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Sample records for accelerated nursing students

  1. Comparison of Generic Accelerated Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaddorura, Mahmood; Williams, Collette

    2012-01-01

    Case study pedagogy is a teaching strategy in which teachers hope to help students develop and use critical thinking (CT) abilities. This study compared CT skills of 75 second year generic accelerated baccalaureate nursing students during their Fundamentals of Nursing course before and after being educated using case study pedagogical method.…

  2. Becoming a nurse: role formation among accelerated baccalaureate students.

    PubMed

    Ostrogorsky, Tanya L; Raber, Anjanette M; McKinley Yoder, Claire; Nielsen, Ann E; Lutz, Kristin F; Wros, Peggy L

    2015-01-01

    To understand nursing role formation for students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, end-of-term narrative reflections from 34 students were analyzed over the course of the 15-month program. Using thematic analysis, 4 major themes were identified: evolving role perception, extending nursing student-patient interaction, engaging with health care team and systems of care, and expanding clinical thinking.

  3. Becoming a nurse: role formation among accelerated baccalaureate students.

    PubMed

    Ostrogorsky, Tanya L; Raber, Anjanette M; McKinley Yoder, Claire; Nielsen, Ann E; Lutz, Kristin F; Wros, Peggy L

    2015-01-01

    To understand nursing role formation for students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, end-of-term narrative reflections from 34 students were analyzed over the course of the 15-month program. Using thematic analysis, 4 major themes were identified: evolving role perception, extending nursing student-patient interaction, engaging with health care team and systems of care, and expanding clinical thinking. PMID:25290964

  4. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  5. Using student satisfaction data to evaluate a new online accelerated nursing education program.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Matthias, April

    2016-10-01

    As increasing numbers of students enroll in online education, institutions of higher education are responsible for delivering quality online courses and programs. Agencies that accredit institutions and programs require evidence of program quality, including student satisfaction. A large state university in the Southeastern United States transitioned an online nursing education degree completion, or Registered Nurse-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing, program to an online accelerated format in order to meet the needs of working nurses and ultimately, increase the number of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level. This article describes a descriptive, cross-sectional study that evaluated the effectiveness of the new online accelerated program using the quality indicator of student satisfaction. Ninety-one (32%) of the 284 students who were enrolled or had been enrolled in a course within the online accelerated degree completion program between fall 2013 session 1 and summer 2014 session participated in the study. The electronic Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners™ was used to measure student satisfaction with the program and associated services. Results provided insight into the students' satisfaction with the new program format and served as the basis for an interdepartmental program enhancement plan aimed at maintaining and enhancing student satisfaction and overall program quality. Findings indicated that measuring and evaluating student satisfaction can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of an online program. Recommendations for using the measurement tool in online program planning and studying student satisfaction in relation to retention and program completion were identified.

  6. Using student satisfaction data to evaluate a new online accelerated nursing education program.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Matthias, April

    2016-10-01

    As increasing numbers of students enroll in online education, institutions of higher education are responsible for delivering quality online courses and programs. Agencies that accredit institutions and programs require evidence of program quality, including student satisfaction. A large state university in the Southeastern United States transitioned an online nursing education degree completion, or Registered Nurse-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing, program to an online accelerated format in order to meet the needs of working nurses and ultimately, increase the number of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level. This article describes a descriptive, cross-sectional study that evaluated the effectiveness of the new online accelerated program using the quality indicator of student satisfaction. Ninety-one (32%) of the 284 students who were enrolled or had been enrolled in a course within the online accelerated degree completion program between fall 2013 session 1 and summer 2014 session participated in the study. The electronic Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners™ was used to measure student satisfaction with the program and associated services. Results provided insight into the students' satisfaction with the new program format and served as the basis for an interdepartmental program enhancement plan aimed at maintaining and enhancing student satisfaction and overall program quality. Findings indicated that measuring and evaluating student satisfaction can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of an online program. Recommendations for using the measurement tool in online program planning and studying student satisfaction in relation to retention and program completion were identified. PMID:27419621

  7. Perceived benefits and challenges of repeated exposure to high fidelity simulation experiences of first degree accelerated bachelor nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud; Vandyke, Olga; Smallwood, Christopher; Gonzalez, Kristen Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of first-degree entry-level accelerated bachelor nursing students regarding benefits and challenges of exposure to multiple high fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios, which has not been studied to date. These perceptions conformed to some research findings among Associate Degree, traditional non-accelerated, and second-degree accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students faced with one to two simulations. However, first-degree accelerated BSN students faced with multiple complex simulations perceived improvements on all outcomes, including critical thinking, confidence, competence, and theory-practice integration. On the negative side, some reported feeling overwhelmed by the multiple HFS scenarios. Evidence from this study supports HFS as an effective teaching and learning method for nursing students, along with valuable implications for many other fields. PMID:26260522

  8. Accelerated baccalaureate nursing students use of emotional intelligence in nursing as "caring for a human being": a mixed methods grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lisa Sherry

    2013-11-30

    Accelerated nursing students are ideal informants regarding abstract nursing concepts. How emotional intelligence (EI) is used in nursing remains a relatively elusive process that has yet to be empirically modeled. The purpose of this study was to generate a theoretical model that explains how EI is used in nursing by accelerated baccalaureate nursing students. Using a mixed methods grounded theory study design, theoretical sampling of EI scores directed sampling for individual interviews and focus groups. Caring for a human being emerged as the basic social process at the heart of which all other processes--Getting it; Being caring; The essence of professional nurse caring; Doing something to make someone feel better; and Dealing with difficulty--are interconnected. In addition to a theoretical explanation of the use of EI in nursing, this study corroborates findings from other qualitative studies in nursing and contributes a rich description of accelerated baccalaureate nursing students and an example of a mixed methods study design to the small but growing literature in these areas.

  9. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  10. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress. PMID:27078809

  11. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  12. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program. PMID:26021133

  13. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  14. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  15. Predictors of success for Saudi Arabian students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate degree program in nursing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carty, Rita M; Moss, Margaret M; Al-Zayyer, Wael; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Arietti, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    In the mid 1980s, a professional nursing education program was initiated between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. Based on a perceived and documented need, a collaborative education and research program was established with George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, to begin building a community of new scholars to assist in the advancement of professional nursing in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Four cohorts of Saudi citizens from three institutions (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia National Guard Hospital, and Ministry of Aviation and Defense Hospital), who held a degree in science or a related field, were enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate program leading to a bachelor of science in nursing degree. This project was funded by Saudi Arabian sources. A descriptive research study was conducted to identify predictors of success in the program. Results indicated a rate of program completion that was higher than expected. Some of the first graduates went on for a doctor of philosophy degree, but not all enrolled completed the program. Many countries around the world are seeking ways to upgrade and increase the supply of qualified nurses within their own borders. This study identified those factors that were predictors of success for Saudi Arabian students who completed a baccalaureate degree in nursing program in the United States.

  16. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice. PMID:20964066

  17. Great expectations: points of congruencies and discrepancies between incoming accelerated second-degree nursing students and faculty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Patricia; Beal, Margaret W; Underwood, Patricia W; Ward, Frances Rieth; McKelvey, Michele; Guthrie, Barbara; Lindell, Deborah

    2010-12-01

    This study analyzes the expectations that incoming students and faculty bring to accelerated pre-licensure education programs for second-degree students. Although research supports the congruence of expectations between students and faculty as essential to learning, anecdotal evidence and single case reports suggest there may be important discrepancies in expectations of second-degree students and their faculty. Data are intended to support curriculum review, refinement, and innovation in these programs. PMID:20795607

  18. Evaluating an accelerated nursing program: a dashboard for diversity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bonnie J; MacWilliams, Brent R

    2015-01-01

    Diversity is a topic of increasing attention in higher education and the nursing workforce. Experts have called for a nursing workforce that mirrors the population it serves. Students in nursing programs in the United States do not reflect our country's diverse population; therefore, much work is needed before that goal can be reached. Diversity cannot be successfully achieved in nursing education without inclusion and attention to quality. The Inclusive Excellence framework can be used by nurse educators to promote inclusion, diversity, and excellence. In this framework, excellence and diversity are linked in an intentional metric-driven process. Accelerated programs offer a possible venue to promote diversity, and one accelerated program is examined using a set of metrics and a dashboard approach commonly used in business settings. Several recommendations were made for future assessment, interventions, and monitoring. Nurse educators are called to examine and adopt a diversity dashboard in all nursing programs. PMID:25839946

  19. Evaluating an accelerated nursing program: a dashboard for diversity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bonnie J; MacWilliams, Brent R

    2015-01-01

    Diversity is a topic of increasing attention in higher education and the nursing workforce. Experts have called for a nursing workforce that mirrors the population it serves. Students in nursing programs in the United States do not reflect our country's diverse population; therefore, much work is needed before that goal can be reached. Diversity cannot be successfully achieved in nursing education without inclusion and attention to quality. The Inclusive Excellence framework can be used by nurse educators to promote inclusion, diversity, and excellence. In this framework, excellence and diversity are linked in an intentional metric-driven process. Accelerated programs offer a possible venue to promote diversity, and one accelerated program is examined using a set of metrics and a dashboard approach commonly used in business settings. Several recommendations were made for future assessment, interventions, and monitoring. Nurse educators are called to examine and adopt a diversity dashboard in all nursing programs.

  20. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  1. Locating nursing students' chronicles.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of students' stories and reflections has contributed to faculty members' knowledge of the student experience. Examining different sources of nursing students' narratives might lead to further understanding of what they think, feel, and perceive during their educational pursuits. Whereas some texts provide ample insights into student life, others are fragmentary or not recorded, evaluated, or systematically investigated. To achieve a different appreciation of stories and other texts calls for faculty research. What is discovered might change teaching approaches.

  2. [Smoking among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Kolleck, Bernd

    2004-04-01

    Smoking as a major public-health concern is still a widespread habit among nurses and young students of nursing. The hypothesis however, that professional environment positively influences smoking habit, could not be supported: smoking is less influenced by vocational training and practice than by the social environment of the students. The results of the survey also show, that a great part of the smokers have a critical attitude towards their habit and would agree to counteractions. Nursing schools could play an important role therein. The conception of nursing as a responsible health profession would demand to take over a more active part in considering the consequences, in smoking prevention and in supporting cessation. PMID:15137673

  3. Writing approaches of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Ellen; Ball, Susan C; Maliszewski, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20years, research has focused on the writing processes of college students, however, despite recent support for writing as a tool of reflection in nursing education, little is known about how it is that nursing students go about writing papers and assignments as part of their professional education. In order to determine the writing processes of nursing students, the Inventory of Processes in College Composition, a self-response questionnaire, was administered to 169 nursing students. Results support the independence of the writing approaches that nursing students use and similarity to the writing approaches of a general college student population.

  4. Evaluation of selected outcomes of an accelerated nursing degree program.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Louiselle L; MacIntosh, Judy; Gibson, Cheryl H; Jefferson, Steven

    2008-02-01

    Accelerated or condensed programs in nursing have gained popularity over the last 10 years in Canada. They are designed to accommodate the learning needs of a special pool of learners with prior university education. These learners have expectations, abilities, and skills different from students in basic baccalaureate programs and so require instruction to suit their background. While accelerated programs have proliferated, there is little published evidence as to the actual number in Canada or on their effectiveness in preparing beginning practitioners who can meet the demands of the workplace. In this paper, the authors discuss selected outcomes of a pilot project wherein an accelerated option was examined as a feasible avenue for the education of Canadian professional nurses. Evaluation during and following the project was an integral component to contribute to an evidence base for nursing education decisions. Data were collected from two student cohorts and multiple stakeholders including faculty, employers, and nurse co-workers. Data were elicited on many variables but only four are addressed here. These are: scores on the national licensure examination, competency-to-practice rankings, student and employer perceptions of preparedness for practice, and manageability of students' stress levels during the program. The paper focuses on the findings pertaining to each variable and the lessons learned.

