational tissues, and may contribute to regulation of immune response at the feto-maternal interface during pregnancy.

  8. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, ameliorates cognitive impairment, oxidative burden, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Shin, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Yamada, Shinnosuke; Nakai, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2013-08-01

    Senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) is a model of aging characterized by the early onset of learning and memory impairment and various pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, and NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves age-related cognitive impairment and reduces oxidative stress and tau phosphorylation in SAMP8 mice. Treatment with nobiletin (10 or 50mg/kg) reversed the impairment of recognition memory and context-dependent fear memory in SAMP8 mice. Treatment with nobiletin also restored the decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio in the brain of SAMP8 mice. In addition, increases in glutathione peroxidase and manganese-superoxide dismutase activities, as well as a decrease in protein carbonyl level, were observed in the brain of nobiletin-treated SAMP8 mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice. Together, the markedly beneficial effects of nobiletin represent a potentially useful treatment for ameliorating the learning and memory deficits, oxidative stress, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in aging as well as age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  9. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M; Prompers, Jeanine J; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. Key to our approach is that we exploit the stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme to produce an undersampled and random k-t space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction and acceleration. As a standard, a self-gated FLASH sequence with a total acquisition time of 10 min was used to produce single-slice Cine movies of seven mouse hearts with 90 frames per cardiac cycle. Two times (2×) and three times (3×) k-t space undersampled Cine movies were produced from 2.5- and 1.5-min data acquisitions, respectively. The accelerated 90-frame Cine movies of mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. The movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters, i.e. end-systolic and end-diastolic lumen surface areas and early-to-late filling rate ratio as a parameter to evaluate diastolic function, derived from the standard and accelerated Cine movies, were nearly identical.

  10. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  11. Modulation of Macrophage Polarization and HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 Cascade Plays a Crucial Role for Cardiac Remodeling in Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Quevedo, Joao; Watanabe, Kenichi; Konishi, Tetsuya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophage polarization in aging heart. Macrophage differentiation is pathogenically linked to many inflammatory and immune disorders. It is often preceded by myocardial inflammation, which is characterized by increased cardiac damage and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that senescence accelerated-prone (SAMP8) mice cardiac tissue would develop macrophage polarization compared with senescence-resistant control (SAMR1) mice. Both SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice were sacrificed when they became six month old. We evaluated, histo-pathological changes and modifications in protein expression by Western blotting and immuno-histochemical staining for M1 and M2 macrophage markers, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1 and its cascade proteins, pro-inflammatory factors and inflammatory cytokines in cardiac tissue. We observed significant upregulation of HMGB1, toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, nuclear factor (NF)κB p65, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and M1 like macrophage specific marker cluster of differentiation (CD)68 expressions in SAMP8 heart. In contrast, M2 macrophage specific marker CD36, and IL-10 expressions were down-regulated in SAMP8 mice. The results from the study demonstrated that, HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 signaling cascade and induction of phenotypic switching to M1 macrophage polarization in SAMP8 mice heart would be one of the possible reasons behind the cardiac dysfunction and thus it could become an important therapeutic target to improve the age related cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Modulation of Macrophage Polarization and HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 Cascade Plays a Crucial Role for Cardiac Remodeling in Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Quevedo, Joao; Watanabe, Kenichi; Konishi, Tetsuya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophage polarization in aging heart. Macrophage differentiation is pathogenically linked to many inflammatory and immune disorders. It is often preceded by myocardial inflammation, which is characterized by increased cardiac damage and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that senescence accelerated-prone (SAMP8) mice cardiac tissue would develop macrophage polarization compared with senescence-resistant control (SAMR1) mice. Both SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice were sacrificed when they became six month old. We evaluated, histo-pathological changes and modifications in protein expression by Western blotting and immuno-histochemical staining for M1 and M2 macrophage markers, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1 and its cascade proteins, pro-inflammatory factors and inflammatory cytokines in cardiac tissue. We observed significant upregulation of HMGB1, toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, nuclear factor (NF)κB p65, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and M1 like macrophage specific marker cluster of differentiation (CD)68 expressions in SAMP8 heart. In contrast, M2 macrophage specific marker CD36, and IL-10 expressions were down-regulated in SAMP8 mice. The results from the study demonstrated that, HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 signaling cascade and induction of phenotypic switching to M1 macrophage polarization in SAMP8 mice heart would be one of the possible reasons behind the cardiac dysfunction and thus it could become an important therapeutic target to improve the age related cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27070323

  13. Differences in saccharin preference and genetic alterations of the Tas1r3 gene among senescence-accelerated mouse strains and their parental AKR/J strain.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-05-10

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is used as an animal model of senescence acceleration and age-associated disorders. SAM is derived from unexpected crosses between the AKR/J and unknown mouse strains. There are nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and three senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Although SAMP strains exhibit strain-specific and age-related pathological changes, the genes responsible for the pathologic changes in SAMP strains have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, we evaluated sweet taste perception using the two-bottle test. We compared genotypes of the taste related gene, Tas1r3, using SAM strains and the parental AKR/J strain. The two-bottle test revealed that SAMR1 (R1), SAMP6 (P6), SAMP8 (P8), and SAMP10 (P10) mice were saccharin-preferring strains, whereas AKR/J did not prefer saccharin. All genotypes of the R1, P6, P8, and P10 strains at the polymorphic sites in Tas1r3, which is known to influence saccharin preference, were identical to those of C57BL6/J, a well-known saccharin-preferring strain, and were completely different from those of the parental AKR/J strain. These genetic alterations in SAM strains appear to arise from an unknown strain that is thought to have been crossed with AKR/J initially. PMID:24726396

  14. Differences in saccharin preference and genetic alterations of the Tas1r3 gene among senescence-accelerated mouse strains and their parental AKR/J strain.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-05-10

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is used as an animal model of senescence acceleration and age-associated disorders. SAM is derived from unexpected crosses between the AKR/J and unknown mouse strains. There are nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and three senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Although SAMP strains exhibit strain-specific and age-related pathological changes, the genes responsible for the pathologic changes in SAMP strains have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, we evaluated sweet taste perception using the two-bottle test. We compared genotypes of the taste related gene, Tas1r3, using SAM strains and the parental AKR/J strain. The two-bottle test revealed that SAMR1 (R1), SAMP6 (P6), SAMP8 (P8), and SAMP10 (P10) mice were saccharin-preferring strains, whereas AKR/J did not prefer saccharin. All genotypes of the R1, P6, P8, and P10 strains at the polymorphic sites in Tas1r3, which is known to influence saccharin preference, were identical to those of C57BL6/J, a well-known saccharin-preferring strain, and were completely different from those of the parental AKR/J strain. These genetic alterations in SAM strains appear to arise from an unknown strain that is thought to have been crossed with AKR/J initially.

  15. Acceleration of proliferative response of mouse fibroblasts by short-time pretreatment with polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Makoto; Niwano, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Nakashima, Takuji; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    Under the hypothesis that photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin could accelerate wound healing through reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, we examined the effect of proanthocyanidin on 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblasts with or without photo-irradiation. As a result, irrespective of presence or absence of photo-irradiation, only 1 min exposure of the cells to proanthocyanidin resulted in accelerated proliferation of the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly to proanthocyanidin, 1 min pretreatment with catechin, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid accelerated the proliferative response, but gallic acid, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate failed. If incorporated active ingredient such as proanthocyanidin for such a short time as 1 min accelerates the proliferation response, a bioassay was conducted by utilizing antioxidant potential of proanthocyanidin. That is, intracellular oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin induced by H2O2 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with proanthocyanidin for 1 min, suggesting that incorporated proanthocyanidin into the cells exerted antioxidant effect. This was also supported by a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis in which incorporation of proanthocyanidin components such as catechin monomers and dimers into the cells within 1 min was confirmed. These results suggest that active polyphenolic compounds such as proanthocyanidin, catechin, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid incorporated into the cells in such a short time as 1 min could accelerate the proliferative response of the cells. PMID:25173673

  16. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  17. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice. PMID:14967896

  18. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27(Kip1) expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice. PMID

  19. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  20. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  1. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  2. Cell death in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of senescence accelerated mouse (SAMP(8)).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Lee, Cleo C L; Lam, W P; Wai, Maria S M; Rudd, John A; Yew, David T

    2007-10-01

    The cerebella of SAMP(8) (accelerated aging mouse) and SAMR(1) controls were analyzed by Western Blotting of tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, as well as by TUNEL and histological silver staining. Both tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase levels were higher in SAMR(1) than in SAMP(8). There was also an age-related decrease in enzyme levels in SAMP(8), with the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase being more apparent. Concomitantly, there was an age-related increase of apoptosis in the medial neocerebellum and the vermis as revealed by TUNEL, with changes being significant in the SAMP(8) strain. Histologically, some Purkinje cells appeared to disappear during aging. Taken together, the data suggests that the aging SAMP(8) strain displays differential Purkinje cell death in the medial cerebellum and that some of the dying cells are likely to be catecholaminergic. PMID:17415677

  3. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane. PMID:2657842

  4. Muscle mass, structural and functional investigations of senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, An Yun; Leung, Kwok Sui; Siu, Parco Ming Fai; Qin, Jiang Hui; Chow, Simon Kwoon Ho; Qin, Ling; Li, Chi Yu; Cheung, Wing Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-related systemic syndrome with progressive deterioration in skeletal muscle functions and loss in mass. Although the senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) was reported valid for muscular ageing research, there was no report on the details such as sarcopenia onset time. Therefore, this study was to investigate the change of muscle mass, structure and functions during the development of sarcopenia. Besides the average life span, muscle mass, structural and functional measurements were also studied. Male SAMP8 animals were examined at month 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, in which the right gastrocnemius was isolated and tested for ex vivo contractile properties and fatigability while the contralateral one was harvested for muscle fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA) and typing assessments. Results showed that the peak of muscle mass appeared at month 7 and the onset of contractility decline was observed from month 8. Compared with month 8, most of the functional parameters at month 10 decreased significantly. Structurally, muscle fiber type IIA made up the largest proportion of the gastrocnemius, and the fiber size was found to peak at month 8. Based on the altered muscle mass, structural and functional outcomes, it was concluded that the onset of sarcopenia in SAMP8 animals was at month 8. SAMP8 animals at month 8 should be at pre-sarcopenia stage while month 10 at sarcopenia stage. It is confirmed that SAMP8 mouse can be used in sarcopenia research with established time line in this study. PMID:26193895

  5. Induction of pathogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies is controlled on the level of B cells in a non-lupus prone mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Langnickel, Dirk; Enghard, Philipp; Klein, Claudia; Undeutsch, Reinmar; Hocher, Berthold; Manz, R; Burmester, G R; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    The SmD1(83-119) peptide is a main target of autoantibodies and T cells in human and murine lupus, but its role in autoimmunity induction remains elusive. Therefore, female Balb/c mice and (NZW x Balb/c)F1 [CWF1] mice with identical MHC haplotype as lupus prone NZB/W mice were immunized with SmD1(83-119). Immunizations of CWF1 mice with SmD1(83-119), but not with the controls (irrelevant peptide, HEL peptide, or saline), induced anti-SmD1(83-119) and anti-dsDNA antibodies and proteinuria not present in Balb/c mice. DsDNA-specific plasma cell induction after SmD1(83-119) immunizations was confirmed by ELISPOT assays showing that the generation of dsDNA-specific antibody forming cells (AFC) was mainly driven by increased T-cell help. T-cell help for the generation of dsDNA-specific AFC was also present in saline-treated CWF1 mice but was controlled on the levels of B cells preventing autoimmunity.

  6. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD.

  7. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Henrik H.; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A.; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  8. Activin A accelerates the progression of fetal oocytes throughout meiosis and early oogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Jin; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Wang, Jun-Jie; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Li, Lan; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Activins can exert several roles in ovary development. However, little is known about their involvement in early mammalian oogenesis. In this study, we reported that activin receptors (including ActRIA, ActRIB, ActRIIA, and ActRIIB) are expressed throughout the development of the mouse ovaries from 12.5 days postcoitum (dpc) to 21 days postparturition (dpp). Moreover, we found that in vitro, the addition of activin A (ActA) to the culture medium of 12.5 dpc ovarian tissues accelerated the progression of oocytes throughout meiotic prophase I stages. This result was reproduced in vivo following administration of ActA to pregnant mice. The in vitro effect of ActA was associated with increased expression of premeiotic and meiotic genes (including Dazl, Spo11, Stra8, Scp3, and Rec8) in the ovarian tissues. Mechanistically, ActA-dependent SMAD3 signaling modulated the expression of members of the retinoic acid (RA) system, including the RA degradation CYP26B1 enzyme and the RA receptors. Finally, ActA promoted the survival and growth of fetal and early postnatal oocytes and primordial follicle assembly both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study identifies new roles of ActA in early oogenesis and suggested that ActA and RA might cooperate in promoting meiosis in female germ cells.

  9. Beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactive granular structures in the brain of senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M.; Nakamura, S.; Akiguchi, I.; Ueno, M.; Oka, N.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimada, A.; Kimura, J.; Takeda, T.

    1993-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of amyloid beta/A4 protein in the senescence-accelerated mouse brain was studied using six different antisera against human amyloid precursor protein peptides. beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactivity was observed in the form of granular structures (beta-LIGS) in various regions, including the medial septum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and some cranial nerve roots. beta-LIGS were 1.5 to 2.5 mu in diameter and irregularly shaped. They increased significantly in number with aging, predominantly in animals with a phenotype of age-related deterioration of memory and learning abilities. Congo red and thioflavine S did not stain the granules. On immunoblots, the main immunoreactive bands were observed at 14 to 18 kd. The staining intensities of these bands also increased with advancing age. We consider that beta-LIGS are not only a new morphological manifestation of senescence in mice, but also a pertinent clue in understanding the mechanisms of amyloid deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8506956

  10. [Proteoglycan in Bruch's membrane of senescence accelerated mouse: localization and age-related changes].

    PubMed

    Takada, Y; Ohkuma, H; Ogata, N; Matsushima, M; Sugasawa, K; Uyama, M

    1994-05-01

    We demonstrated the distribution of sulfated proteoglycans in Bruch's membrane of Senescence Accelerated Mouse histochemically and ultrastructurally using cuprolinic blue in conjunction with specific enzyme treatments and nitrous acid digestion. Two kinds of proteoglycan filaments were observed in the inner and outer collagenous layers, i.e., small collagen fibril-associated filaments (11 nm in average length), and large filaments (32 nm in average length). Intermediate size filaments (25 nm in average length) were seen in the basement membranes of the retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. Chondroitinase AC treatment eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate). Chondroitinase ABC treatment also eliminated the staining of filaments in the collagenous layers (chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate). Nitrous acid eliminated the staining of filaments in both basement membranes (heparan sulfate). Proteoglycans containing chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were associated uniquely with collagen fibrils. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans were associated with the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. With aging, the thickness of the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris and the staining of the filaments in the basement membranes of the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris (heparan sulfate proteoglycans) increased. Collagen fibers became disarranged and the staining of both filaments in the collagenous layers decreased. The results of the staining characteristics probably reflect the aging of Bruch's membrane.

  11. Telomere shortening leads to an acceleration of synucleinopathy and impaired microglia response in a genetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Scheffold, Annika; Holtman, Inge R; Dieni, Sandra; Brouwer, Nieske; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Kahle, Philipp J; Hengerer, Bastian; Lechel, André; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Boddeke, Erik W G M; Eggen, Bart J L; Rudolph, Karl-Lenhard; Biber, Knut

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders of the elderly and ageing hence described to be a major risk factor. Telomere shortening as a result of the inability to fully replicate the ends of linear chromosomes is one of the hallmarks of ageing. The role of telomere dysfunction in neurological diseases and the ageing brain is not clarified and there is an ongoing discussion whether telomere shortening is linked to Parkinson's disease. Here we studied a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (Thy-1 [A30P] α-synuclein transgenic mouse model) in the background of telomere shortening (Terc knockout mouse model). α-synuclein transgenic mice with short telomeres (αSYN(tg/tg) G3Terc(-/-)) developed an accelerated disease with significantly decreased survival. This accelerated phenotype of mice with short telomeres was characterized by a declined motor performance and an increased formation of α-synuclein aggregates. Immunohistochemical analysis and mRNA expression studies revealed that the disease end-stage brain stem microglia showed an impaired response in αSYN(tg/tg) G3Terc(-/-) microglia animals. These results provide the first experimental data that telomere shortening accelerates α-synuclein pathology that is linked to limited microglia function in the brainstem. PMID:27550225

  12. Hypertension accelerates the progression of Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Dere, Ekrem; Broquères-You, Dong; Bonnin, Philippe; Benessiano, Joëlle; Pocard, Marc; Mariani, Jean; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular impairment is frequent in patients with Alzheimer disease and is believed to influence clinical manifestation and severity of the disease. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially hypertension, have been associated with higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypertension, Alzheimer disease cross talk, we established a mouse model of dual pathology by infusing hypertensive doses of angiotensin II into transgenic APPPS1 mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor and presenilin 1 proteins. At 4.5 months, at the early stage of disease progression, only hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented impairment of temporal order memory performance in the episodic-like memory task. This cognitive deficit was associated with an increased number of cortical amyloid deposits (223±5 versus 207±5 plaques/mm(2); P<0.05) and a 2-fold increase in soluble amyloid levels in the brain and in plasma. Hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented several cerebrovascular alterations, including a 25% reduction in cerebral microvessel density and a 30% to 40% increase in cerebral vascular amyloid deposits, as well as a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the brain, compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice. Moreover, the brain levels of nitric oxide synthase 1 and 3 and the nitrite/nitrate levels were reduced in hypertensive APPPS1 mice (by 49%, 34%, and 33%, respectively, compared with wild-type mice; P<0.05). Our results indicate that hypertension accelerates the development of Alzheimer disease-related structural and functional alterations, partially through cerebral vasculature impairment and reduced nitric oxide production.

  13. Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, I; Parkinson, L G; Shen, Y; Toro, A; Brown, T; Zhao, H; Bleackley, R C; Granville, D J

    2014-10-09

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. Although once thought to function primarily as a pro-apoptotic serine protease, granzyme B (GzmB) can also accumulate in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during chronic inflammation and cleave ECM proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing through excessive ECM degradation. In the present study, the murine serine protease inhibitor, serpina3n (SA3N), was administered to excisional wounds created on the dorsum of genetically induced type-II diabetic mice. Wound closure was monitored and skin wound samples were collected for analyses. Wound closure, including both re-epithelialization and contraction, were significantly increased in SA3N-treated wounds. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of SA3N-treated wounds revealed a more mature, proliferative granulation tissue phenotype as indicated by increased cell proliferation, vascularization, fibroblast maturation and differentiation, and collagen deposition. Skin homogenates from SA3N-treated wounds also exhibited greater levels of full-length intact fibronectin compared with that of vehicle wounds. In addition, GzmB-induced detachment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts correlated with a rounded and clustered phenotype that was prevented by SA3N. In summary, topical administration of SA3N accelerated wound healing. Our findings suggest that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing through the proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin that is essential for normal wound closure, and that SA3N promotes granulation tissue maturation and collagen deposition.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid on SH-SY5Y cells and senescence-accelerated-prone mice 8 through the up-regulation of phosphoglycerate kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Miyamae, Y; Shigemori, H; Isoda, H

    2010-09-01

    As aged population dramatically increases in these decades, efforts should be made on the intervention for curing age-associated neurologic degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), an antioxidant component and its derivatives are natural functional compounds isolated from a variety of plants. In this study, we determined the neuroprotective effect of 3,5-di-O-CQA on Abeta(1-42) treated SH-SY5Y cells using MTT assay. To investigate the possible neuroprotective mechanism of 3,5-di-O-CQA, we performed proteomics analysis, real-time PCR analysis and measurement of the intracellular ATP level. In addition, we carried out the measurement of escape latency time to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze (MWM), real-time PCR using senescence-accelerated-prone mice (SAMP) 8 and senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1 mice. Results showed that 3,5-di-O-CQA had neuroprotective effect on Abeta (1-42) treated cells. The mRNA expression of glycolytic enzyme (phosphoglycerate kinase-1; PGK1) and intracellular ATP level were increased in 3,5-di-O-CQA treated SH-SY5Y cells. We also found that 3,5-di-O-CQA administration induced the improvement of spatial learning and memory on SAMP8 mice, and the overexpression of PGK1 mRNA. These findings suggest that 3,5-di-O-CQA has a neuroprotective effect on neuron through the upregulation of PGK1 expression and ATP production activation.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid on SH-SY5Y cells and senescence-accelerated-prone mice 8 through the up-regulation of phosphoglycerate kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Miyamae, Y; Shigemori, H; Isoda, H

    2010-09-01

    As aged population dramatically increases in these decades, efforts should be made on the intervention for curing age-associated neurologic degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), an antioxidant component and its derivatives are natural functional compounds isolated from a variety of plants. In this study, we determined the neuroprotective effect of 3,5-di-O-CQA on Abeta(1-42) treated SH-SY5Y cells using MTT assay. To investigate the possible neuroprotective mechanism of 3,5-di-O-CQA, we performed proteomics analysis, real-time PCR analysis and measurement of the intracellular ATP level. In addition, we carried out the measurement of escape latency time to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze (MWM), real-time PCR using senescence-accelerated-prone mice (SAMP) 8 and senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1 mice. Results showed that 3,5-di-O-CQA had neuroprotective effect on Abeta (1-42) treated cells. The mRNA expression of glycolytic enzyme (phosphoglycerate kinase-1; PGK1) and intracellular ATP level were increased in 3,5-di-O-CQA treated SH-SY5Y cells. We also found that 3,5-di-O-CQA administration induced the improvement of spatial learning and memory on SAMP8 mice, and the overexpression of PGK1 mRNA. These findings suggest that 3,5-di-O-CQA has a neuroprotective effect on neuron through the upregulation of PGK1 expression and ATP production activation. PMID:20570715

  16. Prone positioning for surgery.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The role of the registered perioperative practitioner (Operating Department Practitioner or Registered Nurse) includes the responsibility for safely positioning patients for surgery. The prone position is in common use for a variety of surgical procedures. The formal term for this surgical position is ventral decubitus (meaning laying face down). PMID:22720505

  17. The immunomodulatory parasitic worm product ES-62 reduces lupus-associated accelerated atherosclerosis in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Zhong, Xuemei; Amir, Shahzada; Binder, Christoph J.; Chiang, Lo-Ku; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Gharakhanian, Raffi; Harnett, Margaret M.; Harnett, William; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    ES-62 is an anti-inflammatory phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae. Accelerated atherosclerosis frequently occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), resulting in substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We examined the effects of ES-62 in the gld.apoE−/− mouse model of this condition. Treatment with ES-62 did not substantially modulate renal pathology but caused decreased anti-nuclear autoantibody levels. Moreover, a striking 60% reduction in aortic atherosclerotic lesions was observed, with an associated decrease in macrophages and fibrosis. We believe that these latter findings constitute the first example of a defined parasitic worm product with therapeutic potential in atherosclerosis: ES-62-based drugs may represent a novel approach to control accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE. PMID:25666929

  18. DeltaNp63alpha overexpression induces downregulation of Sirt1 and an accelerated aging phenotype in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Matthias; Poliak, Nina; Upadhyay, Sunil; Ratovitski, Edward; Nelkin, Barry D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sidransky, David

    2006-09-01

    p63 is highly expressed in the skin and appears to be an early marker of keratinocyte differentiation. To examine the role of p63 in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress deltaNp63alpha in the skin. These mice exhibited an accelerated aging phenotype in the skin characterized by striking wound healing defects, decreased skin thickness, decreased subcutaneous fat tissue, hair loss, and decreased cell proliferation. The accelerated skin aging was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in longevity of the mice. We found that aging in deltaNp63alpha transgenic mice and other mouse models correlated with levels of Sirt1, a mammalian SIR2 orthologue thought to extend the lifespan in lower species. Moreover, increased deltaNp63alpha expression induced cellular senescence that was rescued by Sirt1. Our data suggest that deltaNp63alpha levels may affect aging in mammals, at least in part, through regulation of Sirt1.

  19. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) with special references to neurodegeneration models, SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strains, a group of related inbred strains consisting of senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) and senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR), have been successfully developed by selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson laboratory in 1968. The characteristic feature of aging common to the SAMP and SAMR is accelerated senescence and normal aging, respectively. Furthermore, SAMP and SAMR strains of mice manifest various pathobiological phenotypes spontaneously. Among SAMP strains, SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice show age-related behavioral deterioration such as deficits in learning and memory, emotional disorders (reduced anxiety-like behavior and depressive behavior) and altered circadian rhythm associated with certain pathological, biochemical and pharmacological changes. Here, the previous and recent literature on SAM mice are reviewed with an emphasis on SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice. A spontaneous model like SAM with distinct advantages over the gene-modified model is hoped by investigators to be used more widely as a biogerontological resource to explore the etiopathogenesis of accelerated senescence and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19199030

  20. Accelerated phagocytosis of amyloid-beta by mouse and human microglia overexpressing the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Olivera M; Murphy, Greer M

    2002-08-16

    Microglia surrounding A beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease and in the APPV717F transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease have enhanced immunoreactivity for the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR), encoded by the proto-oncogene c-fms. Increased expression of M-CSFR on cultured microglia results in proliferation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase. We transfected mouse BV-2 and human SV-A3 microglia to overexpress M-CSFR and examined microglial phagocytosis of fluorescein-conjugated A beta. Flow cytometry and laser confocal microscopy showed accelerated phagocytosis of A beta in mouse and human microglia because of M-CSFR overexpression that was time- and concentration-dependent. In contrast, microglial uptake of 1-microm diameter polystyrene microspheres was not enhanced by M-CSFR overexpression. Microglial uptake of A beta was blocked by cytochalasin D, which inhibits phagocytosis. M-CSFR overexpression increased the mRNA for macrophage scavenger receptor A, and fucoidan blocking of macrophage scavenger receptors inhibited uptake of A beta. M-CSFR antibody blocking experiments demonstrated that increased A beta uptake depended on the interaction of the M-CSFR with its ligand. These results suggest that overexpression of M-CSFR in APPV717F mice may prime microglia for phagocytosis of A beta after immunization.

  1. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  2. Tissue distribution of products of the mouse decay-accelerating factor (DAF) genes. Exploitation of a Daf1 knock-out mouse and site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Fukuoka, Y; Spicer, A; Ohta, R; Okada, N; Harris, C L; Emancipator, S N; Medof, M E

    2001-10-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a membrane regulator of C3 activation that protects self cells from autologous complement attack. In humans, DAF is uniformly expressed as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored molecule. In mice, both GPI-anchored and transmembrane-anchored DAF proteins are produced, each of which can be derived from two different genes (Daf1 and Daf2). In this report, we describe a Daf1 gene knock-out mouse arising as the first product of a strategy for targeting one or both Daf genes. As part of the work, we characterize recently described monoclonal antibodies against murine DAF protein using deletion mutants synthesized in yeast, and then employ the monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with wild-type and the Daf1 knock-out mice to determine the tissue distribution of the mouse Daf1 and Daf2 gene products. To enhance the immunohistochemical detection of murine DAF protein, we utilized the sensitive tyramide fluorescence method. In wild-type mice, we found strong DAF labelling of glomeruli, airway and gut epithelium, the spleen, vascular endothelium throughout all tissues, and seminiferous tubules of the testis. In Daf1 knock-out mice, DAF labelling was ablated in most tissues, but strong labelling of the testis and splenic dendritic cells remained. In both sites, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses identified both GPI and transmembrane forms of Daf2 gene-derived protein. The results have relevance for studies of in vivo murine DAF function and of murine DAF structure.

  3. Nano-porous nitrocellulose liquid bandage modulates cell and cytokine response and accelerates cutaneous wound healing in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaofeng; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Caizhen; Chen, Xiufang; Cheng, Zhiyun; Bai, Ruyu; Wu, Xunxun; Yu, Qian; Wu, Chunlin; Diao, Yong

    2016-01-20

    Nitrocellulose liquid bandage (L-Bandage) is extensively used in hard-to-cover cuts and wounds management, owing to its flexibility, softness, transparency, and conformability. However, evidence supporting their mechanisms of action as wound dressing is scanty. This study introduces a novel nano-porous L-Bandage, and provides results from a mouse full-thickness wound model investigating its mechanism of action on wound healing. Different characteristics, such as porosity, mechanical properties and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) were determined. The L-Bandage formed film had a porous network structure with mean diameter of 18 nm that could effectively prevent the bacterial invasion, and favorable properties of tensile strength, elongation, and WVTR. The L-Bandage treated wound exhibited accelerated healing, with reduced inflammations, enhanced wound re-epithelialization, contraction, granulation tissue formation, and rapid angiogenesis. Our data suggested that L-Bandage could serve as a promising wound dressing, because of its desirable properties for wound healing.

  4. Age-related expression of sigma1 receptors and antidepressant efficacy of a selective agonist in the senescence-accelerated (SAM) mouse.

    PubMed

    Phan, Vân-Ly; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Maurice, Tangui

    2005-02-15

    The sigma1 receptor is a unique intracellular receptor whose activation results in an efficient modulation of several neurotransmitter responses. Its role as a target for the rapid nongenomic effects of neuro(active)steroids and the age-related diminutions in steroid levels suggested that targeting the sigma1 receptor might allow alleviation of age-related neuronal dysfunctions. We examined here the expression and behavioral efficacy of sigma1 receptors in the senescence-accelerated (SAM) mouse model. The sigma1 receptor mRNA expression was measured by using comparative RT-PCR in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cortex, or cerebellum of senescence-prone SAMP/8 and senescence-resistant SAMR/1 control animals. No difference was observed between substrains in 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old (m.o.) mice. The sigma1 protein expression was analyzed by using immunohistochemical techniques. Labeling was intense in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and midbrain of both SAMR/1 and SAMP/8 mice, and the distribution appeared unchanged in 6-, 9-, and 12-m.o. animals. The receptor's in vivo availability was examined by using in vivo [3H](+)-SKF-10,047 binding. No age-related difference was observed in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem of 6- or 12-m.o. SAMR/1 or SAMP/8 mice. The antidepressant efficacy of the selective agonist igmesine was examined in the forced-swimming test. The compound decreased significantly the immobility duration at 60 mg/kg in 6- and 12-m.o. SAMR/1 and in 6-m.o. SAMP/8 mice. In 12-m.o. SAMP/8 mice, the drug efficacy was facilitated; a significant effect was measured at 30 mg/kg. Decreased neurosteroid levels, particularly of progesterone, were seen in 12-m.o. SAMP/8 mice that might explain the enhanced efficacy of igmesine. Preserved sigma1 receptor expression and enhanced behavioral efficacy of sigma1 agonists were measured in SAM animals, confirming the therapeutic opportunities for

  5. PTEN deficiency in a luminal ErbB-2 mouse model results in dramatic acceleration of mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Schade, Babette; Rao, Trisha; Dourdin, Nathalie; Lesurf, Robert; Hallett, Michael; Cardiff, Robert D; Muller, William J

    2009-07-10

    Overexpression and/or amplification of the ErbB-2 oncogene as well as inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor are two important genetic events in human breast carcinogenesis. To address the biological impact of conditional inactivation of PTEN on ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model that utilizes the murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter to directly couple expression of activated ErbB-2 and Cre recombinase to the same mammary epithelial cell (MMTV-NIC). Disruption of PTEN in the mammary epithelium of the MMTV-NIC model system dramatically accelerated the formation of multifocal and highly metastatic mammary tumors, which exhibited homogenous pathology. PTEN-deficient/NIC-induced tumorigenesis was associated with an increase in angiogenesis. Moreover, inactivation of PTEN in the MMTV-NIC mouse model resulted in hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. However, like the parental strain, tumors obtained from PTEN-deficient/NIC mice displayed histopathological and molecular features of the luminal subtype of primary human breast cancer. Taken together, our findings provide important implications in understanding the molecular determinants of mammary tumorigenesis driven by PTEN deficiency and ErbB-2 activation and could provide a valuable tool for testing the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that target these critical signaling pathways.

  6. Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Accelerates Alzheimer's Disease Pathology with Cerebrovascular Remodeling in a Novel Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yun; Yamashita, Toru; Nakano, Yumiko; Sun, Zhuoran; Shang, Jingwei; Feng, Tian; Morihara, Ryuta; Fukui, Yusuke; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Abe, Koji

    2016-06-13

    Recently, aging societies have been showing an increasingly strong relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (HP). In the present study, we created a new mouse model for AD with HP, and investigated its clinical and pathological characteristics. Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice (APP23) were subjected to bilateral common carotid arteries stenosis with ameroid constrictors for slowly progressive cerebral HP. In contrast to simple APP23 mice, cerebral HP exacerbated motor and cognitive dysfunctions with white matter lesions and meningo-parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ) burdens. Strong cerebrovascular inflammation and severe amyloid angiopathy with cerebrovascular remodeling were also observed in APP23 + HP mouse brains. An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine improved such clinical dysfunctions, retrieved above neuropathological characteristics, and enhanced nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-binding activity. The present study demonstrates that chronic cerebral HP enhanced cognitive/motor dysfunctions with parenchymal/cerebrovascular Aβ accumulation and cerebrovascular remodeling. These neuropathological abnormalities were greatly ameliorated by galantamine treatment associated with nAChR-mediated neuroprotection by allosterically potentiating ligand action. PMID:27314529

  7. Spontaneous and artificial lesions of magnocellular reticular formation of brainstem deteriorate avoidance learning in senescence-accelerated mouse SAM.

    PubMed

    Yagi, H; Akiguchi, I; Ohta, A; Yagi, N; Hosokawa, M; Takeda, T

    1998-04-27

    The role of the magnocellular reticular formation (MGRF) of the brainstem on learning and memory was examined in memory-deficient mice with spontaneous spongy degeneration in the brainstem (senescence-accelerated mouse, SAMP8) and control mice (accelerated-senescence resistant mouse, SAMR 1). SAMP8 showed spontaneous age-related impairment of learning and memory, as determined by passive and active avoidance responses. The deficits of learning and memory function in passive avoidance performances began at two months of age and increased with ageing. In the brains of SAMP8 at one month of age and older, spongy degeneration was mainly observed in the brainstem, while no vacuoles were evident in SAMR1 control (normal ageing mouse) brains in the age range tested (up to 12 months). The vacuolization in SAMP8 was marked in the MGRF, especially in the dorsomedial MGRF. Quantitative analysis of the vacuolization showed that the total area and number of vacuoles in the MGRF increased with age, and they were affected by the degree of deficits in learning and memory. The latency 24 h after footshock in passive avoidance tests decreased with the increase in total area and number of vacuoles in MGRF. The number of shocks in active avoidance tests increased with the increase in total number and area of vacuoles. Thus, learning and memory ability in passive and active avoidance responses deteriorated with enlargement in the vacuolated area in MGRF, and it was assumed that MGRF (especially, the dorsomedial part) possesses functions related to learning and memory. To confirm this notion, behavior and memory tests (passive avoidance and active avoidance tests, open field tests and shock sensitivity measurements) were carried out in SAMR1 mice, whose bilateral dorsomedial MGRF was destroyed electrolytically (MGRF-lesioned mice). The MGRF-lesioned mice showed no difference from sham mice in sensory threshold or open field activity; however, there was severe deterioration in passive

  8. Behavioral assessment of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM P8 and R1).

    PubMed

    Markowska, A L; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-04-01

    Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM P8 and R1) were behaviorally assessed in a cross-sectional study at 4 and 15 months of age. Behavioral measures included memory (place discrimination and repeated acquisition in a water maze), sensorimotor performance (turning in an alley, traversing bridges, wire rod hanging, and falls from a wire screen), psychomotor performance (open-field exploration), and emotionality (entries in a plus maze, grooming, and defecation in a plus maze and in an open field). In the water maze, aged P8 mice were impaired in place discrimination and in repeated acquisition tasks, demonstrating evidence of an age-related decline in spatial memory processing abilities. The demonstration of this impairment, however, was complicated by noncognitive factors, such as the tendency of many older P8 mice to float. Sensorimotor skill impairment was accelerated with age in P8 mice, but not in R1 mice, and this impairment was present despite the lack of age-related changes in body weight in P8 mice. Although P8 and R1 mice were not different in general activity at old age, P8 mice were substantially more hyperactive in an open field and in the plus maze than R1 mice when compared at young age. Independent of age, P8 mice demonstrated a reduction of anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Taken as a whole, the data suggest that although age-related behavioral alterations occur in the P8 mice, some of these changes are evident at 4 months of age. Thus, the behavioral abnormalities that exist not only represent an accelerated aging phenomenon but may also be considered a developmental pathology. PMID:9661977

  9. Boredom proneness and psychosocial development.

    PubMed

    Watt, J D; Vodanovich, S J

    1999-05-01

    The effect of boredom proneness as measured by the Boredom Proneness Scale (R. F. Farmer & N. D. Sundberg, 1986) on college students' psychosocial development was investigated via the Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Assessment (SDTLA; R. B. Winston, T. K. Miller, & J. S. Prince, 1995). Low boredom-prone students had significantly higher scores on the following SDTLA measures: career planning, lifestyle planning, peer relationships, educational involvement, instrumental autonomy, emotional autonomy, interdependence, academic autonomy, and salubrious lifestyle. Gender differences on boredom proneness and psychosocial development measures are discussed. PMID:10319449

  10. Fish Oil Accelerates Diet-Induced Entrainment of the Mouse Peripheral Clock via GPR120

    PubMed Central

    Itokawa, Misa; Nagahama, Hiroki; Ohtsu, Teiji; Furutani, Naoki; Kamagata, Mayo; Yang, Zhi-Hong; Hirasawa, Akira; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian peripheral clock is entrained by restricted feeding (RF) at a fixed time of day, and insulin secretion regulates RF-induced entrainment of the peripheral clock in mice. Thus, carbohydrate-rich food may be ideal for facilitating RF-induced entrainment, although the role of dietary oils in insulin secretion and RF-induced entrainment has not been described. The soybean oil component of standard mouse chow was substituted with fish or soybean oil containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Tuna oil (high DHA/EPA), menhaden oil (standard), and DHA/EPA dissolved in soybean oil increased insulin secretion and facilitated RF-induced phase shifts of the liver clock as represented by the bioluminescence rhythms of PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. In this model, insulin depletion blocked the effect of tuna oil and fish oil had no effect on mice deficient for GPR120, a polyunsaturated fatty acid receptor. These results suggest food containing fish oil or DHA/EPA is ideal for adjusting the peripheral clock. PMID:26161796

  11. Acceleration of fusion in mouse palates by in vitro exposure to excess G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1984-01-01

    Palatal shelves from 13- and 14-day mouse embryos were excised and cultured in contiguous pairs. Experimental cultures were exposed to 2.6 G in a culture centrifuge; controls were in the same incubator. After 24 hours, palates were prepared for light or electron microscopy. Scoring of paraffin sections according to the stage of fusion seen in the medial epithelial edges (MEE) showed that palates exposed to excess G were in more advanced stages of fusion than were controls. Ultrastructurally, control MEE had tightly apposed cell membranes and numerous desmosomes; in centrifuged MEE, desmosomes had been removed and there was much intercellular space. Nuclear membranes were intact in control MEE, but showed marked deterioration in MEE of centrifuged palates. Few lysosomes and no necrosis were seen in control MEE; centrifuged MEE had numerous lysosomes as well as necrotic cells. Basal lamina were intact in controls, but interrupted in centrifuged palates. The results confirm the hypothesis that gravitational increases speed up the differentiative process.