  5. Neuroscience nursing elective for senior nursing students.

    PubMed

    Barker, E L

    1985-10-01

    In response to baccalaureate student requests for additional clinical experience and expanded opportunities in neurological and neurosurgical nursing, an experimental course was designed for the winter session semester in cooperation with a local teaching hospital. A three-credit elective, "Discovering Neuroscience Nursing," was offered to senior students for five weeks. The course included thirty hours of lecture and laboratory, field trips, and over 200 hours of clinical experience. A student stipend was provided by the hospital. Goals for the course centered on providing an opportunity for the student to gain competence and confidence in caring for patients with neurological dysfunctions and providing family support. Students were assigned staff nurse preceptors as they rotated to every clinical setting caring for patients with alterations to the nervous system. Evaluations from students and staff preceptors indicated the successful acceptance of the program which will be modified and continued as a senior elective.

  6. Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs: Insights into Teaching and Learning Experiences. New Careers in Nursing. Research Report. ETS RR-15-29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millett, Catherine M.; Stickler, Leslie M.; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-01-01

    The Study of Teaching and Learning in Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs explores how nurse educators are adapting their teaching practices for accelerated, second-degree nursing program students. To provide findings on topics including instructional practices and the roles and attitudes of faculty, a web survey was administered to almost 100…

  7. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  8. An integrative curriculum for accelerated nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Ann M; Peery, Annette I; McLean, Cathy B

    2009-05-01

    The number of accelerated baccalaureate and direct-entry master's nursing programs being offered in the United States is increasing. These programs shorten the amount of time to educate entry-level nurses. This article describes one school's curriculum for a direct-entry master's nursing program. A faculty task force developed the curriculum and used the opportunity to change the educational paradigm from traditional pedagogical to a concept student-learning approach. The curriculum design, which integrates nursing content through a conceptual model, and an innovative clinical experience model are described. In addition, the article discusses the successes and challenges of the program encountered during the first 2 years of initiation of the curriculum. PMID:19476034

  9. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  11. Avoiding socialization pitfalls in accelerated second-degree nursing education: the returning-to-school syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Utley-Smith, Queen; Phillips, Beth; Turner, Kathleen

    2007-09-01

    Second-degree students are highly motivated and tend to excel academically. However, nurse educators in accelerated programs face challenges in socializing these students to the nursing role. One pitfall is the hostility that may develop if students perceive a mismatch between their expectations and their new role as baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students in a fast-paced and intense program. This article discusses the applicability of the returning-to-school syndrome model in helping second-degree nursing students maneuver successfully through an accelerated BSN program. This 3-stage model has been previously applied in RN-to-BSN education. Using the model in an accelerated BSN curriculum to identify transition points and offer student support through specific stages can better prepare students to meet the challenges of accelerated education, as well as help nurse educators become more adept at providing resources and implementing supportive strategies at the appropriate time.

  12. [Compassionate care for student nurses].

    PubMed

    Cann, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are practising in a work environment which is sometimes difficult and which can affect their capacity to supervise students. They may sometimes find themselves taking out their frustration on these students. By being better trained in the specificities of adult learning, frontline professionals and tutors could find it easier to adopt a compassionate care attitude towards nursing students, an essential condition for the development of their skills. PMID:27157564

  13. High Test Anxiety among Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard; Evans, Ginger; Ramsey, Gary; Wheeler, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Nursing programs can be highly stressful, and the investigation was undertaken to see if nursing students are more test anxious than students in other fields. The Westside Test Anxiety Scale has administered to 298 nursing students at two colleges, and to a comparison group of 471 high school and college students. Fully 30% of nursing students…

  14. Teaching Ethics to Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Joyce E.; Thompson, Henry O.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the ethics content to be taught in nursing education and the goals of ethics education for both undergraduate and graduate students. Teacher qualifications and evaluation of learning are also considered. (CH)

  15. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is...

  18. Recruiting Students into Nursing: Prior Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Opal S.

    1983-01-01

    Raises fundamental questions regarding student recruitment: (1) why recruit students into nursing? (2) what are the issues that determine whether a school should have a nursing program? and (3) what are students being recruited into? (JOW)

  19. Student Immersion in Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Monahan, Janean; Poly-Droulard, Lynda; Prechowski, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    The aging workforce and the lack of perioperative clinical practice and theoretical content in nursing education programs are factors contributing to the perioperative nursing shortage. This article discusses the implementation of a creatively designed perioperative program, which includes a didactic course and a 210-hour clinical course, developed by the faculty members of a Michigan school of nursing in collaboration with administrators at area hospitals. The didactic content covers materials presented during the first three months of orientation for newly employed perioperative nurses. Interested baccalaureate nursing students in their senior year are selected to participate in the program after being interviewed by hospital personnel and university faculty members. To date, the program has 18 student graduates in two semesters; all have been offered positions in the perioperative setting, and 14 have accepted positions. The active learning strategies used in the course are described with examples. PMID:26849984

  20. Learning formative skills of nursing practice in an accelerated program.

    PubMed

    McNiesh, Susan; Benner, Patricia; Chesla, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to describe how students in an accelerated master's degree entry program experientially learned the practice of nursing. One research question examined in this study was: What formative experiences did students identify as helping them develop and differentiate their clinical practice? Data from clinical observations and a combination of small group and individual interviews were collected and analyzed using interpretive phenomenological methods. Students identified formative skills learned through the independent care of a patient as pivotal in their identity and agency development. By experiencing the responsibility and action from within the body and from within concrete situations, students developed a new understanding that changed their embodied ways of perceiving and orienting to the situation, as well as their skills and sense of agency.

  1. Professional socialization: students becoming nurses.

    PubMed

    Shinyashiki, Gilberto Tadeu; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Day, René A

    2006-01-01

    Usually colleges are evaluated by the quality of the knowledge and technical training offered to the students. Little attention is given to the acquisition of the values, behaviors and attitudes necessary to assume their professional role. This exploratory study aims to increase understanding of the professional socialization process that occurs at nursing schools and the results obtained through the socialization of professional values and standards. The educational experience of nursing students involves more than a body of scientific knowledge and the acquisition of abilities to provide care to patients. Questionnaires were filled out by 278 students of two public Nursing Schools in São Paulo state, 164 in school A and 114 in school B. The results indicated that some professional values, norms and behaviors are influenced by College years, studying at a College of Nursing during four years leads to a difference in values, norms and professional behavior.

  2. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  3. Cultural competence revisited: nursing students with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Marks, Beth

    2007-02-01

    The demographic profile of students in nursing schools is changing in relation to many different cultural backgrounds. Despite the potential for students with disabilities to enrich the nursing profession, nurse educators may be perpetuating historical attitudes, values, and practices that exclude students with disabilities from gaining admission or identifying themselves as people with disabilities. Educators in nursing schools continue to ask whether people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession, while the more salient question is, "When will people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession?" More important, as we create environments that welcome students with disabilities into the nursing profession, how does the quality of nursing care improve and become more appropriate for people with different cultural experiences? The purpose of this article is to present the value of recruiting students with disabilities into nursing schools in, order to enhance culturally competent nursing care. PMID:17315565

  4. The nursing education programme in Lithuania: voices of student nurses.

    PubMed

    Kapborg, I

    2000-10-01

    The nursing education programme in Lithuania has passed through many changes. The latest change has been carried out with support from Denmark. Ten female student nurses have been interviewed with the assistance of an interpreter. The purpose of this paper is to describe how student nurses perceived their preregistration training. The most outstanding feature of the nursing education programme in Lithuania was lack of adequate textbooks and students found this disadvantage caused a heavy workload. Students were spending the whole day in school, then studying during the evening. They were constantly tired. Although students were encouraged to be independent and to think actively during lectures, in reality this was difficult because of their workload. Students as a group were satisfied with their education, but they were doubtful about how to manage work as an independent nurse. Nowadays, many nurses in Lithuania view their work professionally and have taken over responsibility for some tasks that were carried out previously by physicians. Nurses trained previously may cause problems for newly graduated nurses because these nurses still work in a traditional manner. It will be impossible to evaluate the usefulness of the new nursing education programme in Lithuania until further investigations show how students qualify and manage their work as nurses.

  5. Evaluation of a nursing program that supports active learning accelerated online bachelor's to BSN program.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stephanie; Chappy, Sharon; Zachman, Pam; Pope, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    The Wisconsin State Board of Nursing gave approval to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (UWO) to admit students to the nation's first Accelerated Online Bachelor's to BSN Program. This program allows qualified students who already have a bachelor's degree to earn a Bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN) within a 12-month time period. Students must have completed all academic prerequisites before the beginning of the program. Students take one course at a time and progress through the program as a cohort. Theory courses are offered online at a rate of one credit per week. Evaluation data are presented. PMID:17102399

  6. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses and "how"…

  7. A model of nursing student retention.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Elisabeth N

    2012-03-18

    A model of nursing student retention was studied in nontraditional, associate degree nursing students. Student retention was defined as persistence, or choosing to continue in a nursing program, and successful academic performance, or meeting the necessary academic standards to continue in a nursing program. The model shows the interaction of background variables, internal psychological processes, and external supports, and their relationships to persistence and academic performance. Participants were 458 nontraditional associate degree nursing students. There were significant differences in background variables between students who persisted and those who withdrew voluntarily or failed academically. Perceived faculty support was related to both persistence and academic performance, such that students with higher perceived faculty support were more likely to continue in a nursing program until graduation and were more likely to be successful academically. Students with higher perceived faculty support also had higher outcome expectations of earning an associate degree in nursing.

  8. The Stress Sources of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oner Altiok, Hatice; Ustun, Besti

    2013-01-01

    Overall, nursing training is a stressful process. Especially when second year nursing students are evaluated within the professional socialization theory, they are stated to be affected by these sources of stress more negatively. This research was carried out in order to determine the stress sources of second year nursing students. 15 nursing…

  9. Student Nurses' Perception of Death and Dying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederriter, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    Student nurses are involved in caring for patients who are actively dying or who have been told they have a terminal illness and are faced with the process of dying. Students encounter these patients in hospitals, nursing homes, at home or in hospice care settings. According to Robinson (2004), "nurses are the healthcare providers that are most…

  10. Nursing students' reflections on racism.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Karen Moore

    2008-01-01

    Racism is the systematic oppression of people of color at personal/interpersonal, institutional, and/or cultural levels. Discussions about racism often become emotional and personal. A discussion related to the accurate labeling of students on the basis of their heritage in an undergraduate professional issues class became emotionally charged. To prevent any further escalation of emotions, the author brought closure by asking students to read and write a reflective response to the Black Prayer. This article is a summary of urban nursing students' reflections and how giving voice to such reflections is a way of opening the door to frank discussions of racism and its effects.

  11. Lessons learned from an accelerated post-master's nurse educator certificate program: teaching the practicum course.

    PubMed

    Flood, Lisa Sue; Powers, Mary Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Nursing faces current and future shortages in the practice arena. The nurse educator shortage exacerbates the nursing shortage.This article describes an innovative and collaborative approach developed to increase the supply of nurse educators. An overview of the initial offering of this post-master's nurse educator certificate program, a grant-funded, cohort-based program, delivered online in an accelerated format, is provided. Particular attention is given to the nursing education practicum, a precepted teaching experience. This course is viewed as a culminating course, wherein the role transition from expert practitioner to novice educator occurs as students connect the experiential aspects of the practicum with knowledge gained in didactic courses and enter a new community of practice. Lessons learned and recommendations for future cohorts are discussed.

  12. Patient Deception: Nursing Students' Beliefs and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Drew A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined nursing students' beliefs about indicators of deception and their attitudes toward patient deception. Fifty-eight participants from various nursing programs at a southwestern university completed a Detection of Deception Questionnaire and Attitudes Toward Patient Deception Scale. Findings indicated that nursing students have a number of inaccurate beliefs about deception and possess a number of negative attitudes toward patients who lie. Implications for nursing education are discussed.