  12. Dynamic changes of DNA epigenetic marks in mouse oocytes during natural and accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yan; Tu, Jiajie; Tang, Nelson Leung Sang; Kong, Grace Wing Shan; Chung, Jacqueline Pui Wah; Chan, Wai-Yee; Lee, Tin-Lap

    2015-10-01

    Aging is a complex time-dependent biological process that takes place in every cell and organ, eventually leading to degenerative changes that affect normal biological functions. In the past decades, the number of older parents has increased significantly. While it is widely recognized that oocyte aging poses higher birth and reproductive risk, the exact molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. DNA methylation of 5-cytosine (5mC) and histone modifications are among the key epigenetic mechanisms involved in critical developmental processes and have been linked to aging. However, the impact of oocyte aging on DNA demethylation pathways has not been examined. The recent discovery of Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family proteins, thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) and the demethylation intermediates 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC has provided novel clues to delineate the molecular mechanisms in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examined the cellular level of modified cytosines (5mC, 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC) and Tet/Tdg expression in oocytes obtained from natural and accelerated oocyte aging conditions. Here we show all the DNA demethylation marks are dynamically regulated in both aging conditions, which are associated with Tet3 over-expression and Tdg repression. Such an aberrant expression pattern was more profound in accelerated aging condition. The results suggest that DNA demethylation may be actively involved in oocyte aging and have implications for development of potential drug targets to rejuvenate aging oocytes. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics dynamics in development and disease.

  13. Sex-Specific Differences in an ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) Mouse Model of Accelerated Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Venegas-Pino, Daniel E; Wang, Pei-Wen; Stoute, Heidi K; Singh-Pickersgill, Nicholas A; Hong, Brian Y; Khan, Mohammad I; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have a twofold to fourfold increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Despite a vast amount of research, the underlying mechanisms that predispose individuals with diabetes to the development of cardiovascular disease are unclear. To further our understanding of how diabetes promotes atherosclerosis, we have established, characterized, and manipulated a new model of hyperglycemia-induced atherosclerosis: the apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)):Ins2(+/Akita) mouse. All mice were fed a standard chow diet. Male ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) mice developed chronic hyperglycemia, which significantly accelerated atherosclerosis. Female ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) mice presented hyperglycemia that normalized by 15 weeks of age. Despite the transient hyperglycemia, advanced atherosclerosis was observed at 15 weeks of age compared with ApoE(-/-) females. To better understand these differences, subsets of mice were castrated or ovariectomized at 5 weeks of age. Castrated ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) mice showed a reduction in blood glucose levels that correlated with the amelioration of atherosclerosis. Interestingly, castrated normoglycemic ApoE(-/-) mice developed larger atherosclerotic lesions than sham-operated on controls. Ovariectomized ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) mice presented chronic hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis appeared to be advanced. We have characterized the distinctive sex-specific phenotypes exhibited by the ApoE(-/-):Ins2(+/Akita) mouse model and present evidence for the action of sex hormones on pancreatic β-cell function and the vasculature that affect the regulation of blood glucose levels and the development of atherosclerosis. This model will provide a test bed to further delineate these effects.

  14. Pro-inflammatory high-density lipoproteins and atherosclerosis are induced in lupus-prone mice by a high-fat diet and leptin.

    PubMed

    Hahn, B H; Lourencço, E V; McMahon, M; Skaggs, B; Le, E; Anderson, M; Iikuni, N; Lai, C K; La Cava, A

    2010-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is accelerated in people with systemic lupus erythematosus, and the presence of dysfunctional, pro-inflammatory high-density lipoproteins is a marker of increased risk. We developed a mouse model of multigenic lupus exposed to environmental factors known to accelerate atherosclerosis in humans - high-fat diet with or without injections of the adipokine leptin. BWF1 mice were the lupus-prone model; BALB/c were non-autoimmune controls. High-fat diet increased total serum cholesterol in both strains. In BALB/c mice, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased; they did not develop atherosclerosis. In contrast, BWF1 mice on high-fat diets developed increased quantities of high-density lipoproteins as well as elevated high-density lipoprotein scores, indicating pro-inflammatory high-density lipoproteins; they also developed atherosclerosis. In the lupus-prone strain, addition of leptin increased pro-inflammatory high-density lipoprotein scores and atherosclerosis, and accelerated proteinuria. These data suggest that environmental factors associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome can accelerate atherosclerosis and disease in a lupus-prone background.

  15. Acceleration of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Induced Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis by a p53172H Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Rosner, Andrea; Han, Yi; Zelazny, Edward T.; Li, Baolin; Cardiff, Robert D.; Perkins, Archibald S.

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that a mammary-specific dominant-negative p53 transgene (WAP-p53172H) could accelerate ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice, but was not tumorigenic on its own. To identify other genes that cooperate with WAP-p53172H in tumorigenesis, we performed mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral mutagenesis. We derived F1, N2, and N4/N5 mice from p53172H transgenic FVB mice backcrossed onto MMTV+ C3H/He mice. Results show the latency of MMTV tumorigenesis is correlated with FVB contribution. F1 tumors had the shortest latency (217 days), had a higher rate of metastasis, and were less differentiated than the N2 and N4/N5 tumors. The latency was 269 days in N2 mice, and lengthened to 346 days in N4/N5 mice. p53172H significantly accelerated MMTV tumorigenesis only in N2 mice, indicating cooperativity between p53172H and MMTV in this cohort. To identify genes that may be causally involved in MMTV-induced mammary tumorigenesis, we identified 60 sites of proviral insertion in the N2 tumors. Among the insertions in p53172H transgenic tumors were 10 genes not previously found as sites of MMTV insertion including genes involved in signaling (Pdgfra, Pde1b, Cnk1), cell adhesion (Cd44), angiogenesis (Galgt1), and transcriptional regulation (Olig1, Olig2, and Uncx4.1). These may represent cellular functions that are likely not deregulated by mutation in p53. PMID:12466138

  16. Guanabenz Treatment Accelerates Disease in a Mutant SOD1 Mouse Model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Fernando G; Ping, Qinggong; Moreno, Andy J; Kidd, Joshua D; Thompson, Kenneth; Jiang, Bingbing; Lincecum, John M; Wang, Monica Z; De Zutter, Gerard S; Tassinari, Valerie R; Levine, Beth; Hatzipetros, Theo; Gill, Alan; Perrin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. The mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in ALS are unclear. However, there is evidence for involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in ALS, notably in mutant SOD1 mediated models of ALS. Stress induced phosphorylation of the eIF2 alpha subunit by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 Perk activates the UPR. Guanabenz is a centrally acting alpha2 adrenergic receptor agonist shown to interact with a regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase, Pp1/Gadd34, and selectively disrupt the dephosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eif2alpha). Here we demonstrate that guanabenz is protective in fibroblasts expressing G93A mutant SOD1 when they are exposed to tunicamycin mediated ER stress. However, in contrast to other reports, guanabenz treatment accelerated ALS-like disease progression in a strain of mutant SOD1 transgenic ALS mice. This study highlights challenges of pharmacological interventions of cellular stress responses in whole animal models of ALS.

  17. Guanabenz Treatment Accelerates Disease in a Mutant SOD1 Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fernando G.; Ping, Qinggong; Moreno, Andy J.; Kidd, Joshua D.; Thompson, Kenneth; Jiang, Bingbing; Lincecum, John M.; Wang, Monica Z.; De Zutter, Gerard S.; Tassinari, Valerie R.; Levine, Beth; Hatzipetros, Theo; Gill, Alan; Perrin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. The mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in ALS are unclear. However, there is evidence for involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in ALS, notably in mutant SOD1 mediated models of ALS. Stress induced phosphorylation of the eIF2 alpha subunit by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 Perk activates the UPR. Guanabenz is a centrally acting alpha2 adrenergic receptor agonist shown to interact with a regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase, Pp1/Gadd34, and selectively disrupt the dephosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eif2alpha). Here we demonstrate that guanabenz is protective in fibroblasts expressing G93A mutant SOD1 when they are exposed to tunicamycin mediated ER stress. However, in contrast to other reports, guanabenz treatment accelerated ALS-like disease progression in a strain of mutant SOD1 transgenic ALS mice. This study highlights challenges of pharmacological interventions of cellular stress responses in whole animal models of ALS. PMID:26288094

  18. Accelerated Aging of Intervertebral Discs in a Mouse Model of Progeria

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Nam; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Bentley, Douglas; Taylor, Lauren; Studer, Rebecca; Usas, Arvydas; Huard, Johnny; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Lee, Joon; Coehlo, Paulo; Wang, Dong; Loppini, Mattia; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a common and debilitating disorder that results in reduced flexibility of the spine, pain, and reduced mobility. Risk factors for IDD include age, genetic predisposition, injury, and other environmental factors such as smoking. Loss of proteoglycans (PGs) contributes to IDD with advancing age. Currently there is a lack of a model for rapid investigation of disc aging and evaluation of therapeutic interventions. Here we examined progression of disc aging in a murine model of a human progeroid syndrome caused by deficiency of the DNA repair endonuclease, ERCC1–XPF (Ercc1−/Δ mice). The ERCC1-deficient mice showed loss of disc height and degenerative structural changes in their vertebral bodies similar to those reported for old rodents. Compared to their wild-type littermates, Ercc1−/Δ mice also exhibit other age-related IDD characteristics, including premature loss of disc PG, reduced matrix PG synthesis, and enhanced apoptosis and cell senescence. Finally, the onset of age-associated disc pathologies was further accelerated in Ercc1−/Δ mice following chronic treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent mechlorethamine. These results demonstrate that Ercc1−/Δ mice represent an accurate and rapid model of disc aging and provide novel evidence that DNA damage negatively impacts PG synthesis. PMID:20973062

  19. Early natural stimulation through environmental enrichment accelerates neuronal development in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; He, Shan; Yu, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is the primary afferent into the hippocampal formation, with important functions in learning and memory. Granule cells, the principle neuronal type in the dentate gyrus, are mostly formed postnatally, in a process that continues into adulthood. External stimuli, including environmental enrichment, voluntary exercise and learning, have been shown to significantly accelerate the generation and maturation of dentate granule cells in adult rodents. Whether, and to what extent, such environmental stimuli regulate the development and maturation of dentate granule cells during early postnatal development is largely unknown. Furthermore, whether natural stimuli affect the synaptic properties of granule cells had been investigated neither in newborn neurons of the adult nor during early development. To examine the effect of natural sensory stimulation on the dentate gyrus, we reared newborn mice in an enriched environment (EE). Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that dentate granule cells from EE-reared mice exhibited earlier morphological maturation, manifested as faster peaking of doublecortin expression and elevated expression of mature neuronal markers (including NeuN, calbindin and MAP2) at the end of the second postnatal week. Also at the end of the second postnatal week, we found increased density of dendritic spines across the entire dentate gyrus, together with elevated levels of postsynaptic scaffold (post-synaptic density 95) and receptor proteins (GluR2 and GABA(A)Rγ2) of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Furthermore, dentate granule cells of P14 EE-reared mice had lower input resistances and increased glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. Together, our results demonstrate that EE-rearing promotes morphological and electrophysiological maturation of dentate granule cells, underscoring the importance of natural environmental stimulation on development of the dentate gyrus.

  20. Exercise is not beneficial and may accelerate symptom onset in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michelle C; Yuan, Chunyan; Ottenritter, Conwell; Mughal, Mohamed; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Exercise benefits both general health and brain function in rodents and humans. However, it is less clear whether physical activity prevents or ameliorates neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether voluntary wheel running can delay the onset or reduce the severity of Huntington’s disease (HD) in a mouse model. To investigate whether running may delay HD symptoms lifespan, disease onset, locomotor activity, glucose levels, weight, striatal volume, inclusions, cognition and hippocampal neurogenesis were studied in male N171-82Q transgenic HD mice. Running started in pre-symptomatic (44±1 days old) male HD mice, did not improve function and appeared to accelerate disease onset. In particular, HD runners had an earlier onset of disease symptoms (shaking, hunched back and poor grooming), reduced striatal volume and impaired motor behavior, including a shorter latency to fall from the rotarod compared to sedentary controls. Furthermore, weight loss, reduced lifespan, hyperglycemia, Morris water maze learning deficits, diminished hippocampal neurogenesis, deficits in immature neuronal morphology, intranuclear inclusions and decreased dentate gyrus volume were refractory to physical activity. Taken together our research indicates that exercise is not beneficial, and may be detrimental to a vulnerable nervous system. PMID:21152076

  1. Restricting dietary magnesium accelerates ectopic connective tissue mineralization in a mouse model of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (Abcc6(-/-) ).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiujie; Uitto, Jouni

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic mineralization, linked to a number of diseases, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable multisystem disorder characterized by calcium phosphate deposition in various tissues. The mineral content of diet has been suggested to modify the disease severity in PXE. The aim of this study is to explore the role of diet with reduced magnesium in modifying tissue mineralization in a mouse model of PXE. Abcc6(-/-) mice were placed on either standard rodent diet (control) or an experimental diet low in magnesium at weaning (4 weeks) and examined for mineralization in the skin and internal organs at the ages of 1.5, 2 or 6 months by computerized morphometric analysis of histopathological sections and by chemical assay of calcium and phosphate. Abcc6(-/-) mice on experimental diet demonstrated an accelerated, early-onset mineralization of connective tissues, as compared to control mice. Wild-type or heterozygous mice on experimental diet did not show evidence of mineralization up to 6 months of age. All mice on experimental diet showed decreased urinary calcium, increased urinary phosphate and elevated parathyroid serum levels. However, no difference in bone density at 6 months of age was noted. Our findings indicate that the mineral content, particularly magnesium, can modify the extent and the onset of mineralization in Abcc6(-/-) mice and suggest that dietary magnesium levels may contribute to the phenotypic variability of PXE. The control of mineralization by dietary magnesium may have broader implications in general population in the context of vascular mineralization.

  2. Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury with impact acceleration in the mouse: Multifocal axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Nguyen, Judy V; Lehar, Mohamed; Menon, Adarsh; Rha, Elizabeth; Arena, John; Ryu, Jiwon; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Marmarou, Christina R; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is implicated in chronic neurological illness. The development of animal models of repetitive mTBI in mice is essential for exploring mechanisms of these chronic diseases, including genetic vulnerability by using transgenic backgrounds. In this study, the rat model of impact acceleration (IA) was redesigned for the mouse cranium and used in two clinically relevant repetitive mTBI paradigms. We first determined, by using increments of weight dropped from 1m that the 40g weight was most representative of mTBI and was not associated with fractures, brain contusions, anoxic-ischemic injury, mortality, or significant neurological impairments. Quantitative evaluation of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum and corpus callosum confirmed that weight increase produced a graded injury. We next evaluated two novel repetitive mTBI paradigms (1 time per day or 3 times per day at days 0, 1, 3, and 7) and compared the resulting TAI, neuronal cell death, and neuroinflammation to single hit mTBI at sub-acute (7days) and chronic time points (10weeks) post-injury. Both single and repetitive mTBI caused TAI in the optic nerve/tract, cerebellum, corticospinal tract, lateral lemniscus and corpus callosum. Reactive microglia with phagocytic phenotypes were present at injury sites. Severity of axonal injury corresponded to impact load and frequency in the optic nerve/tract and cerebellum. Both single and repeat injury protocols were associated with retinal ganglion cell loss and optic nerve degeneration; these outcomes correlated with impact load and number/frequency. No phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity was detected in the brains of animals subjected to repetitive mTBI. Our findings establish a new model of repetitive mTBI model featured by TAI in discrete CNS tracts, especially the visual system and cerebellum. Injury in retina and optic nerve provides a sensitive measure of severity of mTBI, thus enabling

  3. RanBP9 Overexpression Accelerates Loss of Dendritic Spines in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, BN; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice were similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD brains, Ran

  4. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of dendritic spines in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, B N; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice was similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that the hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, the cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD

  5. Ubiquitous Transgene Expression of the Glucosylceramide-Synthesizing Enzyme Accelerates Glucosylceramide Accumulation and Storage Cells in a Gaucher Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Sonya; Xu, You-Hai; Zhang, Wujuan; Liou, Benjamin; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Bao, Liming; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by defective activity of acid β-glucosidase (GCase), which leads to the accumulation of its major substrates, glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph) in many cells. To modulate cellular substrate concentration in viable mouse models of Gaucher disease (Gba1 mutants), a novel mouse model was created with enhanced glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. This was accomplished by cross-breeding Gba1 mutant mice with mice expressing a transgene (GCStg) containing the mouse glucosylceramide synthase (GCS, Ugcg) cDNA driven by the ROSA promoter, yielding GCStg/Gba1 mice. The GCStg rescued Ugcg null mice from embryonic lethality. GCStg/Gba1 mice showed 2–3 fold increases in tissue GCS activity as well as accelerated GlcCer accumulation and the appearance of lipid-laden CD68 positive macrophages in visceral organs. Although GlcCer/GlcSph concentrations were elevated in the brain, there was no neurodegenerative phenotype up to 1 yr of age conceivably due to the greater residual GCase hydrolytic activity in the brains than in the visceral tissues of 9V/null mice. These studies provide ‘proof of principle’ for threshold substrate flux that modifies phenotypic development in Gaucher disease and other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:25551612

  6. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α accelerates disease progression in mouse models of leukemia and lymphoma but is not a poor prognosis factor in human AML.

    PubMed

    Forristal, C E; Brown, A L; Helwani, F M; Winkler, I G; Nowlan, B; Barbier, V; Powell, R J; Engler, G A; Diakiw, S M; Zannettino, A C W; Martin, S; Pattabiraman, D; D'Andrea, R J; Lewis, I D; Levesque, J P

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α accumulation promotes hematopoietic stem cells' quiescence and is necessary to maintain their self-renewal. However, the role of HIF-2α in hematopoietic cells is less clear. We investigated the role of HIF-2α in leukemia and lymphoma cells. HIF-2α expression was high in subsets of human and mouse leukemia and lymphoma cells, whereas it was low in normal bone marrow leukocytes. To investigate the role of HIF-2α, we transduced human HIF-2α cDNA in mouse syngeneic models of myeloid preleukemia and a transgenic model of B lymphoma. Ectopic expression of HIF-2α accelerated leukemia cell proliferation in vitro. Mice transplanted with cells transduced with HIF-2α died significantly faster of leukemia or B lymphoma than control mice transplanted with empty vector-transduced cells. Conversely, HIF-2α knockdown in human myeloid leukemia HL60 cells decreased proliferation in vitro and significantly prolonged animal survival following transplantation. In human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), HIF-2α mRNA was significantly elevated in several subsets such as the t(15;17), inv(16), complex karyotype and favorable cytogenetic groups. However, patients with high HIF-2α expression had a trend to higher disease-free survival in univariate analysis. The different effects of HIF-2α overexpression in mouse models of leukemia and human AML illustrates the complexity of this mutliclonal disease.

  7. Dietary (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Supplementation Counteracts Aging-Associated Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Fatty Liver in Senescence-Accelerated Mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Wen; Chan, Yin-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Wei, Chu-Chun; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2015-09-30

    Aging is accompanied by pathophysiological changes including insulin resistance and fatty liver. Dietary supplementation with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) improves insulin sensitivity and attenuates fatty liver disease. We hypothesized that EGCG could effectively modulate aging-associated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism in senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) prone 8 (SAMP8). Higher levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid, inhibited Akt activity, and decreased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression were observed in SAMP8 mice compared to the normal aging group, SAM resistant 1 mice. EGCG supplementation for 12 weeks successfully decreased blood glucose and insulin levels via restoring Akt activity and GLUT4 expression and stimulating AMPKα activation in skeletal muscle. EGCG up-regulated genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and subsequently restored mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle of SAMP8 mice. Decreased adipose triglyceride lipase and increased sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c (SREBP-1c) and carbohydrate responsive element binding protein at mRNA levels were observed in SAMP8 mice in accordance with hepatocellular ballooning and excess lipid accumulation. The pevention of hepatic lipid accumulation by EGCG was mainly attributed to down-regulation of mTOR and SREBP-1c-mediated lipid biosynthesis via suppression of the positive regulator, Akt, and activation of the negative regulator, AMPKα, in the liver. EGCG beneficially modulates glucose and lipid homeostasis in skeletal muscle and liver, leading to alleviation of aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  8. [Pathogenesis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus from LE-prone mice].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Kanazawa, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models are similar but not identical to human diseases. However, they are important for research into the pathogenesis underlying autoimmune diseases because they allow us to evaluate similarities and differences between human diseases and mouse models. There are many inbred strains of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-prone mice including New Zealand Black (NZB), F1 hybrids of NZB x New Zealand White (NZW) (B/W F1), MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr), and BXSB mice. The postulated etiology of these murine diseases includes many genetic and extrinsic factors such as retroviruses, an impaired balance of T cell interaction, ultraviolet irradiation, etc. For examples, genetic studies of MRL/lpr mice revealed that the appearance of macroscopic LE-like skin lesions needs the lpr mutation plus an additional factor in an autosomal dominant fashion. The candidate is ultraviolet (UV) B light, the susceptibility to which is regulated by the genetic background. Such abnormalities described in SLE now span the spectrum from innate immunity to acquired immunity. In this review, based on historical review, we focus on skin lesions from the well-studied MRL/lpr and B/W F1 mouse and discuss how SLE-prone mice can contribute to a better understanding of cutaneous LE pathogenesis. PMID:20818144

  9. Vegetation fire proneness in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Aranha, José; Amraoui, Malik

    2015-04-01

    Fire selectivity has been studied for vegetation classes in terms of fire frequency and fire size in a few European regions. This analysis is often performed along with other landscape variables such as topography, distance to roads and towns. These studies aims to assess the landscape sensitivity to forest fires in peri-urban areas and land cover changes, to define landscape management guidelines and policies based on the relationships between landscape and fires in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, the objectives of this study includes the: (i) analysis of the spatial and temporal variability statistics within Europe; and, (ii) the identification and characterization of the vegetated land cover classes affected by fires; and, (iii) to propose a fire proneness index. The datasets used in the present study comprises: Corine Land Cover (CLC) maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006) and burned area (BA) perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe, provided by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS). The CLC is a part of the European Commission programme to COoRdinate INformation on the Environment (Corine) and it provides consistent, reliable and comparable information on land cover across Europe. Both the CLC and EFFIS datasets were combined using geostatistics and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of shrubs and forest affected by fires. Obtained results confirms the usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index which allows to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire. As expected, differences between northern and southern Europe are notorious in what concern to land cover distribution, fire incidence and fire proneness of vegetation cover classes. This work was supported by national funds by FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project PEst-OE/AGR/UI4033/2014 and by

  10. High-fat diet intake accelerates aging, increases expression of Hsd11b1, and promotes lipid accumulation in liver of SAMP10 mouse.

    PubMed

    Honma, Taro; Shinohara, Nahoko; Ito, Junya; Kijima, Ryo; Sugawara, Soko; Arai, Tatsuya; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms of aging is important for prevention of age-related diseases. In this study, we examined age-dependent changes in lipid metabolism in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM)P10 fed a high-fat diet to investigate the effects of high-fat intake and aging. Tissue weights and biological parameters in plasma and liver were measured at 6 and 12 months old in SAMP10 mice fed a high-fat diet. These mice showed marked increases in liver triacylglycerol and plasma insulin levels with intake of a high-fat diet intake and aging. Lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and morphological aberrations and hypertrophy in pancreatic islets were also promoted by a high-fat diet and aging. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, the activities and mRNA levels for enzymes associated with lipid metabolism in liver were measured. The results indicated that the lipid metabolic system was activated by a high-fat diet and aging. Liver mRNA level for hydroxysteroid 11-beta dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd11b1), which exhibit age-dependent increases and promote insulin secretion, was also markedly increased. These results suggest that a high-fat diet accelerated aging in the liver of SAMP10 mice by increasing liver mRNA level for Hsd11b1, increasing insulin secretion, and promoting lipid accumulation in the liver.

  11. Effects of +G/sub x/ acceleration and aduetron on nuclei acid content and other parameters of mouse peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Minkova, M.I.; Nikolov, I.T.; Datsov, Y.R.; Pantev, T.P.; Tenchova, V.B.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of acceleration and adeturon, a radioprotector, on the content of nucleic acids and the count, composition and osmotic resistance of white and red blood cells was investigated. Male mice of the H strain were exposed to +20G sub x for 5 min. The above parameters were measured 1, 24, and 48 hours after the exposure. The nuclei acid content decreased significantly immediately after the exposure and tended to return to normal afterwards. The leucocyte count was increased during all observation periods, and the erythrocyte count was decreased 1 hour after the exposure. Osmotic resistance of white and red blood cells varied in a different manner after the exposure. Adeturon administered at optimal protective doses (300 mg/kg) modified regulatory mechanisms of the animal body.

  12. Mono(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Accelerates Early Folliculogenesis and Inhibits Steroidogenesis in Cultured Mouse Whole Ovaries and Antral Follicles1

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are ubiquitously exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is an environmental toxicant present in common consumer products. DEHP potentially targets the ovary through its metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP). However, the direct effects of MEHP on ovarian folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis, two processes essential for reproductive and nonreproductive health, are unknown. The present study tested the hypotheses that MEHP directly accelerates early folliculogenesis via overactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, a pathway that regulates primordial follicle quiescence and activation, and inhibits the synthesis of steroid hormones by decreasing steroidogenic enzyme levels. Neonatal ovaries from CD-1 mice were cultured for 6 days with vehicle control, DEHP, or MEHP (0.2–20 μg/ml) to assess the direct effects on folliculogenesis and PI3K signaling. Further, antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or MEHP (0.1–10 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of MEHP on steroid hormones and steroidogenic enzymes. In the neonatal ovaries, MEHP, but not DEHP, decreased phosphatase and tensin homolog levels and increased phosphorylated protein kinase B levels, leading to a decrease in the percentage of germ cells and an increase in the percentage of primary follicles. In the antral follicles, MEHP decreased the mRNA levels of 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase leading to a decrease in testosterone, estrone, and estradiol levels. Collectively, MEHP mediates the effect of DEHP on accelerated folliculogenesis via overactivating PI3K signaling and inhibits steroidogenesis by decreasing steroidogenic enzyme levels. PMID:25810477

  13. ISSLS PRIZE WINNER: INHIBITION OF NF-κB ACTIVITY AMELIORATES AGE-ASSOCIATED DISC DEGENERATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ACCELERATED AGING

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria R.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Pola, Enrico; Lee, Joon Y.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James D.; Robbins, Paul D.; Vo, Nam V.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design NF-κB activity was pharmacologically and genetically blocked in an accelerated aging mouse model to mitigate age-related disc degenerative changes. Objective To study the mediatory role of NF-κB signaling pathway in age-dependent intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Background Data Aging is a major contributor to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but the molecular mechanism behind this process is poorly understood. NF-κB is a family of transcription factors which play a central role in mediating cellular response to damage, stress, and inflammation. Growing evidence implicates chronic NF-κB activation as a culprit in many aging-related diseases, but its role in aging-related IDD has not been adequately explored. We studied the effects of NF-κB inhibition on IDD using a DNA repair-deficient mouse model of accelerated aging (Ercc1-/Δ mice) previously been reported to exhibit age-related IDD. Methods Systemic inhibition of NF-κB activation was achieved either genetically by deletion of one allele of the NF-κB subunit p65 (Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice) or pharmacologically by chronic intra-peritoneal administration of the Nemo Binding Domain (8K-NBD) peptide to block the formation of the upstream activator of NF-κB, IκB Inducible Kinase (IKK), in Ercc1-/Δ mice. Disc cellularity, total proteoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis of treated mice and untreated controls were assessed. Results Decreased disc matrix proteoglycan content, a hallmark feature of IDD, and elevated disc NF-κB activity were observed in discs of progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice and naturally aged wild-type compared to young WT mice. Systemic inhibition of NF-κB by the 8K-NBD peptide in Ercc1-/Δ mice increased disc proteoglycan synthesis and ameriolated loss disc cellularity and matrix proteoglycan. These results were confirmed genetically by using the p65 haploinsufficient Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway

  14. Accelerated Detection of Mycolactone Production and Response to Antibiotic Treatment in a Mouse Model of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J.; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <105 CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >105 CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than smear

  15. Accelerated detection of mycolactone production and response to antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed

    Converse, Paul J; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V; Nuermberger, Eric L; Grosset, Jacques H; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <10(5) CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >10(5) CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  17. The anti-aging effects of LW-AFC via correcting immune dysfunctions in senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) strain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiaorui; Zhang, Xiaorui; Cheng, Junping; Xu, Yiran; Zeng, Ju; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there were considerable advances in the anti-aging medical field, it is short of therapeutic drug for anti-aging. Mounting evidence indicates that the immunosenescence is the key physiopathological mechanism of aging. This study showed the treatment of LW-AFC, an herbal medicine, decreased the grading score of senescence, increased weight, prolonged average life span and ameliorated spatial memory impairment in 12- and 24-month-old senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) strain. And these anti-aging effects of LW-AFC were more excellent than melatonin. The administration of LW-AFC enhanced ConA- and LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation in aged SAMR1 mice. The treatment of LW-AFC not only reversed the decreased the proportions of helper T cells, suppressor T cells and B cells, the increased regulatory T cells in the peripheral blood of old SAMR1 mice, but also could modulate the abnormal secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, TNF-β, RANTES, eotaxin, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and G-CSF. These data indicated that LW-AFC reversed the immunosenescence status by restoring immunodeficiency and decreasing chronic inflammation and suggested LW-AFC may be an effective anti-aging agent. PMID:27105505

  18. The Concept of Accident Proneness: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, Peter; Smiley, James A.

    1964-01-01

    The term accident proneness was coined by psychological research workers in 1926. Since then its concept—that certain individuals are always more likely than others to sustain accidents, even though exposed to equal risk—has been questioned but seldom seriously challenged. This article describes much of the work and theory on which this concept is based, details the difficulties encountered in obtaining valid information and the interpretative errors that can arise from the examination of imperfect data, and explains why accident proneness became so readily accepted as an explanation of the facts. A recent hypothesis of accident causation, namely that a person's accident liability may vary from time to time, is outlined, and the respective abilities of this and of accident proneness to accord with data from the more reliable literature are examined. The authors conclude that the hypothesis of individual variation in liability is more realistic and in better agreement with the data than is accident proneness. PMID:14106130

  19. ApoE4 expression accelerates hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits by enhancing Aβ impairment of insulin signaling in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elizabeth S.; Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Chen, Christopher; Soong, Tuck Wah; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The AD brain was shown to be insulin resistant at end stage, but the interplay between insulin signaling, ApoE4 and Aβ across time, and their involvement in memory decline is unclear. To investigate insulin response in the ageing mouse hippocampus, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with the mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice (ApoExAPP). While hippocampal Aβ levels were comparable between ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mice at 26 weeks, insulin response was impaired in the ApoE4xAPP hippocampus. Insulin treatment was only able to stimulate insulin signaling and increased AMPA-GluR1 phosphorylation in forskolin pre-treated hippocampal slices from ApoE3xAPP mice. In ApoE4xAPP mice, insulin dysfunction was also associated with poorer spatial memory performance. Using dissociated hippocampal neuron in vitro, we showed that insulin response in ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons increased AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitudes and GluR1-subunit insertion. Pre-treatment of ApoE3 neurons with Aβ42 did not affect insulin-mediated GluR1 subunit insertion. However, impaired insulin sensitivity observed only in the presence of ApoE4 and Aβ42, attenuated GluR1-subunit insertion. Taken together, our results suggest that ApoE4 enhances Aβ inhibition of insulin-stimulated AMPA receptor function, which accelerates memory impairment in ApoE4xAPP mice. PMID:27189808

  20. Effect of Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Vibration Treatment on Retardation of Sarcopenia: Senescence-Accelerated Mouse-P8 Model.

    PubMed

    Guo, An-Yun; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Qin, Jiang-Hui; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Cheung, Wing-Hoi

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia-related falls and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling elderly people garnered more and more interest in recent years. Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) was proven beneficial to musculoskeletal system and recommended for sarcopenia treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LMHFV on the sarcopenic animals and explore the mechanism of the stimulatory effects. Senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) mice at month 6 were randomized into control (Ctrl) and vibration (Vib) groups and the mice in the Vib group were given LMHFV (0.3 g, 20 min/day, 5 days/week) treatment. At months 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 post-treatment, muscle mass, structure, and function were assessed. The potential proliferation capacity of the muscle was also evaluated by investigating satellite cells (SCs) pool and serum myostatin expression. At late stage, the mice in the Vib group showed higher muscle strength (month 4, p = 0.028). Generally, contractibility was significantly improved by LMHFV (contraction time [CT], p = 0.000; half-relaxation time [RT50], p = 0.000). Enlarged cross-sectional area of fiber type IIA was observed in the Vib group when compared with Ctrl group (p = 0.000). No significant difference of muscle mass was observed. The promotive effect of LMHFV on myoregeneration was reflected by suppressed SC pool reduction (month 3, p = 0.000; month 4, p = 0.000) and low myostatin expression (p = 0.052). LMHFV significantly improved the structural and functional outcomes of the skeletal muscle, hence retarding the progress of sarcopenia in SAMP8. It would be a good recommendation for prevention of the diseases related to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26608404

  1. Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hajime; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    Several pathological and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a possible relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the exact contribution of TBI to AD onset and progression is unclear. Hence, we examined AD-related histopathological changes and cognitive impairment after TBI in triple transgenic (3×Tg)-AD model mice. Five- to seven-month-old 3×Tg-AD model mice were subjected to either TBI by the weight-drop method or a sham treatment. In the 3×Tg-AD mice subjected to TBI, the spatial learning was not significantly different 7 days after TBI compared to that of the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. However, 28 days after TBI, the 3×Tg-AD mice exhibited significantly lower spatial learning than the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. Correspondingly, while a few amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques were observed in both sham-treated and TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD mouse hippocampus 7 days after TBI, the Aβ deposition was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. Thus, we demonstrated that TBI induced a significant increase in hippocampal Aβ deposition 28 days after TBI compared to that of the control animals, which was associated with worse spatial learning ability in 3×Tg-AD mice. The present study suggests that TBI could be a risk factor for accelerated AD progression, particularly when genetic and hereditary predispositions are involved. PMID:27373531

  2. Validation of an accelerated solvent extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for Pacific ciguatoxin-1 in fish flesh and comparison with the mouse neuroblastoma assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia Jun; Mak, Yim Ling; Murphy, Margaret B; Lam, James C W; Chan, Wing Hei; Wang, Mingfu; Chan, Leo L; Lam, Paul K S

    2011-07-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a global foodborne illness caused by consumption of seafood containing ciguatoxins (CTXs) originating from dinoflagellates such as Gambierdiscus toxicus. P-CTX-1 has been suggested to be the most toxic CTX, causing ciguatera at 0.1 μg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. CTXs are structurally complex and difficult to quantify, but there is a need for analytical methods for CFP toxins in coral reef fishes to protect human health. In this paper, we describe a sensitive and rapid extraction method using accelerated solvent extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for the detection and quantification of P-CTX-1 in fish flesh. By the use of a more sensitive MS system (5500 QTRAP), the validated method has a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.01 μg/kg, linearity correlation coefficients above 0.99 for both solvent- and matrix-based standard solutions as well as matrix spike recoveries ranging from 49% to 85% in 17 coral reef fish species. Compared with previous methods, this method has better overall recovery, extraction efficiency and LOQ. Fish flesh from 12 blue-spotted groupers (Cephalopholis argus) was assessed for the presence of CTXs using HPLC-MS/MS analysis and the commonly used mouse neuroblastoma assay, and the results of the two methods were strongly correlated. This method is capable of detecting low concentrations of P-CTX-1 in fish at levels that are relevant to human health, making it suitable for monitoring of suspected ciguateric fish both in the environment and in the marketplace. PMID:21505950

  3. ApoE4 expression accelerates hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits by enhancing Aβ impairment of insulin signaling in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elizabeth S; Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Chen, Christopher; Soong, Tuck Wah; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2016-05-18

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The AD brain was shown to be insulin resistant at end stage, but the interplay between insulin signaling, ApoE4 and Aβ across time, and their involvement in memory decline is unclear. To investigate insulin response in the ageing mouse hippocampus, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with the mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice (ApoExAPP). While hippocampal Aβ levels were comparable between ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mice at 26 weeks, insulin response was impaired in the ApoE4xAPP hippocampus. Insulin treatment was only able to stimulate insulin signaling and increased AMPA-GluR1 phosphorylation in forskolin pre-treated hippocampal slices from ApoE3xAPP mice. In ApoE4xAPP mice, insulin dysfunction was also associated with poorer spatial memory performance. Using dissociated hippocampal neuron in vitro, we showed that insulin response in ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons increased AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitudes and GluR1-subunit insertion. Pre-treatment of ApoE3 neurons with Aβ42 did not affect insulin-mediated GluR1 subunit insertion. However, impaired insulin sensitivity observed only in the presence of ApoE4 and Aβ42, attenuated GluR1-subunit insertion. Taken together, our results suggest that ApoE4 enhances Aβ inhibition of insulin-stimulated AMPA receptor function, which accelerates memory impairment in ApoE4xAPP mice.

  4. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  5. Ethnic and gender differences in boredom proneness

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G.S.; Morales,

    1996-02-01

    Although boredom may exhibit many shared elements, culturally specific attitudes have also been found to exist. The present paper investigated boredom proneness among African-American college students. Data from 120 participants on the Boredom Proneness (BP) Scale was analyzed and compared to cross-cultural participants. African-American females scored significantly higher than African-American males. Scores were presented from two other studies to show a comparative look at boredom proneness in five other ethnic groups. African-American females are the only female ethnic group to score higher on the BP Scale than their male counterparts. Additionally, overall African-Americans, were found to have higher BP scores than their Western counterparts.