  13. Patient Deception: Nursing Students' Beliefs and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Drew A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined nursing students' beliefs about indicators of deception and their attitudes toward patient deception. Fifty-eight participants from various nursing programs at a southwestern university completed a Detection of Deception Questionnaire and Attitudes Toward Patient Deception Scale. Findings indicated that nursing students have a number of inaccurate beliefs about deception and possess a number of negative attitudes toward patients who lie. Implications for nursing education are discussed. PMID:25783815

  14. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  15. Teaching Senior Nursing Students Leadership Core Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Nancie L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical placements for senior nursing students enrolled in leadership courses are vital to student learning and to the preparation of new graduates. Schools of nursing are struggling with issues of access and availability of adequate clinical experiences for student learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and availability…

  16. Clinical violence in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanloo, Ali; Nirumand-Zandi, Kianoosh; Safavi-Bayat, Zahra; Alavi-Majd, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the significant issues in health studies is violence. Although violence against nurses has been recognized as a major occupational problem, its magnitude and extent is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the extent and types of violence during clinical training of nursing students. METHODS: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, 180 sophomores, juniors and seniors of Shahid Beheshti, Tehran and Iran Medical Universities were selected by quota sampling method. A questionnaire was used for collecting data regarding violence over the past year. Content and test-retest methods were used for evaluating its validity and reliability, respectively. RESULTS: Findings showed that 6.7%, 8.3% and 39.4% of the students experienced physical assault, physical menace and insult, respectively, over the past year. Most cases of the assaults (66.7%) were done by patients, most menaces by staff as well as patients’ attendants (18.1%) and most insults by staff (33.7%) and patients (31%). No significant relation was found between the sex as well as the educational year of the students and the experience of insult. 41.6% of the assaults were due to the effects of disease in assailants. However, no specific reason was found for physical menace and insult in most cases. 66.65%, 26.6% and 39.4% of the students reported physical assault, menace and insult to their tutors, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students are subject to more violence because of young age and inadequate experience. Therefore, devising educational programs regarding occupational violence as well as its prevention and providing necessary support and consultation following violence are essential. PMID:23449964

  17. The influence of end-of-life education on attitudes of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Barrere, Cynthia C; Durkin, Anne; LaCoursiere, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care is an important aspect of nursing when comfort and quality of life are the patient goals. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) developed a comprehensive program of teaching care of the dying to nurses and nursing students. This pretest-posttest study evaluated the influence of the integration of the ELNEC curriculum into a baccalaureate nursing program on students' attitudes toward care of the dying. The Frommelt Attitudes toward Care of the Dying Scale for nurses (FATCOD) was administered to traditional and accelerated baccalaureate students before and after exposure to a nursing curriculum that integrated essential ELNEC elements. Multiple regression analyses indicated that no previous experience with death and an age of 18-22 accounted for the most variance in attitude change. The findings suggest that integrating the ELNEC curriculum throughout a baccalaureate program positively affects the attitudes of nursing students toward the care of patients who are dying.

  18. Elementary School Nurses' Perceptions of Student Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershot, Candace; Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; Lartey, Grace K.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess elementary school nurses' perceptions of student bullying, actions when they encounter bullies or victims, and perceived level of preparation for dealing with this problem. School nurses identified the most common barriers to dealing with bullying, which included bullying taking place where the nurse is not…

  19. What do nurses do? Student reflections.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cate

    The art of caring and the science of curing are accepted elements of a nurse's role, with symbiosis and overlap between them. However, following the publication of the Francis report there is now greater emphasis on developing the caring roles of nurses. The chief nursing officer for England's vision for care staff places care and compassion as central to nurses' roles. Student nurses often enter the profession with idealistic lay beliefs of what a nurse's role exemplifies. These beliefs are then challenged when they are exposed to education and practice. A recent educational evaluative exercise used with adult nursing students highlights their thoughts in response to the simple question: 'What do nurses do?', and how they differ at different stages of their education and training. PMID:26768044

  20. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  1. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  2. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  3. Asian nursing students in the United States.

    PubMed

    Abu-Saad, H; Kayser-Jones, J; Tien, J

    1982-09-01

    It is obvious that there is a great need to familiarize faculty and students with the Asian culture and heritage and to sensitize them to the difficulties and problems that Asian nursing students encounter in their adjustment to the university nursing program in the United States. Recommendations and strategies to achieve the above goals are: (1) Organizing cross-cultural courses for Asians and non-Asians to familiarize them with different cultures, (2) sensitizing faculty and counselors to the detrimental effects of existing nursing programs on international students, and (3) helping Asian nursing students better adjust to the American culture by providing English tutorial classes, support groups and host families that will act as socializing agents during the student's adjustment process. Through such educational and support programs, it is hoped that Asian nursing students will experience fewer difficulties which in turn will make their studies more meaningful and applicable. PMID:6288640

  4. The continuing quest for parity: HBCU nursing students' perspectives on nursing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Talley, Costellia; Talley, Henry; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2016-08-01

    The benefits of a diverse nursing workforce are well-recognized, yet, the attainment of a sustainable, competent and diverse nursing workforce continues to be a global challenge. In this qualitative study, we describe nursing students' perceptions on nursing and nursing education at a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Focus groups were conducted with 16 graduate and undergraduate nursing students. Four themes emerged: communication, lack of resources, support systems and professional socialization. Mentoring and civility were identified as factors important to enhance a diverse workforce. PMID:27286940

  5. How student nurses can influence care quality.

    PubMed

    Banks, Suzanne; May, Ruth; Boath, Elizabeth; Tilford, Sarah; Johnston, Charlotte

    With support from NHS England, NHS Improving Quality and universities, student nurses have run conferences across the country on pressure ulcer prevention. The success of the events suggests that, as emerging nurse leaders, students recognise they have a key role in educating, motivating and galvanising their peers around a shared purpose. PMID:27089752

  6. [Do nursing students have entrepreneur profile?].

    PubMed

    Roncon, Paulo Fernando; Munhoz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Descriptive-exploratory study that aimed at knowing the profile of nursing students regarding entrepreneurship. The General Entrepreneurship Trend Test with 54 questions was applied to 41 students. Results demonstrated that 14% present five entrepreneur tendencies, 12% present four entrepreneur tendencies, and 80% do not present entrepreneur tendencies. The majority of student intent to work as clinical nurses, while none of them intent to work in management activities. It was concluded that students have low grade of the entrepreneurship characteristics.

  7. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  8. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  9. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  10. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  11. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  12. Videoconferencing expands nursing students' cultural realm.

    PubMed

    Pirkey, Jean M; Levey, Janet A; Newberry, Shirley M; Guthman, Pamela L; Hansen, Judith M

    2012-10-01

    Nurse educators struggle to provide culturally diverse community health clinical placements that cultivate cultural awareness, knowledge, and competence among baccalaureate nursing students. Public health nurses observe that many new nursing graduates lack the fundamental knowledge, skills, and affective behaviors necessary to work with culturally diverse populations. To address this, nursing faculty from two schools partnered to strategize, design, implement, and evaluate a community health assessment project using the instructional method of videoconferencing. The goal was to maximize students' exposure to and engagement with geographically and demographically dissimilar populations. Through videoconferencing, students from two distant schools were able to exchange and actively discuss their community health assessments. Videoconferencing gave students the opportunity to exchange community assessments and perceptions augmented by technology and guided through faculty networking. This article describes a piloted teaching strategy by which students performed and exchanged their community health assessments from diverse populations to enhance their cultural awareness.

  13. Using Second Life to enhance ACCEL an online accelerated nursing BSN program.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stephanie; Pope, Dawn; Duncan, Debra

    2009-01-01

    To create a presence in Second Life (SL) the university college of nursing (CON) purchased four virtual islands in December 2007. The intent was to enhance distance education with immersion learning experiences for nursing students in SL. The Pollock Alumni House, classrooms, faculty offices, a library, a student welcome center, a public health office, a disaster scenario, a clinic, a hospital, and several patient avatars were created. Houses are being built for nursing students to experience different patient care scenarios during home visits. At least 20 nursing faculty and academic staff and three cohorts of accelerated nursing students (77) have avatars and have experienced class sessions. Faculty and students schedule office hours, engage in synchronous chats, and utilize the public health department and SL support groups for class exercises. Current exercises in the public health department include a module in which the student learns the role of the sanitarian. Students use a checklist to inspect restaurants and bars in SL. They are also able to view a video of an interview with a sanitarian. Another module introduces them to the WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) program. Future student activities related to public health include disaster planning, bioterrorism, evacuations, community assessment, windshield surveys, fund raising, and health education as well as other activities suggested by public health nurses and students. The possibilities are limitless because of the resources that exist in the virtual world, SL. The purchase of the first two islands, the initial buildings, and the creation of the public health department was funded by a research grant. Virtual environments offer many advantages for nursing education. Many nursing students say they learn best when they actually "do something," which indicates that they often prefer experiential learning. Rare but life-threatening patient situations can be experienced since the clinical environment can

  14. Competence areas of nursing students in Europe.

    PubMed

    Satu, Kajander-Unkuri; Leena, Salminen; Mikko, Saarikoski; Riitta, Suhonen; Helena, Leino-Kilpi

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this study is on European nursing education, where there have been several reforms over the last two decades attempting to harmonise curricula and degree structures. One of the most powerful reforms was started by the Bologna Declaration in 1999; since then, significant progress has been made towards achieving the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the implementation of the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) in education practice. The Directive of recognition of professional qualifications (2005/36/EC) regulates nursing education. All these strategies aim to harmonise nursing education, but specific competence areas in nursing are still missing within the European Union (EU). The purpose of this review was to seek competence areas for nursing students within the EU as identified in previous studies and other documents. Altogether, 67 competence areas were identified and classified into eight main categories: (1) professional and ethical values and practice, (2) nursing skills and intervention, (3) communication and interpersonal skills, (4) knowledge and cognitive ability, (5) assessment and improving quality in nursing, (6) professional development, (7) leadership, management and teamwork, and (8) research utilisation. In order to obtain a comprehensive concept of competence, more research is needed on nursing students' competence areas across the EU due to the fact that the EU is a common labour market and nurses are educated for the EU as a whole. Nursing is a global profession and nurse competence is central to patient care outcomes, so it is also internationally important that nurses have good competence.

  15. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care.

  16. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  17. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  18. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients. PMID:25629348

  19. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.

  20. Assessing nursing students' knowledge of health literacy.

    PubMed

    McCleary-Jones, Voncella

    2012-01-01

    Because patients' limited level of health literacy can have a negative impact on patient health outcomes, it is important to address this topic in the nursing curricula. The author discusses a comparative study that assessed baccalaureate nursing students' knowledge of health literacy before and after implementation of an asynchronous online educational module. With a significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores, the findings provide information that can inform curriculum planning in baccalaureate nursing programs.

  1. Exposing Baccalaureate Nursing Students to Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    OʼConnor, Melissa; Arcamone, Angelina; Amorim, Frances; Hoban, Mary Beth; Boyd, Regina M; Fowler, Lauren; Marcelli, Theresa; Smith, Jacalyn; Nassar, Kathleen; Fitzpatrick, M Louise

    2016-10-01

    Management and facilitation of care transitions from hospital to alternative settings requires skill and attention to avoid adverse events. Several interprofessional organizations and nurse leaders have called for the expansion and redesign of undergraduate nursing curricula to include care transitions. Yet there is little evidence describing how undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students are educated on this critical topic or how successful they are in improving student knowledge about care transitions. To address this gap, an in-classroom and clinical experience was implemented to prepare students to manage and facilitate care transitions from the hospital to alternative settings-including the home. Perceptions of undergraduate nursing students and home healthcare nurse preceptors were assessed via an electronic survey that was emailed to participants. Forty-eight responses to the survey were received. Students agreed this experience contributed to their understanding of caring for adults and older adults who are experiencing a care transition and they had a good understanding of care transitions to apply to their future nursing courses. Home healthcare nurse preceptors agreed they were able to demonstrate transitional care and that students were engaged. Future work should include expanding transitional care immersion to other care settings as well as the inclusion of additional healthcare disciplines in care transition education.

  2. Exposing Baccalaureate Nursing Students to Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    OʼConnor, Melissa; Arcamone, Angelina; Amorim, Frances; Hoban, Mary Beth; Boyd, Regina M; Fowler, Lauren; Marcelli, Theresa; Smith, Jacalyn; Nassar, Kathleen; Fitzpatrick, M Louise

    2016-10-01

    Management and facilitation of care transitions from hospital to alternative settings requires skill and attention to avoid adverse events. Several interprofessional organizations and nurse leaders have called for the expansion and redesign of undergraduate nursing curricula to include care transitions. Yet there is little evidence describing how undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students are educated on this critical topic or how successful they are in improving student knowledge about care transitions. To address this gap, an in-classroom and clinical experience was implemented to prepare students to manage and facilitate care transitions from the hospital to alternative settings-including the home. Perceptions of undergraduate nursing students and home healthcare nurse preceptors were assessed via an electronic survey that was emailed to participants. Forty-eight responses to the survey were received. Students agreed this experience contributed to their understanding of caring for adults and older adults who are experiencing a care transition and they had a good understanding of care transitions to apply to their future nursing courses. Home healthcare nurse preceptors agreed they were able to demonstrate transitional care and that students were engaged. Future work should include expanding transitional care immersion to other care settings as well as the inclusion of additional healthcare disciplines in care transition education. PMID:27677063

  3. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  4. [Socialisation, a fundamental process for student nurses].

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Raphaël; Yalazoglu, Shadya

    2011-10-01

    Socialisation is an essential part of learning the nursing profession. Through it, students develop, during the theoretical training and practical placements, various strategies and resources to help them acquire the skills required to be a professional nurse. Numerous studies demonstrate the importance and interest of the socialisation process.

  5. Simulation Technology in Nursing Education: Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panunto, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education programs are faced with the challenge of providing students with the necessary skills to function in a fast paced, high technological environment. To address this challenge, the current trend in nursing education is to integrate the use of high-fidelity simulation technology into the curricula although there has been limited…

  6. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  7. Providing Relevance in Chemistry for Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Theodore H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an introductory chemistry course for nurses in which students learn basic chemical principles by performing 12 chemical analyses that are routinely conducted on body fluids and listed on a patient's clinical laboratory chart. (MLH)

  8. Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Science in the Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    2013-01-01

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students'…

  9. Changing institutional identities of the student nurse.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Damien; Timmins, Fiona

    2012-10-01

    This paper emphasises the tensions between the ideal of the compliant within care settings and the ideal of the critical thinker within the university setting with reference to student nurse education and identity. Identity is an important part of who we are as people. While modernisation and increased professionalisation of nursing have impacted on staff and patients mostly in a positive way, changes in the management of nursing education in the past 20 years have also heralded a remarkable change in the student identity. Historically informed by association with a particular hospital or health service provider, student nurse identity was shaped by institutional rituals and routine, physically embodied in objects such as uniforms and hospital medals and informed by claims to honesty, virtue and personal integrity (Bradby, 1990). Once part of the structure and fabric of hospital life, nursing students functioned as part of the health care service. As such, their identity was synonymous with that of practicing nurses, whose learning needs were secondary to that of the organisational needs. While this social milieu provided the platform for the formation of institutional pride, belonging and identity, such forms of identity can result in institutional compliance; with the associated risk of ritualistic practice, poor levels of transparent accountability and barriers to whistle blowing should substandard practice arise. Increased student freedom and an emphasis on teaching and learning within the university setting may have benefitted students, patients and the profession, however, the potential impact on student identity is less certain. There is evidence to suggest that students are ill-equipped for their professional identity once qualified and thus require more support for this within universities. This paper explores the tensions between traditional hospital identity and contemporary university identity with reference to student nurse education. The ideal of the

  10. Changing institutional identities of the student nurse.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Damien; Timmins, Fiona

    2012-10-01

    This paper emphasises the tensions between the ideal of the compliant within care settings and the ideal of the critical thinker within the university setting with reference to student nurse education and identity. Identity is an important part of who we are as people. While modernisation and increased professionalisation of nursing have impacted on staff and patients mostly in a positive way, changes in the management of nursing education in the past 20 years have also heralded a remarkable change in the student identity. Historically informed by association with a particular hospital or health service provider, student nurse identity was shaped by institutional rituals and routine, physically embodied in objects such as uniforms and hospital medals and informed by claims to honesty, virtue and personal integrity (Bradby, 1990). Once part of the structure and fabric of hospital life, nursing students functioned as part of the health care service. As such, their identity was synonymous with that of practicing nurses, whose learning needs were secondary to that of the organisational needs. While this social milieu provided the platform for the formation of institutional pride, belonging and identity, such forms of identity can result in institutional compliance; with the associated risk of ritualistic practice, poor levels of transparent accountability and barriers to whistle blowing should substandard practice arise. Increased student freedom and an emphasis on teaching and learning within the university setting may have benefitted students, patients and the profession, however, the potential impact on student identity is less certain. There is evidence to suggest that students are ill-equipped for their professional identity once qualified and thus require more support for this within universities. This paper explores the tensions between traditional hospital identity and contemporary university identity with reference to student nurse education. The ideal of the

  11. International nursing students: a phenomenological perspective.

    PubMed

    Pross, Elizabeth

    2003-08-01

    Colleges and universities are faced with the challenge of how to create learning environments relevant to the internationalization of society and culture. International learning experiences, the focus of this article, may be one effective tool for internationalizing nursing curricula. Baccalaureate nursing students with international education experiences who were residing in a rural USA state were invited to participate in a qualitative descriptive study informed by phenomenology. Sixteen nursing students participated in mail surveys and eleven in interviews. Participants were mainly female, Caucasian, university seniors with an average age of 31 years. Thematic statements were isolated into nine experiential structures and four essential themes. Themes were identified as preparing, adjusting, caring, and transforming and were found to be influenced by culture, values, and ethics. A descriptive diagram was created summarizing the structure of meaning. Significance of this nursing study was the identification of plausible descriptive insights that may be useful to educators who assist students with international education experiences. PMID:12900187

  12. The relationship between student nurse and nurse clinician: impact on student learning.

    PubMed

    Vallant, Sharon; Neville, Stephen

    2006-11-01

    Student nurse learning within a clinical environment is an essential component of Bachelor of Nursing curricula in New Zealand. During clinical experiences, student nurses rely on nurse clinicians for day-to-day facilitation of their learning. The purpose of this descriptive interpretive study was to explore relationships between student nurses and nurse clinicians. Eleven student nurses at the end of a three year Bachelor of Nursing programme in one institution participated in focus group interviews. Data gathered from the three focus groups were analysed using an inductive approach. Five categories, namely 'being invisible in the relationship', 'not stepping on toes', 'lost opportunities for learning', 'nurturance' and 'reciprocity' emerged from data analysis. These are presented with appropriate quotes to demonstrate the essence of participant experiences. Findings indicated that when students experienced relationships with clinicians as not being positive, this inhibited learning. Conversely, when students saw the clinician as participating actively and positively in the student/clinician relationship then student learning was enhanced. This evidence forms the basis for recommending further complementary research into the clinician's attitudes and perceptions related to their teaching role.

  13. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  14. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form....

  15. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form....

  16. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  17. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  18. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  19. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form....

  20. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form....

  1. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form....

  2. Intellectual disability nursing assessment: student reflections.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; McInerney, Paula; Linnane, Lynda

    Nursing students, Paula and Lynda, reflect on their first academic assessment of their 4-year intellectual disability nursing course. The reflection is conducted by the second and third authors of this article, and is guided by Gibbs' (1998) cycle, highlighting the positive and negative aspects of their 'workbook' assignment during their first academic semester. Overall, the use of the workbook as an assessment method enabled the students to discover the importance of time management, attendance at lectures, database searching, referencing and academic writing. The assignment enabled the students to be more prepared for clinical practice placement, and develop a basis for future learning and knowledge of intellectual disability.

  3. Measuring Cultural Awareness in Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rew, Lynn; Becker, Heather; Cookston, Jeff; Khosropour, Shirin; Martinez, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    A multicultural awareness scale completed by 72 nursing students obtained a Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of .91. An expert panel analyzed content validity and the revised scale was completed by 118 students. Factor analysis supported the measure's construct validity. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  4. Nursing Students Respond to a Computer Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Thomas, Barbara; McMahon, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Nursing students learned to send e-mail, use discussion lists, search the Internet, and critique Web sites while completing an assignment. Evaluation by 44 of 56 students showed they increased their computer literacy; most thought the skills were more relevant to their education than to their future practice. (SK)

  5. Recruiting Middle School Students into Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matutina, Robin E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to illustrate the importance of initiating nursing recruitment during the middle school years. Data sources included citations from the years 1989 to 2006. The study focused on middle school students 9 to 13 years of age in Grades 6 to 8. One survey compared middle school students' perceptions of an ideal…

  6. Student Nurse-Older Person Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuohy, Dympna

    2003-01-01

    Observations and interviews of eight student nurses in clinical placements with older patients yielded four themes: task- and nontask-related communication, need for verbal and nonverbal communication, communication hindrances and enhancers, and students' approach to communicating with older persons. A person-centered approach to elder care and…

  7. Teaching Design of Cultivating Nursing Students' Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xi-wen, Liu; Chun-ping, Ni; Rui, Yang; Xiu-chuan, Li; Cheng, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Chinese nursing education levels have developed fast over the past few years. Many nursing educators are devoted to the research of nursing teaching. How to cultivate nursing students, creative thinking is one of the principle researches and has received increasing attention. In the course of nursing teaching, we renewed the teaching design based…

  8. The Lived Experience of How Adult Nursing Students Blend Lifestyle Obligations with Nursing School Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutrier, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Many adult nursing students have lifestyle obligations that require integration with nursing school programs in order to graduate and fulfill their dreams of becoming a nurse. Fourteen participants shared their stories of how they were able to blend their lifestyles commitments with nursing school. Student interaction between lifestyle obligations…

  9. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  10. Pathways to Nursing: an innovative program to encourage high school students to enter nursing.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Denise K; Frerick, Judi A; Dean, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Pathways to Nursing was implemented as a partnership between Northern Kentucky University School of Nursing and Health Professions, a local high school in the Northern Kentucky region, a local hospital system, and a large regional medical practice. The goal of this project was to increase interest in nursing as a career among local high school students in order to impact the nursing shortage and improve the health of Northern Kentuckians. Pathways to Nursing activities allowed high school students to explore post-secondary nursing education by participating in nursing career day activities at the university and summer nursing camp which included an overnight stay at the university and nurse shadowing days at the local hospital. High school students were exposed to various clinical experiences, diverse nursing roles, nursing skills laboratory activities and human simulation activities. Students also met with nursing faculty, academic advisors, and university admissions counselors. One hundred and twenty-four high school students participated in Nurse Career Days over the two-year period of the program, and 45 students participated in Summer Nurse Camp over two summers. Ninety-four percent of the high school students who participated in Nurse Career Day stated they would "probably choose" or "definitely choose" the university to attend nursing school; 93.6% stated they "might want to be a nurse" or "definitely would want to be a nurse", and 93.7% rated the information covered as very relevant. Sixty-two percent of the students reported that they "definitely want to be a nurse" after attendance at Summer Nurse Camp. The goal of the Pathways to Nursing program was to provide Northern Kentucky high school students the opportunity to explore nursing through active learning experiences that augment career and academic interests. Collaborative relationships were developed between the University, the School of Nursing and Health Professions (SNHP), a local hospital system

  11. 'Not for resuscitation': the student nurses' viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Candy, C E

    1991-02-01

    A variable proportion of hospital in-patients were deemed 'not for resuscitation'. Using a qualitative methodology, this phenomenon was investigated, placing particular emphasis upon the effect on nursing care. A total of 71 student nurses from two district general hospitals were interviewed and from transcriptions of tape recordings of the interviews, utilizing a grounded theory approach, the following conceptual categories were identified: the patients; decision making; changes in nursing care? are patients and/or their relatives consulted? the unsuccessful resuscitation; the right to die; and dying and death. Up to 40% of patients on medial wards, and up to 100% of patients on geriatric and psychiatric wards, were deemed 'not for resuscitation'. The most junior members of the medical team had the power to make this decision without consultation with the nursing staff, patients or relatives. Nurses spent more time attending to patients 'not for resuscitation', but physiotherapists and medical staff withdrew. Informants felt that subjecting patients to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was incompatible with a dignified death. Senior members of the nursing staff were felt to be unfeeling in dealing with the distress of their juniors when laying out deceased patients. More discussion and joint decision making between health care professionals would alleviate some of the student nurses' distress concerning patients who are 'not for resuscitation'.