  6. Use of senescence-accelerated mouse model in bleomycin-induced lung injury suggests that bone marrow-derived cells can alter the outcome of lung injury in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Gonzalez, Edilson T; Iyer, Smita S; Mac, Valerie; Mora, Ana L; Sutliff, Roy L; Reed, Alana; Brigham, Kenneth L; Kelly, Patricia; Rojas, Mauricio

    2009-07-01

    The incidence of pulmonary fibrosis increases with age. Studies from our group have implicated circulating progenitor cells, termed fibrocytes, in lung fibrosis. In this study, we investigate whether the preceding determinants of inflammation and fibrosis were augmented with aging. We compared responses to intratracheal bleomycin in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP), with responses in age-matched control senescence-accelerated resistant mice (SAMR). SAMP mice demonstrated an exaggerated inflammatory response as evidenced by lung histology. Bleomycin-induced fibrosis was significantly higher in SAMP mice compared with SAMR controls. Consistent with fibrotic changes in the lung, SAMP mice expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 in the lung. Furthermore, SAMP mice showed higher numbers of fibrocytes and higher levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the peripheral blood. This study provides the novel observation that apart from increases in inflammatory and fibrotic factors in response to injury, the increased mobilization of fibrocytes may be involved in age-related susceptibility to lung fibrosis. PMID:19359440

  7. Sensory integrative processing in delinquent-prone and non-delinquent-prone adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fanchiang, S P; Snyder, C; Zobel-Lachiusa, J; Loeffler, C B; Thompson, M E

    1990-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to obtain a preliminary description of the sensory integrative and practic abilities of 114 non-delinquent-prone adolescents aged 12 through 18 years and to compare their performances with those of 12 delinquent-prone adolescents with learning problems. Ten of the 17 subtests of the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT) (Ayres, 1989) as well as the Finger Posture Imitation Test (Druker, 1980) and the MacQuarrie Test for Mechanical Ability (MacQuarrie, 1925/1953) were administered to both groups. It was hypothesized that performance on some tests would correlate with age in the non-delinquent-prone adolescents. It was also hypothesized that some delinquent-prone adolescents with learning problems would perform significantly worse on the tests of sensory integrative and practic abilities than would the non-delinquent-prone adolescents. A data analysis indicated that performance on the praxis tests, Manual Form Perception, Graphesthesia, and Bilateral Motor Coordination showed a significant age correlation. The results of this study indicated a difference between the two groups, and it was concluded that the delinquent-prone group performed more poorly on all of the praxis-related tests and on the absolute values of the tests of Postrotary Nystagmus, Standing and Walking Balance, and Bilateral Motor Coordination. Some of the vestibular- and praxis-related tests, therefore, may still provide useful information on children older than 8 years of age.

  8. Why is psychiatry prone to fads?

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2013-10-01

    Psychiatry has long been prone to fads. The main reason is that mental illness is poorly understood and can be difficult to treat. Most diagnostic fads have involved the extension of well-known categories into broader spectra. The most prominent treatment fads have involved the overuse of pharmacological interventions and a proliferation of methods for psychotherapy. The best antidote to fads is a commitment to evidence-based psychiatry.

  9. Current Suicide Proneness and Past Suicidal Behavior in Adjudicated Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Lamis, Dorian A.

    2008-01-01

    Youth recently assigned to probation (n = 233) were assessed for current suicide proneness, depression, and hopelessness, as well as for recent suicide ideation, previous suicide ideation, or suicide attempt(s). The Life Attitudes Schedule-Short Form (LAS-SF) was used to assess suicide proneness. As per the LAS-SF, suicide proneness was defined…

  10. Action simulation in hallucination-prone adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dahoun, Tarik; Eliez, Stephan; Chen, Fei; Badoud, Deborah; Schneider, Maude; Larøi, Frank; Debbane, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical accounts suggest that impairments in self-other discrimination processes are likely to promote the expression of hallucinations. Studies using a variety of paradigms involving self-performed actions argue in favor of perspective taking confusion in hallucination-prone subjects. However, our understanding of such processes during adolescence is still at an early stage. The present study thus aims (1) to delineate the neural correlates sustaining mental simulation of actions involving self-performed actions (first-person perspective; 1PP) and other-performed actions (third-person perspective; 3PP) during adolescence (2) to identify atypical activation patterns during 1PP/3PP mental simulation of actions in hallucination-prone adolescents (3) to examine whether differential risk for schizophrenia (clinical vs. genetic) is also associated with differential impairments in the 1PP/3PP mental simulation of actions during adolescence. Twenty-two typically developing controls (Control group; 6 females), 12 hallucination-prone adolescents [auditory hallucination (AH) group; 7 females] and 13 adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS group; 4 females) were included in the study. During the fMRI task, subjects were presented with a cue (self-other priming cues) indicating to perform the task using either a first person perspective (“you”-1PP) or a third person perspective (“best friend”-3PP) and then they were asked to mentally simulate actions based on the type of cue. Hallucination-proneness was assessed using a self-report questionnaire [Cardiff Anomalous Perception Scale (CAPS)]. Our results indicated that atypical patterns of cerebral activation, particularly in the key areas of self-other distinction, were found in both groups at risk for auditory hallucinations (AHs and 22q11.2DS). More precisely, adolescents in the AH group presented decreased activations in the right middle occipital gyrus BA19, left cingulate gyrus BA31

  11. Production of prone-to-aggregate proteins.

    PubMed

    Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi

    2014-01-21

    Expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) remains the most popular and cost-effective method for producing proteins in basic research and for pharmaceutical applications. Despite accumulating experience and methodologies developed over the years, production of recombinant proteins prone to aggregate in E. coli-based systems poses a major challenge in most research applications. The challenge of manufacturing these proteins for pharmaceutical applications is even greater. This review will discuss effective methods to reduce and even prevent the formation of aggregates in the course of recombinant protein production. We will focus on important steps along the production path, which include cloning, expression, purification, concentration, and storage. PMID:24211444

  12. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations. PMID:26530207

  13. Extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Flor-Lorente, Blas; Frasson, Matteo; Montilla, Erick

    2014-03-01

    The Miles operation is every day more in the limelight. The abdominoperineal resection compared to anterior resection results in increased rate of circumferential resection margin (CRM) infiltration, increased iatrogenic tumor perforation rate and poorer quality of the mesorectum. These worse results may be caused by excessive dissection between the distal mesorectum and the plane of the levator ani and the consequent "resection waist" or "cone" effect in the specimen. A wider excision of the pelvic floor muscles, known as extraelevator abdominoperineal resection (ELAPE), would provide a "cylindrical" specimen which would hypothetically reduce the risk of tumor perforation and CRM infiltration and local recurrence rate. However, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that the ELAPE is oncologically superior compared to standard abdominoperineal resection. Independently from the surgical technique adopted, another actual point of discussion is the position of the patient during the perineal part of the operation. The position on "prone" provides excellent pelvic exposure, a top-down dissection under direct vision and is very comfortable for the operating surgeons. However, there is no clear scientific evidence of the superiority of prone ELAPE over supine ELAPE in terms of oncologic results, morbidity and mortality. The laparoscopy seems to be the best surgical approach for the abdominal part of the operation, although it has not been validated so far by large prospective studies. Prospective, controlled and randomized trials are necessary to resolve all these issues. The current interest in a more accurate and standardized perineal surgery to obtain a cylindrical specimen, undoubtedly, will improve results.

  14. G-protein signaling modulator 1 deficiency accelerates cystic disease in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Michelle; Pavlov, Tengis S; Nozu, Kandai; Rasmussen, Shauna A; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Lerch-Gaggl, Alexandra; North, Lauren M; Kim, Hyunho; Qian, Feng; Sweeney, William E; Avner, Ellis D; Blumer, Joe B; Staruschenko, Alexander; Park, Frank

    2012-12-26

    Polycystic kidney diseases are the most common genetic diseases that affect the kidney. There remains a paucity of information regarding mechanisms by which G proteins are regulated in the context of polycystic kidney disease to promote abnormal epithelial cell expansion and cystogenesis. In this study, we describe a functional role for the accessory protein, G-protein signaling modulator 1 (GPSM1), also known as activator of G-protein signaling 3, to act as a modulator of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A complete loss of Gpsm1 in the Pkd1(V/V) mouse model of ADPKD, which displays a hypomorphic phenotype of polycystin-1, demonstrated increased cyst progression and reduced renal function compared with age-matched cystic Gpsm1(+/+) and Gpsm1(+/-) mice. Electrophysiological studies identified a role by which GPSM1 increased heteromeric polycystin-1/polycystin-2 ion channel activity via Gβγ subunits. In summary, the present study demonstrates an important role for GPSM1 in controlling the dynamics of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of ADPKD and presents a therapeutic target for drug development in the treatment of this costly disease.

  15. Amyloid and tau pathology of familial Alzheimer's disease APP/PS1 mouse model in a senescence phenotype background (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Porquet, D; Andrés-Benito, P; Griñán-Ferré, C; Camins, A; Ferrer, I; Canudas, A M; Del Valle, J; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    The amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of familial AD-like pattern at early ages, whereas senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) has a remarkable early senescence phenotype with pathological similarities to AD. The aim of this study was the investigation and characterization of cognitive and neuropathological AD markers in a novel mouse model that combines the characteristics of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model with a senescence-accelerated background of SAMP8 mice. Initially, significant differences were found regarding amyloid plaque formation and cognitive abnormalities. Bearing these facts in mind, we determined a general characterization of the main AD brain molecular markers, such as alterations in amyloid pathway, neuroinflammation, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in these mice along their lifetimes. Results from this analysis revealed that APP/PS1 in SAMP8 background mice showed alterations in the pathways studied in comparison with SAMP8 and APP/PS1, demonstrating that a senescence-accelerated background exacerbated the amyloid pathology and maintained the cognitive dysfunction present in APP/PS1 mice. Changes in tau pathology, including the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), differs, but not in a parallel manner, with amyloid disturbances. PMID:25663420

  16. Hallucination proneness, schizotypy and meta-cognition.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John; Barkus, Emma; Lewis, Shon

    2007-06-01

    Disordered or maladaptive meta-cognitive processing appears to be a prominent feature for some individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. We sought to establish whether healthy individuals distinguished either in terms hallucination proneness (HP) or level of schizotypy could also be differentiated on the sub-scales of the Meta-cognitions Questionnaire (MCQ), or a modified version of it in which items about worry were replaced with items specifically related to thinking. A total of 106 healthy volunteers completed the Oxford and Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences and Launay-Slade hallucination scale, the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and two versions of the MCQ: the original which assesses five domains of meta-cognition and an adapted version in which items relating to worry had been replaced by items relating to thinking or reflecting on thinking (MCQ-th). ANOVA indicated highly significant differences between three groups of individuals differentiated in terms of high, medium and low proneness to hallucinations on four of the five MCQ sub-scales, and three of the four MCQ-th factors. Regression analyses indicated that the MCQ factors encompassing (1) a sense of uncontrollability of thinking (and the perceived attendant dangers of this) and (2) negative beliefs about thinking related to suspicion and punishment were the strongest predictors of high schizotypy. Individuals who score higher on a measure of HP are more likely to display patterns of meta-cognitive processing that resemble, in certain respects, those reported in individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. High schizotypy predicts a negative appraisal about both the controllability and consequences of thinking. PMID:16934218

  17. Loss of epidermal hypoxia-inducible factor-1α accelerates epidermal aging and affects re-epithelialization in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Ali, Nsrein; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Dubus, Pierre; Varon, Christine; Ged, Cécile; Pain, Catherine; Cario-André, Muriel; Seneschal, Julien; Taïeb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-12-15

    In mouse and human skin, HIF-1α is constitutively expressed in the epidermis, mainly in the basal layer. HIF-1α has been shown to have crucial systemic functions: regulation of kidney erythropoietin production in mice with constitutive HIF-1α epidermal deletion, and hypervascularity following epidermal HIF-1α overexpression. However, its local role in keratinocyte physiology has not been clearly defined. To address the function of HIF-1α in the epidermis, we used the mouse model of HIF-1α knockout targeted to keratinocytes (K14-Cre/Hif1a(flox/flox)). These mice had a delayed skin phenotype characterized by skin atrophy and pruritic inflammation, partly mediated by basement membrane disturbances involving laminin-332 (Ln-332) and integrins. We also investigated the relevance of results of studies in mice to human skin using reconstructed epidermis and showed that HIF-1α knockdown in human keratinocytes impairs the formation of a viable reconstructed epidermis. A diminution of keratinocyte growth potential, following HIF-1α silencing, was associated with a decreased expression of Ln-322 and α6 integrin and β1 integrin. Overall, these results indicate a role of HIF-1α in skin homeostasis especially during epidermal aging.

  18. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  19. Neglected children, shame-proneness, and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David S; Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; Lewis, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Neglected children may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms. This study examines shame-proneness as an outcome of child neglect and as a potential explanatory variable in the relation between neglect and depressive symptoms. Participants were 111 children (52 with a Child Protective Services [CPS] allegation of neglect) seen at age 7. Neglected children reported more shame-proneness and more depressive symptoms than comparison children. Guilt-proneness, in contrast, was unrelated to neglect and depressive symptoms, indicating specificity for shame-proneness. The potential role of shame as a process variable that can help explain how some neglected children exhibit depressive symptoms is discussed.

  20. A novel phage element of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis P125109 contributes to accelerated type III secretion system 2-dependent early inflammation kinetics in a mouse colitis model.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Bhusan Pati, Niladri; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis exhibits type III secretion system 2 (TTSS2)-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetics faster than those of closely related S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. To investigate the accelerated TTSS-2-dependent pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis, we focused on its genome. Results of a previously published comparative genomic study revealed the presence of mutually exclusive genes in both serovars. In this study, we investigated the roles of six S. Enteritidis-specific genes in vivo by using differential fluorescence induction (DFI) through putative gene-specific promoters. The promoter construct associated with the gene locus SEN1140 induced green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the gut lumen, lamina propria, mesenteric lymph nodes, and related systemic organs. To further investigate the potential role of SEN1140, we compared a SEN1140 deletion mutant with S. Typhimurium in a TTSS1-deficient background. Interestingly, the S. Enteritidis mutant lacking SEN1140 did not show the unique TTSS-2-dependent early colonization and inflammation kinetic phenotype of S. Typhimurium. Consistent with this result, complementation of SEN1140 restored the TTSS-2-dependent accelerated inflammatory potential of S. Enteritidis. This report presents a suitable screening strategy that uses a combination of DFI, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, and wild-type isogenic tagged-strain techniques to explore the unique roles of S. Enteritidis-specific genes in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:22753379

  1. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  2. Increased B Cell ADAM10 in Allergic Patients and Th2 Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Lauren Folgosa; Martin, Rebecca K; Zellner, Hannah B; Irani, Anne-Marie; Uram-Tuculescu, Cora; El Shikh, Mohey Eldin; Conrad, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    ADAM10, as the sheddase of the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23), promotes IgE production and thus is a unique target for attenuating allergic disease. Herein, we describe that B cell levels of ADAM10, specifically, are increased in allergic patients and Th2 prone WT mouse strains (Balb/c and A/J). While T cell help augments ADAM10 expression, Balb WT B cells exhibit increased ADAM10 in the naïve state and even more dramatically increased ADAM10 after anti-CD40/IL4 stimulation compared C57 (Th1 prone) WT B cells. Furthermore, ADAM17 and TNF are reduced in allergic patients and Th2 prone mouse strains (Balb/c and A/J) compared to Th1 prone controls. To further understand this regulation, ADAM17 and TNF were studied in C57Bl/6 and Balb/c mice deficient in ADAM10. C57-ADAM10B-/- were more adept at increasing ADAM17 levels and thus TNF cleavage resulting in excess follicular TNF levels and abnormal secondary lymphoid tissue architecture not noted in Balb-ADAM10B-/-. Moreover, the level of B cell ADAM10 as well as Th context is critical for determining IgE production potential. Using a murine house dust mite airway hypersensitivity model, we describe that high B cell ADAM10 level in a Th2 context (Balb/c WT) is optimal for disease induction including bronchoconstriction, goblet cell metaplasia, mucus, inflammatory cellular infiltration, and IgE production. Balb/c mice deficient in B cell ADAM10 have attenuated lung and airway symptoms compared to Balb WT and are actually most similar to C57 WT (Th1 prone). C57-ADAM10B-/- have even further reduced symptomology. Taken together, it is critical to consider both innate B cell levels of ADAM10 and ADAM17 as well as Th context when determining host susceptibility to allergic disease. High B cell ADAM10 and low ADAM17 levels would help diagnostically in predicting Th2 disease susceptibility; and, we provide support for the use ADAM10 inhibitors in treating Th2 disease.

  3. Parent Proneness to Shame and the Use of Psychological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Freeman, Wendy S.; Clara, Ian P.; Elgar, Frank J.; Walling, Bobbi R.; Mak, Leanne

    2007-01-01

    We examined the link between parent proneness to shame and two forms of psychological control, overprotection and critical/rejecting behavior, in parents of preschoolers. Because shame is self-condemning, proneness to shame affects intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning. We hypothesized that parents' emotion-regulatory responses to shame…

  4. Bangle (Zingiber purpureum) Improves Spatial Learning, Reduces Deficits in Memory, and Promotes Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of Senescence-Accelerated Mouse P8.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Matsui, Nobuaki; Hosogi, Kazuko; Imai, Akiko; Abe, Noriaki; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Hirata, Ayumu; Yagi, Yusuke; Jobu, Kohei; Yokota, Junko; Kato, Eishin; Hosoda, Shinya; Yoshioka, Saburo; Harada, Kenichi; Kubo, Miwa; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Bangle (Zingiber purpureum) is a tropical ginger that is used as a spice in Southeast Asia. Phenylbutenoid dimers isolated from Bangle have exhibited neurotrophic effects in primary cultured rat cortical neurons and PC12 cells. Furthermore, chronic treatment with phenylbutenoid dimers enhances hippocampal neurogenesis in olfactory bulbectomized mice. In this study, we investigated the effects of Bangle extract on behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. SAMP8 mice, which are an established model for accelerated aging, with age-related learning and memory impairments, were given a Bangle-containing diet for 1 month, and subsequent behavioral tests and immunohistochemistry for Ki67, a proliferating cell marker, were performed. We found that the Bangle-containing diet improved spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze and significantly increased the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the SAMP8 mice. In addition, the Bangle extract exhibited a neurotrophin-like activity as indicated by the induction of neurite sprouting in PC12 cells. Our results suggest that Bangle is beneficial for the prevention of age-related progression of cognitive impairment.

  5. Accelerated Development of Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Dysfunction in a RyR2-R176Q Knockin Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    van Oort, Ralph J.; Respress, Jonathan L.; Li, Na; Reynolds, Corey; De Almeida, Angela C.; Skapura, Darlene G.; De Windt, Leon J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2010-01-01

    In response to chronic hypertension, the heart compensates by hypertrophic growth, which frequently progresses to heart failure. Although Ca2+ has a central role in hypertrophic signaling pathways, the Ca2+ source for activating these pathways remains elusive. We hypothesized that pathological sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak through defective cardiac intracellular Ca2+ release channels/ ryanodine receptors (RyR2) accelerates heart failure development by stimulating Ca2+-dependent hypertrophic signaling. Mice heterozygous for the gain-of-function mutation R176Q/+ in RyR2 and wildtype (WT) mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac function was significantly lower, and cardiac dimensions were larger at 8 weeks after TAC in R176Q/+ compared with WT mice. R176Q/+ mice displayed an enhanced hypertrophic response compared to WT mice as assessed by heart weight to body weight ratios and cardiomyocyte cross sectional areas after TAC. Quantitative PCR revealed increased transcriptional activation of cardiac stress genes in R176Q/+ mice after TAC. Moreover, pressure overload resulted in an increased SR Ca2+ leak, associated with higher expression levels of the exon 4 splice form of regulator of calcineurin-1 (RCAN1-4), and a decrease in nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) phosphorylation in R176Q/+ mice compared to WT. Taken together, our results suggest that RyR2-dependent SR Ca2+ leak activates the pro-hypertrophic calcineurin/NFAT pathway under conditions of pressure overload. PMID:20157052

  6. The Effect of Mycophenolate Mofetil on Disease Development in the gld.apoE−/− Mouse Model of Accelerated Atherosclerosis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Richez, Christophe; Richards, Rocco J.; Duffau, Pierre; Weitzner, Zachary; Andry, Christopher D.; Rifkin, Ian R.; Aprahamian, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by autoantibody production and inflammatory disease involving multiple organs. Premature atherosclerosis is a common complication of SLE and results in substantial morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). The reasons for the premature atherosclerosis in SLE are incompletely understood, although chronic inflammation is thought to play an important role. There is currently no known preventative treatment of premature atherosclerosis in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent that is commonly used for treatment of patients with SLE. In order to study the impact of this drug on murine lupus disease including premature atherosclerosis development, we treated gld.apoE−/− mice, a model of SLE and accelerated atherosclerosis, with MMF. We maintained seven-week old gld.apoE−/− mice on a high cholesterol Western diet with or without MMF. After 12 weeks on diet, mice receiving MMF showed decreased atherosclerotic lesion area compared to the control group. MMF treatment also improved the lupus phenotype, indicated by a significant decrease circulating autoantibody levels and ameliorating lupus nephritis associated with this model. This data suggests that the effects of MMF on the immune system may not only be beneficial for lupus, but also for inflammation driving lupus-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:23577189

  7. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  8. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  9. Accelerated Accumulation of Lipofuscin Pigments in the RPE of a Mouse Model for ABCA4-Mediated Retinal Dystrophies following Vitamin A Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Roxana A.; Yuan, Quan; Hu, Jane; Peng, Jennifer H.; Lloyd, Marcia; Nusinowitz, Steven; Bok, Dean; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Dietary supplementation with vitamin A is sometimes prescribed as a treatment for retinitis pigmentosa, a group of inherited retinal degenerations that cause progressive blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the ABCA4 gene are responsible for a subset of recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Other mutant alleles of ABCA4 cause the related diseases, recessive cone-rod dystrophy, and recessive Stargardt macular degeneration. Mice with a knockout mutation in the abca4 gene massively accumulate toxic lipofuscin pigments in the retinal pigment epithelium. Treatment of these mice with fenretinide, an inhibitor of vitamin A delivery to the eye, blocks formation of these toxic pigments. Here the authors tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin A may accelerate lipofuscin pigment formation in abca4−/− mice. Methods Wild-type and abca4−/− mice were fed normal or vitamin A–supplemented diets. Tissues from these mice were analyzed biochemically for retinoids and lipofuscin pigments. Eyes from these mice were analyzed morphologically for lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium and for degeneration of photoreceptors. Visual function in these mice was analyzed by electroretinography. Results Mice that received vitamin A supplementation had dramatically higher levels of retinyl esters in the liver and retinal pigment epithelium. Lipofuscin pigments were significantly increased by biochemical and morphologic analysis in wild-type and abca4−/− mice fed the vitamin A–supplemented diet. Photoreceptor degeneration was observed in 11-month-old albino, but not pigmented, abca4−/− mice on both diets. Conclusions Vitamin A supplementation should be avoided in patients with ABCA4 mutations or other retinal or macular dystrophies associated with lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:18515570

  10. Regulation of the p19Arf/p53 pathway by histone acetylation underlies neural stem cell behavior in senescence-prone SAMP8 mice

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Cantón, Raúl; Perez-Villalba, Ana; Morante-Redolat, José Manuel; Marqués-Torrejón, María Ángeles; Pallás, Mercé; Pérez-Sánchez, Francisco; Fariñas, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Brain aging is associated with increased neurodegeneration and reduced neurogenesis. B1/neural stem cells (B1-NSCs) of the mouse subependymal zone (SEZ) support the ongoing production of olfactory bulb interneurons, but their neurogenic potential is progressively reduced as mice age. Although age-related changes in B1-NSCs may result from increased expression of tumor suppressor proteins, accumulation of DNA damage, metabolic alterations, and microenvironmental or systemic changes, the ultimate causes remain unclear. Senescence-accelerated-prone mice (SAMP8) relative to senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR1) exhibit signs of hastened senescence and can be used as a model for the study of aging. We have found that the B1-NSC compartment is transiently expanded in young SAMP8 relative to SAMR1 mice, resulting in disturbed cytoarchitecture of the SEZ, B1-NSC hyperproliferation, and higher yields of primary neurospheres. These unusual features are, however, accompanied by premature loss of B1-NSCs. Moreover, SAMP8 neurospheres lack self-renewal and enter p53-dependent senescence after only two passages. Interestingly, in vitro senescence of SAMP8 cells could be prevented by inhibition of histone acetyltransferases and mimicked in SAMR1 cells by inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC). Our data indicate that expression of the tumor suppressor p19, but not of p16, is increased in SAMP8 neurospheres, as well as in SAMR1 neurospheres upon HDAC inhibition, and suggest that the SAMP8 phenotype may, at least in part, be due to changes in chromatin status. Interestingly, acute HDAC inhibition in vivo resulted in changes in the SEZ of SAMR1 mice that resembled those found in young SAMP8 mice. PMID:25728253

  11. Restraint in police use of force events: examining sudden in custody death for prone and not-prone positions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Christine; Votova, Kristine; Heyd, Christopher; Walker, Matthew; MacDonald, Scott; Eramian, Doug; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Little is understood about the incidence of sudden death, its underlying pathophysiology, or its actual relationship to subject positioning. We report data from 4828 consecutive use of force events (August 2006-March 2013) in 7 Canadian police agencies in Eastern and Western Canada. Consecutive subjects aged >18 years who were involved in a police use of force event were included regardless of outcome. Officers prospectively documented: final resting position of the subject (prone or non-prone), intoxicants and/or emotional distress, presence of features of excited delirium, and the use of all force modalities. Our outcome of interest was sudden in-custody death. Our study has 80% power to detect a difference of 0.5% in sudden death between the positions. In over 3.25 million consecutive police--public interactions; use of force occurred in 4,828 subjects (0.1% of police public interactions; 95% CI = 0.1%, 0.1%). Subjects were usually male (87.5%); median age 32 years; 81.5% exhibited alcohol and/or drug intoxication, and/or emotional distress at the scene. Significantly more subjects remained in a non-prone vs. prone position; but over 2000 subjects remained prone. One individual died suddenly and unexpectedly in the non-prone position with all 10 features of excited delirium. No subject died in the prone position. There was no significant difference in sudden in custody death, in a worst case scenario 99.8% of subjects would be expected to survive being in either the prone or non-prone position following police use of force.

  12. Empathy, Guilt Proneness, and Gender: Relative Contributions to Prosocial Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Torstveit, Linda; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lugo, Ricardo Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    Guilt is a moral emotion that is often looked upon as a negative trait. However, studies show that some individuals are more predisposed to think, feel and act in a more ethical manner because of a lower threshold to experience guilt. Some theories of helping behaviour emphasize the evolutionary mechanisms, while other theories stress the importance of social variables. This study investigated whether guilt proneness as a dispositional trait can be associated with prosocial behaviour. Five hundred sixty-nine participants reported in an online survey their own levels of guilt proneness, frequency of prosocial behaviour, and related cognitions such as empathy. This study is among the first to demonstrate how guilt proneness combined with empathy can explain additional variance in prosocial behaviour. The findings also indicate gender differences in the precursors of prosocial behaviour, suggesting women are more influenced by the effects of guilt proneness on prosocial behaviour than men. PMID:27298635

  13. Empathy, Guilt Proneness, and Gender: Relative Contributions to Prosocial Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Torstveit, Linda; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lugo, Ricardo Gregorio

    2016-05-01

    Guilt is a moral emotion that is often looked upon as a negative trait. However, studies show that some individuals are more predisposed to think, feel and act in a more ethical manner because of a lower threshold to experience guilt. Some theories of helping behaviour emphasize the evolutionary mechanisms, while other theories stress the importance of social variables. This study investigated whether guilt proneness as a dispositional trait can be associated with prosocial behaviour. Five hundred sixty-nine participants reported in an online survey their own levels of guilt proneness, frequency of prosocial behaviour, and related cognitions such as empathy. This study is among the first to demonstrate how guilt proneness combined with empathy can explain additional variance in prosocial behaviour. The findings also indicate gender differences in the precursors of prosocial behaviour, suggesting women are more influenced by the effects of guilt proneness on prosocial behaviour than men. PMID:27298635

  14. Cancer Survivors More Prone to Obesity, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160399.html Cancer Survivors More Prone to Obesity, Study Finds Risk appears to be particularly high ... 12, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is more common among cancer survivors in the ...

  15. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  16. PEEP titration during prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Guérin, Claude; Ayzac, Louis; Mancebo, Jordi; Bates, Dina M; Malhotra, Atul; Talmor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    No major trial evaluating prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has incorporated a high-positive end-expiratory pressure (high-PEEP) strategy despite complementary physiological rationales. We evaluated generalizability of three recent proning trials to patients receiving a high-PEEP strategy. All trials employed a relatively low-PEEP strategy. After protocol ventilator settings were initiated and the patient was positioned per treatment assignment, post-intervention PEEP was not more than 5 cm H2O in 16.7 % and not more than 10 cm H2O in 66.0 % of patients. Post-intervention PEEP would have been nearly twice the set PEEP had a high-PEEP strategy been employed. Use of either proning or high-PEEP likely improves survival in moderate-severe ARDS; the role for both concomitantly remains unknown.

  17. Sound-Color Associations in Psychosis-Prone Individuals.

    PubMed

    Berman, Brady; Serper, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Synesthetic-pseudosynesthetic characteristics have been hypothesized to be a schizophrenia endophenotype, a developmental feature, and/or a symptom of psychosis. Few studies to date, however, have examined whether individuals at risk for psychosis have synesthetic symptoms. We examined the relationship between hue and pitch in high psychosis prone (HP; n = 30) and low psychosis prone individuals (LP; n = 31). Synesthesia was evaluated using self-report and two performance-based tasks. Results revealed that HP subjects experienced more synesthetic experiences than the LP only on the self-report measure. These results suggest that high psychotic prone patients report unusual experiences but are no more likely to exhibit synesthesia than LP individuals. HP individuals, however, were more likely to choose shorter wavelength colors than LP individuals on performance tasks. These results are consistent with the notion that psychosis vulnerability is associated with a preference to light wavelengths associated with increasing emotional valence and negative affect. PMID:27218222

  18. Interdisciplinary development of an ergonomic prone mobility cart.

    PubMed

    Brose, Steven W; Kilbane, Martin J; Harpster, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Steven J; Ho, Chester; Gustafson, Ken J

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a major source of morbidity and mortality in Veterans with neurologic impairment. Management of pressure ulcers typically involves pressure relief over skin regions containing wounds, but this can lead to loss of mobility and independence when the wounds are located in regions that receive pressure during sitting. An innovative, iterative design process was undertaken to improve prone cart design for persons with spinal cord injury and pressure ulceration. Further investigation of ways to improve prone carts is warranted to enhance the quality of life of persons with pressure ulcers. PMID:27533301

  19. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  20. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  1. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  2. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  3. Effects of an acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment analog on learning and memory and on medial septum cholinergic neurons in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Tooyama, I; Li, A J; Oomura, Y; Kimura, H

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of repeated subcutaneous injections of an acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment analog, [Ala16] acidic fibroblast growth factor (1-29), on learning and memory and on the choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity of forebrain neurons in senescence-accelerated mice. One group of accelerated senescence-prone mice (accelerated senescence-prone-8) received [Ala16] acidic fibroblast growth factor (1-29), whereas the other group of accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice and a group of accelerated senescence-resistant mice (control) received vehicle solution. Injections began at three weeks after birth and were given weekly for 10 months. In a passive avoidance test, the mean retention latency at three, six and nine months of age was significantly longer in controls (vehicle-treated accelerated senescence-resistant-1) and acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 than in vehicle-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice, and the latency in acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice was significantly shorter than that in controls only at nine months of age. In the Morris water maze task, the mean latency to climb onto the platform was significantly longer in acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment- and vehicle-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice than in controls. However, the mean latency in the third and fourth trial blocks was significantly shorter for acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 than for vehicle-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice. In the probe trials, controls and acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice spent significantly more time in the quadrant in which the platform had previously been located than in the other three quadrants. In acidic fibroblast growth factor fragment-treated accelerated senescence-prone-8 mice, the density of medial septum

  4. Increased ghrelin signaling prolongs survival in mouse models of human aging through activation of sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Morinaga, A; Amitani, M S; Amitani, H; Katsuura, G; Sawada, Y; Sudo, Y; Uezono, Y; Mochiki, E; Sakata, I; Sakai, T; Hanazaki, K; Yada, T; Yakabi, K; Sakuma, E; Ueki, T; Niijima, A; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Takeda, H; Asaka, M; Inui, A

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to retard aging and delay functional decline as well as the onset of diseases in most organisms. Ghrelin is secreted from the stomach in response to CR and regulates energy metabolism. We hypothesized that in CR ghrelin has a role in protecting aging-related diseases. We examined the physiological mechanisms underlying the ghrelin system during the aging process in three mouse strains with different genetic and biochemical backgrounds as animal models of accelerated or normal human aging. The elevated plasma ghrelin concentration was observed in both klotho-deficient and senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice. Ghrelin treatment failed to stimulate appetite and prolong survival in klotho-deficient mice, suggesting the existence of ghrelin resistance in the process of aging. However, ghrelin antagonist hastened death and ghrelin signaling potentiators rikkunshito and atractylodin ameliorated several age-related diseases with decreased microglial activation in the brain and prolonged survival in klotho-deficient, SAMP8 and aged ICR mice. In vitro experiments, the elevated sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity and protein expression through the cAMP–CREB pathway was observed after ghrelin and ghrelin potentiator treatment in ghrelin receptor 1a-expressing cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, rikkunshito increased hypothalamic SIRT1 activity and SIRT1 protein expression of the heart in the all three mouse models of aging. Pericarditis, myocardial calcification and atrophy of myocardial and muscle fiber were improved by treatment with rikkunshito. Ghrelin signaling may represent one of the mechanisms activated by CR, and potentiating ghrelin signaling may be useful to extend health and lifespan. PMID:26830139

  5. Pathogenesis of A-beta+ ketosis-prone diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A-beta+ ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD) is an emerging syndrome of obesity, unprovoked ketoacidosis, reversible beta-cell dysfunction, and near-normoglycemic remission. We combined metabolomics with targeted kinetic measurements to investigate its pathophysiology. Fasting plasma fatty acids, acylcarnit...

  6. The Social Antecedents of Anger Proneness in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, R. Jay; Russell, David; Glover, Regan; Hutto, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Anger has been shown to be an important factor in occupational maladjustment, family conflict, physical and sexual assault, criminal behavior, and substance abuse. It has also been linked with such adverse health outcomes as hypertension, heart disease, and cancer. Focusing on anger proneness, conceptualized as a relatively enduring propensity to…

  7. Prone position craniotomy in pregnancy without fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean; Alexander, Ashish; Philip, Shoba; Thomas, Anoop

    2016-09-01

    A pregnant patient in second trimester scheduled for posterior fossa craniotomy in prone position is a challenge for the anesthesiologist. Things to consider are physiological changes during pregnancy, non-obstetric surgery in pregnant patients, neuroanesthetic principles, effects of prone positioning, and need for fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring. We have described the anesthetic management of this case and discussed intra-operative FHR monitoring including controversies about its role, indications, and various options available as per fetal gestational age. In our case we attempted intermittent intra-operative FHR monitoring to optimize maternal positioning and fetal oxygenation even though the fetus was pre-viable. However the attempt was abandoned due to practical difficulties with prone positioning. Patient made good neurological recovery following the procedure and delivered a healthy term baby 4 months later. Decisions regarding fetal monitoring should be individualized based on viability of the fetus and feasibility of emergency cesarean delivery. Good communication between a multidisciplinary team involving neurosurgeon, anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and neonatologist is important for a successful outcome for mother and fetus. We conclude that prone position neurosurgery can safely be carried out in a pregnant patient with pre-viable fetus without FHR monitoring. PMID:27555144

  8. Perioperative visual loss following prone spinal surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative visual loss (POVL) following prone spine surgery occurs in from 0.013% to 1% of cases and is variously attributed to ischemic optic neuropathy (ION: anterior ION or posterior ION [reported in 1.9/10,000 cases: constitutes 89% of all POVL cases], central retinal artery occlusion [CRAO], central retinal vein occlusion [CRVO], cortical blindness [CB], direct compression [horseshoe, prone pillows, and eye protectors Dupaco Opti-Gard]), and acute angle closure glaucoma (AACG). Methods: Risk factors for ION include prolonged operative times, long-segment spinal instrumentation, anemia, intraoperative hypotension, diabetes, obesity, male sex, using the Wilson frame, microvascular pathology, decreased the percent of colloid administration, and extensive intraoperative blood loss. Risk factors for CRAO more typically include improper positioning during the surgery (e.g., cervical rotation), while those for CB included prone positioning and obesity. Results: POVL may be avoided by greater utilization of crystalloids versus colloids, administration of α-2 agonists (e.g., decreases intraocular pressure), avoidance of catecholamines (e.g., avoid vasoconstrictors), avoiding intraoperative hypotension, and averting anemia. Patients with glaucoma or glaucoma suspects may undergo preoperative evaluation by ophthalmologists to determine whether they require prophylactic treatment prior to prone spinal surgery and whether and if prophylactic treatment is warranted. Conclusions: The best way to avoid POVL is to recognize its multiple etiologies and limit the various risk factors that contribute to this devastating complication of prone spinal surgery. Furthermore, routinely utilizing a 3-pin head holder will completely avoid ophthalmic compression, while maintaining the neck in a neutral posture, largely avoiding the risk of jugular vein and/or carotid artery compromise and thus avoiding increasing IOP. PMID:27274409

  9. [The prone position in ARDS. A successful therapeutic strategy].

    PubMed

    Hörmann, C; Benzer, H; Baum, M; Wicke, K; Putensen, C; Putz, G; Hartlieb, S

    1994-07-01

    As early as 1974, Brian advocated the prone position for ventilated patients. He suggested that this position might enhance ventilation of the dorsal parts of the lungs, thereby improving oxygenation. These considerations have been confirmed by several experimental and clinical studies. Better secretion removal, decreased intrapulmonary shunting, and an increased FRC are thought to be responsible for the observed improvement of oxygenation. However, the prone position never became very popular in the clinical treatment of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Routine performance of thoracic CT scans in ARDS patients demonstrated preferential distribution of pathological densities in the dependent lung areas. The prone position therefore could possibly benefit these patients, as shown by two recent studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of repeatedly turning the patient to the prone position on gas exchange and thoracic CT findings in multiple-trauma patients. METHODS. Seven ventilated intensive care patients with severe ARDS (Murray Score > 2.5, Quotient > 0.7, mean airway pressure > 18 cm H2O, thoracic CT scan showing dorsal atelectases) were included in the study. Patients were turned from the supine to the prone position at 12-h intervals using an air-cushion bed (Mediscus, Austria). Redistribution of dystelectatic or atelectatic dependent lung areas was verified by means of repeated thoracic CT scans (Figs. 1, 8). RESULTS. The patients were intermittently turned for 6.5 +/- 1.1 days. The course of gas exchange is shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Initially, improvement of the respiratory quotient could only be achieved during prone positioning, from the 2nd day in the supine position as well. Intrapulmonary shunting showed a similar trend (Figs. 4 and 5). No significant changes in cardiovascular parameters could be observed. Control thoracic CT scans showed uniform reduction of atelectases in dependent lung areas (Figs. 1 and 8). The

  10. Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

    2013-01-08

    Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. β Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their β cell function.