  12. Creating library tutorials for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Heidi

    2010-04-01

    This article describes one librarian's experiences with creating, promoting, and assessing online library tutorials. Tutorials were designed to provide on-demand and accessible library instruction to nursing students at Michigan State University. Topics for tutorials were chosen based on the librarian's liaison experiences and suggestions from nursing faculty. The tutorials were created using Camtasia and required the application of several tools and techniques. Tutorials were promoted through Web pages, the ANGEL course management system, blog posts, librarian interactions, e-mails, and more. In order to assess the tutorials' perceived effectiveness, feedback was gathered using a short survey. Future plans for the nursing tutorials project are also discussed.

  13. The Opinions of Nursing Students Regarding the Nursing Process and Their Levels of Proficiency in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Taskın Yilmaz, Feride; Sabanciogullari, Selma; Aldemir, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing process, as a scientific method of nursing practice, is an important tool for putting nursing knowledge into practice which increases the quality of nursing care. The study was aimed to determine the opinions of nursing students regarding the nursing process and their levels of proficiency. Methods: A total of 44 nursing students participated in this descriptive study. Data were collected by a three-part questionnaire including the opinion of students on nursing process, Gordon’s functional health patterns model and the NANDA diagnoses. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Most of the students (65.9%) believed that the nursing process was necessary. half of the students explained the diagnosis, 58.3% explained the planning, 41.3% explained the implementation, and 43.6% explained the evaluation sufficiently. Conclusion: It is suggested for instructors to use different teaching methods in order to develop critical thinking while teaching the nursing process. PMID:26744726

  14. Using a nursing student conduct committee to foster professionalism among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Katherine Kaby; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Gambescia, Stephen F

    2014-01-01

    This article explains how a university nursing program in the United States created and implemented a nursing student code of conduct and a faculty-led nursing student conduct committee to review and adjudicate violations of academic or professional misconduct. The need for and role of the nursing student conduct committee in providing substantive and fair due process is illustrated with two cases. Professional misconduct has been associated with preventable error and patient safety and is of great concern to nurse educators who are entrusted with producing the next generation of nursing professionals. Accountability and consequences for violations of professional standards must be an integral part of the nursing education curriculum throughout the world to ensure quality and safety and mitigate the adverse effects of nursing error. Given the professional and patient safety implication of such violations, the authors believe that it is prudent to have nursing programs adjudicate nursing majors' professional violations as an alternative or supplement to the general university judicial board.

  15. Preparing nursing students for education in the global village.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Fulmer, Holly; Meedzan, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Educating nurses for the 21st century requires a broad understanding of the health needs of local and global communities. With an increasingly diverse population, nursing students in the United States can gain a unique perspective on health disparities and challenges in providing healthcare for diverse populations. Nursing education has the opportunity to engage students in our global village by providing clinical and theory-based educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Some nursing educational settings in schools of nursing provide global nursing opportunities to explore the social responsibility of nursing. This paper details a specific framework and opportunities for engaging undergraduate and graduate nursing students in caring for the underserved in our global village. Opportunities in the Fulbright Student Exchange Program and Fulbright Senior Scholar Award mechanisms are discussed, and partnerships with international nursing programs are explored.

  16. Health habits of nursing versus non-nursing students: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Shriver, C B; Scott-Stiles, A

    2000-10-01

    As our culture shifts from a sickness repair system to a health promotion and disease prevention system, nurses need to take more responsibility for practicing positive health behaviors. The problem addressed in this study was "Does exposure to nursing theory content and client interactions make any difference in the regular practice of positive health behaviors in nursing students when compared to non-nursing students?" The purpose of this study was to determine if nursing students practice healthy life styles that would help prepare them to be effective advocates for health promotion and disease prevention. The Health Habits Inventory (HHI) was used in this two-year longitudinal study to compare health habits between 71 nursing and 83 non-nursing students. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing and non-nursing students in time 1 (t = 4.91, p < .001) and time 2 (t = 3.59, p < .001) with nursing students scoring higher in health habits. Nursing students improved significantly from time 1 to time 2 (t = 2.05, p = .021) whereas nonnursing students did not improve (t = .94, p = .175). In specific behaviors, nursing students improved in eating breakfast regularly, performing monthly self breast and testicular exams, reading food labels, wearing seatbelts, and exercising at least three times a week. Implications include the importance of emphasizing self health care in nursing curricula to promote healthy life styles of nursing students who can subsequently become role models in their professional practice. PMID:11052653

  17. Debts could deter nursing entry as student loans replace bursaries.

    PubMed

    Sprinks, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    The government's decision to scrap bursaries for nursing students in England and replace them with loans will saddle many graduates with debt and deter entry into the profession, nursing unions and students warn.

  18. Can Grit Be Nurtured in Undergraduate Nursing Students?

    PubMed

    McCabe, Ellen M

    2016-05-01

    Grit, a positive psychological trait, is a character trait of great benefit to the practice of nursing. Nurses who exemplify a combination of excellence, determination, and compassion in their practice are often described as having grit. This article discusses the five major traits of grit and the development and nurturing of these traits in both nursing students and novice nurses. The topic of the development of grit is relevant to school nurses who find themselves in mentor roles with nursing students and with nurses new to school nursing. PMID:26980850

  19. [Alcohol and alcoholism: attitudes of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Divane; Bittencourt, Marina Nolli

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive exploratory study that aimed to verify nursing students' attitudes facing to the alcoholic drinks, alcoholism and alcoholics, according to their position in face of an attitudes scale items. For data collection, it was used the Scale of Attitudes to alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholic, applied to 144 nursing students. The results showed a tendency to negative attitudes of these students in face of alcoholism, alcoholic person and alcoholic drinks, since most participants were placed in category indifferent or disagree with the positive items, agreeing with negative scale items. We conclude that this trend of negative attitudes is connected to insufficient attention given to the subject during the nurses' education, being verified the need for greater importance to be given to this problem.

  20. Factors Related to Homophobia Among Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rowniak, Stefan R

    2015-01-01

    A convenience sample of 90 nursing students participated in an online survey measuring homophobia or sexual prejudice. Significantly higher scores were seen among those who endorsed the belief that being gay was a matter of personal choice, did not have a friend or family member who was gay or lesbian, and endorsed religiosity. A significantly higher level of sexual prejudice was seen among those who identified as non-Catholic Christians when compared to other religions. Asian/Pacific Islanders showed significantly higher scores on the scales compared to non-Hispanic Caucasian students. Nursing education should focus on those aspects of homophobia amenable to change.

  1. Attitudes toward Older People among Nursing Students and Registered Nurses in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderhamn, Olle; Lindencrona, Catharina; Gustavsson, Siw Merit

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 151 undergraduate nursing students and 41 registered nurses in Sweden found that those who were under 25, male, or had limited prior experience caring for older people had less favorable attitudes toward the elderly. First-year students were more negative than third-year students. No differences among nurses in different practice…

  2. Beliefs Held by Associate Degree Nursing Students about Role Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellinger, Kathleen; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a study of the professional socialization of associate degree nursing (ADN) students. Reviews previous research on the process of nursing socialization. Presents study findings based on responses from 1,877 nursing students in 20 ADN programs, focusing on students' characteristics and ideal and actual role models. (DMM)

  3. Comparison between Heads of Nursing and Nursing Administration Students in the Sultanate of Oman regarding Education for Nurse Administrators

    PubMed Central

    White, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the future of nursing administration in preparation for a major review of the current curriculum in the one-year diploma in nursing administration at the Oman Specialized Nursing Institute (OSNI). Methods: A two-part study explored 1) requisite roles, skills and competencies of the nurse administrator, 2) a leadership profile with two convenience samples: heads of nursing and nursing administration students. Each part was analysed separately; the two groups were then compared with the latter revealing similarities and differences. Results: Heads of nursing were more likely to describe roles and be task-oriented, emphasising problem solving, whereas students focused on functions and processes. Both groups wanted nursing to be known for its code of professional conduct, and have an empowered nursing association. Leadership profile comparisons indicated heads of nursing were mature and practical whereas students were idealistic, with risk-taking tendencies. There was overall agreement that preparation for the nursing administration specialty should be at master’s level; however, all nurses should undertake a leadership and management course during their progression to senior positions. Conclusion: The vision of those preparing to enter and those already in leadership positions is for empowerment of the nursing profession in Oman. Thus there is a need for highly educated nurse leaders and managers in nursing administration to provide the driving force for change and sustained motivation. The current Nursing Administration Programme (NAP) needs to be upgraded and delivered at the master’s level for nurses specialising in nursing administration. PMID:22912924

  4. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  5. Summer Learning: Accelerating Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitcock, Sarah; Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As numerous studies from 1906 on have confirmed, children lose ground in learning if they lack opportunities for building skills over the summer. Nonetheless, summer learning loss comes up but rarely in the national discussion of education reform. By the end of summer, students perform on average one month behind where they left off in the spring.…

  6. Student nurses' experiences of anxiety in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Melincavage, Sharon M

    2011-11-01

    It is known that some student nurses who experience anxiety during clinical experiences leave nursing education programs. If nurse educators can better understand the anxiety of student nurses during clinical experience, they will be able to develop educational interventions to minimize students' anxiety. Decreasing anxiety has a two-fold effect. First, when anxiety is decreased, learning may be increased. Second, decreasing anxiety may help alleviate the nursing shortage because more students complete their nursing education. This qualitative phenomenological study examines student nurses' perception of anxiety in the clinical setting. Situated cognition learning theory is the theoretical framework. The main method of data collection is unstructured face-to-face interviews with 7 student nurses. The data was analyzed using a thematic analysis. The themes are reported in the rich descriptive words of the subjects. Implications for practice are discussed.

  7. Perception of nursing students towards internship.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Hema

    2012-04-01

    The study, undertaken to assess the perception of students regarding integrated internship in the preparation of staff nurse position among the BSc (N) final year undergraduate students included 43 students (21, 47% female and 22, 53% male) in the hospital setting of Chennai (TN). Majority of students (96%) perceived that there was significant enrichment in preparation in the three aspects: knowledge, skill and attitude and that due to their learning in the internship period, they would confidently function independently in the ward in discharge of their duties.

  8. International Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pross, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Results of a survey of 16 nursing students and interviews with 11 regarding international education experience were distilled into 4 themes--preparing, adjusting, caring, and transforming--that were influenced by culture, values, and ethics. All participants experienced shock related to culture or to the poverty they encountered. (Contains 19…

  9. Death metaphors in Korean undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kae-Hwa; An, Gyeong-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meaning of death metaphors seen by 133 undergraduate nursing students through open questionnaires and collage artworks, using qualitative content analysis in Korea. The 4 themes emerged: "rest-physical," "fear-psychological," "separating-social," and "new life-spiritual."

  10. Nursing Students Benefit from Video Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Rich

    2006-01-01

    At Renton Technical College in Renton, Washington, a video system that captures and records live images is enhancing the educational experience for students in the nursing program. Capturing and recording live images from the rooms has proven to be one of the most successful teaching methods instituted at Renton Tech. Instructors are able to…

  11. Being a Nursing Aide; Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Hospital Association, Chicago, IL.

    Developed for students receiving on-the-job training as nursing aides, this illustrated manual contains these chapters: (1) Orientation, (2) Introduction to the Patient, (3) Your Working Environment, (4) The Patient's Unit: Making the Unoccupied Bed, (5) Lifting, Moving, and Transporting Patients: Making the Occupied Bed, (6) Personal Care of the…

  12. Academic Dishonesty among Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study identified socio-demographic and situational conditions that affected 336 nursing students' engagement in academic dishonesty, their attitudes regarding various forms of academic dishonesty, and the prevalence of academic dishonesty they witnessed and engaged in. Over half of the participants reported cheating in the…

  13. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  14. Student Selection and Retention in Nursing Schools. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY.

    In order to provide all eligible nursing school applicants with equal access to careers in professional nursing and to assure an adequate supply of professional nurses, a study was conducted to identify factors that contribute to the successful recruitment, selection, and retention of students by nursing schools. A questionnaire was sent to all…

  15. An outcome-based evaluation of nursing competency of baccalaureate senior nursing students in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2013-12-01

    Limited literature is available for demographic and learning factors related to performance of baccalaureate nursing students. The study aimed at examining mean differences in nursing competency between the first week and the sixth week of a nursing clinical practicum as well as evaluating mean differences in nursing competency by demographic and learning factors at the sixth week of a nursing clinical practicum controlling for baseline scores of nursing competency. A comparative study design was conducted using the competency inventory for baccalaureate senior nursing students based on learning outcomes. Participants were surveyed at the first week and the sixth week of a nursing practicum with 95% mean response rate. Paired t test was used to compare within-subjects differences in mean nursing competency. ANCOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U test were conducted to compare between-subjects differences in mean nursing competency. There are significant mean differences in nursing competency in general clinical skills, lifelong learning, clinical biomedical science, caring, and critical thinking and reasoning between the 1st week and the 6th week of nursing practicum. Likewise, type of nursing program, prior schooling, type of nursing license, interest in nursing, and extracurricular activity experience were significantly related to mean total nursing competency. Similarly, demographic attributes (location of school, type of nursing program, prior schooling, type of nursing license, a family member working as a medical practitioner or a nurse, interest in nursing, attributes of preferred workplace after college) and learning factors (extracurricular activity experience, played an active role in classroom discussions and asked questions, academic class rank, and English grade, clinical biomedical science, nursing science, and nursing practicum) were significantly related to six-subscale scores of nursing competency. There are mean differences in nursing

  16. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

    PubMed

    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  17. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  18. Cultural Self-Efficacy of Second- Degree Nursing Students in Providing Care to Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Miskin, Predrag; Matthews, Eric; Wallace, Lisa A; Fox, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of perceived cultural self-efficacy of senior students in second-degree pre-licensure nursing programs in the provision of culturally appropriate care to immigrants. The study employed a quantitative, non-experimental design with survey methodology. The convenience sample consisted of 117 senior students enrolled in accelerated bachelor of sciences in nursing and entry levels master of sciences programs. The study used Bernal and Froman's Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). The study found that the participants had low levels of transcultural self-efficacy. There was no association between the participants' demographic characteristics and their CSES scores. These findings were consistent with the findings of previous studies that surveyed traditional nursing students. The study provided important assessment data on learning needs of second-degree nursing student concerning the provision of culturally congruent care. PMID:26817174

  19. Cultural Self-Efficacy of Second- Degree Nursing Students in Providing Care to Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Miskin, Predrag; Matthews, Eric; Wallace, Lisa A; Fox, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of perceived cultural self-efficacy of senior students in second-degree pre-licensure nursing programs in the provision of culturally appropriate care to immigrants. The study employed a quantitative, non-experimental design with survey methodology. The convenience sample consisted of 117 senior students enrolled in accelerated bachelor of sciences in nursing and entry levels master of sciences programs. The study used Bernal and Froman's Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). The study found that the participants had low levels of transcultural self-efficacy. There was no association between the participants' demographic characteristics and their CSES scores. These findings were consistent with the findings of previous studies that surveyed traditional nursing students. The study provided important assessment data on learning needs of second-degree nursing student concerning the provision of culturally congruent care.

  20. Fostering creativity in nursing students: a blending of nursing and the arts.

    PubMed

    Pavill, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Integrating nursing and fine arts can evoke a more holistic view of clients as well as foster creativity in students. Presented is an overview of The Creative Project assignment that culminates with nursing students developing a creative self-expression of a clinical experience through the lens of liberal arts and nursing.

  1. Differential Dimensions of Death Anxiety in Nursing Students with and without Nursing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Chuen; Ben, Kevin S. Del; Fortson, Beverly L.; Lewis, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated death anxiety in nursing professionals; however, it is unclear as to when this anxiety develops. This study used a multidimensional measure to investigate death anxiety in a group of experienced (n = 53) and inexperienced (n = 49) nursing students and a control group of non-nursing students (n = 50). Experienced…

  2. Fundraising for Accelerated Study for the PhD in Nursing: A Community Partnership.

    PubMed

    Starck, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    This article describes fundraising strategies by a School of Nursing to support a post-master's accelerated (3-year) PhD degree program. A sample proposal to solicit funds is included, as well as a contract that students sign before accepting the scholarship and agreeing to teach for 3 years or repay the money. The first campaign raised $2.3 million for ten students, and the second campaign raised $1.3 million for six students. One useful marketing strategy is to show the impact of an investment in educating ten doctoral students who will become faculty and teach 100 additional students per year, who will then become professionals caring for thousands of patients during their careers. Over a 10 year period, the impact of an accelerated program is enormous, with 660 students taught who in their lifetime will care for 2.4 million patients. The article also discusses motivation and mind sets for giving to promote success in fundraising. PMID:25999190

  3. Life History and Zimbabwean Nursing Student: "Global Boarder"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Sue

    2005-01-01

    A considerable number of students undertaking pre-registration nurse education in the UK are international students from Zimbabwe. The traditional strength of nursing education in Zimbabwe itself has been the large labour pool available for recruitment into the programmes. However, the numbers of recruits to UK nursing courses from Zimbabwe…

  4. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  5. Facilitating Trust Engenderment in Secondary School Nurse Interactions with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summach, Anne H. J.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses are involved in a complex framework of interactions with students, other professionals, parents, and administrators. Trust between nurse and student is critical for interaction effectiveness. The goal of this study was to understand through phenomenology the process of engendering trust in school nurse-high school student…

  6. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean T.; Winters, Karen; Williams, P. Renee; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental descriptive study was to explore types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours that nursing students experience while in nursing school. The study also evaluated resources utilised by nursing students to cope with these bullying behaviours. Six hundred thirty-six participants completed the…

  7. High school students' perceptions of nursing as a career choice.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P A; Edwards, T A

    1990-01-01

    Declining enrollments in nursing programs, coupled with the current shortage of practicing registered nurses, prompted this investigation of 306 high school students' beliefs about nurses and nursing. The study also identifies potential numbers of future nursing students from high school populations and their primary source of information about nursing. Using an investigator questionnaire, subjects responded to statements about educational requirements for registered nurses along with their working conditions, earning power, and social status. Findings reveal a projected continuing shortage of nurses based on the very small percentage of subjects even considering nursing as a career. Additional findings show that whereas some perceptions about nursing seem congruent with those of nurses themselves, other beliefs held by high school students are not consistent with the realities of professional nursing today. Results of this study can be used by nurse recruiters to correct misconceptions about nursing and to help high school students perceive the profession in a more positive way. Expanding the informational sources about nursing can facilitate the recruitment process. PMID:2153778

  8. Mentoring disadvantaged nursing students through technical writing workshops.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Molly K; Symes, Lene; Bernard, Lillian; Landson, Margie J; Carroll, Theresa L

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a problematic gap for nursing students between terse clinical writing and formal academic writing. This gap can create a potential barrier to academic and workplace success, especially for disadvantaged nursing students who have not acquired the disciplinary conventions and sophisticated writing required in upper-level nursing courses. The authors demonstrate the need for writing-in-the-discipline activities to enhance the writing skills of nursing students, describe the technical writing workshops they developed to mentor minority and disadvantaged nursing students, and provide recommendations to stimulate educator dialogue across disciplines and institutions.

  9. Simulation: Perceptions of First Year Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Suzanne V.

    2011-01-01

    It was the purpose of this study to determine if there is a relationship between student satisfaction with high-fidelity-patient simulation experience and self-confidence in learning among student nurses. The population was associate nursing degree students. The study measured by the students' perceptions of their satisfaction and self-confidence.…

  10. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience.

  11. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience. PMID:27235560

  12. Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration in Pediatric Workers and Undergraduate Medical/Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Yong-fang; Li, Hao; Li, Tingyu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of pediatric workers and undergraduate medical/nursing students toward collaboration. Attitude toward collaboration was measured using an adaptation of the Jefferson Scale of Attitude toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. The 656 questionnaires were gathered from pediatrician, pediatric interns, and medical students (PIS) and pediatric nurses, nursing interns, and nursing students (NIS). Results showed a statistically significant difference in the total mean scores in attitudes towards collaboration with NIS scoring higher. Among the participants of PIS, the pediatricians obtained the highest mean scores, while, among the participants of NIS, the pediatric nurses got higher mean scores than nursing interns. It is desirable that medical and nurse schools should include interprofessional education in their curriculum to increase the understanding of the complementary roles of physicians and nurses and to encourage establishment of an interdependent relationship between them. PMID:26273131

  13. Telling the story of role conflict among Black nurses and Black nursing students: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ora V

    2013-09-01

    Racism continues to affect minority nursing students and nurses in professional roles. A selective review of the literature published from 1992 to 2011 was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Literature in Nursing and Allied Health, ScienceDirect, and EBSCOhost. Keywords used included racism within nursing, minority nurses and role conflict, cultural diversity within nursing, racism, and diversity. The purpose of this review is to describe Black nurses' and Black nursing students' experiences of role conflict as an outcome of perceived racism within the nursing profession to gain an understanding of factors that contribute to perceived racism and role conflict. Noblit's and Hare's framework for metasynthesis of the data was used to identify and synthesize key concepts. The role perspectives of Hardy and Conway guided the review to develop a conceptual framework for minority role conflict and the nursing implications discussed herein.

  14. Students requiring personal nursing care in school: nursing care models and a checklist for school nurses.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Minchella, Lindsey

    2015-03-01

    Unprecedented numbers of children in the United States are now surviving extreme conditions and complications of prematurity, severe congenital anomalies, and significant birth trauma. Advances in medical science and technology have given rise to a marked increase in the population of children with special health care needs who require continuous nursing care, including at school. Students who are considered medically complex and/or are health technology-dependent present many rewards and challenges for families, educational staff, district administrators, and school nurses who may not feel prepared to integrate involved health care for students into the school setting. The purpose of this article is to describe care delivery models for success in providing for the health and safety needs of students who require continuous or personal nursing care at school. PMID:25816436

  15. Improving medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior nursing students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Kreamer, Carolyn L; Frownfelter, Penny; Helmuth, Amy; Lutter, Stacy; Schafer, Deborah J; Wilson, Cyndy

    2006-01-01

    Medication administration is an essential nursing competency as calculation difficulties can lead to serious medication errors. Nurses involved in staff education need to be aware of methods to assess for computation difficulty and develop strategies for nurses to improve their computation abilities. The purposes of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to assess the medication calculation skills of nurses and nursing students and to determine the effectiveness of teaching strategies aimed at improving these skills. PMID:16885685

  16. Faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Grady, Carole A; Stewardson, Gary A; Hall, Janice L

    2008-07-01

    Men are entering the field of nursing in increasing numbers. As men enter nursing programs, they may encounter role stereotyping and gender bias through the faculty's assumption of stereotypical notions of caring. The purpose of this interpretive phenomenological study was to describe the ways faculty perceive and respond to caring in male nursing students to better understand how to facilitate it. The central question for this study was: What are the essences and meaning of nursing faculty notions regarding caring in male nursing students? Six faculty members in a nursing program with a large percentage of male student enrollment were interviewed. Applying a phenomenological data analysis method, the researchers identified six themes: altruism, antecedents, attainment, ambiguity, agency, and anecdotes. Implications for nursing education and practice are made, including the need to recognize, allow, and support male nursing student ways of caring.

  17. Teaching Problems and Strategies with Male Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumminia, Patricia A.

    1981-01-01

    Male student nurses encounter unique conflicts in the nursing education process that can interfere with their learning abilities and ultimately their success. This article examines these conflicts and offers a variety of teaching strategies to combat them. (Author/CT)

  18. What makes nursing satisfying: a comparison of college students' and registered nurses' views.

    PubMed

    Dodds, A E; Lawrence, J A; Wearing, A J

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports a study of nurses' perceptions of the positive and negative features of the work environment and their contribution to satisfaction with nursing. The concept of a 'work space' was developed to describe nurses' mental images of the features of their work environment. Eighty-four final-year student nurses and 75 registered nurses rated questionnaire items designed to examine perceptions of opportunities for professional development, sources of satisfaction, difficulties, time constraints and problematic interactions with other hospital personnel. There was general agreement among nurses about the aspects of their work that they found satisfying, but student nurses were more pessimistic than registered nurses that nursing would give them opportunities for recognition of their worth. Students returning from practica in critical care wards reported more stressful interactions with other personnel than students returning from general ward practica. Structural equation modelling of the causal relations between sources of satisfaction with nursing revealed that recognition and self-perceptions of work as a nurse were the strongest predictors of overall satisfaction with nursing. Caring for patients contributed only indirectly through its influence on nurses' feelings about themselves. The data indicate the significance of personal and social implications of nursing careers.