  11. Enhancing disaster management by mapping disaster proneness and preparedness.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vishal; Fuloria, Sanjay; Bisht, Shailendra Singh

    2012-07-01

    The focus of most disaster management programmes is to deploy resources-physical and human-from outside the disaster zone. This activity can produce a delay in disaster mitigation and recovery efforts, and a consequent loss of human lives and economic resources. It may be possible to expedite recovery and prevent loss of life by mapping out disaster proneness and the availability of resources in advance. This study proposes the development of two indices to do so. The Indian census data of 2001 is used to develop a methodology for creating one index on disaster proneness and one on resourcefulness for administrative units (tehsils). Findings reveal that tehsil residents face an elevated risk of disaster and that they are also grossly under-prepared for such events. The proposed indices can be used to map regional service provision facilities and to assist authorities in evaluating immediate, intermediate, and long-term disaster recovery needs and resource requirements.

  12. Reward and Affective Regulation in Depression-Prone Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Wileyto, E. Paul; Ashare, Rebecca; Cuevas, Jocelyn; Strasser, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a disproportionately high smoking prevalence among individuals who are prone to depression. While depression has been conceptualized as a disorder of dysregulated positive affect and disrupted reward processing, little research has been conducted to determine the role of smoking in these processes among depression-prone smokers. Methods Depression-prone smokers (DP+; n = 34) and smokers not depression-prone (DP-; n=49) underwent two laboratory sessions, once while smoking abstinent and once while smoking ad-libitum, to assess the relative reinforcing value of smoking and reward sensitivity. Using experience sampling methods, participants completed self-report measures of subjective reward, positive affect, and negative affect across three days while smoking as usual and three days while smoking abstinent. Results DP+ were two times more likely to work for cigarette puffs versus money in a progressive ratio, choice task (OR 2.05; CI 95% 1.04 to 4.06, p=0.039) compared to DP-. Reward sensitivity as measured by the signal detection task did not yield any significant findings. Mixed models regressions revealed a 3-way interaction (depression group, smoking phase, and time) for subjective reward, negative affect and positive affect. For all three of these outcomes, the slopes for DP- and DP+ differed significantly from each other (p's < 0.05), and the effect of smoking (vs. abstinence) over time was greater for DP+ than DP- smokers (p's <0.05). Conclusions These findings indicate that the effects of smoking on reward and positive affect regulation are specific to DP+ smokers and highlight novel targets for smoking cessation treatment in this population. PMID:24947541

  13. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  14. Aggression proneness: Transdiagnostic processes involving negative valence and cognitive systems.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Bresin, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in persons with various mental health problems and has been studied from the perspectives of neuroscience and psychophysiology. The present research reviews some of the extant experimental literature to help clarify the interplay between domains of functioning implicated in aggression proneness. We then convey a process-oriented model that elucidates how the interplay of the Negative Valence and Cognitive System domains of NIMH's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) helps explain aggression proneness, particularly reactive aggression. Finally, we report on a study involving event-related potential (ERP) indices of emotional and inhibitory control processing during an emotional-linguistic go/no-go task among 67 individuals with histories of violence and criminal offending (30% female, 44% African-American) who reported on their aggressive tendencies using the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Results provide evidence that tendencies toward angry and aggressive behavior relate to reduced inhibitory control processing (no-go P3) specifically during relevant threat-word blocks, suggesting deterioration of cognitive control by acute or sustained threat sensitivity. These findings highlight the value of ERP methodologies for clarifying the interplay of Negative Valence and Cognitive System processes in aggression proneness.

  15. Prone positioning reduces severe pushing behavior: three case studies

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Yuji; Amimoto, Kazu; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Fukata, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Masahide; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Makita, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Pushing behavior is classically described as a disorder of body orientation in the coronal plane. Most interventions for pushing behavior have focused on correcting the deviation in vertical perception. However, pushing behavior seems to involve erroneous movements associated with excessive motor output by the non-paretic limbs and trunk. The present study aimed to inhibit muscular hyper-activity by placing the non-paretic limbs and trunk in the prone position. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of the present study were 3 acute stroke patients with severe pushing behavior. The study consisted of the following 3 phases: baseline, intervention, and follow-up. In addition to conventional therapy, patients received relaxation therapy in the prone position for 10 minutes a day over 2 days. The severity of pushing behavior was assessed using the scale for contraversive pushing, and truncal balance was evaluated using the trunk control test. These assessments were performed before and after the baseline phase, and after the intervention and follow-up phases. [Results] At the baseline phase, both scores were poor. Both scores improved after the intervention and follow-up phases, and all the patients could sit independently. [Conclusion] Relaxation therapy in the prone position might ameliorate pushing behavior and impaired truncal balance. PMID:27799722

  16. Pristane-Accelerated Autoimmune Disease in (SWR X NZB) F1 Mice Leads to Prominent Tubulointerstitial Inflammation and Human Lupus Nephritis-Like Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardet, Agnes; Chou, Wei C.; Reynolds, Taylor L.; Velez, Diana B.; Fu, Kai; Czerkowicz, Julia M.; Bajko, Jeffrey; Ranger, Ann M.; Allaire, Normand; Kerns, Hannah M.; Ryan, Sarah; Legault, Holly M.; Dunstan, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert; Lukashev, Matvey; Viney, Joanne L.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Rabah, Dania

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models lupus nephritis (LN) have provided important insights into disease pathogenesis, although none have been able to recapitulate all features of the human disease. Using comprehensive longitudinal analyses, we characterized a novel accelerated mouse model of lupus using pristane treatment in SNF1 (SWR X NZB F1) lupus prone mice (pristane-SNF1 mice). Pristane treatment in SNF1 mice accelerated the onset and progression of proteinuria, autoantibody production, immune complex deposition and development of renal lesions. At week 14, the pristane-SNF1 model recapitulated kidney disease parameters and molecular signatures seen in spontaneous disease in 36 week-old SNF1 mice and in a traditional IFNα-accelerated NZB X NZW F1 (BWF1) model. Blood transcriptome analysis revealed interferon, plasma cell, neutrophil, T-cell and protein synthesis signatures in the pristane-SNF1 model, all known to be present in the human disease. The pristane-SNF1 model appears to be particularly useful for preclinical research, robustly exhibiting many characteristics reminiscent of human disease. These include i) a stronger upregulation of the cytosolic nucleic acid sensing pathway, which is thought to be key component of the pathogenesis of the human disease, and ii) more prominent kidney interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, which have been both associated with poor prognosis in human LN. To our knowledge, this is the only accelerated model of LN that exhibits a robust tubulointerstitial inflammatory and fibrosis response. Taken together our data show that the pristane-SNF1 model is a novel accelerated model of LN with key features similar to human disease. PMID:27760209

  17. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  18. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  19. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  20. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  1. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  2. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  3. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  4. 44 CFR 60.22 - Planning considerations for flood-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Planning considerations for...., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.22 Planning considerations for flood-prone areas... areas. (b) In formulating community development goals after the occurrence of a flood disaster,...

  5. 44 CFR 60.23 - Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.23 Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of this...) Planning subdivisions and other developments in such a manner as to avoid exposure to mudslide...

  6. Reduced nursing frequency during prolonged lactation in the mouse decreases milk production and increases mammary expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), but does not accelerate mammary gland remodeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have observed that lactating mouse dams nursed 4 times per day (4X) maintained lactation, but had lower milk yields by the weigh-suckle-weigh method, than dams nursed ad libitum (AL). Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased nursing frequency would also decrease lactation persistence, increase m...

  7. Decomposition and humification of soil organic carbon after land use change on erosion prone slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring, Volker; Fischer, Holger; Cadisch, Georg; Stahr, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon decline after land use change from forest to maize usually lead to soil degradation and elevated CO2 emissions. However, limited knowledge is available on the interactions between rates of SOC change and soil erosion and how SOC dynamics vary with soil depth and clay contents. The 13C isotope based CIDE approach (Carbon Input, Decomposition and Erosion) was developed to determine SOC dynamics on erosion prone slopes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to test the applicability of the CIDE approach to determine rates of decomposition and SOC input under particular considerations of concurrent erosion events on three soil types (Alisol, Luvisol, Vertisol), (2) to adapt the CIDE approach to deeper soil layers (10-20 and 20-30 cm) and (3) to determine the variation of decomposition and SOC input with soil depth and soil texture. SOC dynamics were determined for bulk soil and physically separated SOC fractions along three chronosequences after land use change from forest to maize (up to 21 years) in northwestern Vietnam. Consideration of the effects of soil erosion on SOC dynamics by the CIDE approach yielded a higher total SOC loss (6 to 32%), a lower decomposition (13 to 40%) and a lower SOC input (14 to 31%) relative to the values derived from a commonly applied 13C isotope based mass balance approach. Comparison of decomposition between depth layers revealed that tillage accelerated decomposition in the plough layer (0-10 cm), accounting for 3 to 34% of total decomposition. With increasing clay contents SOC input increased. In addition, decomposition increased with increasing clay contents, too, being attributed to decomposition of exposed labile SOC which was attached to clay particles in the sand sized stable aggregate fraction. This study suggests that in situ SOC dynamics on erosion prone slopes are commonly misrepresented by erosion unadjusted approaches.

  8. Boredom proneness and emotion regulation predict emotional eating.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Amanda C; Myhre, Samantha K; Rokke, Paul D

    2015-05-01

    Emotional eating is considered a risk factor for eating disorders and an important contributor to obesity and its associated health problems. It has been suggested that boredom may be an important contributor to overeating, but has received relatively little attention. A sample of 552 college students was surveyed. Linear regression analyses found that proneness to boredom and difficulties in emotion regulation simultaneously predicted inappropriate eating behavior, including eating in response to boredom, other negative emotions, and external cues. The unique contributions of these variables to emotional eating were discussed. These findings help to further identify which individuals could be at risk for emotional eating and potentially for unhealthy weight gain. PMID:25903253

  9. Size and Shape Analysis of Error-Prone Shape Data

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiejun; Dryden, Ian L.; Huang, Xianzheng

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of comparing sizes and shapes of objects when landmark data are prone to measurement error. We show that naive implementation of ordinary Procrustes analysis that ignores measurement error can compromise inference. To account for measurement error, we propose the conditional score method for matching configurations, which guarantees consistent inference under mild model assumptions. The effects of measurement error on inference from naive Procrustes analysis and the performance of the proposed method are illustrated via simulation and application in three real data examples. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:26109745

  10. Rapamycin Extends Maximal Lifespan in Cancer-Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.; Popovich, Irina G.; Piskunova, Tatiana S.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Tyndyk, Margarita L.; Yurova, Maria N.; Antoch, Marina P.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with obesity and cancer. Calorie restriction both slows down aging and delays cancer. Evidence has emerged that the nutrient-sensing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is involved in cellular and organismal aging. Here we show that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin prevents age-related weight gain, decreases rate of aging, increases lifespan, and suppresses carcinogenesis in transgenic HER-2/neu cancer-prone mice. Rapamycin dramatically delayed tumor onset as well as decreased the number of tumors per animal and tumor size. We suggest that, by slowing down organismal aging, rapamycin delays cancer. PMID:20363920

  11. Changes in nerve- and endothelium-mediated contractile tone of the corpus cavernosum in a mouse model of pre-mature ageing.

    PubMed

    Lafuente-Sanchis, A; Triguero, D; Garcia-Pascual, A

    2014-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is very prevalent in the older population, although the ageing-related mechanisms involved in the development of ED are poorly understood. We propose that age-induced differences in nerve- and endothelium-mediated smooth muscle contractility in the corpus cavernosum (CC) could be found between a senescent-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP8) and senescent-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR1) strains. We analysed the changes in muscle tension induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) or agonist addition 'in vitro', assessing nerve density (adrenergic, cholinergic and nitrergic), the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cGMP accumulation and the distribution of interstitial cells (ICs) by immunofluorescence. We observed no change in both the nerve-dependent adrenergic excitatory contractility at physiological levels of stimulation and in the nitrergic inhibitory response in SAMP8 animals. Unlike cholinergic innervation, the density of adrenergic and nitrergic nerves increased in SAMP8 mice. In contrast, smooth muscle sensitivity to exogenous noradrenaline (NA) was slightly reduced, whereas cGMP accumulation in response to EFS and DEA/NO, and relaxations to DEA/NO and sildenafil, were not modified. No changes in the expression of eNOS and in the distribution of vimentin-positive ICs were detected in the aged animals. The ACh induced atropine-sensitive biphasic endothelium-dependent responses involved relaxation at low concentrations that turned into contractions at the highest doses. CC relaxation was mainly because of the production of NO together with some relaxant prostanoid, which did not change in SAMP8 animals. In contrast, the contractile component was considerably higher in the aged animals and it was completely inhibited by indomethacin. In conclusion, a clear imbalance towards enhanced production of contractile prostanoids from the endothelium may contribute to ED in the elderly. On the basis of these data, we

  12. Do infants have motor responses to sudden surface rotations in prone position?

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, H

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated whether sudden rotation of the support surface (platform) triggers motor responses similar to reactions to sudden free fall in infants at very early age (2 to 5 weeks). Ten infants in prone position were exposed to sudden head-down rotation (mimicking the falling phase) and head-up rotation of the platform (mimicking landing phase) of 4 degrees or 6 degrees amplitude and 35 degrees/s velocity while EMGs and kinematics were recorded from the neck, trunk, and right arm. One infant, reassessed at 13 weeks, and one adult were tested for complementary developmental information. Sudden downward acceleration of the platform, induced either during head-down rotation or during the deceleration phase of head-up rotation, indeed mimicked falling and evoked in infants two-peaked EMG responses in the neck, trunk, and arm muscles, lasting in the latter over several hundred milliseconds. The activation pattern showed similarities to the adult and 13-week-old control subjects. The results suggested that the first burst may be ascribed to cutaneous pressure changes at the body and to vestibular signals triggering a startle-like response, whereas the second burst of the pattern in the arm is likely a candidate for an early substrate of the landing response normally seen during later stages of motor development. Head control appeared to be related more to its position with respect to the orientation of the trunk rather than to space in the infants and in the adult and might be due to the experimental paradigm, in which the surface accelerated away from the body and not, as during normal falling, when the body accelerates toward the support surface.

  13. Boredom proneness: its relationship to psychological- and physical-health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sommers, J; Vodanovich, S J

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between boredom proneness and health-symptom reporting was examined. Undergraduate students (N = 200) completed the Boredom Proneness Scale and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. A multiple analysis of covariance indicated that individuals with high boredom-proneness total scores reported significantly higher ratings on all five subscales of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (Obsessive-Compulsive, Somatization, Anxiety, Interpersonal Sensitivity, and Depression). The results suggest that boredom proneness may be an important element to consider when assessing symptom reporting. Implications for determining the effects of boredom proneness on psychological- and physical-health symptoms. as well as the application in clinical settings, are discussed. PMID:10661377

  14. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  15. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  16. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  17. Predicting Fault-Prone Modules: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hao; Shu, Fengdi; Yang, Ye; Wang, Qing

    Offshore and outsourced software development is a rapidly increasing trend in global software business environment. Predicting fault-prone modules in outsourced software product may allow both parties to establish mutually satisfactory, cost-effective testing strategies and product acceptance criteria, especially in iterative transitions. In this paper, based on industrial software releases data, we conduct an empirical study to compare ten classifiers over eight sets of code attributes, and provide recommendations to aid both the client and vendor to assess the products’ quality through defect prediction. Overall, a generally high accuracy is observed, which confirms the usefulness of the metric-based classification. Furthermore, two classification techniques, Random Forest and Bayesian Belief Network, outperform the others in terms of predictive accuracy; in more detail, the former is the most cost-effective and the latter is of the lowest fault-prone module escaping rate. Our study also concludes that code metrics including size, traditional complexity, and object-oriented complexity perform fairly well.

  18. [Reactance proneness, collectivism, uniqueness, and resistance to persuasion].

    PubMed

    Imajo, Shuzo

    2002-10-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of Japanese psychological reactance scales. A total of 167 undergraduates completed a questionnaire of Therapeutic Reactance Scale (TRS), the Hong Reactance Scale (HRS), the Uniqueness Scale, and the Collectivism Scale. They also received messages involving three persuasion situations that were either high or low in terms of threat, and were asked to describe their reactions to them. The author categorized the reactions into three: acceptance, indirect resistance, and direct resistance. Reliabilities of the reactance scales were satisfactory. Their scores positively correlated with uniqueness scores, and negatively with collectivism scores. Those high on reactance proneness were less persuaded in two of the three situations. But in the third, an HRS by threat interaction was observed, indicating that only those who were high on reactance proneness under the high-threat condition showed resistance to persuasion. These results suggest that the Japanese versions of reactance scale were reliable and valid. However, the assertiveness aspect of TRS may not be appropriate for the definition of reactance. The influence of culture on psychological reactance was also discussed. PMID:12516187

  19. Coping Mechanisms for Crop Plants in Drought-prone Environments

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Drought is a major limitation to plant productivity. Various options are available for increasing water availability and sustaining growth of crop plants in drought-prone environments. Scope After a general introduction to the problems of water availability, this review focuses on a critical evaluation of recent progress in unravelling mechanisms for modifying plant growth responses to drought. Conclusions Investigations of key regulatory mechanisms integrating plant growth responses to water deficits at the whole-organism, cellular and genomic levels continue to provide novel and exiting research findings. For example, recent reports contradict the widespread conception that root-derived abscisic acid is necessarily involved in signalling for stomatal and shoot-growth responses to soil water deficits. The findings bring into question the theoretical basis for alternate-side root-irrigation techniques. Similarly, recent reports indicate that increased ABA production or increased aquaporin expression did not lead to improved drought resistance. Other reports have concerned key genes and proteins involved in regulation of flowering (FT), vegetative growth (DELLA), leaf senescence (IPT) and desiccation tolerance (LEA). Introgression of such genes, with suitable promoters, can greatly impact on whole-plant responses to drought. Further developments could facilitate the introduction by breeders of new crop varieties with growth physiologies tailored to improved field performance under drought. Parallel efforts to encourage the introduction of supplementary irrigation with water made available by improved conservation measures and by sea- or brackish-water desalination, will probably provide comprehensive solutions to coping with drought-prone environments. PMID:18252764

  20. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  1. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  2. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  3. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. Silica-Triggered Autoimmunity in Lupus-Prone Mice Blocked by Docosahexaenoic Acid Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg I.; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lock, Adam L.; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (cSiO2, quartz) is etiologically linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) and other human autoimmune diseases (ADs). In the female NZBWF1 mouse, a widely used animal model that is genetically prone to lupus, short-term repeated intranasal exposure to cSiO2 triggers premature initiation of autoimmune responses in the lungs and kidneys. In contrast to cSiO2’s triggering action, consumption of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) prevents spontaneous onset of autoimmunity in this mouse strain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of DHA will prevent cSiO2-triggered autoimmunity in the female NZBWF1 mouse. Mice (6 wk old) were fed isocaloric AIN-93G diets containing 0.0, 0.4, 1.2 or 2.4% DHA. Two wk after initiating feeding, mice were intranasally instilled with 1 mg cSiO2 once per wk for 4 wk and maintained on experimental diets for an additional 12 wk. Mice were then sacrificed and the lung, blood and kidney assessed for markers of inflammation and autoimmunity. DHA was incorporated into lung, red blood cells and kidney from diet in a concentration-dependent fashion. Dietary DHA dose-dependently suppressed cSiO2-triggered perivascular leukocyte infiltration and ectopic lymphoid tissue neogenesis in the lung. DHA consumption concurrently inhibited cSiO2–driven elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, B-cell proliferation factors, IgG and anti-dsDNA Ig in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. DHA’s prophylactic effects were further mirrored in reduced proteinuria and glomerulonephritis in cSiO2-treated mice. Taken together, these results reveal that DHA consumption suppresses cSiO2 triggering of autoimmunity in female NZBWF1 mice as manifested in the lung, blood and kidney. Our findings provide novel insight into how dietary modulation of the lipidome might be used to prevent or delay triggering of AD by cSiO2. Such knowledge opens the

  6. Silica-Triggered Autoimmunity in Lupus-Prone Mice Blocked by Docosahexaenoic Acid Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bates, Melissa A; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg I; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lock, Adam L; Harkema, Jack R; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (cSiO2, quartz) is etiologically linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) and other human autoimmune diseases (ADs). In the female NZBWF1 mouse, a widely used animal model that is genetically prone to lupus, short-term repeated intranasal exposure to cSiO2 triggers premature initiation of autoimmune responses in the lungs and kidneys. In contrast to cSiO2's triggering action, consumption of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) prevents spontaneous onset of autoimmunity in this mouse strain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of DHA will prevent cSiO2-triggered autoimmunity in the female NZBWF1 mouse. Mice (6 wk old) were fed isocaloric AIN-93G diets containing 0.0, 0.4, 1.2 or 2.4% DHA. Two wk after initiating feeding, mice were intranasally instilled with 1 mg cSiO2 once per wk for 4 wk and maintained on experimental diets for an additional 12 wk. Mice were then sacrificed and the lung, blood and kidney assessed for markers of inflammation and autoimmunity. DHA was incorporated into lung, red blood cells and kidney from diet in a concentration-dependent fashion. Dietary DHA dose-dependently suppressed cSiO2-triggered perivascular leukocyte infiltration and ectopic lymphoid tissue neogenesis in the lung. DHA consumption concurrently inhibited cSiO2-driven elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, B-cell proliferation factors, IgG and anti-dsDNA Ig in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. DHA's prophylactic effects were further mirrored in reduced proteinuria and glomerulonephritis in cSiO2-treated mice. Taken together, these results reveal that DHA consumption suppresses cSiO2 triggering of autoimmunity in female NZBWF1 mice as manifested in the lung, blood and kidney. Our findings provide novel insight into how dietary modulation of the lipidome might be used to prevent or delay triggering of AD by cSiO2. Such knowledge opens the possibility

  7. Jerky driving--An indicator of accident proneness?

    PubMed

    Bagdadi, Omar; Várhelyi, András

    2011-07-01

    This study uses continuously logged driving data from 166 private cars to derive the level of jerks caused by the drivers during everyday driving. The number of critical jerks found in the data is analysed and compared with the self-reported accident involvement of the drivers. The results show that the expected number of accidents for a driver increases with the number of critical jerks caused by the driver. Jerk analyses make it possible to identify safety critical driving behaviour or "accident prone" drivers. They also facilitate the development of safety measures such as active safety systems or advanced driver assistance systems, ADAS, which could be adapted for specific groups of drivers or specific risky driving behaviour.

  8. Error-prone rolling circle amplification greatly simplifies random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Ryota; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Hayashi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple and easy protocol to introduce random mutations into plasmid DNA: error-prone rolling circle amplification. A template plasmid is amplified via rolling circle amplification with decreased fidelity in the presence of MnCl2 and is used to transform a host strain resulting in a mutant library with several random point mutations per kilobase through the entire plasmid. The primary advantage of this method is its simplicity. This protocol does not require the design of specific primers or thermal cycling. The reaction mixture can be used for direct transformation of a host strain. This method allows rapid preparation of randomly mutated plasmid libraries, enabling wider application of random mutagenesis.

  9. Error-Prone Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kasey; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Preserving the integrity of the DNA double helix is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability. Therefore, DNA double-strand breaks represent a serious threat to cells. In this review, we describe the two major strategies used to repair double strand breaks: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination, emphasizing the mutagenic aspects of each. We focus on emerging evidence that homologous recombination, long thought to be an error-free repair process, can in fact be highly mutagenic, particularly in contexts requiring large amounts of DNA synthesis. Recent investigations have begun to illuminate the molecular mechanisms by which error-prone double-strand break repair can create major genomic changes, such as translocations and complex chromosome rearrangements. We highlight these studies and discuss proposed models that may explain some of the more extreme genetic changes observed in human cancers and congenital disorders.

  10. Type A coronary-prone behavior pattern and social facilitation.

    PubMed

    Gastorf, J W; Suls, J; Sanders, G S

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the task performance of Type A coronary-prone individuals relative to Type B's in three types of social situations: alone, with a similarly performing coactor, or with a better-performing coactor. The results indicate that Type A's performance on a simple task was facilitated by the presence of either a similar or superior coactor, whereas the presence of coactors impaired performance on a complex task. Type B's showed weak and nonsignificant facilitation effects that occurred only in the presence of similar coactors. The results are discussed in terms of the Type A's concern about evaluation, achievement, and social comparison, and Sanders and Baron's distraction-conflict theory of social facilitation. PMID:7381682

  11. Quantitative electroencephalography as a biomarker for proneness toward developing psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fuggetta, Giorgio; Bennett, Matthew A; Duke, Philip A; Young, Andrew M J

    2014-03-01

    The fully dimensional approach to the relationship between schizotypal personality traits and schizophrenia describes schizotypy as a continuum throughout the general population ranging from low schizotypy (LoS) and psychological health to high schizotypy (HiS) and psychosis-proneness. However, no biological markers have yet been discovered that reliably quantify an individual's degree of schizotypy and/or psychosis. This study aimed to evaluate quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) measures of power spectra as potential biomarkers of the proneness towards the development of psychosis in schizotypal individuals. The resting-state oscillatory brain dynamics under eyes-closed condition from 16 LoS and 16 HiS individuals were analysed for qEEG measures of background rhythm frequency, relative power in δ, θ, low-α, high-α, low-β, high-β and low-γ frequency bands, and the high-temporal cross-correlation of power spectra between low- and high-frequency bands observed by averaging signals from whole-head EEG electrodes. HiS individuals at rest locked the thalamocortical loop in the low-α band at a lower-frequency oscillation and displayed an abnormally high level of neural synchronisation. In addition, the high-α band was found to be positively correlated with both the high-β and low-γ bands unlike LoS individuals, indicating widespread thalamocortical resonance in HiS individuals. The increase of regional alpha oscillations in HiS individuals suggests abnormal high-level attention, whereas the pattern of correlation between frequency bands resembles the thalamocortical dysrhythmia phenomenon which underlies the symptomatology of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. These qEEG biomarkers may aid clinicians in identifying HiS individuals with a high-risk of developing psychosis.

  12. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  13. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  14. Mice deficient in Rbm38, a target of the p53 family, are susceptible to accelerated aging and spontaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Xu, Enshun; Ren, Cong; Yan, Wensheng; Zhang, Min; Chen, Mingyi; Cardiff, Robert D.; Imai, Denise M.; Wisner, Erik; Chen, Xinbin

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding motif protein 38 (Rbm38), also called RNPC1 [RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 1], is a target of the p53 family and modulates p53 expression via mRNA translation. To investigate the biological function of Rbm38 in vivo, we generated an Rbm38-null mouse model. We showed that mice deficient in Rbm38 exhibit signs of accelerated aging and are prone to hematopoietic defects and spontaneous tumors. To determine the biological significance of the p53-Rbm38 loop, we showed that Rbm38 deficiency enhances accumulation of p53 induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and sensitizes mice to IR-induced lethality in a p53-dependent manner. Most importantly, Rbm38 deficiency markedly decreases the tumor penetrance in mice heterozygous for p53 via enhanced p53 expression. Interestingly, we found that Rbm38 deficiency shortens the life span of, and promotes lymphomagenesis in, mice deficient in p53. These results provide genetic evidence that Rbm38 is necessary for normal hematopoiesis and for suppressing accelerated aging and tumorigenesis. Thus, the p53-Rbm38 axis might be explored for extending longevity and for tumor suppression. PMID:25512531

  15. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  16. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  17. Cross-Cultural Differences and Similarities in Proneness to Shame: An Adaptationist and Ecological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Kosuke; Delton, Andrew W.; Sato, Kosuke; Robertson, Theresa; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2013-01-01

    People vary in how easily they feel ashamed, that is, in their shame proneness. According to the information threat theory of shame, variation in shame proneness should, in part, be regulated by features of a person’s social ecology. On this view, shame is an emotion program that evolved to mitigate the likelihood or costs of reputation-damaging information spreading to others. In social environments where there are fewer possibilities to form new relationships (i.e., low relational mobility), there are higher costs to damaging or losing existing ones. Therefore, shame proneness toward current relationship partners should increase as perceived relational mobility decreases. In contrast, individuals with whom one has little or no relationship history are easy to replace, and so shame-proneness towards them should not be modulated by relational mobility. We tested these predictions cross-culturally by measuring relational mobility and shame proneness towards friends and strangers in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Japanese subjects were more shame-prone than their British and American counterparts. Critically, lower relational mobility was associated with greater shame proneness towards friends (but not strangers), and this relationship partially mediated the cultural differences in shame proneness. Shame proneness appears tailored to respond to relevant features of one’s social ecology. PMID:22947644

  18. Procrastination and suicide proneness: A moderated-mediation model for cognitive schemas and gender.

    PubMed

    Klibert, Jeffrey; LeLeux-LaBarge, Kayla; Tarantino, Nicholas; Yancey, Thresa; Lamis, Dorian A

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect paths between procrastination and suicide proneness while considering gender differences. Participants included 547 undergraduates from a southeastern university. Procrastination was positively related to suicide proneness for both genders, although this relation was stronger for women. Moderated-mediation analyses with bootstrapping highlighted insufficient self-control schemas as a mediator in the relation between procrastination and suicide proneness. However, indirect pathways did not vary by gender. Results represent an extension of the Procrastination-Health Model by highlighting the contribution of cognitive factors in explaining the relation between procrastination and suicide proneness. PMID:26766597

  19. Procrastination and suicide proneness: A moderated-mediation model for cognitive schemas and gender.

    PubMed

    Klibert, Jeffrey; LeLeux-LaBarge, Kayla; Tarantino, Nicholas; Yancey, Thresa; Lamis, Dorian A

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect paths between procrastination and suicide proneness while considering gender differences. Participants included 547 undergraduates from a southeastern university. Procrastination was positively related to suicide proneness for both genders, although this relation was stronger for women. Moderated-mediation analyses with bootstrapping highlighted insufficient self-control schemas as a mediator in the relation between procrastination and suicide proneness. However, indirect pathways did not vary by gender. Results represent an extension of the Procrastination-Health Model by highlighting the contribution of cognitive factors in explaining the relation between procrastination and suicide proneness.

  20. Drinking hydrogen water ameliorated cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Inoue, Tota; Yamashita, Takenori; Ishida, Torao; Kang, Ki-Mun; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to have neuron protective effects due to its antioxidant properties, but the effects of hydrogen on cognitive impairment due to senescence-related brain alterations and the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated the efficacies of drinking hydrogen water for prevention of spatial memory decline and age-related brain alterations using senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits early aging syndromes including declining learning ability and memory. However, treatment with hydrogen water for 30 days prevented age-related declines in cognitive ability seen in SAMP8 as assessed by a water maze test and was associated with increased brain serotonin levels and elevated serum antioxidant activity. In addition, drinking hydrogen water for 18 weeks inhibited neurodegeneration in hippocampus, while marked loss of neurons was noted in control, aged brains of mice receiving regular water. On the basis of our results, hydrogen water merits further investigation for possible therapeutic/preventative use for age-related cognitive disorders.

  1. Soleus muscles of SAMP8 mice provide an accelerated model of skeletal muscle senescence.

    PubMed

    Derave, Wim; Eijnde, Bert O; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Animal models are valuable research tools towards effective prevention of sarcopenia and towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging. We investigated whether senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains provide valid models for skeletal muscle aging studies. Male senescence-prone mice SAMP6 and SAMP8 were studied at age 10, 25 and 60 weeks and compared with senescence-resistant strain, SAMR1. Soleus and EDL muscles were tested for in vitro contractile properties, phosphocreatine content, muscle mass and fiber-type distribution. Declined muscle mass and contractility were observed at 60 weeks, the differences being more pronounced in SAMP8 than SAMP6 and more pronounced in soleus than EDL. Likewise, age-related decreases in muscle phosphocreatine content and type-II fiber size were most pronounced in SAMP8 soleus. In conclusion, typical features of muscular senescence occur at relatively young age in SAMP8 and nearly twice as fast as compared with other models. We suggest that soleus muscles of SAMP8 mice provide a cost-effective model for muscular aging studies. PMID:16023814

  2. Drinking hydrogen water ameliorated cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Inoue, Tota; Yamashita, Takenori; Ishida, Torao; Kang, Ki-Mun; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to have neuron protective effects due to its antioxidant properties, but the effects of hydrogen on cognitive impairment due to senescence-related brain alterations and the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated the efficacies of drinking hydrogen water for prevention of spatial memory decline and age-related brain alterations using senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits early aging syndromes including declining learning ability and memory. However, treatment with hydrogen water for 30 days prevented age-related declines in cognitive ability seen in SAMP8 as assessed by a water maze test and was associated with increased brain serotonin levels and elevated serum antioxidant activity. In addition, drinking hydrogen water for 18 weeks inhibited neurodegeneration in hippocampus, while marked loss of neurons was noted in control, aged brains of mice receiving regular water. On the basis of our results, hydrogen water merits further investigation for possible therapeutic/preventative use for age-related cognitive disorders. PMID:20490324

  3. Development of Korean Smartphone addiction proneness scale for youth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongil; Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Juyoung; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Chung, Yeoju

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (SAPS) based on the existing internet and cellular phone addiction scales. For the development of this scale, 29 items (1.5 times the final number of items) were initially selected as preliminary items, based on the previous studies on internet/phone addiction as well as the clinical experience of involved experts. The preliminary scale was administered to a nationally representative sample of 795 students in elementary, middle, and high schools across South Korea. Then, final 15 items were selected according to the reliability test results. The final scale consisted of four subdomains: (1) disturbance of adaptive functions, (2) virtual life orientation, (3) withdrawal, and (4) tolerance. The final scale indicated a high reliability with Cronbach's α of .880. Support for the scale's criterion validity has been demonstrated by its relationship to the internet addiction scale, KS-II (r  =  .49). For the analysis of construct validity, we tested the Structural Equation Model. The results showed the four-factor structure to be valid (NFI  =  .943, TLI  =  .902, CFI  =  .902, RMSEA  =  .034). Smartphone addiction is gaining a greater spotlight as possibly a new form of addiction along with internet addiction. The SAPS appears to be a reliable and valid diagnostic scale for screening adolescents who may be at risk of smartphone addiction. Further implications and limitations are discussed. PMID:24848006

  4. Neurobiological correlates of theory of mind in psychosis proneness.

    PubMed

    Modinos, Gemma; Renken, Remco; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, André

    2010-11-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) refers to the capacity to infer one's own and other persons' mental states. ToM abilities are compromised in schizophrenia, in association with dysfunctional activity in predominantly prefrontal brain regions. Prior behavioral studies have also suggested ToM deficits in healthy individuals with psychosis proneness (PP), although no study to date had investigated the associated neural mechanisms in such a sample. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain activation of subjects with high versus low scores on positive-dimension PP and a ToM task. The ToM task involved first and second order attribution of cognitive and affective mental states to a cartoon character based on verbal and eye-gaze cues. No between-group differences were found on behavioral performance. fMRI analyses revealed a group interaction in anterior prefrontal cortex (BA 10), with the high PP group showing significantly more activity thereof, relative to the low PP, during second order mentalizing than during first order mentalizing. Further between-group differences were observed in dorsomedial and lateral prefrontal regions (BA 46/9), with the high PP group also showing greater activation during second order mentalizing. These results suggest that subjects with positive-dimension PP require more activation of prefrontal areas to adequately mentalize. Differences in the neural mechanisms underlying ToM might be associated with vulnerability to psychosis. PMID:20888847

  5. Hepatitis C virus infection among transmission-prone medical personnel.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, H L; Appelman, P; Frijstein, G

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected physicians have been reported to infect some of their patients during exposure-prone procedures (EPPs). There is no European consensus on the policy for the prevention of this transmission. To help define an appropriate preventive policy, we determined the prevalence of HCV infection among EPP-performing medical personnel in the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The prevalence of HCV infection was studied among 729 EPP-performing health care workers. Serum samples, stored after post-hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination testing in the years 2000-2009, were tested for HCV antibodies. Repeat reactive samples were confirmed by immunoblot assay and the detection of HCV RNA. The average age of the 729 health care workers was 39 years (range 18-66), suggesting a considerable cumulative occupational exposure to the blood. Nevertheless, only one of the 729 workers (0.14%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: <0.01% to 0.85%) was tested and confirmed to be positive for anti-HCV and positive for HCV RNA, which is comparable to the prevalence of HCV among Amsterdam citizens. Against this background, for the protection of personnel and patients, careful follow-up after needlestick injuries may be sufficient. If a zero-risk approach is desirable and costs are less relevant, the recurrent screening of EPP-performing personnel for HCV is superior to the follow-up of reported occupational exposures.

  6. Development of Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale for Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongil; Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Juyoung; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Chung, Yeoju

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (SAPS) based on the existing internet and cellular phone addiction scales. For the development of this scale, 29 items (1.5 times the final number of items) were initially selected as preliminary items, based on the previous studies on internet/phone addiction as well as the clinical experience of involved experts. The preliminary scale was administered to a nationally representative sample of 795 students in elementary, middle, and high schools across South Korea. Then, final 15 items were selected according to the reliability test results. The final scale consisted of four subdomains: (1) disturbance of adaptive functions, (2) virtual life orientation, (3) withdrawal, and (4) tolerance. The final scale indicated a high reliability with Cronbach's α of .880. Support for the scale's criterion validity has been demonstrated by its relationship to the internet addiction scale, KS-II (r  =  .49). For the analysis of construct validity, we tested the Structural Equation Model. The results showed the four-factor structure to be valid (NFI  =  .943, TLI  =  .902, CFI  =  .902, RMSEA  =  .034). Smartphone addiction is gaining a greater spotlight as possibly a new form of addiction along with internet addiction. The SAPS appears to be a reliable and valid diagnostic scale for screening adolescents who may be at risk of smartphone addiction. Further implications and limitations are discussed. PMID:24848006

  7. Auditory and vestibular pathology of seizure-prone chicks.

    PubMed

    Beck, M M; Kuenzel, W J; Switzer, R C

    1983-01-31

    The mutant sex-linked lethal recessive px (paroxysmal) gene, expressed in White Leghorn chicks (Gallus domesticus) causes seizures beginning on approximately day 8 post-hatching. Seizures are spontaneous and inducible by auditory but not by photic stimulation. Prior to seizure onset px chicks are indistinguishable from non-px siblings. With seizure onset is a decrease in food intake which causes deterioration and death by 4-10 weeks of age. In a preliminary histological study conducted on 22-day-old seizure-prone chicks, brains were perfused and sections treated according to a modified cupric-silver staining technique. Nuclei and fiber tracts of px auditory and vestibular systems were extensively degenerated; control brains showed essentially no degeneration. A second experiment was conducted with preseizure chicks to determine whether and to what extent degeneration occurs prior to seizure onset. Deep nuclei of px cerebellum appeared to be the first seriously affected (5 days of age). Extent of degeneration progressed steadily over time through 20 days of age, by which time all components of the two sensory systems were maximally affected. Ambient noise did not affect onset or extent of degeneration, nor did it affect onset of seizures. PMID:6824948

  8. Epidermal injury promotes nephritis flare in lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kaitlyn L; Reed, Tamra J; Wolf, Sonya J; Lowe, Lori; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Kahlenberg, J Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is clinically characterized by episodes of flare and remission. In patients, cutaneous exposure to ultraviolet light has been proposed as a flare trigger. However, induction of flare secondary to cutaneous exposure has been difficult to emulate in many murine lupus models. Here, we describe a system in which epidermal injury is able to trigger the development of a lupus nephritis flare in New Zealand Mixed (NZM) 2328 mice. 20-week old NZM2328 female mice underwent removal of the stratum corneum via duct tape, which resulted in rapid onset of proteinuria and death when compared to sham-stripped littermate control NZM2328 mice. This was coupled with a drop in serum C3 concentrations and dsDNA antibody levels and enhanced immune complex deposition in the glomeruli. Recruitment of CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages and CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(low) dendritic cells was noted prior to the onset of proteinuria in injured mice. Transcriptional changes within the kidney suggest a burst of type I IFN-mediated and inflammatory signaling which is followed by upregulation of CXCL13 following epidermal injury. Thus, we propose that tape stripping of lupus-prone NZM2328 mice is a novel model of lupus flare induction that will allow for the study of the role of cutaneous inflammation in lupus development and how crosstalk between dermal and systemic immune systems can lead to lupus flare.