  19. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected. PMID:24837816

  20. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience.

  1. When nursing meets English: using a pathography to develop nursing students' culturally competent selves.

    PubMed

    Slade, Diann; Thomas-Connor, Iona; Tsao, Ting Man

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a collaboration between nursing and English faculty to pilot and study the use of a pathography to develop nursing students' cultural competence. The setting is a nursing program in an urban community college serving many foreign-born students. Interpreting a pathography was found to develop students' compassion for the patient and family. Exercises and assignments were used to challenge students to critically read complex transcultural interactions and apply relevant nursing concepts to analysis of these situations in health care delivery. The essay assignment presented challenges to students because of their writing skills.

  2. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the “concerns of becoming a nurse,” which itself consisted of three categories: “nurses clinical competency,” “nurses as full-scale mirror of the future,” and “Monitoring and modeling through clinical education” (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education. PMID:22830005

  3. Engaging student nurses in commissioning.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jackie; Fagan, Debbie; Prescott, Brendan; Thomson, Yvonne; McCann, Stacey

    Commissioning is an important element of healthcare provision, but is often not understood or considered in depth by students. It is vital that the workforce of the future understands the machinations of service development and commissioning, so one higher education establishment decided to offer its students a placement in a clinical commissioning group. This article outlines how a university partnered with local CCGs and a regional placement network to develop the CCG clinical placement and its benefits. PMID:27295802

  4. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  5. Nurses' experiences working with nursing students in a hospital: a phenomenological enquiry

    PubMed Central

    Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda Raquel; Cibanal-Juan, Luis; Orts-Cortés, Mª Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Mª Loreto; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this paper explores the experiences of registered nurses working with Spanish nursing students within the hospital. Methods: a qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Purposeful sampling was employed. Twenty-one registered nurses, from a public hospital located in Spain, were included in the study. Data were collected by means of unstructured and semi-structured interviews and were analysed using Giorgi's proposal. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research were followed. Results: three main themes described the experience of registered nurses: "The nurse's relationship with nursing students"; most nurses emphasized the importance of the first contact with students and they considered students' attitude to be key. "Defining the role of the student in clinical practice"; it is necessary to unify the nurse's role and interventions to avoid misleading students and establish priorities in clinical practice. "Building bridges between clinical settings and the University"; the need to establish a common ground and connection between the university and hospital clinical settings was emphasized. Nurses felt that the training program should also be designed by the clinical settings themselves. Conclusions: understanding the meaning of nursing students with registered nurses might gain a deeper insight into their expectations. PMID:27463112

  6. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print.

  7. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print. PMID:27209871

  8. Career intentions of nursing students and new nurse graduates: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laureen J; Orchard, Carole A; McGillis Hall, Linda; Nincic, Vera; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Andrews, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights findings from a literature search to examine the role of nursing education in preparing nurses to meet healthcare demands. The review focused on nursing students' perceptions of nursing and whether these views change during their nursing studies and impact workplace preferences. Nursing students often enter their program with preconceived ideas of where they want to work following graduation. Large urban hospitals were favored over community care because of the perceived opportunities for support. Of particular importance were the negative views relating to care of elderly patients. Unless attitudes are changed during their nursing studies, they may affect initial job selection. Implications for nursing education include provision of educational experiences that foster an optimistic career outlook in areas where there is a growing need for nursing services. More research is needed to determine how to enable appropriate learning experiences when there are limited resources and practice placements. PMID:17140394

  9. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing.

  10. Teaching statistics to nursing students: an expert panel consensus.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Matthew J; Eckardt, Patricia; Higgins, Melinda; Kim, MyoungJin; Schmiege, Sarah J

    2013-06-01

    Statistics education is a necessary element of nursing education, and its inclusion is recommended in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing guidelines for nurse training at all levels. This article presents a cohesive summary of an expert panel discussion, "Teaching Statistics to Nursing Students," held at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings. All panelists were statistics experts, had extensive teaching and consulting experience, and held faculty appointments in a U.S.-based nursing college or school. The panel discussed degree-specific curriculum requirements, course content, how to ensure nursing students understand the relevance of statistics, approaches to integrating statistics consulting knowledge, experience with classroom instruction, use of knowledge from the statistics education research field to make improvements in statistics education for nursing students, and classroom pedagogy and instruction on the use of statistical software. Panelists also discussed the need for evidence to make data-informed decisions about statistics education and training for nurses.

  11. Avoiding plagiarism: guidance for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    The pressures of study, diversity of source materials, past assumptions relating to good writing practice, ambiguous writing guidance on best practice and students' insecurity about their reasoning ability, can lead to plagiarism. With the use of source checking software, there is an increased chance that plagiarised work will be identified and investigated, and penalties given. In extreme cases, plagiarised work may be reported to the Nursing and Midwifery Council and professional as well as academic penalties may apply. This article provides information on how students can avoid plagiarism when preparing their coursework for submission.

  12. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  13. Discontinued students in nursing education - Who and why?

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, Pia; Suhonen, Riitta; Salminen, Leena

    2016-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in student nurse attrition due to the high level of attrition rates in many countries. Studies about nursing education and attrition have been conducted internationally, but only a few have explored attrition from the perspective of the students' own experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe who is a discontinued student in nursing education and the students' own experiences of reasons for leaving a nursing school. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. 25 nursing students were interviewed at two different universities of applied sciences in Finland. Four different types of discontinued nursing students were identified: those who moved to another school, those who faced a life crisis, those who made the wrong career choice and those who lived 'busy years'. The results show that the nursing student population is diverse, which has an effect on the students' career intentions, their learning and their ability to cope with studies. In nursing education, it is important to identify students who are at risk of discontinue their studies and develop individual support systems to help nursing students complete their studies and enter into the workforce.

  14. Self-Efficacy of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Preceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Dolly; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Nursing students (n=23) rated their self-efficacy in nursing behaviors and clinical preceptors (n=24) rated their self-efficacy in helping students with the behaviors. Students' self-efficacy increased after the preceptorship; preceptors' scores remained high both before and after. The value of the preceptorship was supported. (SK)

  15. Graduating Finnish nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing--a survey study.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Sanna; Hupli, Maija; Katajisto, Jouko; Salminen, Leena

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to examine nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing and the factors enhancing and decreasing that interest. The quantitative data was collected in the autumn of 2009 using a structured instrument with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), which was developed for this study based on the literature review. Graduating nurse students (n=183) from three polytechnics in Southern Finland participated in the study. The data was analysed statistically using descriptive statistics and t-test for independent samples to indicate statistical significance. The students did not clearly state if they are interested in gerontological nursing as a future career choice or not. Students who had prior gerontological nursing work experience, women, and students who had learned about gerontological nursing through an independent course were the most interested in the field. The factors that enhance interest are the quality of gerontological nursing, the challenging aspects of the field and the opportunities for career advancement, the gerontological nursing education and the practical training in gerontological nursing. On the basis of the results, it seems that it is possible to enhance nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing as a future career choice.

  16. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  17. Nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession from clinical practicum in a baccalaureate nursing program-a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Weng, Wei-Che

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore senior nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession and their experiences in clinical practicum in Taiwan. This study used semistructured interview guides and unstructured face-to-face dialogue with the participants based on a qualitative method. A purposive sample with a snowball method from a baccalaureate nursing program in Southern Taiwan was used to recruit participants. A total of 30 senior nursing students participated in this study. Data were collected from February to May 2011. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed based on the phenomenological approach of qualitative methodology. Data were categorized into three major themes: in-depth recognition of nursing, recognition of the meaning and value of life, and decision conflicts for being a nurse. The findings of the study not only help nursing educators further understand the educational effects of clinical practicum, but also provide information for managers of medical organizations to recruit and train newly graduated nurses.

  18. Caring behaviours of student nurses: Effects of pre-registration nursing education.

    PubMed

    Loke, Jennifer C F; Lee, Kah Wai; Lee, Bryant K; Mohd Noor, Asmah

    2015-11-01

    In an increasing technologised and cost-constrained healthcare environment, the role of pre-registration nursing education in nurturing and developing the professional caring disposition of students is becoming far more critical than before. In view of this growing demand, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Singapore's pre-registration nursing programmes on students' concept of caring. A descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data using the Caring Behaviour Inventory from first and final year student nurses, nurse lecturers and nurses in practice. The findings based on student surveys indicated a statistically significant reduction in the overall level of caring behaviour in first to final year students. When compared with the findings of lecturers and nurses, less variance to lecturers than to nurses was found amongst the first years' score, and the lowest variance to nurses was demonstrated amongst the final year. A greater reduction was evidenced amongst Singaporean students, which was exaggerated with exposure to pre-enrolled nursing education and magnified with caring job experience. This study indicates more effort is necessary to harness student caring attributes in students' entire educational journey so that expressive caring is not subsumed in the teaching of students to meet demands of complicated contemporary care.

  19. Caring behaviours of student nurses: Effects of pre-registration nursing education.

    PubMed

    Loke, Jennifer C F; Lee, Kah Wai; Lee, Bryant K; Mohd Noor, Asmah

    2015-11-01

    In an increasing technologised and cost-constrained healthcare environment, the role of pre-registration nursing education in nurturing and developing the professional caring disposition of students is becoming far more critical than before. In view of this growing demand, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Singapore's pre-registration nursing programmes on students' concept of caring. A descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data using the Caring Behaviour Inventory from first and final year student nurses, nurse lecturers and nurses in practice. The findings based on student surveys indicated a statistically significant reduction in the overall level of caring behaviour in first to final year students. When compared with the findings of lecturers and nurses, less variance to lecturers than to nurses was found amongst the first years' score, and the lowest variance to nurses was demonstrated amongst the final year. A greater reduction was evidenced amongst Singaporean students, which was exaggerated with exposure to pre-enrolled nursing education and magnified with caring job experience. This study indicates more effort is necessary to harness student caring attributes in students' entire educational journey so that expressive caring is not subsumed in the teaching of students to meet demands of complicated contemporary care. PMID:26059429

  20. Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

    The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

  1. The importance of awareness of nursing students' denotative images of nursing.

    PubMed

    Lyckhage, Elisabeth Dahlborg; Pilhammar, Ewa

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the images that recent nursing students in Eurocentric culture have of nursing and discuss how these images can be used to highlight nurses' authority and autonomy in comparison with the medical profession. The empirical material consists of short narratives from 168 nursing students. Three themes emerged from the categories of answers: The Nurse as an Idealistic Helper, The Nurse as a Realistic Developer, and The Nurse as a Young Seeker. The essence of nursing could be traced in these themes even if a solid ground of nursing shows itself in changing forms. According to this study and previous research, nursing can be considered as a mummified occupation in its essence, given that the old values and stereotypes largely remain. The main motives for becoming a nurse are altruism, a desire for autonomy, and flexibility. To strengthen the profession, both teachers and clinical supervisors should use the students' images of nursing as a starting point in nursing education and develop them in different contexts.

  2. Nursing staff and nursing students' emotions towards homosexual patients and their wish to refrain from nursing, if the option existed.