  9. A prone technique for treatment of the breast, supraclavicular and axillary nodes.

    PubMed

    Mason, Nicole; Macfarlane, Deborah; Guidi, Robyn; Owen, Rebecca; Poulsen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Radiation therapy to women with large pendulous breasts presents dosimetric challenges when the whole breast (WB) and supraclavicular and axillary (SCF + AX) nodes need to be encompassed. The aim of this case study was to demonstrate the feasibility of planning and treating a pendulous breasted patient in the prone position. Computerised tomography (CT) images were acquired of the patient in both the prone and supine positions. A Perspex plate was added to the CDR Systems Inc. (Calgary, Canada) prone breastboard to minimize SCF + AX contour variations. Dosimetry was performed on both CT scans and the resultant treatment plans were evaluated for conformity, homogeneity, dose to the lung and maximum doses to the spinal cord (SC) and irradiated volume. The daily set-up in the prone position was monitored for stability and reproducibility. The patient completed her treatment course in the prone position. Minimal daily interventions were required to ensure the position was reproduced. Grade 3 skin toxicity was recorded in the SCF + AX region where the Perspex plate was added to the prone positioning device. There was minimal difference in dosimetry between prone and supine plans in the SCF + AX region. The prone WB plan showed improved homogeneity (prone 0.15; supine 0.22) and conformity (prone 0.90; supine 0.77). A simple addition to the breastboard has enabled a pendulous breasted woman with SC + AX involvement to be treated in the prone position. Set-up of this technique is achievable on a daily basis with minimal impact on workflow. It is a feasible alternative to supine treatment for this patient group.

  10. Critical Differences between the Type-A Prone and Type-A Personalitites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1984-01-01

    Type-A Prone and Type-A personalities were assessed on the basis of the Cassel Type-A Personality Assessment Profile. Statistical data analysis indicated differences in positive lifestyle, blood pressure, and self-control and no differences in negative lifestyle, pulse rate, or peripheral temperature. Type-A Prone and Type-A norm profiles were…

  11. The Relationship of Stress Arousal and Stress Prone Personality Traits to Menstrual Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, David C.

    The various relationships of stress arousal and stress-prone personality traits to menstrual distress were investigated in order to quantify psychophysiological arousal differences between high and low menstrual distress symptom reporters and examine differences in stress-prone personality traits between high and low menstrual distress symptom…

  12. 44 CFR 60.22 - Planning considerations for flood-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flood-prone areas. 60.22 Section 60.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Additional Considerations in Managing Flood-Prone, Mudslide...

  13. 44 CFR 60.22 - Planning considerations for flood-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... flood-prone areas. 60.22 Section 60.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Additional Considerations in Managing Flood-Prone, Mudslide...

  14. 44 CFR 60.22 - Planning considerations for flood-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... flood-prone areas. 60.22 Section 60.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Additional Considerations in Managing Flood-Prone, Mudslide...

  15. 44 CFR 60.22 - Planning considerations for flood-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... flood-prone areas. 60.22 Section 60.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Additional Considerations in Managing Flood-Prone, Mudslide...

  16. 44 CFR 60.23 - Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.23 Planning considerations for... aggravation; (e) Coordination of land use, sewer, and drainage regulations and ordinances with fire prevention, flood plain, mudslide (i.e., mudflow), soil, land, and water regulation in neighboring communities;...

  17. 44 CFR 60.23 - Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.23 Planning considerations for... aggravation; (e) Coordination of land use, sewer, and drainage regulations and ordinances with fire prevention, flood plain, mudslide (i.e., mudflow), soil, land, and water regulation in neighboring communities;...

  18. 44 CFR 60.23 - Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.23 Planning considerations for... aggravation; (e) Coordination of land use, sewer, and drainage regulations and ordinances with fire prevention, flood plain, mudslide (i.e., mudflow), soil, land, and water regulation in neighboring communities;...

  19. 44 CFR 60.23 - Planning considerations for mudslide (i.e., mudflow)-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.23 Planning considerations for... aggravation; (e) Coordination of land use, sewer, and drainage regulations and ordinances with fire prevention, flood plain, mudslide (i.e., mudflow), soil, land, and water regulation in neighboring communities;...

  20. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for..., and with planning at the level of neighboring communities; (d) Preventive action in E zones, including... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Planning considerations...

  1. Body Image, Self-Esteem, and Depression-Proneness: Closing the Gender Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaulay, Marci; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines gender differences in body image and its relationship to depression-proneness and self-esteem. Findings indicate a preoccupation with body weight and appearance for both men and women, and a relationship between body satisfaction and depression-proneness. (FMW)

  2. Ocular fixation using a baseball catcher's mask for postoperative prone positioning.

    PubMed

    Kobari, Y; Tokoi, Y; Hara, T; Hara, T

    1993-01-01

    1. The optimal ocular position after vitreoretinal surgery with intravitreous gas tamponade is with the axis of the eye pointed downward. 2. Careless prone fixation may cause accidents of eyeball depression. 3. To help patients keep the proper prone facial and ocular positions, a modified catcher's mask was developed for use as a facial support.

  3. Suicide Proneness in College Students: Relationships with Gender, Procrastination, and Achievement Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klibert, Jeffrey; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Luna, Amy; Robichaux, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between 2 academic dispositions (i.e., procrastination and achievement motivation) and 2 indices of suicidal proneness in college women and men. The degree these 2 academic dispositions could predict unique variance in suicide proneness scores, above and beyond the influence of depression and self-esteem was…

  4. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  5. A Comprehensive Review of Prone Position in ARDS.

    PubMed

    Kallet, Richard H

    2015-11-01

    Prone position (PP) has been used since the 1970s to treat severe hypoxemia in patients with ARDS because of its effectiveness at improving gas exchange. Compared with the supine position (SP), placing patients in PP effects a more even tidal volume distribution, in part, by reversing the vertical pleural pressure gradient, which becomes more negative in the dorsal regions. PP also improves resting lung volume in the dorsocaudal regions by reducing the superimposed pressure of both the heart and the abdomen. In contrast, pulmonary perfusion remains preferentially distributed to the dorsal lung regions, thus improving overall alveolar ventilation/perfusion relationships. Moreover, the larger tissue mass suspended from a wider dorsal chest wall effects a more homogeneous distribution of pleural pressures throughout the lung that reduces abnormal strain and stress development. This is believed to ameliorate the severity or development of ventilator-induced lung injury and may partly explain why PP reduces mortality in severe ARDS. Over 40 years of clinical trials have consistently reported improved oxygenation in approximately 70% of subjects with ARDS. Early initiation of PP is more likely to improve oxygenation than initiation during the subacute phase. Maximal oxygenation improvement occurs over a wide time frame ranging from several hours to several days. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials suggest that PP provides a survival advantage only in patients with relatively severe ARDS (PaO2 /FIO2 < 150 mm Hg). Moreover, survival is enhanced when patients are managed with a smaller tidal volume (≤ 8 mL/kg), higher PEEP (10-13 cm H2O), and longer duration of PP sessions (> 10-12 h/session). Combining adjunctive therapies (high PEEP, recruitment maneuvers, and inhaled vasodilators) with PP has an additive effect in improving oxygenation and may be particularly helpful in stabilizing gas exchange in very severe ARDS.

  6. Lifespan and reproduction in brain-specific miR-29-knockdown mouse.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toru; Tanabe, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-18

    The microRNA miR-29 is widely distributed and highly expressed in adult mouse brain during the mouse's lifetime. We recently created conditional mutant mice whose miR-29 was brain-specifically knocked down through overexpression of an antisense RNA transgene against miR-29. To explore a role for brain miR-29 in maximizing organismal fitness, we assessed somatic growth, reproduction, and lifespan in the miR-29-knockdown (KD) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. The KD mice were developmentally indistinguishable from WT mice with respect to gross morphology and physical activity. Fertility testing revealed that KD males were subfertile, whereas KD females were hyperfertile, only in terms of reproductive success, when compared to their gender-matched WT correspondents. Another phenotypic difference between KD and WT animals appeared in their lifespan data; KD males displayed an overall increasing tendency in post-reproductive survival relative to WT males. In contrast, KD females were prone to shorter lifespans than WT females. These results clarify that brain-targeted miR-29 knockdown affects both lifespan and reproduction in a gender-dependent manner, and moreover that the reciprocal responsiveness to the miR-29 knockdown between these two phenotypes in both genders closely follow life-course models based on the classical trade-off prediction wherein elaborate early-life energetic investment in reproduction entails accelerated late-life declines in survival, and vice versa. Thus, this study identified miR-29 as the first mammalian miRNA that is directly implicated in the lifetime trade-off between the two major fitness components, lifespan and reproduction.

  7. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3XTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function. Increasing evidence indicates that the production and accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ), particularly soluble Aβ oligomers, is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice, and senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3XTg-AD) that progressively develops amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive impairments. Treatment with nobiletin (30 mg/kg) for 3 months reversed the impairment of short-term memory and recognition memory in 3XTg-AD mice. Our ELISA analysis also showed that nobiletin reduced the levels of soluble Aβ1-40 in the brain of 3XTg-AD mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced ROS levels in the hippocampus of 3XTg-AD as well as wild-type mice. These results suggest that this natural compound has potential to become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD.

  8. Electroacupuncture Treatment Improves Learning-Memory Ability and Brain Glucose Metabolism in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Using Morris Water Maze and Micro-PET

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Gao, Kai; Zhou, Yuan; Xu, Anping; Shi, Suhua; Liu, Gang; Li, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes progressive hippocampus dysfunctions leading to the impairment of learning and memory ability and low level of uptake rate of glucose in hippocampus. What is more, there is no effective treatment for AD. In this study, we evaluated the beneficial and protective effects of electroacupuncture in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8). Method. In the electroacupuncture paradigm, electroacupuncture treatment was performed once a day for 15 days on 7.5-month-old SAMP8 male mice. In the normal control paradigm and AD control group, 7.5-month-old SAMR1 male mice and SAMP8 male mice were grabbed and bandaged while electroacupuncture group therapy, in order to ensure the same treatment conditions, once a day, 15 days. Results. From the Morris water maze (MWM) test, we found that the treatment of electroacupuncture can improve the spatial learning and memory ability of SAMP8 mouse, and from the micro-PET test, we proved that after the electroacupuncture treatment the level of uptake rate of glucose in hippocampus was higher than normal control group. Conclusion. These results suggest that the treatment of electroacupuncture may provide a viable treatment option for AD. PMID:25821477

  9. Caffeoylquinic acid-rich purple sweet potato extract, with or without anthocyanin, imparts neuroprotection and contributes to the improvement of spatial learning and memory of SAMP8 mouse.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Han, Junkyu; Shimozono, Hidetoshi; Villareal, Myra O; Isoda, Hiroko

    2013-05-29

    The effects of caffeoylquinic acid (CQA)-rich purple sweet potato (PSP) extract, with (PSPEa) or without (PSPEb) anthocyanin, on the improvement of spatial learning and memory of senescence-accelerated prone mouse strain (SAMP) 8 was determined. SAMP8 was treated with 20 mg/kg/day of PSPEa or PSPEb for 30 days. The effect on spatial learning and memory and the molecular mechanism of this effect were determined in vivo (SAMP8) and in vitro (SH-SY5Y cells). PSPEa or PSPEb reduced the escape latency time of SAMP8 by 17.0 ± 8.0 and 14.2 ± 5.8 s (P < 0.01), respectively. PSPEa administration induced an overexpression of antioxidant-, energy metabolism-, and neuronal plasticity-related proteins in the brain of SAMP8. Additionally, PSPEa and PSPEb increased the cell viability by 141.6 and 133% as compared to Aβ1-42-treated cells. These findings suggest that PSP rich in CQA derivatives with or without anthocyanidine had a neuroprotective effect on mouse brain and can improve the spatial learning and memory of SAMP8.

  10. Caffeoylquinic acid-rich purple sweet potato extract, with or without anthocyanin, imparts neuroprotection and contributes to the improvement of spatial learning and memory of SAMP8 mouse.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Han, Junkyu; Shimozono, Hidetoshi; Villareal, Myra O; Isoda, Hiroko

    2013-05-29

    The effects of caffeoylquinic acid (CQA)-rich purple sweet potato (PSP) extract, with (PSPEa) or without (PSPEb) anthocyanin, on the improvement of spatial learning and memory of senescence-accelerated prone mouse strain (SAMP) 8 was determined. SAMP8 was treated with 20 mg/kg/day of PSPEa or PSPEb for 30 days. The effect on spatial learning and memory and the molecular mechanism of this effect were determined in vivo (SAMP8) and in vitro (SH-SY5Y cells). PSPEa or PSPEb reduced the escape latency time of SAMP8 by 17.0 ± 8.0 and 14.2 ± 5.8 s (P < 0.01), respectively. PSPEa administration induced an overexpression of antioxidant-, energy metabolism-, and neuronal plasticity-related proteins in the brain of SAMP8. Additionally, PSPEa and PSPEb increased the cell viability by 141.6 and 133% as compared to Aβ1-42-treated cells. These findings suggest that PSP rich in CQA derivatives with or without anthocyanidine had a neuroprotective effect on mouse brain and can improve the spatial learning and memory of SAMP8. PMID:23647122

  11. [Effect of epitalon and melatonin on life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in senescence accelerated mice (SAM)].

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V N; Popovich, I G; Zabezhinskiĭ, M A; Rozenfel'd, S V; Khavinson, V Kh; Semenchenko, A V; Iashin, A I

    2005-01-01

    Female senescence accelerated mice SAMP-1. (prone) and SAMR-1 (resistant) were exposed 5 times a week monthly to melatonin (with drinking water 20mg/ml during the night hours) or to s.c. injections of epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) at a single dose 1mkg/mouse. Control mice were intact or exposed to injection of 0.1 ml normal saline. The body weight and temperature, food consumption, estrous function were monitored regularly. The life span and tumor incidence were evaluated as well. As age advanced, the weight increased whereas food consumption and body temperature did not change. There was no significant substrain difference in these parameters. Exposure to melatonin or epitalon also failed to influence those indices. As age advanced, the incidence of irregular estrous cycles increased both in SAMP-1 and SAMR-1, whereas the treatment with both melatonin and epitalon prevented such disturbances. SAMP-1 revealed some features of accelerated aging as compared to SAMR-1. The mean life span of the 10% of the last survivors among treated SAMP-1 was shorter than that of SAMR-1, aging rate increased and mortality doubling time decreased. There was a direct correlation between body mass of the two substrains at the age of 3 and 12 months matched by body mass increase and longer life span. Melatonin or epitalon treatment was followed by longer mean and maximum survival in the 10% of the last survivors among SAMP-1. Melatonin involved decreased aging rate and increased mortality doubling time. Malignant lymphomas predominated in SAM without any significant difference in frequency between the substrains. While melatonin failed to influence tumor incidence or term of detection in SAMP-1, neither did epitalon affect frequency. However, it was followed by longer survival in tumor-free animals. No link between melatonin or epitalon treatment, on the one hand, and carcinogenesis, on the other, was reported in SAMR-1. PMID:15909815

  12. Compression of the lungs by the heart in supine, side-lying, semi-prone positions

    PubMed Central

    Mase, Kyoushi; Noguchi, Tisa; Tagami, Miki; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide; Monma, Masahiko; Nozoe, Masafumi; Takashima, Sachie; Kawakatsu, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Clarification of the differences in the compression volume of the lungs by the heart (CVLH) between postures may facilitate the selection of optimal postures in respiratory care. Determining CVLH in the supine, semi-prone (Sim’s position), and side-lying positions was the aim of this study. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy volunteers (six males, two females; mean age, 29.0 ± 9.2 years) were enrolled in the study. Measurements were performed in the supine, right and left semi-prone, and right and left side-lying positions. semi-prone position was inclined 45° ventrally from the side-lying position. A 1.5-T system with a fast advanced spin-echo sequence in the coronal plane was used for magnetic resonance imaging. [Results] CVLH and heart compression ratio were significantly lower in the semi-prone position on both sides than the other positions. The heart was displaced ventrally when semi-prone and a larger area of the heart leaned on the ventral chest wall, localizing compression to part of the ventral region of the dependent lung. [Conclusion] The region of lungs compressed by the heart is reduced in the semi-prone position due to ventral displacement of the heart. These results suggest that maintaining expansion of the dependent lung is easier in the semi-prone position. PMID:27799672

  13. Regional ventilation-perfusion distribution is more uniform in the prone position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mure, M.; Domino, K. B.; Lindahl, S. G.; Hlastala, M. P.; Altemeier, W. A.; Glenny, R. W.

    2000-01-01

    The arterial blood PO(2) is increased in the prone position in animals and humans because of an improvement in ventilation (VA) and perfusion (Q) matching. However, the mechanism of improved VA/Q is unknown. This experiment measured regional VA/Q heterogeneity and the correlation between VA and Q in supine and prone positions in pigs. Eight ketamine-diazepam-anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were studied in supine and prone positions in random order. Regional VA and Q were measured using fluorescent-labeled aerosols and radioactive-labeled microspheres, respectively. The lungs were dried at total lung capacity and cubed into 603-967 small ( approximately 1.7-cm(3)) pieces. In the prone position the homogeneity of the ventilation distribution increased (P = 0.030) and the correlation between VA and Q increased (correlation coefficient = 0.72 +/- 0.08 and 0.82 +/- 0.06 in supine and prone positions, respectively, P = 0.03). The homogeneity of the VA/Q distribution increased in the prone position (P = 0.028). We conclude that the improvement in VA/Q matching in the prone position is secondary to increased homogeneity of the VA distribution and increased correlation of regional VA and Q.

  14. Individual Positioning: A Comparative Study of Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy in the Prone Versus Supine Position

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Hideghety, Katalin; Mezo, Tamas; Nikolenyi, Aliz; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Methods and Materials: Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. Results: The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% {+-} 4.2% vs. 89.2 {+-} 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V{sub 20Gy}, was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  15. Effect of Head Rotation on Cerebral Blood Velocity in the Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    Højlund, Jakob; Sandmand, Marie; Sonne, Morten; Mantoni, Teit; Jørgensen, Henrik L.; Belhage, Bo; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Pott, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prone position is applied to facilitate surgery of the back and to improve oxygenation in the respirator-treated patient. In particular, with positive pressure ventilation the prone position reduces venous return to the heart and in turn cardiac output (CO) with consequences for cerebral blood flow. We tested in healthy subjects the hypothesis that rotating the head in the prone position reduces cerebral blood flow. Methods. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined, together with the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) and jugular vein diameters bilaterally in 22 healthy subjects in the prone position with the head centered, respectively, rotated sideways, with and without positive pressure breathing (10 cmH2O). Results. The prone position reduced SV (by 5.4 ± 1.5%; P < 0.05) and CO (by 2.3 ± 1.9 %), and slightly increased MAP (from 78 ± 3 to 80 ± 2 mmHg) as well as bilateral jugular vein diameters, leaving MCA Vmean unchanged. Positive pressure breathing in the prone position increased MAP (by 3.6 ± 0.8 mmHg) but further reduced SV and CO (by 9.3 ± 1.3 % and 7.2 ± 2.4 % below baseline) while MCA Vmean was maintained. The head-rotated prone position with positive pressure breathing augmented MAP further (87 ± 2 mmHg) but not CO, narrowed both jugular vein diameters, and reduced MCA Vmean (by 8.6 ± 3.2 %). Conclusion. During positive pressure breathing the prone position with sideways rotated head reduces MCA Vmean ~10% in spite of an elevated MAP. Prone positioning with rotated head affects both CBF and cerebrovenous drainage indicating that optimal brain perfusion requires head centering. PMID:22988456

  16. Prone cross-table lateral view: an alternative to the invertogram in imperforate anus

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimharao, K.L.; Prasad, G.R.; Katariya, S.; Yadav, K.; Mitra, S.K.; Pathak, I.C.

    1983-02-01

    The prone cross-table lateral radiograph provides equal or sometimes better information, compared to the invertogram, for demonstration of the level of rectal atresia in neonates. Easy positioning, better cooperation of the patient, elimination of the effect of gravity, and better delineation of the rectal gas shadow are the advantages of the prone lateral view. Among the 45 cases compared, equal findings were noted in 37, but in eight babies the level of rectal atresia was more caudal in the prone radiograph than in the invertogram.

  17. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  18. 44 CFR 60.5 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.5 Section 60.5 Emergency Management and Assistance... Management Regulations § 60.5 Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The... flood-related erosion-prone areas shall be based. If the Federal Insurance Administrator has...

  19. 44 CFR 60.5 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.5 Section 60.5 Emergency Management and Assistance... Management Regulations § 60.5 Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The... flood-related erosion-prone areas shall be based. If the Federal Insurance Administrator has...

  20. 44 CFR 60.5 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.5 Section 60.5 Emergency Management and Assistance... Management Regulations § 60.5 Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The... flood-related erosion-prone areas shall be based. If the Federal Insurance Administrator has...

  1. 44 CFR 60.5 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.5 Section 60.5 Emergency Management and Assistance... Management Regulations § 60.5 Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The... flood-related erosion-prone areas shall be based. If the Federal Insurance Administrator has...

  2. 44 CFR 60.5 - Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.5 Section 60.5 Emergency Management and Assistance... Management Regulations § 60.5 Flood plain management criteria for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The... flood-related erosion-prone areas shall be based. If the Federal Insurance Administrator has...

  3. When feeling bad leads to feeling good: guilt-proneness and affective organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Francis J; Schaumberg, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    The authors posit that higher levels of guilt-proneness are associated with higher levels of affective organizational commitment. To explain this counterintuitive link, the authors suggest that a dispositional tendency to feel guilt motivates individuals to exert greater effort on their work-related tasks that, in turn, strengthens their affinity for the organization. The authors tested this idea using a laboratory study and field data from 2 samples of working adults. Individuals who are more guilt-prone reported higher levels of organizational attachment compared with less guilt-prone individuals. Furthermore, mediation analyses indicate that the link between guilt-proneness and affective commitment is driven by greater task effort. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the affective drivers of commitment in organizations. PMID:21728398

  4. Modeling interactions betweenspotted owl and barred owl populations in fire-prone forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background / Question / Methods Efforts to conserve northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the eastern Cascades of Washington must merge the challenges of providing sufficient structurally complex forest habitat in a fire-prone landscape with the limitations impos...

  5. When feeling bad leads to feeling good: guilt-proneness and affective organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Francis J; Schaumberg, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    The authors posit that higher levels of guilt-proneness are associated with higher levels of affective organizational commitment. To explain this counterintuitive link, the authors suggest that a dispositional tendency to feel guilt motivates individuals to exert greater effort on their work-related tasks that, in turn, strengthens their affinity for the organization. The authors tested this idea using a laboratory study and field data from 2 samples of working adults. Individuals who are more guilt-prone reported higher levels of organizational attachment compared with less guilt-prone individuals. Furthermore, mediation analyses indicate that the link between guilt-proneness and affective commitment is driven by greater task effort. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the affective drivers of commitment in organizations.

  6. [Prone position: effect on gas exchange and functional capacity for exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bastidas-L, Andrea Carolina; Colina-Chourio, José A; Guevara, Jesnel M; Nunez, Alexis

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate gas exchange and cardiopulmonary functional behavior in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) before, during and after the change to a prone position. Thirty patients with PH and alterations in gas exchange were included in the study. Gas exchange measurements were performed in four stages: at the baseline supine position and after 30, 120 and 240 minutes in prone position. Also, the patients were evaluated by the six minutes walking test (6MWT) after 30 days in prone position during night's sleep. After four hours in prone position, all patients showed an increase of PaO2 and arterial saturation of oxygen (SaO2), with a decrease of intrapulmonary shunts, improving the gas exchange and therefore the physiological demand imposed by exercise in patients with PH. PMID:25920183

  7. Multiple-Mouse MRI with Multiple Arrays of Receive Coils

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marc S.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Bankson, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to traditional single-animal imaging methods, multiple-mouse MRI has been shown to dramatically improve imaging throughput and reduce the potentially prohibitive cost for instrument access. To date, up to a single radiofrequency coil has been dedicated to each animal being simultaneously scanned, thus limiting the sensitivity, flexibility, and ultimate throughput. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of multiple-mouse MRI with a phased-array coil dedicated to each animal. A dual-mouse imaging system, consisting of a pair of two-element phased-array coils, was developed and used to achieve acceleration factors greater than the number of animals scanned at once. By simultaneously scanning two mice with a retrospectively gated cardiac cine MRI sequence, a three-fold acceleration was achieved with SNR in the heart that is equivalent to that achieved with an unaccelerated scan using a commercial mouse birdcage coil. PMID:20146352

  8. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  9. Having fun with a cordless mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-07-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in different ways. The data is analysed to obtain initial accelerations (down the ramp) and subsequent decelerations (on the flat), as well as maximum velocities, and these results are used to compare the actual performance of the trolley (with friction) with the theoretical expectation. An agreement of better than 2% on the value of gravity is obtained. Encouraging agreement on frictional forces (and accelerations) is also obtained by considering the maximum kinetic energies reached at the bottom of the ramp. This paper includes the free provision of custom software to record the time history of the clicking of a mouse.

  10. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  11. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  12. Awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone patients

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yu; Sun, Hou-Liang; Zhu, Shan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anesthesia followed by placement in the prone position takes time and may result in complications. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone-positioned patients under general anesthesia. Sixty-two patients (ASA physical status I–II) scheduled for awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and prone self-positioning before surgery under general anesthesia were selected. Patient preparation began with detailed preoperative counseling regarding the procedure. Premedication with sedative and antisialagogue was followed by airway anesthesia with topical lidocaine; then, awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation was carried out. The patients then positioned themselves comfortably before induction of general anesthesia. The changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), incidence of coughing or gagging, and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance. Fifty-eight of the 62 patients completed prone self-positioning smoothly. Compared with values before intubation, SBP, DBP, HR, and RPP were slightly increased after intubation, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). One patient had moderate coughing and 1 patient had gagging during prone self-positioning, which were tolerable. These findings indicated that awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by induction of anesthesia is safe and feasible alternative to routine prone positioning after induction of general anesthesia. PMID:27512858

  13. Prediction of Fault-Prone Software Modules Using a Generic Text Discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Osamu; Kikuno, Tohru

    This paper describes a novel approach for detecting fault-prone modules using a spam filtering technique. Fault-prone module detection in source code is important for the assurance of software quality. Most previous fault-prone detection approaches have been based on using software metrics. Such approaches, however, have difficulties in collecting the metrics and constructing mathematical models based on the metrics. Because of the increase in the need for spam e-mail detection, the spam filtering technique has progressed as a convenient and effective technique for text mining. In our approach, fault-prone modules are detected in such a way that the source code modules are considered text files and are applied to the seam filter directly. To show the applicability of our approach, we conducted experimental applications using source code repositories of Java based open source developments. The result of experiments shows that our approach can correctly predict 78% of actual fault-prone modules as fault-prone.

  14. Modified supine versus prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Surgical outcomes from a tertiary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Madeleine Nina; Cetti, Richard; Newell, Bradley; Chu, Kevin; Harper, Matthew; Kourambas, John; McCahy, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The traditional prone positioning of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is associated with various anesthetic and logistic difficulties. We aimed to compare the surgical outcomes of PCNLs performed using our modified supine position with those performed in the standard prone position. Materials and Methods A prospective group of 236 renal units (224 patients) undergoing PCNL were included in this 2 site study: 160 were performed in the modified supine position were compared with 76 undergoing PCNL in the prone position. The outcomes of radiation dose, radiation time, stone free rate, body mass index (BMI), stone size, operative time, length of stay (LOS), in hospital and complications were compared. Chi-square and t-tests were used. Results There were no significant differences in mean radiation time, radiation dose or stone size between the modified supine and prone groups. The supine group had a higher mean BMI (31 kg/m2 vs. 28 kg/m2, p=0.03), shorter mean surgical time (93 minutes vs. 123 minutes, p<0.001), shorter mean LOS (2 days vs. 3 days, p=0.005) and higher stone free rate (70% vs. 50%, p=0.005). There were no differences in septic or bleeding complications but the prone group had a higher rate of overall complications. Conclusions Modified supine PCNL has significantly lower operative time, shorter LOS and higher stone-free rate compared with prone in our series, while remaining a safe procedure. PMID:27437536

  15. Shame- and guilt-proneness: relationships with anxiety disorder symptoms in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Valentiner, David P; McGrath, Patrick B; Jencius, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Researchers postulate that both shame and guilt are emotions important to anxiety disorders. Extant data, however, indicate that guilt-proneness shares non-significant relationships with psychopathology symptoms after controlling for shame-proneness. To further investigate the relevance of shame and guilt to the anxiety disorders domain, the current study examined associations between shame- and guilt-proneness and anxiety disorder symptoms using data from patients (N=124) with primary anxiety disorder diagnoses. Results indicated that only symptoms of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) shared significant relations with shame-proneness after controlling for other types of anxiety disorder symptoms, depression symptoms, and guilt-proneness. Further, changes in shame-proneness during treatment were found to share significant relations with changes in obsessive-compulsive disorder, SAD, and GAD symptoms. The current results indicate that shame is more relevant to symptoms of the anxiety disorders domain than is guilt. The implications of these results for the conceptualization and treatment of anxiety disorders are discussed. PMID:20591613

  16. Children’s Proneness to Shame and Guilt Predict Risky and Illegal Behaviors in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Stuewig, Jeffrey; Tangney, June P.; Kendall, Stephanie; Folk, Johanna B.; Meyer, Candace Reinsmith; Dearing, Ronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Do shame and guilt help people avoid doing wrong? Although some research suggests that guilt-proneness is a protective factor while shame-proneness puts individuals at risk, most research is either cross-sectional or short-term. In this longitudinal study, 380 5th graders (ages 10–12) completed measures of proneness to shame and guilt. We re-interviewed 68% of participants after they turned 18 years old (range 18–21). Guilt-proneness assessed in childhood predicted fewer sexual partners, less use of illegal drugs and alcohol, and less involvement with the criminal justice system. Shame-proneness, in contrast, was a risk factor for later deviant behavior. Shame-prone children were more likely to have unprotected sex and use illegal drugs in young adulthood. These results held when controlling for childhood SES and teachers’ ratings of aggression. Children’s moral emotional styles appear to be well established by at least middle childhood, with distinct downstream implications for risky behavior in early adulthood. PMID:24842762

  17. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the “sponge lung” - and the “shape matching” -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients’ response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  18. Delusion proneness in nonclinical individuals and cognitive insight: the contributions of rumination and reflection.

    PubMed

    Carse, Traci; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-08-01

    Although previous research demonstrates that clinical individuals with delusions score low on one of the facets of cognitive insight, self-reflection, and high on the other facet, self-certainty, analogous studies of delusion proneness in nonclinical individuals have found that delusion proneness in nonclinical individuals associates with higher levels of both self-certainty and self-reflection. The present study sought to reconcile these inconsistent results by examining the contributions of different facets of self-reflection, rumination and reflection, to delusion proneness. One hundred fifty-two individuals completed three questionnaires: the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS), the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (PDI), and the Rumination-Reflection Questionnaire (RRQ). The results showed that the individuals scoring higher on delusion proneness demonstrated higher levels of both self-certainty and self-reflection on the BCIS as well as higher levels of rumination and reflection on the RRQ. As predicted, the strength of the relationship between BCIS self-reflection and delusion proneness was diminished when rumination was controlled for. These findings suggest that the previously observed positive relation between BCIS self-reflection and nonclinical delusion proneness might be driven, in part, by the ruminative aspect of self-reflection.

  19. Vocational interests and career indecision among psychosis-prone college students.

    PubMed

    Poreh, A M; Schullen, C

    1998-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between scores on scales that purport to measure psychosis-proneness and scores on vocational interests, identity, and differentiation scales in a sample of 233 college students who completed the Perceptual Aberration and Magical Ideation scales, the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, and the Career Decision Scale. The present findings are consistent with prior work indicating a sex-related association of scores on measures of psychosis-proneness and vocational interests. A positive correlation between scores on vocational indecision and measures of psychosis-proneness was also found, suggesting that both men and women who score high on psychosis-proneness find it difficult to formulate long-term career goals. Finally, there was no significant correlation between scores on measures of psychosis-proneness and Holland's Vocational Differentiation Index. Present results are discussed in light of previously reported sex differences among psychosis-prone adults and diagnosed schizophrenics. The implications of the findings for vocational counselors are also addressed.

  20. Prone positioning improves distribution of pulmonary perfusion: noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging study in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hisashi; Sato, Yukio; Shindo, Masashi; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Taro; Onizuka, Masataka; Sakakibara, Yuzuru

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of prone positioning on pulmonary perfusion using flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging technique that requires no contrast medium. Seven healthy volunteers were studied in the supine and prone positions under three respiratory conditions: normal breathing of room air, unassisted breathing of 45% O2, and controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) with positive end-expiratory pressure. Signal intensities (SIs) were obtained from ventral, middle, and dorsal regions on sagittal lung images and dependent/nondependent SI ratios were calculated to evaluate pulmonary perfusion distribution. In the supine position, SIs increased significantly from the ventral to dorsal region under all three respiratory conditions and prone positioning inverted the perfusion distribution under all conditions. Right lung SI ratios were 2.34 +/- 0.29, 2.74 +/- 0.66, and 2.42 +/- 0.73 in the supine position and 1.68 +/- 0.48, 1.78 +/- 0.36, and 1.92 +/- 0.21 in prone for room air, 45% O2, and CMV, respectively. The difference between supine and prone positions was statistically significant. The left lung showed a similar pattern and the difference was significant only under CMV. No difference was observed between the different respiratory conditions in both lungs. This study demonstrated that the distribution of pulmonary perfusion was more uniform in prone than in the supine position.

  1. Enzyme-treated Asparagus officinalis extract shows neuroprotective effects and attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Arai, Takashi; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Ishida, Hitoshi; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the number of patients with dementia involving Alzheimer's disease (AD) are seen as a grave public health problem. In neurodegenerative disorders involving AD, biological stresses, such as oxidative and inflammatory stress, induce neural cell damage. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a popular vegetable, and an extract prepared from this reportedly possesses various beneficial biological activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) on neuronal cells and early cognitive impairment of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. The expression of mRNAs for factors that exert cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, such as heat-shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, was upregulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by treatment with ETAS. Moreover, when release of lactate dehydrogenase from damaged NG108-15 cells was increased for cells cultured in medium containing either the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or the hypoxia mimic reagent cobalt chloride, ETAS significantly attenuated this cell damage. Also, when contextual fear memory, which is considered to be a hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice, ETAS attenuated the cognitive impairment. These results suggest that ETAS produces cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells and attenuates the effects on the cognitive impairment of SAMP8 mice.

  2. Enzyme-treated Asparagus officinalis extract shows neuroprotective effects and attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Arai, Takashi; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Ishida, Hitoshi; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the number of patients with dementia involving Alzheimer's disease (AD) are seen as a grave public health problem. In neurodegenerative disorders involving AD, biological stresses, such as oxidative and inflammatory stress, induce neural cell damage. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a popular vegetable, and an extract prepared from this reportedly possesses various beneficial biological activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) on neuronal cells and early cognitive impairment of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. The expression of mRNAs for factors that exert cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, such as heat-shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, was upregulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by treatment with ETAS. Moreover, when release of lactate dehydrogenase from damaged NG108-15 cells was increased for cells cultured in medium containing either the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or the hypoxia mimic reagent cobalt chloride, ETAS significantly attenuated this cell damage. Also, when contextual fear memory, which is considered to be a hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice, ETAS attenuated the cognitive impairment. These results suggest that ETAS produces cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells and attenuates the effects on the cognitive impairment of SAMP8 mice. PMID:24660475

  3. Effects of salvianolate on bone metabolism in glucocorticoid-treated lupus-prone B6.MRL-Faslpr/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanzhi; Cui, Yang; Zhang, Xiao; Gao, Xiang; Su, Yanjie; Xu, Bilian; Wu, Tie; Chen, Wenshuang; Cui, Liao

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the bone-protective effects of salvianolate (Sal), a total polyphenol from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, on bone tissue in the spontaneous lupus-prone mouse model, B6.MRL-Faslpr/J, undergoing glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. Methods Fifteen-week-old female B6.MRL-Faslpr/J mice were administered either a daily dose of saline (lupus group), prednisone 6 mg/kg (GC group), Sal 60 mg/kg (Sal group); or GC plus Sal (GC + Sal group) for a duration of 12 weeks. Age-matched female C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice were used for control. Micro-computed tomography assessments, bone histomorphometry analysis, bone biomechanical test, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting analysis for bone markers, and renal histology analysis were performed to support our research endeavor. Results Lupus mice developed a marked bone loss and deterioration of mechanical properties of bone due to an increase in bone resorption rather than suppression of bone formation. GC treatment strongly inhibited bone formation in lupus mice. Sal treatment significantly attenuated osteogenic inhibition, and also suppressed hyperactive bone resorption, which recovered the bone mass and mechanical properties of bone in both the untreated and GC-treated lupus mice. Conclusion The data support further preclinical investigation of Sal as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus-related bone loss. PMID:27563234

  4. Back analysis of fault-slip in burst prone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.

    2016-11-01

    In deep underground mines, stress re-distribution induced by mining activities could cause fault-slip. Seismic waves arising from fault-slip occasionally induce rock ejection when hitting the boundary of mine openings, and as a result, severe damage could be inflicted. In general, it is difficult to estimate fault-slip-induced ground motion in the vicinity of mine openings because of the complexity of the dynamic response of faults and the presence of geological structures. In this paper, a case study is conducted for a Canadian underground mine, herein called "Mine-A", which is known for its seismic activities. Using a microseismic database collected from the mine, a back analysis of fault-slip is carried out with mine-wide 3-dimensional numerical modeling. A back analysis is conducted to estimate the physical and mechanical properties of the causative fracture or shear zones. One large seismic event has been selected for the back analysis to detect a fault-slip related seismic event. In the back analysis, the shear zone properties are estimated with respect to moment magnitude of the seismic event and peak particle velocity (PPV) recorded by a strong ground motion sensor. The estimated properties are then validated through comparison with peak ground acceleration recorded by accelerometers. Lastly, ground motion in active mining areas is estimated by conducting dynamic analysis with the estimated values. The present study implies that it would be possible to estimate the magnitude of seismic events that might occur in the near future by applying the estimated properties to the numerical model. Although the case study is conducted for a specific mine, the developed methodology can be equally applied to other mines suffering from fault-slip related seismic events.

  5. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  6. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Giovannini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors. PMID:12082543

  7. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo; Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  8. Dosimetric and toxicity comparison between prone and supine position IMRT for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Jain, Sheena K.; Heron, Dwight E.; De Andrade, Regiane S.; Lin, Chyonghiou J.; Kim, Hayeon

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric and toxicity differences between prone and supine position intensity-modulate radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Forty-seven consecutive endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant RT were analyzed. Of these, 21 were treated in prone position and 26 in the supine position. Dose-volume histograms for normal tissue structures and targets were compared between the two groups. Acute and chronic toxicity were also compared between the cohorts. Results: The percentage of volume receiving 10, 20, 30, 40, 45, and 50 Gy for small bowel was 89.5%, 69%, 33%, 12.2%, 5%, and 0% in the prone group and 87.5%, 62.7%, 26.4%, 8%, 4.3%, and 0% in the supine group, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant. The dose-volume histograms for bladder and rectum were also comparable, except for a slightly greater percentage of volume receiving 10 Gy (1.5%) and 20 Gy (5%) for the rectum in the prone group. Acute small bowel toxicities were Grade 1 in 7 patients and Grade 2 in 14 patients in the prone group vs. Grade 1 in 6 patients and Grade 2 in 19 patients in the supine group. Chronic toxicity was Grade 1 in 7 patients and Grade 3 in 1 patient in the prone group and Grade 1 in 5 patients in the supine group. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that no difference exists in the dose to the normal tissue and toxicity between prone and supine intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial cancer. Longer follow-up and more outcome studies are needed to determine whether any differences exist between the two approaches.

  9. Increased potency and binding of mazindol to putative brain anorectic receptors in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, B E; Brown, K L; Vincent, G

    1994-12-30

    A class of sodium-sensitive, low affinity binding sites in the brain recognizes [3H]mazindol (MAZ). Competition for [3H]MAZ binding at these sites correlates with the anorectic potency of various phenethylamine drugs suggesting that these might be anorectic binding sites. Here [3H]MAZ binding, in the absence of sodium, was assessed by quantitative receptor autoradiography in rat brain. Binding was saturable, widespread and heterogenous with Kd = 3-229 microM and Bmax = 0.64-21.9 nmol/mg protein in various brain areas. By saturation studies, highest binding was in the somatosensory cortex, central amygdalar nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Hypothalamic subnuclei had intermediate and the piriform cortex had low binding. Rats were identified as prone to develop (DIO-prone) or resist (DR-prone) diet-induced obesity by their low vs. high 24 h urine norepinephrine excretion, respectively. While similar in body weight and basal 30 min intake of 4% sucrose, DIO-prone rats had 28% greater inhibition of sucrose intake by 3 mg/kg MAZ, i.p. (86 +/- 5%) than DR-prone rats (67 +/- 6%; P = 0.05). DIO-prone rats also had 23-55% higher levels of 10 nM [3H]MAZ binding in various hypothalamic and amygdalar nuclei, the somatosensory, piriform and gustatory cortices and thalamus. Given their greater sensitivity the highest dose of MAZ used and their higher binding of MAZ to putative brain anorectic receptors, DIO-prone rats might have a deficiency of an endogenous satiety factor which could predispose them to develop obesity when challenged with high energy, high sucrose diets.

  10. Winner of the Young Investigator Award of the Society for Biomaterials at the 10th World Biomaterials Congress, May 17-22, 2016, Montreal QC, Canada: Microribbon-based hydrogels accelerate stem cell-based bone regeneration in a mouse critical-size cranial defect model.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-Hsin; Conrad, Bogdan; Chung, Michael T; Deveza, Lorenzo; Jiang, Xinyi; Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick; Yang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell-based therapies hold great promise for enhancing tissue regeneration. However, the majority of cells die shortly after transplantation, which greatly diminishes the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. Poor cell engraftment and survival remain a major bottleneck to fully exploiting the power of stem cells for regenerative medicine. Biomaterials such as hydrogels can serve as artificial matrices to protect cells during delivery and guide desirable cell fates. However, conventional hydrogels often lack macroporosity, which restricts cell proliferation and delays matrix deposition. Here we report the use of injectable, macroporous microribbon (μRB) hydrogels as stem cell carriers for bone repair, which supports direct cell encapsulation into a macroporous scaffold with rapid spreading. When transplanted in a critical-sized, mouse cranial defect model, μRB-based hydrogels significantly enhanced the survival of transplanted adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) (81%) and enabled up to three-fold cell proliferation after 7 days. In contrast, conventional hydrogels only led to 27% cell survival, which continued to decrease over time. MicroCT imaging showed μRBs enhanced and accelerated mineralized bone repair compared to hydrogels (61% vs. 34% by week 6), and stem cells were required for bone repair to occur. These results suggest that paracrine signaling of transplanted stem cells are responsible for the observed bone repair, and enhancing cell survival and proliferation using μRBs further promoted the paracrine-signaling effects of ADSCs for stimulating endogenous bone repair. We envision μRB-based scaffolds can be broadly useful as a novel scaffold for enhancing stem cell survival and regeneration of other tissue types. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1321-1331, 2016.

  11. Beneficial effect of the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor mycophenolate mofetil on survival and severity of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, C A; Svensson, L; Carlsten, H

    1999-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on the course of disease in SLE-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice. Three-months-old mice displaying clinical symptoms of glomerulonephritis were given MMF (100 mg/kg per day) orally via the drinking water. Control mice received i.p. injections of cyclophosphamide (CYC) (1.8 mg/mouse per week) or saline. Survival, albuminuria and haematuria, immunoglobulin levels and anti-dsDNA antibodies in serum, frequencies of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes and glomerular deposits of immunoglobulin and C3 were analysed. The results showed that MMF treatment significantly prolonged survival and reduced the occurrence of albuminuria and haematuria in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In addition, the number of immunoglobulin-producing B cells and serum levels of IgG and IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies were reduced after MMF and CYC treatment. MMF treatment significantly reduced the extent of deposition of C3 in glomeruli. We conclude that the reduced severity of glomerulonephritis following treatment of lupus-prone mice with MMF was as efficacious as that of CYC. These results warrant clinical trials of MMF in SLE patients with glomerulonephritis.

  12. IL-10 Production Is Critical for Sustaining the Expansion of CD5+ B and NKT Cells and Restraining Autoantibody Production in Congenic Lupus-Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Baglaenko, Yuriy; Manion, Kieran P; Chang, Nan-Hua; Gracey, Eric; Loh, Christina; Wither, Joan E

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus is mediated by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To decipher the genetics that contribute to pathogenesis and the production of pathogenic autoantibodies, our lab has focused on the generation of congenic lupus-prone mice derived from the New Zealand Black (NZB) strain. Previous work has shown that an NZB-derived chromosome 4 interval spanning 32 to 151 Mb led to expansion of CD5+ B and Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, and could suppress autoimmunity when crossed with a lupus-prone mouse strain. Subsequently, it was shown that CD5+ B cells but not NKT cells derived from these mice could suppress the development of pro-inflammatory T cells. In this paper, we aimed to further resolve the genetics that leads to expansion of these two innate-like populations through the creation of additional sub-congenic mice and to characterize the role of IL-10 in the suppression of autoimmunity through the generation of IL-10 knockout mice. We show that expansion of CD5+ B cells and NKT cells localizes to a chromosome 4 interval spanning 91 to 123 Mb, which is distinct from the region that mediates the majority of the suppressive phenotype. We also demonstrate that IL-10 is critical to restraining autoantibody production and surprisingly plays a vital role in supporting the expansion of innate-like populations. PMID:26964093

  13. IL-10 Production Is Critical for Sustaining the Expansion of CD5+ B and NKT Cells and Restraining Autoantibody Production in Congenic Lupus-Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baglaenko, Yuriy; Manion, Kieran P.; Chang, Nan-Hua; Gracey, Eric; Loh, Christina; Wither, Joan E.

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus is mediated by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To decipher the genetics that contribute to pathogenesis and the production of pathogenic autoantibodies, our lab has focused on the generation of congenic lupus-prone mice derived from the New Zealand Black (NZB) strain. Previous work has shown that an NZB-derived chromosome 4 interval spanning 32 to 151 Mb led to expansion of CD5+ B and Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, and could suppress autoimmunity when crossed with a lupus-prone mouse strain. Subsequently, it was shown that CD5+ B cells but not NKT cells derived from these mice could suppress the development of pro-inflammatory T cells. In this paper, we aimed to further resolve the genetics that leads to expansion of these two innate-like populations through the creation of additional sub-congenic mice and to characterize the role of IL-10 in the suppression of autoimmunity through the generation of IL-10 knockout mice. We show that expansion of CD5+ B cells and NKT cells localizes to a chromosome 4 interval spanning 91 to 123 Mb, which is distinct from the region that mediates the majority of the suppressive phenotype. We also demonstrate that IL-10 is critical to restraining autoantibody production and surprisingly plays a vital role in supporting the expansion of innate-like populations. PMID:26964093

  14. Role of Disgust Proneness in Parkinson’s Disease: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ille, Rottraut; Wabnegger, Albert; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Kögl-Wallner, Mariella; Wenzel, Karoline; Schienle, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge about personality traits in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still limited. In particular, disgust proneness has not been investigated as well as its neuronal correlates. Although several morphometric studies demonstrated that PD is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) reduction in olfactory and gustatory regions involved in disgust processing, a possible correlation with disgust proneness has not been investigated. We conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare GMV between 16 cognitively normal male PD patients with mild to moderate symptoms and 24 matched control subjects. All participants had answered questionnaires for the assessment of disgust proneness, trait anger and trait anxiety. We correlated questionnaire scores with GMV in both groups. The clinical group reported selectively reduced disgust proneness toward olfactory stimuli associated with spoilage. Moreover, they showed GMV reduction in the central olfactory system [orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and piriform cortex]. Disgust items referring to olfactory processing were positively correlated with OFC volume in PD patients. Our data suggest an association between PD-associated neurodegeneration and olfactory related facets of the personality trait disgust proneness. PMID:25908177

  15. Individual differences in posterior cortical volume correlate with proneness to pride and gratitude.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Roland; Garrido, Griselda; Moll, Jorge; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Proneness to specific moral sentiments (e.g. pride, gratitude, guilt, indignation) has been linked with individual variations in functional MRI (fMRI) response within anterior brain regions whose lesion leads to inappropriate behaviour. However, the role of structural anatomical differences in rendering individuals prone to particular moral sentiments relative to others is unknown. Here, we investigated grey matter volumes (VBM8) and proneness to specific moral sentiments on a well-controlled experimental task in healthy individuals. Individuals with smaller cuneus, and precuneus volumes were more pride-prone, whereas those with larger right inferior temporal volumes experienced gratitude more readily. Although the primary analysis detected no associations with guilt- or indignation-proneness, subgenual cingulate fMRI responses to guilt were negatively correlated with grey matter volumes in the left superior temporal sulcus and anterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (right >left). This shows that individual variations in functional activations within critical areas for moral sentiments were not due to grey matter volume differences in the same areas. Grey matter volume differences between healthy individuals may nevertheless play an important role by affecting posterior cortical brain systems that are non-critical but supportive for the experience of specific moral sentiments. This may be of particular relevance when their experience depends on visuo-spatial elaboration.

  16. Role of disgust proneness in Parkinson's disease: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Ille, Rottraut; Wabnegger, Albert; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Kögl-Wallner, Mariella; Wenzel, Karoline; Schienle, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge about personality traits in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still limited. In particular, disgust proneness has not been investigated as well as its neuronal correlates. Although several morphometric studies demonstrated that PD is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) reduction in olfactory and gustatory regions involved in disgust processing, a possible correlation with disgust proneness has not been investigated. We conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis to compare GMV between 16 cognitively normal male PD patients with mild to moderate symptoms and 24 matched control subjects. All participants had answered questionnaires for the assessment of disgust proneness, trait anger and trait anxiety. We correlated questionnaire scores with GMV in both groups. The clinical group reported selectively reduced disgust proneness toward olfactory stimuli associated with spoilage. Moreover, they showed GMV reduction in the central olfactory system [orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and piriform cortex]. Disgust items referring to olfactory processing were positively correlated with OFC volume in PD patients. Our data suggest an association between PD-associated neurodegeneration and olfactory related facets of the personality trait disgust proneness.

  17. An update: use of laryngeal mask airway devices in patients in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Whitacre, William; Dieckmann, Loraine; Austin, Paul N

    2014-04-01

    Some providers advocate using laryngeal mask airways (LMAs) for procedures performed in the prone position to meet the demands of quicker operating room turnover time requirements, staffing reductions and the desire to expedite patient recovery in the postoperative period. We provide an update to a 2010 systemic review examining the use of LMAs in patients in the prone position. Six peer-reviewed articles described the use of LMAs in prone patients: a randomized controlled trial, 2 description studies, a case series, and 2 case reports. The risk of publication bias was possibly high. This evidence, mostly from lower level sources, supports the use of the LMA in this setting, with risks comparable to when LMAs are used in patients in the supine position. Experienced providers should carefully select patients and procedures when considering using LMAs for patients in the prone position. There must be a plan to control the airway if problems are encountered with the LMA. These devices might be considered as a bridge device when a prone patient is accidentally extubated. Additional rigorous studies are needed before use of LMAs in this manner can be widely recommended. PMID:24902451

  18. Individual differences in posterior cortical volume correlate with proneness to pride and gratitude

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Roland; Garrido, Griselda; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Proneness to specific moral sentiments (e.g. pride, gratitude, guilt, indignation) has been linked with individual variations in functional MRI (fMRI) response within anterior brain regions whose lesion leads to inappropriate behaviour. However, the role of structural anatomical differences in rendering individuals prone to particular moral sentiments relative to others is unknown. Here, we investigated grey matter volumes (VBM8) and proneness to specific moral sentiments on a well-controlled experimental task in healthy individuals. Individuals with smaller cuneus, and precuneus volumes were more pride-prone, whereas those with larger right inferior temporal volumes experienced gratitude more readily. Although the primary analysis detected no associations with guilt- or indignation-proneness, subgenual cingulate fMRI responses to guilt were negatively correlated with grey matter volumes in the left superior temporal sulcus and anterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (right >left). This shows that individual variations in functional activations within critical areas for moral sentiments were not due to grey matter volume differences in the same areas. Grey matter volume differences between healthy individuals may nevertheless play an important role by affecting posterior cortical brain systems that are non-critical but supportive for the experience of specific moral sentiments. This may be of particular relevance when their experience depends on visuo-spatial elaboration. PMID:24106333

  19. Hip rotation range of motion in sitting and prone positions in healthy Japanese adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Heonsoo; Kubo, Akira; Kurosawa, Kazuo; Maruichi, Shizuka; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to elucidate the difference in hip external and internal rotation ranges of motion (ROM) between the prone and sitting positions. [Subjects] The subjects included 151 students. [Methods] Hip rotational ROM was measured with the subjects in the prone and sitting positions. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze ipsilateral hip rotation ROM in the prone and sitting positions in males and females. The total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM was calculated by adding the measured values for external and internal rotations. [Results] Ipsilateral hip rotation ROM revealed significant differences between two positions for both left and right internal and external rotations. Hip rotation ROM was significantly higher in the prone position than in the sitting position. Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the men and women. Hip external rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in men; conversely, hip internal rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in women. [Conclusion] Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the sexes and between the sitting and prone positions. Total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM, total angle of external rotation, and total angle of internal rotation of the left and right hips greatly varied, suggesting that hip joint rotational ROM is widely distributed. PMID:25729186

  20. Assessing Jail Inmates’ Proneness to Shame and Guilt: Feeling Bad About the Behavior or the Self?

    PubMed Central

    Tangney, June P.; Stuewig, Jeffrey; Mashek, Debra; Hastings, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study of 550 jail inmates (379 male and 171 female) held on felony charges examines the reliability and validity of the Test of Self Conscious Affect –Socially Deviant Version (TOSCA-SD; Hanson & Tangney, 1996) as a measure of offenders’ proneness to shame and proneness to guilt. Discriminant validity (e.g., vis-à-vis self-esteem, negative affect, social desirability/impression management) and convergent validity (e.g., vis-à-vis correlations with empathy, externalization of blame, anger, psychological symptoms, and substance use problems) was supported, paralleling results from community samples. Further, proneness to shame and guilt were differentially related to widely used risk measures from the field of criminal justice (e.g., criminal history, psychopathy, violence risk, antisocial personality). Guilt-proneness appears to be a protective factor, whereas there was no evidence that shame-proneness serves an inhibitory function. Subsequent analyses indicate these findings generalize quite well across gender and race. Implications for intervention and sentencing practices are discussed. PMID:21743757

  1. Serum antibody response to three non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane proteins during acute otitis media and nasopharyngeal colonization in otitis prone and non-otitis prone children.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2011-01-29

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is the most common bacteria responsible for episodic acute otitis media (AOM; non-otitis prone), recurrent AOM (rAOM; otitis prone) and AOM treatment failure (AOMTF) in children. In this 3.5 years of prospective study, we measured the serum antibody response to outer membrane proteins D, P6 and OMP26 of NTHi in children with AOM (n=26), rAOM (n=32), AOMTF (n=27). The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of IgG at their acute AOM visit against Protein D in otitis prone children were significantly lower compared to AOMTF (p value<0.01) and non-otitis prone (p value<0.03) children; otitis prone children had significantly lower IgG levels to P6 compared to AOMTF children (p value<0.02); otitis prone children had significantly lower IgG levels to OMP26 compared to AOMTF children (p value<0.04). Comparing acute to convalescent titers after AOM, otitis prone and AOMTF children had no significant change in total IgG against all the three proteins, while non-otitis prone children had significant increases to Protein D. Anti-protein D, P6 and OMP26 antibody levels measured longitudinally during NP colonization between age 6 and 24 months in 10 otitis prone children and 150 non-otitis prone children showed <2-fold increases over time in otitis prone children compared to >4 fold increases in the non-otitis prone children (p value<0.001). We conclude that otitis prone children mount less of an IgG serum antibody response toward Protein D, P6 and OMP26 after AOM which may account for recurrent infections. The data on acute sera of otitis prone vs non-otitis prone children and the acute-to-convalescence response in non-otitis prone children point to a possible link of anti-PD to protection. Moreover, the data suggest that otitis prone children should be evaluated for their responses to Protein D, P6 and OMP26 vaccine antigens of NTHi.

  2. SU-E-T-538: Does Abdominal Compression Through Prone Patient Position Reduce Respiratory Motion in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Catron, T; Rosu, M; Weiss, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of physiological abdominal compression from prone positioning by comparing respiratory-induced tumor movements in supine and prone positions. Methods: 19 lung cancer patients underwent repeated supine and prone free-breathing 4DCT scans. The effect of patient position on motion magnitude was investigated for tumors, lymph nodes (9 cases), and subgroups of central (11 cases), peripheral (8 cases) and small peripheral tumors (5 cases), by evaluating the population average excursions, absolute and relative to a carina-point. Results: Absolute motion analysis: In prone, motion increased by ~20% for tumors and ~25% for lymph nodes. Central tumors moved more compared to peripheral tumors in both supine and prone (~22%, and ~4% respectively). Central tumors movement increased by ~12% in prone. For peripheral tumors the increase in prone position was ~25% (~40% and 29% changes on along RL and AP directions). Motion relative to carina-point analysis: Overall, tumor excursions relative to carina-point increased by ~17% in prone. Lymph node relative magnitudes were lower by ~4%. Likewise, the central tumors moved ~7% less in prone. The subgroup of peripheral tumors exhibited increased amplitudes by ~44%; the small peripheral tumors had even larger relative displacements in prone (~46%). Conclusion: Tumor and lymph node movement in the patient population from this study averaged to be higher in prone than in supine position. Results from carina analysis also suggest that peripheral tissues have more physiologic freedom of motility when placed in the prone position, regardless of size. From these observations we should continue to avoid prone positioning for all types of primary lung tumor, suggesting that patients should receive radiotherapy for primary lung cancer in supine position to minimize target tissue mobility during normal respiratory effort. Further investigation will include more patients with peripheral tumors to validate our

  3. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  4. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  5. Muscle relaxant or prone position, which one unfastened the entrapped epidural catheter?

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Amir Poya; Mirzashahi, Babak; Emami, Ali; Hassani, Motahareh

    2015-01-01

    Some nonsurgical steps have been introduced to remove an entrapped catheter. But occasionally, the majority of them fail, and we are forced to extract the catheter through an invasive procedure. This article depicts our team's experience on the issue. When we found that the inserted epidural catheter was entrapped, we performed all recommended noninvasive maneuvers to release the catheter, but no progress was achieved. Therefore, after obtaining informed consent, we induced anesthesia and changed her to a prone position to explore her back. The intact catheter was removed easily in this stage. The authors believe, in this process, it would have been better if they had tried pulling the catheter in a prone position as a preliminary step. Furthermore, pulling the catheter in a prone position after injecting a muscle relaxant appeared to be more effective and saved the patient from the scheduled surgery. PMID:26240556

  6. Dysmorphic concern is related to delusional proneness and negative affect in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Keating, Charlotte; Thomas, Neil; Stephens, Jessie; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2016-06-30

    Body image concerns are common in the general population and in some mental illnesses reach pathological levels. We investigated whether dysmorphic concern with appearance (a preoccupation with minor or imagined defects in appearance) is explained by psychotic processes in a community sample. In a cross-sectional design, two hundred and twenty six participants completed an online survey battery including: The Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire; the Peters Delusional inventory; the Aberrant Salience Inventory; and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Participants were native English speakers residing in Australia. Dysmorphic concern was positively correlated with delusional proneness, aberrant salience and negative emotion. Regression established that negative emotion and delusional proneness predicted dysmorphic concern, whereas, aberrant salience did not. Although delusional proneness was related to body dysmorphia, there was no evidence that it was related to aberrant salience. Understanding the contribution of other psychosis processes, and other health related variables to the severity of dysmorphic concern will be a focus of future research. PMID:27085667

  7. The Presence of Neurological Soft Signs Along the Psychosis Proneness Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, Emma; Stirling, John; Hopkins, Richard; Lewis, Shôn

    2006-01-01

    Neurological soft signs have been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives. However, it has not been considered whether the increased rates of neurological soft signs are related to measures of psychosis proneness in the general population. We tested this hypothesis in a group of normal volunteers (n = 28) who scored highly for positive schizotypy when assessed online and a control group (n = 33) who scored below the mean. Compared with the controls, high psychosis-prone individuals showed significantly higher Total and Other Soft Signs subscale scores on the Neurological Evaluation Scale. It appears that soft signs are also associated with psychosis proneness when measured in the general population, which suggests that soft signs are distributed along a continuum of risk for schizophrenia. PMID:16407574

  8. Attitudes Toward Divorce, Commitment, and Divorce Proneness in First Marriages and Remarriages.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Sarah W; Stanley, Scott M; Markman, Howard J; Johnson, Christine A

    2013-04-01

    A random multistate sample of married individuals (N = 1,931) was used to explore whether more positive attitudes toward divorce and weaker commitment to marriage may contribute to the greater instability of remarriages than first marriages. Remarried adults, whether or not they brought children from a previous union into the remarriage, reported marital quality (happiness and conflict) equal to those in first marriages. They also reported more positive attitudes toward divorce, which were associated with higher divorce proneness (i.e., thinking about and taking actions toward divorce). Marriage type interacted with marital quality to predict divorce proneness, such that the association between low marital quality and divorce proneness was stronger for remarried individuals than for those in first marriages. This suggests that remarried adults may be more likely than adults in first marriages to take steps toward divorce when experiencing marital distress, possibly reflecting a weaker commitment to marriage.

  9. Suicide proneness in college students: relationships with gender, procrastination, and achievement motivation.

    PubMed

    Klibert, Jeffrey; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Luna, Amy; Robichaux, Michelle

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the relationships between 2 academic dispositions (i.e., procrastination and achievement motivation) and 2 indices of suicidal proneness in college women and men. The degree these 2 academic dispositions could predict unique variance in suicide proneness scores, above and beyond the influence of depression and self-esteem was also examined for each gender. Participants included 475 (336 women, 139 men) undergraduates from a southeastern university. For both genders, procrastination and achievement motivation were significantly correlated at the univarate level with the suicide proneness indices. However, for college women, but not men, procrastination significantly accounted for unique amounts of variance in both suicide indices above and beyond the influence of depression and self-esteem. Implications for suicide intervention efforts directed toward college women and men are offered. PMID:24501841

  10. Boredom proneness--the development and correlates of a new scale.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R; Sundberg, N D

    1986-01-01

    This article reports the development, validation, and correlates of a self-report measure of boredom proneness. The 28-item Boredom Proneness (BP) Scale demonstrates satisfactory levels of internal consistency (coefficient alpha = .79) and test-retest reliability (r = .83) over a 1-week interval. Evidence of validity for the BP is supported by correlations with other boredom measures and from a set of studies evaluating interest and attention in the classroom. Other hypothesized relationships with boredom were tested, with significant positive associations found with depression, hopelessness, perceived effort, loneliness, and amotivational orientation. Additional findings indicate boredom proneness to be negatively related to life satisfaction and autonomy orientation. The relationship of boredom to other affective states is discussed, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:3723312

  11. [A case of ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation after changing position from prone to supine].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kei; Kitamura, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old obese woman (BMI 35) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion in prone position. Immediately after changing position postoperatively from prone to supine, severe ventilation disorder and poor oxygenation occured. Chest X-ray showed severe atelectasis. Poor oxygenation was suspected to be the result of the atelectasis by the pressure of massive abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm. Ventilation disorder was suspected of the bronchospasm associated with inadequate anesthesia. We ventilated her manually with a bag in Fowler position for twenty minutes, and then mechanically by pressure controlled ventilation. She recovered gradually. It is concluded that in obese patients undergoing operation in prone position, changing position should be done very carefully during adequate anesthesia, understanding respiratory physiology in positioning and considering the effect of the abdominal fatty tissue to the diaphragm.

  12. Suicide proneness in college students: relationships with gender, procrastination, and achievement motivation.

    PubMed

    Klibert, Jeffrey; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Luna, Amy; Robichaux, Michelle

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the relationships between 2 academic dispositions (i.e., procrastination and achievement motivation) and 2 indices of suicidal proneness in college women and men. The degree these 2 academic dispositions could predict unique variance in suicide proneness scores, above and beyond the influence of depression and self-esteem was also examined for each gender. Participants included 475 (336 women, 139 men) undergraduates from a southeastern university. For both genders, procrastination and achievement motivation were significantly correlated at the univarate level with the suicide proneness indices. However, for college women, but not men, procrastination significantly accounted for unique amounts of variance in both suicide indices above and beyond the influence of depression and self-esteem. Implications for suicide intervention efforts directed toward college women and men are offered.

  13. Intra- and Interfractional Variations for Prone Breast Irradiation: An Indication for Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Stepaniak, Christopher; White, Julia; Wilson, J. Frank; Li, X. Allen

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Intra- and interfractional errors for breast cancer patients undergoing breast irradiation in the prone position were analyzed. Methods and Materials: To assess intrafractional error resulting from respiratory motion, four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 3 prone and 3 supine patients, and the respiratory motion was compared for the two positions. To assess the interfractional error caused by daily set-up variations, daily electronic portal images of one of the treatment beams were taken for 15 prone-positioned patients. Portal images were then overlaid with images from the planning system that included the breast contour and the isocenter, treatment beam portal, and isocenter. The shift between the planned and actual isocenter was recorded for each portal image, and descriptive statistics were collected for each patient. The margins were calculated using the 2{sigma}+0.7{sigma} recipe, as well as 95% confidence interval based on the pooled standard deviation of the datasets. Results: Respiratory motion of the chest wall is drastically reduced from 2.3 {+-} 0.9 mm in supine position to -0.1 {+-} 0.4 mm in prone position. The daily set-up errors vary in magnitude from 0.0 cm to 1.65 cm and are patient dependent. The margins were defined by considering only the standard deviation to be 1.1 cm, and 2.0 cm when the systematic errors were considered using the 2{sigma}+0.7{sigma} recipe. Conclusions: Prone positioning of patients for breast irradiation significantly reduces the uncertainty introduced by intrafractional respiratory motion. The presence of large systematic error in the interfractional variations necessitates a large clinical target volume-to-planning target volume margin and indicates the importance of image guidance for partial breast irradiation in the prone position, particularly using imaging modality capable of identifying the lumpectomy cavity.

  14. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  15. Flood-prone areas and waterways, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Robert W.; Bowers, James C.

    2002-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) is in the Mojave Desert region of southern California. Although the climate in the study area is arid, occasional intense storms result in flooding on the base, damaging roads and buildings. To plan for anticipated development at EAFB, the U.S. Department of the Air Force (USAF) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative study to locate flood-prone areas on the base. This report describes flood hazards and shows flood-prone areas of the base.

  16. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  17. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  18. Linear accelerator: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutzberg, J.

    1972-01-01

    Design is proposed for inexpensive accelerometer which would work by applying pressure to fluid during acceleration. Pressure is used to move shuttle, and shuttle movement is sensed and calibrated to give acceleration readings.

  19. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  20. Evidence for accelerated tauopathy in the retina of transgenic P301S tau mice exposed to repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Nguyen, Judy V; Arena, John; Rha, Elizabeth; Vranis, Pamela; Hitt, Devon; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-11-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the context of contact and collision sports, but not all exposed individuals develop this condition. In addition, experiments in animal models in several laboratories have shown that non-transgenic mice do not develop tauopathy after exposure to repetitive mTBI schedules. It is thus reasonable to assume that genetic factors may play an etiological role in the development of CTE. More than 40 mutations in the tau gene are known to confer proneness to aggregation and are thought to cause neurodegenerative diseases including frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Transgenic mice harboring these mutations can be used to ask the question whether repetitive mTBI can accelerate onset and course of tauopathy or worsen the outcomes of transgenic disease. In this study, we exposed mice harboring the tau P301S transgene associated with FTD to repetitive mTBI schedules by impact acceleration (IA) that we have previously characterized. We explored the progression of tauopathy in the retina and neocortex based on density of neuronal profiles loaded with tau pS422, a marker of advanced tau hyperphosphorylation. We found that the density of tau pS422 (+) retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) increased twenty fold with one mTBI hit, a little over fifty fold with four mTBI hits and sixty fold with 12 mTBI hits. The severity of mTBI burden (number of hits) was a significant factor in tauopathy outcome. On the other hand, we found no association between repetitive mTBI and density of pS422 (+) neuronal profiles in neocortex, a region that is not featured by significant TAI in our repetitive mTBI model. We observed similar, but less prominent, trends in tauopathy-prone transgenic mice harboring all 6 isoforms of wild-type human tau without mouse tau. Our findings indicate that repetitive mTBI accelerates tauopathy under diverse genetic conditions predisposing to tau aggregation and suggest a

  1. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  2. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  3. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  4. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  5. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  6. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  7. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  8. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  9. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  10. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  11. Effect of Indirect Teacher Influence on Dependent-Prone Students' Learning Outcomes in Secondary School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Student's personality orientation and teacher's classroom behavior are among the many factors that influence student's learning. In this study, the author examined the effect of indirect teacher influence on dependent-prone students' learning outcomes (achievement) in mathematics at the senior secondary school level. Method: The…

  12. Supine or prone position for mini-PNL procedure: does it matter.

    PubMed

    Tokatlı, Zafer; Gokce, Mehmet Ilker; Süer, Evren; Sağlam, Remzi

    2015-06-01

    In this study it is aimed to compare the success and complication rates of mini-PNL procedure in supine and prone positions. In this retrospective study data of 180 patients treated with MPNL either in supine (n = 54) or prone (n = 126) positions between May 2009 and August 2014 was investigated. Success was defined as no visible stones >2 mm. Perioperative complications were classified using the modified Clavien system. Groups were compared with Chi square test or Student t test and for statistical significance p value of 0.05 was accepted. Mean age of the population was 42.5 ± 8.2 years and mean stone size was 23.9 ± 4.1 mm. The two groups were similar with regard to demographic characteristics and stone related characteristics except the ASA status. Success rates of the supine and prone groups were 85.1 and 87.3%, respectively (p = 0.701). No statistically significant differences in terms of complications were observed. Mean operative time was the only parameter different between the two groups (55 vs 82 min, p = 0.001). Supine position for PNL seems to be promising and the complication and success rates are shown to be similar to the prone position with MPNL technique. The only significant benefit of this technique is shorter operative time. PMID:25700801

  13. "Deviance Proneness" and Adolescent Smoking 1980 versus 2001: Has There Been a "Hardening" of Adolescent Smoking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio; Sherman, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    In a midwestern community sample, we tested for evidence of "hardening" of adolescent cigarette smoking between 1980 and 2001 by comparing adolescent smokers and nonsmokers at these two times on measures indicative of "deviance proneness" in Jessor and Jessor's [Jessor, R., & Jessor, S. L. (1977). "Problem behavior and psychosocial development: A…

  14. Development of the 1984-85 Validation Selection Criteria: The Eclectic Error Prone Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The development of the error prone model (EPM) for the 1984-1985 student financial aid validation criteria for Pell Grant recipient selection is discussed, based on a comparison of the 1983-1984 EPM criteria and a newly estimated EPM. Procedures/assumptions on which the new EPM was based include: a sample of 1982-1983 Pell Grant recipients…

  15. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] There were significant differences in the internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae according to the three kinds of bridging exercises. The internal oblique, external oblique and transverse abdominis activities were highest in the prone bridge exercise, followed by those in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and supine bridge exercises. The activity of erector spine was highest in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise followed by the supine bridge exercise and prone bridge exercise. [Conclusion] These results suggest that prone bridge exercise is more effective than conventional supine bridge exercise and supine bridge on Swiss ball in increasing trunk muscle activity of chronic low back pain patients.

  16. The effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Park, Seol; Jang, Gwon-Uk

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven chronic low back pain patients participated in this study. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three exercise groups, namely, a prone bridge exercise group, supine bridge exercise on a Swiss ball group, and supine bridge exercise group. The thicknesses of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) were measured using ultrasound. [Results] After eight weeks of training, the three groups showed significant increases in the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO. Among the groups, TrA and IO showed significantly different muscle thicknesses. [Conclusion] The prone bridge exercise significantly affected the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO unlike the supine bridge exercises. Based on the results of this study, the prone bridge exercise is a more effective method to improve trunk stability than conventional supine bridge exercises.

  17. Counter-transference and counter-experience in the treatment of violence prone youth.

    PubMed

    King, C H

    1976-01-01

    The constant confrontation inherent in therapeutic intervention with violence prone children, some of whome have committed homicide, is explored. Problems unique to work with these youths are discussed in terms of counter-transference issues for clinicians and counter-experience of teachers and child care workers. Suggestions for training and supervision are offered.

  18. A Modified Obesity Proneness Model Predicts Adolescent Weight Concerns and Inability to Self-Regulate Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickelson, Jen; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Buhi, Eric R.; DeBate, Rita D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity among high school students has risen in recent decades. Many high school students report trying to lose weight and some engage in disordered eating to do so. The obesity proneness model suggests that parents may influence their offspring's development of disordered eating. This study examined the…

  19. Supine or prone position for mini-PNL procedure: does it matter.

    PubMed

    Tokatlı, Zafer; Gokce, Mehmet Ilker; Süer, Evren; Sağlam, Remzi

    2015-06-01

    In this study it is aimed to compare the success and complication rates of mini-PNL procedure in supine and prone positions. In this retrospective study data of 180 patients treated with MPNL either in supine (n = 54) or prone (n = 126) positions between May 2009 and August 2014 was investigated. Success was defined as no visible stones >2 mm. Perioperative complications were classified using the modified Clavien system. Groups were compared with Chi square test or Student t test and for statistical significance p value of 0.05 was accepted. Mean age of the population was 42.5 ± 8.2 years and mean stone size was 23.9 ± 4.1 mm. The two groups were similar with regard to demographic characteristics and stone related characteristics except the ASA status. Success rates of the supine and prone groups were 85.1 and 87.3%, respectively (p = 0.701). No statistically significant differences in terms of complications were observed. Mean operative time was the only parameter different between the two groups (55 vs 82 min, p = 0.001). Supine position for PNL seems to be promising and the complication and success rates are shown to be similar to the prone position with MPNL technique. The only significant benefit of this technique is shorter operative time.

  20. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] There were significant differences in the internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae according to the three kinds of bridging exercises. The internal oblique, external oblique and transverse abdominis activities were highest in the prone bridge exercise, followed by those in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and supine bridge exercises. The activity of erector spine was highest in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise followed by the supine bridge exercise and prone bridge exercise. [Conclusion] These results suggest that prone bridge exercise is more effective than conventional supine bridge exercise and supine bridge on Swiss ball in increasing trunk muscle activity of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:26957771

  1. The effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Park, Seol; Jang, Gwon-Uk

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of prone bridge exercise on trunk muscle thickness. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven chronic low back pain patients participated in this study. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three exercise groups, namely, a prone bridge exercise group, supine bridge exercise on a Swiss ball group, and supine bridge exercise group. The thicknesses of the transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) were measured using ultrasound. [Results] After eight weeks of training, the three groups showed significant increases in the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO. Among the groups, TrA and IO showed significantly different muscle thicknesses. [Conclusion] The prone bridge exercise significantly affected the thicknesses of the TrA, IO, and EO unlike the supine bridge exercises. Based on the results of this study, the prone bridge exercise is a more effective method to improve trunk stability than conventional supine bridge exercises. PMID:26311928

  2. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong-soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] There were significant differences in the internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae according to the three kinds of bridging exercises. The internal oblique, external oblique and transverse abdominis activities were highest in the prone bridge exercise, followed by those in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and supine bridge exercises. The activity of erector spine was highest in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise followed by the supine bridge exercise and prone bridge exercise. [Conclusion] These results suggest that prone bridge exercise is more effective than conventional supine bridge exercise and supine bridge on Swiss ball in increasing trunk muscle activity of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:26957771

  3. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora; Chiș, Adina; Vulturar, Romana; Dobrean, Anca; Cândea, Diana Mirela; Miu, Andrei C.

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people’s preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR) on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology. PMID:26230319

  4. [A case of endotracheal intubation in prone position utilizing PENTAX-Airwayscope for morbidly obese patient].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroto; Nakajima, Waka; Aoyagi, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Minori; Kuzuta, Toshimichi; Osaki, Mami

    2012-04-01

    We experienced the airway management of a morbidly obese patient in prone position utilizing PENTAX-Airwayscope (AWS) which is a novel airway device for endotracheal intubation. A 29-year-old man, who was 150 kg in weight and 51.9 kg x m(-2) in body mass index, was scheduled for the discectomy for lumbar disc herniation. After the topical anesthesia with lidocaine spray, the patient lay on his stomach by himself on the table. Following the induction of general anesthesia with ketamine and dexmedetomidine in prone position, an anatomically curved blade (INTLOCK) was inserted to his oral cavity first, then the body of AWS was attached. With the patient breathing spontaneously, we successfully inserted the reinforced endotracheal tube. After the maintenance of anesthesia with continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, ketamin and remifentanil, the patient awoke clearly without pain and endotracheal tube was removed safely in the prone position. Although the prone position is not the standard position for endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia, our technique could be performed in emergency situations.

  5. Update: Validation, Edits, and Application Processing. Phase II and Error-Prone Model Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Susan; And Others

    An update to the Validation, Edits, and Application Processing and Error-Prone Model Report (Section 1, July 3, 1980) is presented. The objective is to present the most current data obtained from the June 1980 Basic Educational Opportunity Grant applicant and recipient files and to determine whether the findings reported in Section 1 of the July…

  6. Female Coronary-Prone Behaviors: Relationship to Alpha and Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, David W.; And Others

    Researchers have been working toward isolating a set of psychological risk factors that would reliably predict coronary problems. This coronary-prone behavior pattern, Type A, is characterized by extremes of competitiveness, striving for achievement, impatience, and hostility. Differences were examined between 20 Type A and 20 Type B…

  7. Flood-prone area maps of three sites along the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamke, Robert D.; Jones, Stanley H.

    1980-01-01

    Flood-prone areas in Alaska are delineated on aerial photographs for the Sagavanirktok River near Pump Station 3, Middle Fork Koyukuk River at Coldfoot, and Jim River near Pump Station 5. An analysis of available flood data and a description of recent flood evidence and maximum evident flood marks are included. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations among Temperament, Ability Estimation, and Injury Proneness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwebel, David C.; Plumert, Jodie M.

    1999-01-01

    Examined relations between temperament, ability estimation, and injury proneness from toddlerhood through school age. Found that children scoring high on Extroversion and low on Inhibitory Control as toddlers and preschoolers tended to overestimate their physical abilities and have more unintentional injuries at age 6. Children low on Extroversion…

  9. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  10. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  11. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  12. Phenotypic and functional alterations of pDCs in lupus-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenyuan; Ma, Jianyang; Xiao, Chunyuan; Han, Xiao; Qiu, Rong; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yingying; Wu, Li; Huang, Xinfang; Shen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were considered to be the major IFNα source in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but their phenotype and function in different disease status have not been well studied. To study the function and phenotype of pDCs in lupus-prone mice we used 7 strains of lupus-prone mice including NZB/W F1, NZB, NZW, NZM2410, B6.NZMSle1/2/3, MRL/lpr and BXSB/Mp mice and C57BL/6 as control mice. Increased spleen pDC numbers were found in most lupus mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. The IFNα-producing ability of BM pDCs was similar between lupus and C57BL/6 mice, whereas pDCs from the spleens of NZB/W F1 and NZB mice produced more IFNα than pDCs from the spleens of C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, spleen pDCs from MRL-lpr and NZM2410 mice showed increased responses to Tlr7 and Tlr9, respectively. As the disease progressed, IFN signature were evaluated in both BM and spleen pDC from lupus prone mice and the number of BM pDCs and their ability to produce IFNα gradually decreased in lupus-prone mice. In conclusion, pDC are activated alone with disease development and its phenotype and function differ among lupus-prone strains, and these differences may contribute to the development of lupus in these mice. PMID:26879679

  13. An Experimental Program to Prepare Vocational-Technical Teachers for Laboratory Classes Designed for Dropout-Prone Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Robert A.

    To prepare vocational-technical teachers to work with dropout-prone youths in laboratories within the school and to discover how successful a special vocational-technical program would be in assisting those students with special needs, 24 dropout-prone occupational exploration students were chosen to participate in a 6-week summer experimental…

  14. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  15. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  16. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  17. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  18. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  19. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  20. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  1. Designing an Algorithm to Preserve Privacy for Medical Record Linkage With Error-Prone Data

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients’ privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. Objective To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. Methods To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. Results We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other’s database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error

  2. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  3. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  4. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  5. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  6. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  7. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  8. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  9. DEM-based Approaches for the Identification of Flood Prone Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Caterina; Manfreda, Salvatore; Nardi, Fernando; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Roth, Giorgio; Sole, Aurelia

    2013-04-01

    The remarkable number of inundations that caused, in the last decades, thousands of deaths and huge economic losses, testifies the extreme vulnerability of many Countries to the flood hazard. As a matter of fact, human activities are often developed in the floodplains, creating conditions of extremely high risk. Terrain morphology plays an important role in understanding, modelling and analyzing the hydraulic behaviour of flood waves. Research during the last 10 years has shown that the delineation of flood prone areas can be carried out using fast methods that relay on basin geomorphologic features. In fact, the availability of new technologies to measure surface elevation (e.g., GPS, SAR, SAR interferometry, RADAR and LASER altimetry) has given a strong impulse to the development of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) based approaches. The identification of the dominant topographic controls on the flood inundation process is a critical research question that we try to tackle with a comparative analysis of several techniques. We reviewed four different approaches for the morphological characterization of a river basin with the aim to provide a description of their performances and to identify their range of applicability. In particular, we explored the potential of the following tools. 1) The hydrogeomorphic method proposed by Nardi et al. (2006) which defines the flood prone areas according to the water level in the river network through the hydrogeomorphic theory. 2) The linear binary classifier proposed by Degiorgis et al. (2012) which allows distinguishing flood-prone areas using two features related to the location of the site under exam with respect to the nearest hazard source. The two features, proposed in the study, are the length of the path that hydrologically connects the location under exam to the nearest element of the drainage network and the difference in elevation between the cell under exam and the final point of the same path. 3) The method by

  10. LANDSAT imagery analysis: An aid for predicting landslide prone areas for highway construction. [in Arkansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H. C.; Grubbs, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The most obvious landform features of geologic significance revealed on LANDSAT imagery are linear trends or lineaments. These trends were found to correspond, at least to a large degree, with unmapped faults or complex fracture zones. LANDSAT imagery analysis in northern Arkansas revealed a lineament complex which provides a remarkable correlation with landslide-prone areas along major highway routes. The weathering properties of various rock types, which are considered in designing stable cut slopes and drainage structures, appear to be adversely influenced by the location and trends of LANDSAT defined lineaments. Geologic interpretation of LANDSAT imagery, where applicable and utilized effectively, provides the highway engineer with a tool for predicting and evaluating landslide-prone areas.

  11. Good practices for prone positioning at the bedside: Construction of a care protocol.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vanessa Martins de; Weschenfelder, Michele Elisa; Deponti, Gracieli; Condessa, Robledo; Loss, Sergio Henrique; Bairros, Patrícia Maurello; Hochegger, Thais; Daroncho, Rogério; Rubin, Bibiana; Chisté, Marcele; Batista, Danusa Cassiana Rigo; Bassegio, Deise Maria; Nauer, Wagner da Silva; Piekala, Daniele Martins; Minossi, Silvia Daniela; Santos, Vanessa Fumaco da Rosa Dos; Victorino, Josue; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2016-01-01

    Last year, interest in prone positioning to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) resurfaced with the demonstration of a reduction in mortality by a large randomized clinical trial. Reports in the literature suggest that the incidence of adverse events is significantly reduced with a team trained and experienced in the process. The objective of this review is to revisit the current evidence in the literature, discuss and propose the construction of a protocol of care for these patients. A search was performed on the main electronic databases: Medline, Lilacs and Cochrane Library. Prone positioning is increasingly used in daily practice, with properly trained staff and a well established care protocol are essencial. PMID:27310555

  12. Acute ischemic optic neuropathy with extended prone position ventilation in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Kapoor, Aanchal; Akindipe, Olufemi; Lane, Charles; Krishnan, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Prone position ventilation (PPV) improves mortality in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but outcomes following its use in lung transplant recipients are not known. We report the case of a 42-year-old Caucasian man who presented with severe ARDS from Bordetella pertussis, 5 years after bilateral sequential lung transplant for cystic fibrosis. He was managed with PPV for 22 days and had a prolonged ICU stay complicated by hypoxic ischemic optic neuropathy leading to blindness. Since his discharge from the ICU 6 months ago, his FEV1 has recovered to 47% predicted compared to his pre-ICU peak FEV1 of 85% predicted, suggesting recovery of lung function. This is the first report of optic nerve damage and vision loss in patients undergoing PPV. Our report also suggests that, in appropriately selected lung transplant recipients, severe hypoxemia could potentially be managed with prone ventilation. PMID:27051622

  13. Meralgia Paresthetica after Prone Positioning Ventilation in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ballegaard, Martin; Bestle, Morten H.; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is a mononeuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) caused by external compression of the nerve during its course close to the anterior superior iliac spine. We present a case of a patient with acute respiratory distress induced by Legionella pneumonia who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation. In the ICU, the patient received one session of prone position ventilation for 8.5 consecutive hours. At evaluation six months later, the patient reported persistent bilateral numbness of the anterolateral thigh, which he complained had begun right after he woke up at the ICU. He was referred for further neurological and neurophysiological examination and was diagnosed with bilateral MP, a condition never previously described as a complication to mechanical ventilation in prone position in the ICU. PMID:27752369

  14. The Prone Position During Surgery and its Complications: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Melissa M.; Ho, Yik-Hong; Rozen, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in the prone position is often a necessity when access to posterior anatomic structures is required. However, many complications are known to be associated with this type of surgery, as physiologic changes occur with increased pressure to anterior structures. While several studies have discussed postoperative vision loss, much fewer studies with lower levels of evidence have addressed other complications. A systematic literature review was conducted using 2 different databases, and 53 papers were regarded as appropriate for inclusion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed. Thirteen complications were identified. Postoperative vision loss and cardiovascular complications, including hypovolemia and cardiac arrest, had the most number of studies and highest level of evidence. Careful planning for optimal positioning, padding, timing, as well as increased vigilance are evidence-based recommendations where operative prone positioning is required. PMID:25692433

  15. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Uma; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal-oxide-semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6MV photons at 200cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94cGy, and shielded dose

  16. Evaluating the fakability of a conditional reasoning test of addiction proneness.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Jennifer L; Bowler, Mark C

    2014-10-01

    The quest to assess personality objectively is riddled with challenges. However, conditional reasoning (CR) methodology takes an innovative approach to personality measurement by indirectly evaluating the cognitive biases associated with specific dispositional traits. In addition to demonstrating strong criterion-related validities, the CR format has been shown to be more resistant to response distortion than traditional self-report measures so long as indirect measurement is maintained. The present study evaluated the necessity of maintaining the indirect nature of a CR-based measure of addiction proneness. Results indicated that disclosing the purpose of assessment yielded significant mean shifts on a CR-based measure of addiction proneness compared to those of an uninformed group. Specifically, when the construct of interest was made explicit, participants could identify the keyed response options when instructed to do so. These findings further underscore the necessity of maintaining indirect measurement when administering CR measures. PMID:25178965

  17. Another White Christmas: fantasy proneness and reports of 'hallucinatory experiences' in undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Merckelbach, H; van de Ven, V

    2001-09-01

    In the current experiment, 44 undergraduate students were asked to listen to white noise and instructed to press a button when they believed hearing a recording of Bing Crosby's White Christmas without this record actually being presented. Fourteen participants (32%) pressed the button at least once. These participants had higher scores on fantasy proneness and the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale (LSHS) compared to participants without hallucinatory reports. Both groups did not differ in terms of imagery vividness or sensitivity to social demands. Logistic regression suggested that fantasy proneness is a better predictor of hallucinatory reports than are LSHS scores. This might imply that hallucinatory reports obtained during the White Christmas test reflect a non-specific preference for odd items rather than schizophrenia-like, internal experiences.

  18. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  19. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  20. Electromagnetic Tracking of Intrafraction Prostate Displacement in Patients Externally Immobilized in the Prone Position

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan; Wallner, Kent E.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intrafraction prostate displacement among patients immobilized in the prone position using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso localization system was used to track prostate motion in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer. All patients were treated in the prone position and immobilized with a thermoplastic immobilization device. Real-time measurement of prostate displacement was recorded for each treatment fraction. These measurements were used to determine the duration and magnitude of displacement along the three directional axes. Results: The calculated centroid of the implanted transponders was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 38.0%, 13.9%, and 4.5% of the time. In the lateral dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.06% of the time. In the superior-inferior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 16.1%, 4.7%, and 1.5% of the time, respectively. In the anterior-posterior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 13.4%, 3.0%, and 0.5% of the time. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate displacement in the prone position is comparable to that in the supine position. For patients with large girth, in whom the supine position may preclude accurate detection of implanted radiofrequency transponders, treatment in the prone position is a suitable alternative.

  1. The effect of auditory verbal imagery on signal detection in hallucination-prone individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Smailes, David; Ellison, Amanda; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive models have suggested that auditory hallucinations occur when internal mental events, such as inner speech or auditory verbal imagery (AVI), are misattributed to an external source. This has been supported by numerous studies indicating that individuals who experience hallucinations tend to perform in a biased manner on tasks that require them to distinguish self-generated from non-self-generated perceptions. However, these tasks have typically been of limited relevance to inner speech models of hallucinations, because they have not manipulated the AVI that participants used during the task. Here, a new paradigm was employed to investigate the interaction between imagery and perception, in which a healthy, non-clinical sample of participants were instructed to use AVI whilst completing an auditory signal detection task. It was hypothesized that AVI-usage would cause participants to perform in a biased manner, therefore falsely detecting more voices in bursts of noise. In Experiment 1, when cued to generate AVI, highly hallucination-prone participants showed a lower response bias than when performing a standard signal detection task, being more willing to report the presence of a voice in the noise. Participants not prone to hallucinations performed no differently between the two conditions. In Experiment 2, participants were not specifically instructed to use AVI, but retrospectively reported how often they engaged in AVI during the task. Highly hallucination-prone participants who retrospectively reported using imagery showed a lower response bias than did participants with lower proneness who also reported using AVI. Results are discussed in relation to prominent inner speech models of hallucinations. PMID:26435050

  2. Long-term Clinical Outcomes of Whole-Breast Irradiation Delivered in the Prone Position

    SciTech Connect

    Stegman, Lauren D.; Beal, Katherine P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Fornier, Monica N.; McCormick, Beryl . E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness and toxicity of post-lumpectomy whole-breast radiation therapy delivered with prone positioning. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and August 2004, 245 women with 248 early-stage invasive or in situ breast cancers were treated using a prone breast board. Photon fields treated the whole breast to 46 to 50.4 Gy with standard fractionation. The target volume was clinically palpable breast tissue; no attempt was made to irradiate chest wall lymphatics. Tumor bed boosts were delivered in 85% of cases. Adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy were administered to 42% and 62% of patients, respectively. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, the 5 year actuarial true local and elsewhere ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates were 4.8% and 1.3%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastases were 1.6% and 7.4%. Actuarial disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates at 5 years were 89.4%, 97.3%, and 93%, respectively. Treatment breaks were required by 2.4% of patients. Grade 3 acute dermatitis and edema were each limited to 2% of patients. Only 4.9% of patients complained of acute chest wall discomfort. Chronic Grade 2 to 3 skin and subcutaneous tissue toxicities were reported in 4.4% and 13.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: Prone position breast radiation results in similar long-term disease control with a favorable toxicity profile compared with standard supine tangents. The anatomic advantages of prone positioning may contribute to improving the therapeutic ratio of post-lumpectomy radiation by improving dose homogeneity and minimizing incidental cardiac and lung dose.

  3. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Relationship between Flow Proneness, Locus of Control and Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mosing, Miriam A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Cesarini, David; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Nakamura, Jeanne; Madison, Guy; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral inhibition and locus of control – traits also associated with neuroticism – and their interrelation. Here, we hypothesized that individuals low in behavioral inhibition and with an internal locus of control would be more likely to experience flow and explored the genetic and environmental architecture of the relationship between the three variables. Behavioral inhibition and locus of control was measured in a large population sample of 3,375 full twin pairs and 4,527 single twins, about 26% of whom also scored the flow proneness questionnaire. Findings revealed significant but relatively low correlations between the three traits and moderate heritability estimates of .41, .45, and .30 for flow proneness, behavioral inhibition, and locus of control, respectively, with some indication of non-additive genetic influences. For behavioral inhibition we found significant sex differences in heritability, with females showing a higher estimate including significant non-additive genetic influences, while in males the entire heritability was due to additive genetic variance. We also found a mainly genetically mediated relationship between the three traits, suggesting that individuals who are genetically predisposed to experience flow, show less behavioral inhibition (less anxious) and feel that they are in control of their own destiny (internal locus of control). We discuss that some of the genes underlying this relationship may include those influencing the function of dopaminergic

  4. Perceived threat mediates the relationship between psychosis proneness and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Jennifer Renee; Berman, Mitchell Eric; Mohn, Richard Samuel; McCloskey, Michael Sean

    2010-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are associated with aggressive tendencies, but this relationship is both complex and imperfect. In contrast to psychotic disorders, little is known about aggressive behavior and sub-clinical psychotic symptoms (e.g., “psychosis proneness”), which are relatively common in the general population. Threat/control-override (TCO), which is the propensity to overestimate the likelihood that an outside agent will (1) inflict harm (threat) or (2) control one’s behaviors (control-override), has been associated with aggression in both psychiatric and community samples. The purpose of this study was to determine if psychosis proneness is related to aggression, and if one or both aspects of TCO mediate this relationship. We hypothesized that the propensity to overestimate threat would mediate this relationship, but control-override would not. Sixty men and sixty women (mean age = 20.00 years, sd = 3.00) with no history of psychotic disorder completed measures assessing psychosis proneness, threat control/override, aggressive history, aggressive ideation, and aggressive behavior. Three structural equation models were tested: (1) Threat and control-override modeled as separate mediating variables, (2) TCO as a unitary mediating latent construct, and (3) TCO considered as part of a psychosis-proneness latent variable. Results indicated that psychosis proneness is positively related to aggression and that the best model fit was obtained when threat and control-override were modeled as separate variables, with mediation through threat alone. The utility of TCO for explaining the relation between psychosis spectrum symptoms and aggression is discussed. PMID:20965573

  5. Registration of prone and supine CT colonography scans using correlation optimized warping and canonical correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shijun; Yao Jianhua; Liu Jiamin; Petrick, Nicholas; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), a patient will be scanned twice--Once supine and once prone--to improve the sensitivity for polyp detection. To assist radiologists in CTC reading, in this paper we propose an automated method for colon registration from supine and prone CTC scans. Methods: We propose a new colon centerline registration method for prone and supine CTC scans using correlation optimized warping (COW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based on the anatomical structure of the colon. Four anatomical salient points on the colon are first automatically distinguished. Then correlation optimized warping is applied to the segments defined by the anatomical landmarks to improve the global registration based on local correlation of segments. The COW method was modified by embedding canonical correlation analysis to allow multiple features along the colon centerline to be used in our implementation. Results: We tested the COW algorithm on a CTC data set of 39 patients with 39 polyps (19 training and 20 test cases) to verify the effectiveness of the proposed COW registration method. Experimental results on the test set show that the COW method significantly reduces the average estimation error in a polyp location between supine and prone scans by 67.6%, from 46.27{+-}52.97 to 14.98 mm{+-}11.41 mm, compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline algorithm (p<0.01). Conclusions: The proposed COW algorithm is more accurate for the colon centerline registration compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline method and the dynamic time warping method. Comparison results showed that the feature combination of z-coordinate and curvature achieved lowest registration error compared to the other feature combinations used by COW. The proposed method is tolerant to centerline errors because anatomical landmarks help prevent the propagation of errors across the entire colon centerline.

  6. Differential expression of APE1 and APE2 in germinal centers promotes error-prone repair and A:T mutations during somatic hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, Janet; Linehan, Erin K.; Thompson, Mikayla R.; Habboub, Ghaith; Ucher, Anna J.; Kadungure, Tatenda; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Schrader, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody variable region genes is initiated in germinal center B cells during an immune response by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines to uracils. During accurate repair in nonmutating cells, uracil is excised by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), leaving abasic sites that are incised by AP endonuclease (APE) to create single-strand breaks, and the correct nucleotide is reinserted by DNA polymerase β. During SHM, for unknown reasons, repair is error prone. There are two APE homologs in mammals and, surprisingly, APE1, in contrast to its high expression in both resting and in vitro-activated splenic B cells, is expressed at very low levels in mouse germinal center B cells where SHM occurs, and APE1 haploinsufficiency has very little effect on SHM. In contrast, the less efficient homolog, APE2, is highly expressed and contributes not only to the frequency of mutations, but also to the generation of mutations at A:T base pair (bp), insertions, and deletions. In the absence of both UNG and APE2, mutations at A:T bp are dramatically reduced. Single-strand breaks generated by APE2 could provide entry points for exonuclease recruited by the mismatch repair proteins Msh2–Msh6, and the known association of APE2 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen could recruit translesion polymerases to create mutations at AID-induced lesions and also at A:T bp. Our data provide new insight into error-prone repair of AID-induced lesions, which we propose is facilitated by down-regulation of APE1 and up-regulation of APE2 expression in germinal center B cells. PMID:24927551

  7. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  8. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  9. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  10. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  11. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  12. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  13. Accelerators (5/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-09

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  14. Accelerators (4/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-08

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  15. Accelerators (3/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-07

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  16. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  17. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  18. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  19. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  20. KEK digital accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  1. Random mutagenesis by error-prone pol plasmid replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David L; Lilly, Joshua; Hernandez, Jaime; Romsdahl, Jillian; Troll, Christopher J; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Directed evolution is an approach that mimics natural evolution in the laboratory with the goal of modifying existing enzymatic activities or of generating new ones. The identification of mutants with desired properties involves the generation of genetic diversity coupled with a functional selection or screen. Genetic diversity can be generated using PCR or using in vivo methods such as chemical mutagenesis or error-prone replication of the desired sequence in a mutator strain. In vivo mutagenesis methods facilitate iterative selection because they do not require cloning, but generally produce a low mutation density with mutations not restricted to specific genes or areas within a gene. For this reason, this approach is typically used to generate new biochemical properties when large numbers of mutants can be screened or selected. Here we describe protocols for an advanced in vivo mutagenesis method that is based on error-prone replication of a ColE1 plasmid bearing the gene of interest. Compared to other in vivo mutagenesis methods, this plasmid-targeted approach allows increased mutation loads and facilitates iterative selection approaches. We also describe the mutation spectrum for this mutagenesis methodology in detail, and, using cycle 3 GFP as a target for mutagenesis, we illustrate the phenotypic diversity that can be generated using our method. In sum, error-prone Pol I replication is a mutagenesis method that is ideally suited for the evolution of new biochemical activities when a functional selection is available.

  2. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    PubMed

    Iraqui, Ismail; Chekkal, Yasmina; Jmari, Nada; Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination.

  3. Emotional processing in a non-clinical psychosis-prone sample.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Mascha; Aleman, André; Kessels, Roy P C; Larøi, Frank; Kahn, René S

    2004-06-01

    Symptoms of psychosis have been proposed to form part of a continuous distribution of experiences in the general population rather than being an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Indeed, schizotypal signs have been reported in subjects from non-clinical samples. Emotional processing has been documented to be deficient in schizophrenia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether putatively psychosis-prone subjects would show abnormalities in emotion processing. Based on the extremes of Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale (LSHS) ratings of 200 undergraduate students, two groups of subjects (total N=40) were selected. All 40 participants filled in the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). We compared both groups on an alexithymia questionnaire and on four behavioral emotional information processing tasks. Hallucination-proneness was associated with an increased subjective emotional arousal and fantasy-proneness. Although no differences between the high and low group were observed on three behavioral emotion processing tasks, on the affective word-priming task presentation of emotional stimuli was associated with longer reactions times to neutral words in high schizotypal subjects. Also, SPQ scores correlated with several emotion processing tasks. We conclude that these findings lend partial support to the hypothesis of continuity between symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia and psychosis-related phenomena in the normal population. PMID:15099609

  4. Ten-Year Study of the Stringently Defined Otitis-prone Child in Rochester, NY.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    This review summarizes a prospective, longitudinal 10-year study in Rochester, NY, with virtually every clinically diagnosed acute otitis media (AOM) confirmed by bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. Children experiencing 3 episodes within 6 months or 4 episodes in 12 months were considered stringently defined otitis prone (sOP). We found stringent diagnosis compared with clinical diagnosis reduced the frequency of children meeting the OP definition from 27% to 6% resulting in 14.8% and 2.4% receiving tympanostomy tubes, respectively. Significantly more often respiratory syncytial virus infection led to AOM in sOP than non-otitis-prone children that correlated with diminished total respiratory syncytial virus-specific serum IgG. sOP children produced low levels of antibody to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae candidate vaccine protein antigens and to routine pediatric vaccines. sOP children generated significantly fewer memory B cells, functional and memory T cells to otopathogens following nasopharyngeal colonization and AOM than non-otitis-prone children and they had defects in antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27273691

  5. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  6. Aversion and proneness to shame in self- and informant-reported personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-07-01

    The present study examined the specificity and extent of relationships between shame and symptoms of five personality disorders (PDs), as they are apparent to both the self and others. Borderline, narcissistic, avoidant, dependent, and obsessive-compulsive PD symptoms were assessed in a sample of 367 undergraduates that evidenced a wide range of symptom levels (25.6% endorsed threshold or greater severity of symptoms on the Schedule of Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality-2). Importantly, for both conceptual and methodological reasons, information about PD symptoms was also obtained from friends/family of 45.2% of the sample. Shame aversion (the tendency to perceive shame as a particularly painful and unwanted emotion) was assessed using the Shame-Aversive Reactions Questionnaire, and shame-proneness (the propensity to experience shame across situations) was assessed using the Test of Self-Conscious Affect-3. Shame aversion displayed the most consistent relationship with PD symptoms, being associated with self-reports of symptoms of all five PDs and informant-reports of symptoms of three PDs, over and above experiential avoidance, trait affect, and guilt. A significant Shame Aversion × Shame-Proneness interaction further revealed that shame-proneness was associated with symptoms of avoidant and dependent PDs among individuals with high but not low levels of shame aversion. Thus, these findings highlight shame aversion's specific importance in PD symptoms and suggest important future research directions.

  7. Lupus-prone mice fail to raise antigen-specific T cell responses to intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Linda A; Tsokos, George C

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by multiple cellular abnormalities culminating in the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes, resulting in tissue inflammation and organ damage. Besides active disease, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE patients is infections, including those from opportunistic pathogens. To understand the failure of the immune system to fend off infections in systemic autoimmunity, we infected the lupus-prone murine strains B6.lpr and BXSB with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii and survival was monitored. Furthermore, mice were sacrificed days post infection and parasite burden and cellular immune responses such as cytokine production and cell activation were assessed. Mice from both strains succumbed to infection acutely and we observed greater susceptibility to infection in older mice. Increased parasite burden and a defective antigen-specific IFN-gamma response were observed in the lupus-prone mice. Furthermore, T cell:dendritic cell co-cultures established the presence of an intrinsic T cell defect responsible for the decreased antigen-specific response. An antigen-specific defect in IFN- gamma production prevents lupus-prone mice from clearing infection effectively. This study reveals the first cellular insight into the origin of increased susceptibility to infections in SLE disease and may guide therapeutic approaches.

  8. Non-invasive ventilation in prone position for refractory hypoxemia after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Serra, Eugenio; Barbieri, Stefania; Persona, Paolo; Rea, Federico; Loy, Monica; Ori, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Temporary graft dysfunction with gas exchange abnormalities is a common finding during the postoperative course of a lung transplant and is often determined by the post-reimplantation syndrome. Supportive measures including oxygen by mask, inotropes, diuretics, and pulmonary vasodilators are usually effective in non-severe post-reimplantation syndromes. However, in less-responsive clinical pictures, tracheal intubation with positive pressure ventilation, or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV), is necessary. We report on the clinical course of two patients suffering from refractory hypoxemia due to post-reimplantation syndrome treated with NIV in the prone and Trendelenburg positions. NIV was well tolerated and led to resolution of atelectactic areas and dishomogeneous lung infiltrates. Repeated turning from supine to prone under non invasive ventilation determined a stable improvement of gas exchange and prevented a more invasive approach. Even though NIV in the prone position has not yet entered into clinical practice, it could be an interesting option to achieve a better match between ventilation and perfusion. This technique, which we successfully applied in lung transplantation, can be easily extended to other lung diseases with non-recruitable dorso-basal areas.

  9. Factors Associated with Larval Control Practices in a Dengue Outbreak Prone Area

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Mariam; Selamat, Mohamad Ikhsan; Ismail, Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the risk of dengue outbreak recurrence in a dengue outbreak prone area, the members of the community need to sustain certain behavior to prevent mosquito from breeding. Our study aims to identify the factors associated with larval control practices in this particular community. A cross-sectional study involves 322 respondents living in a dengue outbreak prone area who were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire. The level of knowledge about Aedes mosquitoes, dengue transmission, its symptoms, and personal preventive measures ranges from fair to good. The level of attitude towards preventive measures was high. However, reported level of personal larval control practices was low (33.2%). Our multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only those with a good level of attitude towards personal preventive measure and frequent attendance to health campaigns were significantly associated with the good larval control practices. We conclude that, in a dengue outbreak prone area, having a good attitude towards preventive measures and frequent participation in health campaigns are important factors to sustain practices on larval control. PMID:25309602

  10. Description of a Simple Method of Stoma Protection During Prone Positioning.

    PubMed

    Mackert, Gina A; Reid, Christopher M; Dobke, Marek K; Tenenhaus, Mayer

    2016-06-01

    Surgeries conducted with the patient in the prone position are frequent and can be lengthy. Abdominal stomas and su- prapubic catheters require protection for the complete duration of the procedure to avoid complications such as stomal ischemia, bleeding, or mucocutaneous separation. Standard protection strategies such as pillows and wedges can eas- ily fail. In the course of managing several patients who had sustained ostomy complications following surgery in a prone position, a simple method of stoma protection was devised. Instead of discarding the foam headrest typically used dur- ing induction by anesthesia staff, this device is placed with its central recess over the stoma and secured to the patient's abdominal wall with gentle tape just before turning the patient into a prone position. This method, used in more than 80 patients, has been found to effectively relieve pressure, and no complications have been observed. The foam shape also enables unobstructed drainage of fluids, facilitating collection and preventing leakage and contamination of the surgical field. Because the device is widely used by anesthesia, it is readily available and does not add any extra cost. PMID:27356146

  11. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  12. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  13. Screening of microRNAs associated with Alzheimer's disease using oxidative stress cell model and different strains of senescence accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Qingfu; Niu, Jingya; Lu, Kang; Xie, Bing; Cui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shunjiang

    2014-03-15

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the molecular mechanisms that control the neuron response to oxidative stress have been extensively studied. However, the effects of oxidative stress on miRNA expression in hippocampal neurons has not been investigated, and little is known about the roles of ROS-modulated miRNAs in cell function as yet. In this study, miRNA microarray technology was used to analyze the expression of miRNAs in the oxidative stressed primary hippocampal neurons, hippocampus of senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and prone 10 (SAMP10). The targets of co-regulated microRNAs were also selected for computational prediction using miRWalk software and functional analysis by the DAVID software. In addition, the changes of co-regulated microRNA expression were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of microarray analysis showed that miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a, miR-296, and miR-130b were all upregulated in H2O2-induced primary hippocampal neurons and different strains of senescence accelerated mice. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that these co-regulated microRNAs may be involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, signal transmission and cancer development. In which, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was one of the most significant pathways to be affected by 83 target genes of miR-329, miR-193b, miR-20a miR-296, and miR-130b. The quantitative real-time PCR data confirmed the alterations of the co-upregulated miRNAs. These results suggested that oxidative stress alters the miRNA expression profile of hippocampal neurons, and the deregulated miRNAs might play potential roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study provided a strong basis for the future study aiming at contributions of miRNAs induced by oxidative stress in AD.

  14. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  15. The volume effect in irradiated mouse colorectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark William

    1997-11-01

    Damage of the colorectum is the dose-limiting normal tissue complication following radiotherapy of prostate and cervical cancers. One approach for decreasing complications is to physically reduce the treatment volume. Mathematical models have been previously developed to describe the change in associated toxicity with a change in irradiated volume, i.e. the 'volume effect', for serial-type normal tissues including the colorectum. The first goal of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that there would not be a threshold length in the development of obstruction after irradiation of mouse colorectum, as predicted by the Probability model of the volume effect. The second goal was to examine if there were differences in the threshold and in the incidence of colorectal obstruction after irradiation of two mouse strains, C57B1/6 (C57) and C3Hf/Kam (C3H), previously found to be fibrosis-prone and-resistant, respectively, after lung irradiation due, in part, to genetic differences. The hypothesis examined was that differences in incidence between strains were due to the differential expression of the fibrogenic cytokines TGF/beta and TNF/alpha. Various lengths of C57 and C3H mouse colorectum were irradiated and the incidence of colorectal obstruction was followed up to 15 months. A threshold length was observed for both mouse strains, in contradiction of model predictions. The mechanism of the threshold was epithelial regeneration after irradiation. C57 mice had significantly higher incidence of colorectal obstruction compared to C3H mice, especially at smaller irradiated lengths. Colorectal tissue was obtained at various times after irradiation and prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNase protection assay for measurement of TGF/beta 1, 2, 3 and TNF/alpha mRNA. Distinct strain differences in the histological time of appearance and spatial locations of fibrosis were observed. However, there were no consistent strain difference in mRNA levels or

  16. Child anger proneness moderates associations between child-mother attachment security and child behavior with mothers at 33 months.

    PubMed

    McElwain, Nancy L; Holland, Ashley S; Engle, Jennifer M; Wong, Maria S

    2012-02-01

    Child-mother attachment security, assessed via a modified Strange Situation procedure (Cassidy & Marvin, with the MacArthur Attachment Working Group, 1992), and parent-reported child proneness to anger were examined as correlates of observed child behavior toward mothers during a series of interactive tasks (N = 120, 60 girls). Controlling for maternal sensitivity and child gender and expressive language ability, greater attachment security, and lower levels of anger proneness were related to more child responsiveness to maternal requests and suggestions during play and snack sessions. As hypothesized, anger proneness also moderated several security-behavior associations. Greater attachment security was related to (a) more committed compliance during clean-up and snack-delay tasks for children high on anger proneness, (b) more self-assertiveness during play and snack for children moderate or high on anger proneness, and (c) more help-seeking during play and snack for children moderate or low on anger proneness. Findings further our understanding of the behavioral correlates of child-mother attachment security assessed during late toddlerhood via the Cassidy-Marvin system and underscore child anger proneness as a moderator of attachment-related differences in child behavior during this developmental period. PMID:22182337

  17. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  18. The Benefits of Prone SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Reducing Both Artifact Defects and Patient Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the “gold standard” for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. PMID:26559981

  19. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production. PMID:24477002

  20. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  1. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected breast cancer patients. The median prescription dose to the optimized planning target volume (PTVoptim) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume parameters and indices of conformity were calculated for the PTVoptim and organs-at-risk. Results Prone MB-IMRT achieved (p<0.01) the best dose homogeneity compared to WTF in the prone position and WTF and MB-IMRT in the supine position. Prone IMRT scored better for all dose indices. MB-IMRT lowered lung and heart dose (p<0.05) in supine position, however the lowest ipsilateral lung doses (p<0.001) were in prone position. In left-sided breast cancer patients population averages for heart sparing by radiation dose was better in prone position; though non-significant. For patients with a PTVoptim volume ≥600 cc heart dose was consistently lower in prone position; while for patients with smaller breasts heart dose metrics were comparable or worse compared to supine MB-IMRT. Doses to the contralateral breast were similar regardless of position or technique. Dosimetry of prone MB-IMRT and prone TF-IMRT differed slightly. Conclusions MB-IMRT is the treatment of choice in supine position. Prone IMRT is superior to any supine treatment for right-sided breast cancer patients and left-sided breast cancer patients with larger breasts by obtaining better conformity indices, target dose distribution and sparing of the organs-at-risk. The influence of treatment techniques in prone position is less pronounced; moreover dosimetric differences between TF

  2. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  3. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  4. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  5. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  6. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  7. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  8. In silico analysis of gene expression profiles in the olfactory mucosae of aging senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Thomas V; Peng, Xuejun; Green, C Paul; Stromberg, Arnold J; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Mattson, Mark P; Getchell, Marilyn L

    2004-08-01

    We utilized high-density Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to investigate gene expression in the olfactory mucosae of near age-matched aging senescence-accelerated mice (SAM). The senescence-prone (SAMP) strain has a significantly shorter lifespan than does the senescence-resistant (SAMR) strain. To analyze our data, we applied biostatistical methods that included a correlation analysis to evaluate sources of methodologic and biological variability; a two-sided t-test to identify a subpopulation of Present genes with a biologically relevant P-value <0.05; and a false discovery rate (FDR) analysis adjusted to a stringent 5% level that yielded 127 genes with a P-value of <0.001 that were differentially regulated in near age-matched SAMPs (SAMP-Os; 13.75 months) compared to SAMRs (SAMR-Os, 12.5 months). Volcano plots related the variability in the mean hybridization signals as determined by the two-sided t-test to fold changes in gene expression. The genes were categorized into the six functional groups used previously in gene profiling experiments to identify candidate genes that may be relevant for senescence at the genomic and cellular levels in the aging mouse brain (Lee et al. [2000] Nat Genet 25:294-297) and in the olfactory mucosa (Getchell et al. [2003] Ageing Res Rev 2:211-243), which serves several functions that include chemosensory detection, immune barrier function, xenobiotic metabolism, and neurogenesis. Because SAMR-Os and SAMP-Os have substantially different median lifespans, we related the rate constant alpha in the Gompertz equation on aging to intrinsic as opposed to environmental mechanisms of senescence based on our analysis of genes modulated during aging in the olfactory mucosa. PMID:15248299

  9. Age-related trends in gene expression in the chemosensory-nasal mucosae of senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Thomas V; Peng, Xuejun; Stromberg, Arnold J; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Paul Green, C; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Shah, Dharmen S; Mattson, Mark P; Getchell, Marilyn L

    2003-04-01

    We have utilized high-density GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays to investigate the use of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) as a biogerontological resource to identify patterns of gene expression in the chemosensory-nasal mucosa. Gene profiling in chronologically young and old mice of the senescence-resistant (SAMR) and senescence-prone (SAMP) strains revealed 133 known genes that were modulated by a three-fold or greater change either in one strain or the other or in both strains during aging. We also identified known genes in our study which based on their encoded proteins were identified as aging-related genes in the aging neocortex and cerebellum of mice as reported by Lee et al. (2000) [Nat. Genet. 25 (2000) 294]. Changes in gene profiles for chemosensory-related genes including olfactory and vomeronasal receptors, sensory transduction-associated proteins, and odor and pheromone transport molecules in the young SAMR and SAMP were compared with age-matched C57BL/6J mice. An analysis of known gene expression profiles suggests that changes in the expression of immune factor genes and genes associated with cell cycle progression and cell death were particularly prominent in the old SAM strains. A preliminary cellular validation study supported the dysregulation of cell cycle-related genes in the old SAM strains. The results of our initial study indicated that the use of the SAM models of aging could provide substantive information leading to a more fundamental understanding of the aging process in the chemosensory-nasal mucosa at the genomic, molecular, and cellular levels. PMID:12605961

  10. Exome sequencing of senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) reveals deleterious mutations in degenerative disease-causing genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) are a series of mouse strains originally derived from unexpected crosses between AKR/J and unknown mice, from which phenotypically distinct senescence-prone (SAMP) and -resistant (SAMR) inbred strains were subsequently established. Although SAMP strains have been widely used for aging research focusing on their short life spans and various age-related phenotypes, such as immune dysfunction, osteoporosis, and brain atrophy, the responsible gene mutations have not yet been fully elucidated. Results To identify mutations specific to SAMP strains, we performed whole exome sequencing of 6 SAMP and 3 SAMR strains. This analysis revealed 32,019 to 38,925 single-nucleotide variants in the coding region of each SAM strain. We detected Ogg1 p.R304W and Mbd4 p.D129N deleterious mutations in all 6 of the SAMP strains but not in the SAMR or AKR/J strains. Moreover, we extracted 31 SAMP-specific novel deleterious mutations. In all SAMP strains except SAMP8, we detected a p.R473W missense mutation in the Ldb3 gene, which has been associated with myofibrillar myopathy. In 3 SAMP strains (SAMP3, SAMP10, and SAMP11), we identified a p.R167C missense mutation in the Prx gene, in which mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (Dejerine-Sottas syndrome) have been identified. In SAMP6 we detected a p.S540fs frame-shift mutation in the Il4ra gene, a mutation potentially causative of ulcerative colitis and osteoporosis. Conclusions Our data indicate that different combinations of mutations in disease-causing genes may be responsible for the various phenotypes of SAMP strains. PMID:23586671

  11. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  12. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  13. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  14. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  15. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  16. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  17. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  18. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  19. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  20. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  2. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  3. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  4. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  5. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  6. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  7. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  8. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  9. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  10. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  11. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  12. Nanomaterial Containing Wall Paints Can Increase Radon Concentration in Houses Located in Radon Prone Areas

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Moradgholi, J.; Darvish, L.; Fathi-Pour, E.; Ansari, L.; Ghanbar-pour, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m–3) have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. Objective: This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Methods: Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonitenanoclay. Results: Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint) was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m3 while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model) was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m3. The difference between these means was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations.  It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes. PMID:25505754

  13. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    PubMed

    Iraqui, Ismail; Chekkal, Yasmina; Jmari, Nada; Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination. PMID:23093942

  14. Quick Analysis Method for Estimating Debris Flow Prone Area Caused by Overflow from Landslide dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Uchida, T.; Yamakoshi, T.; Yoshino, K.; Kisa, H.; Ishizuka, T.; Kaji, A.

    2012-04-01

    When earthquake or torrential rainfall cause deep catastrophic landslides, landslide dams can be formed in mountainous region. If water overflows from the landslide dams, large scale debris flow can occurs and possibly causes serious disasters in the downward region. Debris flow caused by the overflow from landslide dam is possible to affect the larger area than normal debris flow and flash flood. It is important for both a decision maker and resident in the area to recognize the disaster prone area as early as possible. For that reason, it is important to establish a quick analysis method for estimating debris flow prone area caused by overflow from landslide dams under the emergency situation. This situation requires the method to have both accuracy and speed for release. Nonetheless these two factors have trade-off relationship. We recently developed the quick analysis method to estimate debris flow disaster prone area caused by overflow from landslide dams. The method including the ways of efficient survey and numerical simulation programs called QUAD-L (QUick Analysis system for Debris flow caused by Landslide dam overflow). Our quick analysis system was actually applied to show the area for evacuation against debris flow caused by overflow from landslide dam formed by the 2011 Typhoon Talas which hit mainly the central region of Japan on September 2-4th, 2011. In addition to background of this application, since May 1st, 2011, Erosion and Sediment Control (SABO) Department of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Japan (MLIT) launched a new scheme using above-mentioned quick analysis method.

  15. Increase of ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by error-prone whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Luhe, Annette Lin; Tan, Lily; Wu, Jinchuan; Zhao, Hua

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was transformed for higher ethanol tolerance by error-prone whole genome amplification. The resulting PCR products were transformed back to the parental strain for homologous recombination to create a library of mutants with the perturbed genomic networks. A few rounds of transformation led to the isolation of mutants that grew in 9% (v/v) ethanol and 100 g glucose l(-1) compared to untransformed yeast which grew only at 6% (v/v) ethanol and 100 g glucose l(-1).

  16. Prone position for minimal invasive or all-arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation at the patella.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Sartory, Nico; Yang, Yuping; Feil, Sven; Paessler, Hans H

    2011-12-01

    Full size retropatellar cartilage lesions are troublesome conditions to treat and an autologous chondrocyte implantation with or without matrix or scaffold in supine position is difficult. Usually, it is necessary to perform a large arthrotomy to evert the patella in order to get sufficient access to the retropatellar cartilage defect. The procedure is associated with a significant parapatellar soft tissue trauma to the patient. This technical note introcudes a minimal invasive approach with the patient in prone position using an all-arthroscopic or mini-open technique to treat retropatellar full size articular cartilage lesions of the patella.

  17. Influence of diet on vascular lesions in autoimmune-prone B/W mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, G; Alonso, D R; Tanaka, T; Thaler, H T; Yunis, E J; Good, R A

    1983-01-01

    Autoimmune-prone B/W mice, which are known to develop severe glomerulonephritis and vasculitis, also are found to develop arteritis and proliferative and fatty-proliferative lesions of the aorta and its branches as well as renal inflammatory lesions. High intake of saturated fat in the diet enhances the development of these atherosclerotic and autoimmune lesions significantly in female mice, whereas restriction of dietary calories and fat inhibits their development. Ad lib feeding of laboratory chow, high in fiber and low in fat, does not foster development of vascular lesions but does permit the development of autoimmune renal disease. Images PMID:6572374

  18. On the relationship between meaning in life and boredom proneness: examining a logotherapy postulate.

    PubMed

    Melton, Amanda M A; Schulenberg, Stefan E

    2007-12-01

    Logotherapy, developed by Viktor Frankl, posits that when one lacks meaning in life, boredom can result. Thus, the two constructs should be inversely related. To examine this relationship, 279 students (M = 19.8 yr., SD = 2.6; 179 women, 98 men) from a university in the southern United States were administered the Purpose of Life test and the Boredom Proneness Scale. As expected, a statistically significant negative correlation was found between the scores on the two scales (r = -.71). Directions for research are offered.

  19. Crisis Management of Accidental Extubation in a Prone-Positioned Patient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spond, Matthew; Burns, Tyler; Rosenbaum, Thea; Lienhart, Kristen

    2016-06-15

    We present the case of an accidental extubation in a prone-positioned patient with a challenging airway because of Klippel-Feil syndrome and previous cervical spine fusions. The surgical procedure was well underway when this occurred, which added substantially to the difficulties produced by this event. We herein highlight the corrective steps we took in our case. We also recommend the need for a comprehensive preoperative briefing with all operating room personnel together with an action plan for how to prevent this particular scenario. PMID:27301052

  20. Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Reconnection Acceleration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A.; Stone, E.; Decker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shock waves, as shown by simulations and observations, can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence, including magnetic islands. We consider a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes as an energization mechanism for charged particles. Observations of electron and ion distributions downstream of interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) are frequently inconsistent with the predictions of classical DSA. We utilize a recently developed transport theory for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets. Particle energization associated with the anti-reconnection electric field, a consequence of magnetic island merging, and magnetic island contraction, are considered. For the former only, we find that (i) the spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed, and (ii) the downstream solution is constant. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, (i) the accelerated spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed; (ii) the particle intensity for a given energy peaks downstream of the shock, and the distance to the peak location increases with increasing particle energy, and (iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x,c/{c}0)/f(0,c/{c}0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA, but increases with increasing particle energy. The general solution combines both the reconnection-induced electric field and plasmoid contraction. The observed energetic particle intensity profile observed by Voyager 2 downstream of the HTS appears to support a particle acceleration mechanism that combines both DSA and magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes.

  1. Holding Back the Tears: Individual Differences in Adult Crying Proneness Reflect Attachment Orientation and Attitudes to Crying.

    PubMed

    Millings, Abigail; Hepper, Erica G; Hart, Claire M; Swift, Louise; Rowe, Angela C

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a universal human attachment behavior, little is known about individual differences in crying. To facilitate such examination we first recommend shortened versions of the attitudes and proneness sections of the Adult Crying Inventory using two independent samples. Importantly, we examine attachment orientation differences in crying proneness and test the mediating role of attitudes toward crying in this relationship. Participants (Sample 1 N = 623, Sample 2 N = 781), completed online measures of adult attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety), attitudes toward crying, and crying proneness. Exploratory factor analyses in Sample 1 revealed four factors for crying attitudes: crying helps one feel better; crying is healthy; hatred of crying; and crying is controllable; and three factors for crying proneness: threat to self; sadness; and joy. Confirmatory factor analyses in Sample 2 replicated these structures. Theoretically and statistically justified short forms of each scale were created. Multiple mediation analyses revealed similar patterns of results across the two samples, with the attitudes "crying is healthy" and "crying is controllable" consistently mediating the positive links between attachment anxiety and crying proneness, and the negative links between attachment avoidance and crying proneness. Results are discussed in relation to attachment and emotion regulation literature. PMID:27458402

  2. Holding Back the Tears: Individual Differences in Adult Crying Proneness Reflect Attachment Orientation and Attitudes to Crying.

    PubMed

    Millings, Abigail; Hepper, Erica G; Hart, Claire M; Swift, Louise; Rowe, Angela C

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a universal human attachment behavior, little is known about individual differences in crying. To facilitate such examination we first recommend shortened versions of the attitudes and proneness sections of the Adult Crying Inventory using two independent samples. Importantly, we examine attachment orientation differences in crying proneness and test the mediating role of attitudes toward crying in this relationship. Participants (Sample 1 N = 623, Sample 2 N = 781), completed online measures of adult attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety), attitudes toward crying, and crying proneness. Exploratory factor analyses in Sample 1 revealed four factors for crying attitudes: crying helps one feel better; crying is healthy; hatred of crying; and crying is controllable; and three factors for crying proneness: threat to self; sadness; and joy. Confirmatory factor analyses in Sample 2 replicated these structures. Theoretically and statistically justified short forms of each scale were created. Multiple mediation analyses revealed similar patterns of results across the two samples, with the attitudes "crying is healthy" and "crying is controllable" consistently mediating the positive links between attachment anxiety and crying proneness, and the negative links between attachment avoidance and crying proneness. Results are discussed in relation to attachment and emotion regulation literature.

  3. Holding Back the Tears: Individual Differences in Adult Crying Proneness Reflect Attachment Orientation and Attitudes to Crying

    PubMed Central

    Millings, Abigail; Hepper, Erica G.; Hart, Claire M.; Swift, Louise; Rowe, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a universal human attachment behavior, little is known about individual differences in crying. To facilitate such examination we first recommend shortened versions of the attitudes and proneness sections of the Adult Crying Inventory using two independent samples. Importantly, we examine attachment orientation differences in crying proneness and test the mediating role of attitudes toward crying in this relationship. Participants (Sample 1 N = 623, Sample 2 N = 781), completed online measures of adult attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety), attitudes toward crying, and crying proneness. Exploratory factor analyses in Sample 1 revealed four factors for crying attitudes: crying helps one feel better; crying is healthy; hatred of crying; and crying is controllable; and three factors for crying proneness: threat to self; sadness; and joy. Confirmatory factor analyses in Sample 2 replicated these structures. Theoretically and statistically justified short forms of each scale were created. Multiple mediation analyses revealed similar patterns of results across the two samples, with the attitudes “crying is healthy” and “crying is controllable” consistently mediating the positive links between attachment anxiety and crying proneness, and the negative links between attachment avoidance and crying proneness. Results are discussed in relation to attachment and emotion regulation literature. PMID:27458402

  4. The relation between social behavior and negative affect in psychosis-prone individuals: an experience sampling investigation.

    PubMed

    Husky, Mathilde M; Grondin, Olivier S; Swendsen, Joel D

    2004-02-01

    Daily social behavior and negative affect were examined in a sample of individuals with a wide spectrum of psychosis-proneness scores. Using the experience sampling method, participants were signaled five times per day for a 1-week period to provide naturalistic reports of location, activity, and social behavior. Little evidence was found for a direct association between psychosis-proneness and specific behavioral profiles, but individuals with higher scores of psychosis-proneness reported spending more time doing nothing or waiting. However, the levels of anxious and depressed moods experienced in certain social and environmental contexts were also predicted by psychosis-proneness scores. The present results indicate that psychosis-proneness was associated with an increase in anxiety when individuals were with friends and an increase in depressed mood in daily task situations such as working or studying. By contrast, psychosis-proneness predicted a decrease in depressed and anxious moods in other situations when the individual was not likely to be confronted by social contact with less known individuals, and lower anxious and depressed moods when in secure environments (in one's own home, home of family or friends). The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of understanding the expression of psychosis vulnerability and the potential reinforcement of maladaptive social behavior through operant conditioning mechanisms.

  5. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    PubMed

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  6. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were

  7. VIP treatment prevents embryo resorption by modulating efferocytosis and activation profile of maternal macrophages in the CBAxDBA resorption prone model

    PubMed Central

    Gallino, Lucila; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Fraccaroli, Laura; Grasso, Esteban; Vermeulen, Mónica; Leirós, Claudia Pérez; Ramhorst, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation occurs followed by a local pro-inflammatory response subsequently shifted toward a tolerogenic one. VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) has embryotrofic, anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic effects. In this sense, we investigated whether the in vivo treatment with VIP contributes to an immunosuppressant local microenvironment associated with an improved pregnancy outcome in the CBA/J × DBA/2 resorption prone model. Pregnancy induced the expression of VIP, VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the uterus from CBA/J × DBA/2 mating females on day 8.5 of gestation compared with non-pregnant mice. VIP treatment (2 nmol/mouse i.p.) on day 6.5 significantly increased the number of viable implantation sites and improved the asymmetric distribution of implanted embryos. This effect was accompanied by a decrease in RORγt and an increase in TGF-β and PPARγ expression at the implantation sites. Moreover, VIP modulated the maternal peritoneal macrophages efferocytosis ability, tested using latex beads-FITC or apoptotic thymocytes, displaying an increased frequency of IL-10-producer F4/80 cells while did not modulate TNF-α and IL-12 secretion. The present data suggest that VIP treatment increases the number of viable embryos associated with an increase in the efferocytic ability of maternal macrophages which is related to an immunosuppressant microenvironment. PMID:26733206

  8. Influence of unlabeled monoclonal anti-mouse antibody on the clearance rate of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Laino, L.; Jackson, G.; Fisher, S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    High blood background levels of intact radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) after intravenous (iv) injection are problematic. The injection of unlabeled polyclonal antimouse Abs following injection with labeled MoAbs produces accelerated MoAb clearance. This study evaluates a Mo antimouse Ab for efficacy of accelerating radio MoAb clearance. HB-58 is a rat/mouse MoAb which binds strongly to mouse kappa light chains present in 95% of murine monoclonals. It is unreactive with rat, rabbit or human kappa chains. Six rats were injected iv with 30 ..mu..Ci (approximately 6 ..mu..g) of I-125 UPC-10, a non-specific IgG2ak MoAb that is bound to well by HB-58. No alteration was seen in the clearance of UPC-10 in any of the animals, regardless of the injection type or amount on the second day. In addition, no increase in liver or spleen activity was seen in those rats that received HB-58. The lack of change in rate of clearance and biodistribution of UPC-10 after the iv injection of a purified, specific, anti-mouse MoAb is in marked contrast to the accelerated clearance reported following polyclonal anti-mouse antibody administration. This may be due to the inability of MoAbs to cross link. These preliminary studies suggest that Mo anti-mouse Abs, at these dose levels, are not useful in achieving increased rates of radiolabeled murine MoAb clearance.

  9. SU-E-J-227: Breathing Pattern Consistency and Reproducibility: Comparative Analysis for Supine and Prone Body Positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Laugeman, E; Weiss, E; Chen, S; Hugo, G; Rosu, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate and compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of breathing patterns and their reproducibility over the course of treatment, for supine and prone positioning. Methods: Respiratory traces from 25 patients were recorded for sequential supine/prone 4DCT scans acquired prior to treatment, and during the course of the treatment (weekly or bi-weekly). For each breathing cycle, the average(AVE), end-of-exhale(EoE) and end-of-inhale( EoI) locations were identified using in-house developed software. In addition, the mean values and variations for the above quantities were computed for each breathing trace. F-tests were used to compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of all pairs of sequential supine and prone scans. Analysis of variances was also performed using population means for AVE, EoE and EoI to quantify differences between the reproducibility of prone and supine respiration traces over the treatment course. Results: Consistency: Cycle-to-cycle variations are less in prone than supine in the pre-treatment and during-treatment scans for AVE, EoE and EoI points, for the majority of patients (differences significant at p<0.05). The few cases where the respiratory pattern had more variability in prone appeared to be random events. Reproducibility: The reproducibility of breathing patterns (supine and prone) improved as treatment progressed, perhaps due to patients becoming more comfortable with the procedure. However, variability in supine position continued to remain significantly larger than in prone (p<0.05), as indicated by the variance analysis of population means for the pretreatment and subsequent during-treatment scans. Conclusions: Prone positioning stabilizes breathing patterns in most subjects investigated in this study. Importantly, a parallel analysis of the same group of patients revealed a tendency towards increasing motion amplitude of tumor targets in prone position regardless of their size or location; thus, the choice for body positioning

  10. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  11. Perspective-taking abilities in the balance between autism tendencies and psychosis proneness

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Akel, Ahmad M.; Wood, Stephen J.; Hansen, Peter C.; Apperly, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties with the ability to appreciate the perspective of others (mentalizing) is central to both autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. While the disorders are diagnostically independent, they can co-occur in the same individual. The effect of such co-morbidity is hypothesized to worsen mentalizing abilities. The recent influential ‘diametric brain theory’, however, suggests that the disorders are etiologically and phenotypically diametrical, predicting opposing effects on one's mentalizing abilities. To test these contrasting hypotheses, we evaluated the effect of psychosis and autism tendencies on the perspective-taking (PT) abilities of 201 neurotypical adults, on the assumption that autism tendencies and psychosis proneness are heritable dimensions of normal variation. We show that while both autism tendencies and psychosis proneness induce PT errors, their interaction reduced these errors. Our study is, to our knowledge, the first to observe that co-occurring autistic and psychotic traits can exert opposing influences on performance, producing a normalizing effect possibly by way of their diametrical effects on socio-cognitive abilities. This advances the notion that some individuals may, to some extent, be buffered against developing either illness or present fewer symptoms owing to a balanced expression of autistic and psychosis liability. PMID:25972469

  12. Absence of food alternatives promotes risk-prone feeding of unpalatable substances in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Lucie; Hotier, Lucie; Giurfa, Martin; Velarde, Rodrigo; de Brito Sanchez, Maria Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The question of why animals sometimes ingest noxious substances is crucial to understand unknown determinants of feeding behaviour. Research on risk-prone feeding behaviour has largely focused on energy budgets as animals with low energy budgets tend to ingest more aversive substances. A less explored possibility is that risk-prone feeding arises from the absence of alternative feeding options, irrespectively of energy budgets. Here we contrasted these two hypotheses in late-fall and winter honey bees. We determined the toxicity of various feeding treatments and showed that when bees can choose between sucrose solution and a mixture of this sucrose solution and a noxious/unpalatable substance, they prefer the pure sucrose solution and reject the mixtures, irrespective of their energy budget. Yet, when bees were presented with a single feeding option and their escape possibilities were reduced, they consumed unexpectedly some of the previously rejected mixtures, independently of their energy budget. These findings are interpreted as a case of feeding helplessness, in which bees behave as if it were utterly helpless to avoid the potentially noxious food and consume it. They suggest that depriving bees of variable natural food sources may have the undesired consequence of increasing their acceptance of food that would be otherwise rejected. PMID:27534586

  13. Tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash in atopic dermatitis-prone subjects.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Staci; Meckfessel, Matthew H; Lio, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease characterized by eczematous eruptions and impaired skin barrier function. Patients, as well as their families, frequently report reductions in quality of life. Pruritus, lack of sleep, and impaired social functioning all contribute to this reduction. A skincare regimen of gentle cleansing and daily moisturization is integral to managing atopic dermatitis. While there are a multitude of reports supporting the use of moisturizers, there is a paucity regarding the use of cleansers, especially cleansers formulated with ingredients known to improve skin hydration. A clinical study was conducted to assess the tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of a body wash formulated with the filaggrin break-down products arginine and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid in subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin (Cetaphil® RestoraDerm® Body Wash). The results of this study indicate that Cetaphil RestoraDerm Body Wash was well tolerated, reduced itch, improved quality of life, and was well-liked by subjects with atopic dermatitis-prone skin.

  14. Chlorophyll fluorescence varies more across seasons than leaf water potential in drought-prone plants.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Bruno H P; Mattos, Eduardo A DE

    2016-01-01

    Among the effects of environmental change, the intensification of drought events is noteworthy, and tropical vegetation is predicted to be highly vulnerable to it. However, it is not clear how tropical plants in drought-prone habitats will respond to this change. In a coastal sandy plain environment, we evaluated the response of six plant species to water deficits across seasons, the relationship between their morpho-physiological traits, and which traits would be the best descriptors of plants' response to drought. Regardless of leaf succulence and phenology, responses between seasons were most strongly related to chlorophyll fluorescence. In this study we have demonstrated that a better comprehension of how tropical species from drought-prone habitats cope with changes in water availability can be based on seasonal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence. Temporal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence was found useful for differentiating between groups of sandy soil species that are responsive or unresponsive to water availability. However, chlorophyll fluorescence appeared to be a more sensitive descriptor of their seasonal and short-term responses. PMID:27142554

  15. Absence of food alternatives promotes risk-prone feeding of unpalatable substances in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Lucie; Hotier, Lucie; Giurfa, Martin; Velarde, Rodrigo; de Brito Sanchez, Maria Gabriela

    2016-08-18

    The question of why animals sometimes ingest noxious substances is crucial to understand unknown determinants of feeding behaviour. Research on risk-prone feeding behaviour has largely focused on energy budgets as animals with low energy budgets tend to ingest more aversive substances. A less explored possibility is that risk-prone feeding arises from the absence of alternative feeding options, irrespectively of energy budgets. Here we contrasted these two hypotheses in late-fall and winter honey bees. We determined the toxicity of various feeding treatments and showed that when bees can choose between sucrose solution and a mixture of this sucrose solution and a noxious/unpalatable substance, they prefer the pure sucrose solution and reject the mixtures, irrespective of their energy budget. Yet, when bees were presented with a single feeding option and their escape possibilities were reduced, they consumed unexpectedly some of the previously rejected mixtures, independently of their energy budget. These findings are interpreted as a case of feeding helplessness, in which bees behave as if it were utterly helpless to avoid the potentially noxious food and consume it. They suggest that depriving bees of variable natural food sources may have the undesired consequence of increasing their acceptance of food that would be otherwise rejected.

  16. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of HCMM day-night thermal infrared (IR) data were selected during the 1978-79 winter to examine patterns of surface temperature and thermal inertia (TI) of peninsular Florida. The GOES and NOAA-6 thermal IR, as well as National Climatic Center temperatures and rainfall, were also used. The HCMM apparent thermal inertia (ATI) images closely corresponded to the general soil map of Florida, based on soil drainage classes. Areas with low ATI overlay well-drained soils, such as deep sands and drained organic soils, whereas with high ATI overlay areas with wetlands and bodies of water. The HCMM ATI images also corresponded well with GOES-detected winter nocturnal cold-prone areas. Use of HCMM data with Carlson's energy balance model showed both high moisture availability (MA) and high thermal inertia (TI) of wetland-type surfaces and low MA and low TI of upland, well-drained soils. Since soil areas with low TI develop higher temperatures during the day, then antecedent patterns of highest maximum daytime surface temperature can also be used to predict nocturnal cold-prone areas in Florida.

  17. Absence of food alternatives promotes risk-prone feeding of unpalatable substances in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Desmedt, Lucie; Hotier, Lucie; Giurfa, Martin; Velarde, Rodrigo; de Brito Sanchez, Maria Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The question of why animals sometimes ingest noxious substances is crucial to understand unknown determinants of feeding behaviour. Research on risk-prone feeding behaviour has largely focused on energy budgets as animals with low energy budgets tend to ingest more aversive substances. A less explored possibility is that risk-prone feeding arises from the absence of alternative feeding options, irrespectively of energy budgets. Here we contrasted these two hypotheses in late-fall and winter honey bees. We determined the toxicity of various feeding treatments and showed that when bees can choose between sucrose solution and a mixture of this sucrose solution and a noxious/unpalatable substance, they prefer the pure sucrose solution and reject the mixtures, irrespective of their energy budget. Yet, when bees were presented with a single feeding option and their escape possibilities were reduced, they consumed unexpectedly some of the previously rejected mixtures, independently of their energy budget. These findings are interpreted as a case of feeding helplessness, in which bees behave as if it were utterly helpless to avoid the potentially noxious food and consume it. They suggest that depriving bees of variable natural food sources may have the undesired consequence of increasing their acceptance of food that would be otherwise rejected. PMID:27534586

  18. Triage of oxidation-prone proteins by Sqstm1/p62 within the mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minjung; Shin, Jaekyoon

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} The mitochondrion contains its own protein quality control system. {yields} p62 localizes within the mitochondria and forms mega-dalton sized complexes. {yields} p62 interacts with oxidation-prone proteins and the proteins of quality control. {yields} In vitro delivery of p62 improves mitochondrial functions. {yields} p62 is implicated as a participant in mitochondrial protein quality control. -- Abstract: As the mitochondrion is vulnerable to oxidative stress, cells have evolved several strategies to maintain mitochondrial integrity, including mitochondrial protein quality control mechanisms and autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Involvement of an autophagy adaptor, Sqstm1/p62, in the latter process has been recently described. In the present study, we provide evidence that a portion of p62 directly localizes within the mitochondria and supports stable electron transport by forming heterogeneous protein complexes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of mitochondrial proteins co-purified with p62 revealed that p62 interacts with several oxidation-prone proteins, including a few components of the electron transport chain complexes, as well as multiple chaperone molecules and redox regulatory enzymes. Accordingly, p62-deficient mitochondria exhibited compromised electron transport, and the compromised function was partially restored by in vitro delivery of p62. These results suggest that p62 plays an additional role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity at the vicinity of target machineries through its function in relation to protein quality control.

  19. Chlorophyll fluorescence varies more across seasons than leaf water potential in drought-prone plants.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Bruno H P; Mattos, Eduardo A DE

    2016-01-01

    Among the effects of environmental change, the intensification of drought events is noteworthy, and tropical vegetation is predicted to be highly vulnerable to it. However, it is not clear how tropical plants in drought-prone habitats will respond to this change. In a coastal sandy plain environment, we evaluated the response of six plant species to water deficits across seasons, the relationship between their morpho-physiological traits, and which traits would be the best descriptors of plants' response to drought. Regardless of leaf succulence and phenology, responses between seasons were most strongly related to chlorophyll fluorescence. In this study we have demonstrated that a better comprehension of how tropical species from drought-prone habitats cope with changes in water availability can be based on seasonal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence. Temporal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence was found useful for differentiating between groups of sandy soil species that are responsive or unresponsive to water availability. However, chlorophyll fluorescence appeared to be a more sensitive descriptor of their seasonal and short-term responses.

  20. Safe Sedation and Hypnosis using Dexmedetomidine for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in a Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an imidazoline compound, is a highly selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist with sympatholytic, sedative, amnestic, and analgesic properties. In order to minimize the patients' pain and anxiety during minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) when compared to conventional surgery under general anesthesia, an adequate conscious sedation (CS) or monitored anesthetic care (MAC) should be provided. Commonly used intravenous sedatives and hypnotics, such as midazolam and propofol, are not suitable for operations in a prone position due to undesired respiratory depression. Dexmedetomidine converges on an endogenous non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep-promoting pathway to exert its sedative effects. The great merit of dexmedetomidine for CS or MAC is the ability of the operator to recognize nerve damage during percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, a representative MISS. However, there are 2 shortcomings for dexmedetomidine in MISS: hypotension/bradycardia and delayed emergence. Its hypotension/bradycardiac effects can be prevented by ketamine intraoperatively. Using atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) might allow doctors to control the rate of recovery from procedural sedation in the future. MAC, with other analgesics such as ketorolac and opioids, creates ideal conditions for MISS. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine provides a favorable surgical condition in patients receiving MISS in a prone position due to its unique properties of conscious sedation followed by unconscious hypnosis with analgesia. However, no respiratory depression occurs based on the dexmedetomidine-related endogenous sleep pathways involves the inhibition of the locus coeruleus in the pons, which facilitates VLPO firing in the anterior hypothalamus. PMID:25317279

  1. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  2. Estrogen promotes microvascular pathology in female stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Stier, Charles T; Chander, Praveen N; Rosenfeld, Louis; Powers, C Andrew

    2003-07-01

    Estrogen produces both beneficial and adverse effects on cardiovascular health via mechanisms that remain unclear. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) maintained on Stroke-Prone Rodent Diet and 1% NaCl drinking water (starting at 8 wk of age) rapidly develop stroke and malignant nephrosclerosis that can be prevented, despite continued hypertension, by drugs targeting angiotensin II and aldosterone actions. This study evaluated estrogen's effects in the SHRSP model. Female SHRSP that were sham operated (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX) at 4 wk of age, or OVX and treated with estradiol benzoate (E2,30 microg x kg-1 x wk-1) were studied. In a survival protocol, OVX rats lived significantly longer (15.1 +/- 0.3 wk) compared with SHAM (13.6 +/- 0.2 wk) or OVX+E2 rats (12.4 +/- 0.2 wk). In a protocol in which animals were matched for age, at 11.5 wk, terminal systolic blood pressure and urine protein excretion were elevated in SHAM and OVX+E2 rats compared with OVX rats; blood urea nitrogen, renal microvascular and glomerular lesions, and plasma renin concentration were elevated in OVX+E2 relative to SHAM or OVX rats. In a survival protocol using intact female SHRSP, treatment with an antiestrogen (tamoxifen, 7 mg.kg-1.wk-1) prolonged survival by >2 wk compared with controls (P < 0.01). The data indicate that estrogen promotes microangiopathy in the kidney and stroke in saline-drinking SHRSP.

  3. Optical measurement of dimensional parameters of the breast with subjects in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Althoff, Felix; Jaeger, Florian; Kalender, Willi; Wenkel, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Various applications require information on breast parameters, such as breast length and volume. An optical system was designed and tested for measuring these parameters with subjects in a prone position. The study results were used for optimizing patient positioning and handling for a future breast computed tomography (BCT) system. Measurements were conducted using an optical measurement system. To test the functionality and accuracy of the system, measurements were performed using reference phantoms. Additionally, 20 women and 5 men were examined to calculate breast parameters in alternative positions and breathing states. The results of the optical measurements were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Volume and length of the reference phantoms were determined with errors below 2%. The patient study demonstrated a mean breast volume of 530.7 ml for women during normal breathing. During an exhalation state, breast volume increased significantly by 17.7 ml in comparison with normal breathing. Differences with MRI measurements were found to be 3% for breast length and 9% for breast volume on average. The proposed optical measurement system was found to be suitable for measuring the dimensional parameters of the breast in a prone position and provides a tool for evaluating breast coverage for BCT. PMID:26240833

  4. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  5. The challenges of trafficking hydrolysis prone metals and ascidians as an archetype.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Jean P; Valentine, Ann M

    2011-06-14

    Some of the metal ions that are required, exploited, or simply managed in biological systems are susceptible to hydrolysis and to hydrolytic precipitation in the aqueous, aerobic environment of much of biology. Organisms have evolved exquisite mechanisms for handling these metal ions, offering striking examples of biological control over inorganic coordination chemistry. This year marks the one hundredth anniversary of the discovery of remarkably high vanadium concentrations in the blood cells of the ascidian. In the ensuing years, these marine invertebrates were established as masters of the biological chemistry of very hydrolysis-prone metals, with various ascidian species accumulating high concentrations of iron, vanadium, and titanium, among others. These three metals have very different histories of biological relevance, and many questions remain about how, and ultimately why, these organisms sequester them. This Perspective addresses the aqueous coordination chemistry that organisms like ascidians must control if they are to manipulate hydrolysis-prone metal ions, and describes some of the ascidian biomolecules that have been implicated in this phenomenon. The recently available genome sequence for one ascidian species offers a glimpse into its metal-management arsenal. It offers the opportunity to map the relatively well-studied paradigm of iron management onto the genome of an organism that is intermediate in evolution between invertebrates and vertebrates. The ascidians have much to teach us about how to manage metals like iron, titanium, and vanadium and how that ability evolved.

  6. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  7. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  8. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  9. Beamlets from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Perri, Silvia; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a realization of the stochastic Fermi acceleration mechanism. The model consists of test particles moving between two oscillating magnetic clouds and differs from the usual Fermi-Ulam model in two ways. (i) Particles can penetrate inside clouds before being reflected. (ii) Particles can radiate a fraction of their energy during the process. Since the Fermi mechanism is at work, particles are stochastically accelerated, even in the presence of the radiated energy. Furthermore, due to a kind of resonance between particles and oscillating clouds, the probability density function of particles is strongly modified, thus generating beams of accelerated particles rather than a translation of the whole distribution function to higher energy. This simple mechanism could account for the presence of beamlets in some space plasma physics situations.

  10. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  11. Acceleration radioisotope production simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-12-31

    We have identified 96 radionuclides now being used or under consideration for use in medical applications. Previously, we calculated the production of {sup 99}Mo from enriched and depleted uranium targets at the 800-MeV energy used in the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos. We now consider the production of isotopes using lower energy beams, which may become available as a result of new high-intensity spallation target accelerators now being planned. The production of four radionuclides ({sup 7}Be, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 99}Mo, and {sup 195m}Pt) in a simplified proton accelerator target design is being examined. The LAHET, MCNP, and CINDER90 codes were used to model the target, transport a beam of protons and secondary produced particles through the system, and compute the nuclide production from spallation and low-energy neutron interactions. Beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV were used, and several targets were considered for each nuclide.

  12. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  13. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  14. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  15. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  16. Two Position Supine/Prone Myocardial Perfusion SPECT (MPS) Imaging Improves Visual Inter-Observer Correlation and Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Arsanjani, Reza; Hayes, Sean W.; Fish, Mathews; Shalev, Aryeh; Nakanishi, Rine; Thomson, Louise EJ; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare the inter-observer agreement between two experienced readers using supine versus combined supine/prone myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in a large population. Methods 1181 consecutive patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing rest 201Tl/stress 99mTc-sestamibi MPS studies were evaluated. Visual reads were performed in 2 consecutive steps, with readers scoring the stress supine perfusion images during step 1 and rescoring the images using both supine/prone data during step 2. Visual summed stress scores (SSS) of 2 readers including regional scores in different vascular territories were compared. Results The specificity for both readers improved using combined supine/prone imaging (Reader 1: 92% vs. 86% [P=0.0002], Reader 2: 88% vs. 72% [P<0.0001]. The inter-observer correlation for SSS (0.90 vs. 0.84, P<0.0001) and inter-observer agreement for combined supine/prone reading (bias = 1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-1.2 vs. 3.1, 95% CI 2.8-3.4, P<0.0001) were significantly better than for supine-only reading. The overall correlation between SSS scores for two readers improved with supine/prone imaging for both genders, as well as in the left anterior descending and right coronary territories. New Knowledge Gained Combined supine/prone imaging improves overall inter-observer agreement as well as based on gender and vascular territories. Conclusion The inter-observer correlation and agreement significantly improves using two-position supine/prone versus supine-only imaging. PMID:24807622

  17. Clinical Trial Design - Effect of prone positioning on clinical outcomes in infants and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Martha A.Q.; Arnold, John H.; Thompson, John E.; Fackler, James C.; Grant, Mary Jo; Fineman, Lori D.; Cvijanovich, Natalie; Barr, Frederick E.; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Steinhorn, David M.; Matthay, Michael A.; Hibberd, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes the methodology of an ongoing clinical trial of prone positioning in pediatric patients with acute lung injury (ALI). Nonrandomized studies suggest that prone positioning improves oxygenation in patients with ALI/ARDS without the risk of serious iatrogenic injury. It is not known if these improvements in oxygenation result in improvements in clinical outcomes. A clinical trial was needed to answer this question. Materials and Methods The pediatric prone study is a multi-center, randomized, non-crossover, controlled clinical trial. The trial is designed to test the hypothesis that at the end of 28 days, children with ALI treated with prone positioning will have more ventilator free days than children treated with supine positioning. Secondary endpoints include the time to recovery of lung injury, organ failure free days, functional outcome, adverse events, and mortality from all causes. Pediatric patients, 42 weeks post-conceptual age to 18 years of age, are enrolled within 48 hours of meeting ALI criteria. Patients randomized to the prone group are positioned prone within 4 hours of randomization and remain prone for 20 hours each day during the acute phase of their illness for a maximum of 7 days. Both groups are managed according to ventilator protocol, extubation readiness testing, and sedation protocols and hemodynamic, nutrition and skin care guidelines. Conclusions This paper describes the process, multidisciplinary input, and procedures used to support the design of the clinical trial, as well as the challenges faced by the clinical scientists during the conduct of the clinical trial. PMID:16616620

  18. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  19. Photocathodes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Gray, E.R.; Giles, P.M.; Springer, R.W.; Loebs, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Some electron accelerator applications require bursts of short pulses at high microscopic repetition rates and high peak brightness. A photocathode, illuminated by a mode-locked laser, is well suited to filling this need. The intrinsic brightness of a photoemitter beam is high; experiments are under way at Los Alamos to study the brightness of short bunches with high space charge after acceleration. A laser-illuminated Cs/sub 3/Sb photoemitter is located in the first rf cavity of an injector linac. Diagnostics include a pepper-pot emittance analyzer, a magnetic spectrometer, and a streak camera.

  20. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.