    PubMed

    Röndahl, Gerd; Innala, Sune; Carlsson, Marianne

    2004-03-01

    Studies have reported that homosexual patients fear they will not receive adequate care if they openly show their sexual orientation, for example, when introducing their partner. The aims of this study were to investigate the emotions of nursing staff and nursing students, and possible relations to cultural background and gender, towards homosexual patients; whether nursing staff and nursing students would choose to refrain from nursing homosexual patients, if the option existed; and, if so, how they express their wish to refrain from nursing this group of patients. All participants received verbal and written information before the study started. Returning a completed questionnaire indicated a participant's tacit consent. Approval was obtained from the heads of departments and persons in charge of nursing and nursing assistant programmes. The study had a descriptive, comparative design, and an Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) and specially designed Nursing Behaviour Questionnaire (NBQ) were used. The participants included nurses and assistant nurses from an infectious disease clinic, and students enrolled in a university nursing programme and upper secondary assistant nurses' training, all in central Sweden. The findings showed that both professional nursing staff (response rate 67%, n = 57), and students (response rate 62%, n = 165), expressed emotions of homophobic anger, homophobic guilt and delight. Groups with a cultural background other than Swedish expressed more homophobia. No gender differences were indicated for homophobic emotions. In the professional group, 36% would refrain from nursing for homosexual patients if given the option. The corresponding figure for the students was 9%. The limitations were that the sample was small and not randomly selected, and as participation was anonymous no follow-up could be done. It was concluded that the emotional factors of homosexual anger and homosexual guilt might be of value in helping to explain and predict

  3. Retaining Students of Diverse Backgrounds in Schools of Nursing. Faculty Development in Nursing Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Onalee, Comp.

    Approaches to improve the teaching of nursing students of diverse backgrounds are described in 16 papers as part of the Southern Regional Education Board's Faculty Development in Nursing Education Project. Among the papers and authors are the following: "Background on the Faculty Development in Nursing Education Project" (Audrey F. Spector);…

  4. Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Aging among Nursing and Non-Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Meredith Troutman; Clark, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing life expectancies and more years spent living with chronic illnesses mean that increasing numbers of older adults will require nursing care. However, most nurses prefer not to work with older adults, and many nursing students have limited knowledge and negative attitudes towards aging and older adults. This study examined the knowledge…

  5. Nursing Student Retention in Associate Degree Nursing Programs Utilizing a Retention Specialist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, Ronna A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine specific variables associated with nursing student retention in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs. Jeffreys (2004) Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) conceptual model provided the framework for this descriptive correlational study. One hundred sixty eight pre-licensure associate degree…

  6. Nursing students' attitudes towards sustainability and health care.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Janet; Grose, Jane; O'Connor, Anita; Bradbury, Martyn; Kelsey, Janet; Doman, Maggie

    2015-06-17

    Aim To evaluate attitudes towards embedding sustainability and climate change in nursing curricula among nursing students, some of whom had participated in a sustainability and health skills session, and determine whether the session could improve knowledge of sustainability. Methods Three months after the sustainability session, students who had participated along with a sample of students who had not, completed a Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey questionnaire. This investigated attitudes towards climate change and sustainability in nursing curricula and the costs of clinical and domestic waste disposal. Results Nursing students were positive about sustainability and climate change and its inclusion in the curriculum, irrespective of their participation in the sustainability scenario session. Participants in the sustainability session were more likely to identify correctly the cost of clinical waste disposal in the NHS. Conclusion The sustainability and health skills session has the potential to improve nursing students' knowledge of the cost of clinical waste disposal.

  7. The Meaning of Visual Thinking Strategies for Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators are called upon to provide creative, innovative experiences for students in order to prepare nurses to work in complex healthcare settings. As part of this preparation, teaching observational and communication skills is critical for nurses and can directly affect patient outcomes. Visual thinking strategies (VTS) are a teaching…

  8. Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.; McNair, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours encountered by nursing students in their final year of nursing education. Six hundred thirty-six respondents reported encountering at least one bullying behaviour from School of Nursing (SON) Faculty during one year of classroom or clinical course work. The results of…

  9. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing with Bullying Situations among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-01-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed…

  10. Toward a Grounded Theory of Nursing Student Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lenora

    2010-01-01

    Attrition of students from a nursing program is a significant concern. It is even more critical now because there are not enough nurses to fill all open positions in the healthcare industry. It is predicted the shortage will worsen in the next decade as an aging society increases the number of people requiring nursing care. While increasing the…

  11. Student evaluation: a performance indicator of quality in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Cowman, S

    1996-09-01

    This study, which forms part of a doctoral thesis, is derived from the increasing demand for economic models of nurse education as a process within a wider economic agenda which converts inputs (e.g. training costs) into outputs (e.g. registered nurses). In such a climate the pursuance and determination of quality in nurse education should be of fundamental concern to the nursing profession. The development of models for evaluation and measurement of quality must take due cognisance of the stakeholders' interests and concerns, and student nurses, as the consumers of nurse education, must be regarded as major stakeholders. This paper describes the use of the course experience questionnaire, an instrument designed to investigate the students' perspective on teaching and learning. The study incorporates a comparative analysis between Project 2000 students in Northern Ireland and students in the apprenticeship programme in the Republic of Ireland, from general, psychiatric, sick children's and mental handicap nursing. This comparative analysis does provide the nursing profession with a level of feedback on which to make decisions in the interest of quality. Nurse teachers should examine potential reasons why their programmes are poorly or highly rated and the actions that may be required to remedy imperfections on the one hand and the actions that may be taken to promote excellence on the other. As nurse education continues to forge links with universities, nurse teachers, by adopting student evaluation as a performance indicator, can maximize an essential element in the web of public accountability. PMID:8876425

  12. Quantifying Eye Tracking Between Skilled Nurses and Nursing Students in Intravenous Injection.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yasuko; Majima, Yukie; Soga, Masato

    2016-01-01

    In nursing education, it is important that nursing students acquire the appropriate nursing knowledge and skills which include the empirical tacit knowledge of the skilled nurses. Verbalizing them is difficult. We paid attention to the eye tracking at the time of the skill enforcement of expert nurses and the nursing students. It is said that the sight accounts for 70% higher than of all sense information. For the purpose of the learning support of the tacit nursing skill, we analyzed the difference of both including the gaze from an actual measured value with the eye mark recorder. In the results the nurses particularly address the part related to inserting a needle among the other actions, they should move their eyes safely, surely, and economically along with the purposes of their tasks. PMID:27332256

  13. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience. PMID:27295244

  14. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  15. Humanistic approach to nursing education: lived experiences of Iranian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Parsa Yekta, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    The nurse teachers tried to have a complete understanding of the educational contents, to transfer knowledge to nursing students better, and to facilitate the process of education. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of Iranian nursing students regarding the characteristics of academic nurse teachers. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, data were collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 Iranian nursing students and the audio-taped and transcribed interviews analyzed according to Van Manen´s method. The main theme emerged during data analysis, was "humanistic approach to nursing education". The theme was extracted from 2 sub-themes including 'ethical necessities' and 'effective interaction'. The findings present greater understanding of humanistic approach to nursing education. PMID:25716394

  16. Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future. PMID:24093735

  17. Humanistic approach to nursing education: lived experiences of Iranian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Parsa Yekta, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    The nurse teachers tried to have a complete understanding of the educational contents, to transfer knowledge to nursing students better, and to facilitate the process of education. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of Iranian nursing students regarding the characteristics of academic nurse teachers. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, data were collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 Iranian nursing students and the audio-taped and transcribed interviews analyzed according to Van Manen´s method. The main theme emerged during data analysis, was "humanistic approach to nursing education". The theme was extracted from 2 sub-themes including 'ethical necessities' and 'effective interaction'. The findings present greater understanding of humanistic approach to nursing education.

  18. The emotional impact of nursing student attrition rates.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Hugh

    Nursing student attrition continues to attract political, organizational and social interest for a number of reasons including: persistent nursing shortages, the age profile of the current nursing population and the economic cost of attrition. While attrition in nursing students is not a new phenomenon, it is surprising that this issue has attracted such little research attention obtained from students who persist, rather than the experiences of students who have withdrawn from pre-registration nursing courses. The emotional impact on students who decide to voluntarily leave has attracted limited theoretical analysis, so a single case study design was selected to help explain the causes of voluntary attrition in nursing students within a School of Nursing and Midwifery. A semi-structured interview method was used to collect data from study participants. The study population was obtained through purposeful sampling and consisted of 15 students who had previously voluntarily withdrawn from pre-registration nursing programmes. The articles describes the range of emotions which many students experienced and the process of gradual disengagement which may precede student decisions to formally withdraw.

  19. [Bachelor and teaching degree in nursing: experiences and expectations of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Santos, Sueli Maria dos Reis; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; da Silva, Marcelo Henrique; Carneiro, Carla Toscano; Aquino, Priscila Sanches

    2011-12-01

    This is a phenomenological study that aimed to understand the experience of the student enrolled in both the Bachelor and the teaching undergraduate degree in nursing at the same time. Interviews with eight nursing students from a public university of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were undertaken. Analyses were conducted based on the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz. Results showed that according to the pupils, there is no connection between the teaching courses and the Bachelor ones, but they also highlighted that the teaching degree helps educational activities in nursing. The students have interest in working with health education and to become nursing teachers. They also consider that the dual degree allows the expansion of knowledge and generates better expectations related to professional practice. However, it has gaps which need to be reviewed by those who work in nursing education, addressing the specific theoretical and practical needs of nursing students. PMID:22299273

  20. Image of nursing held by nursing students according to gender: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Ükke; Uslusoy, Esin; Alpar, Şule Ecevit; Bahçecik, Nefise

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study to determine the nursing images of female and male nursing students. The study used a qualitative research design to determine nursing images of male (n = 20) and female (n = 20) nursing students. To analyse the data, the method used content analysis. Statements were organized under three categories and seven themes after content analysis. The first category, nursing concept, incorporates the two themes of: (i) female or sister; (ii) job definition. The second category, choosing, incorporates the four themes of: (i) Desire of Others; (ii) Guarantee of Work; (iii) Being Helpful to Others; and (iv) Limited to Academic Achievement. The third category, Gender, incorporates the one theme of: (i) Gendered Approach. Male students have started to take part in nursing programs relatively recently; therefore, more research is needed in the fields of academic accomplishments of male students.

  1. Emancipatory knowing: empowering nursing students toward reflection and action.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Marianne

    2014-02-01

    Nursing students in the 21st century are entering highly complex health care systems that require advocates for social justice and human rights on behalf of patients. Nurses are well positioned as patient advocates. This article presents a brief overview of the historical and theoretical perspectives underpinning emancipatory knowing and proposes several methods nursing faculty can use to empower nursing students to provide care informed by this way of knowing. Nursing faculty are urged to adopt a curriculum that supports an emancipatory and caring praxis and to mentor students to provide care supportive of social justice, particularly for the vulnerable and marginalized members of society. Nursing students who learn to embrace and value emancipatory knowing during their educational program may likely continue this praxis after they graduate.

  2. Emancipatory knowing: empowering nursing students toward reflection and action.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Marianne

    2014-02-01

    Nursing students in the 21st century are entering highly complex health care systems that require advocates for social justice and human rights on behalf of patients. Nurses are well positioned as patient advocates. This article presents a brief overview of the historical and theoretical perspectives underpinning emancipatory knowing and proposes several methods nursing faculty can use to empower nursing students to provide care informed by this way of knowing. Nursing faculty are urged to adopt a curriculum that supports an emancipatory and caring praxis and to mentor students to provide care supportive of social justice, particularly for the vulnerable and marginalized members of society. Nursing students who learn to embrace and value emancipatory knowing during their educational program may likely continue this praxis after they graduate. PMID:24410636

  3. Student Triads: A Collaborative Approach to Practicum Experiences for Master's Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Miki; Jenkins-Weinrub, Edith

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an approach for a collaborative practicum experience for master's degree nursing students. The students were placed into triads and then assigned as a group to work in a large health care organization. A triad consisted of 1 student from each concentration of study: nursing administration, nursing education, or nursing informatics, and the group was immersed in real-time problem-solving and decision-making processes over the course of the year. PMID:25689075

  4. Student Triads: A Collaborative Approach to Practicum Experiences for Master's Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Miki; Jenkins-Weinrub, Edith

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an approach for a collaborative practicum experience for master's degree nursing students. The students were placed into triads and then assigned as a group to work in a large health care organization. A triad consisted of 1 student from each concentration of study: nursing administration, nursing education, or nursing informatics, and the group was immersed in real-time problem-solving and decision-making processes over the course of the year.

  5. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks. PMID:26375856

  6. Men Nursing Students: How They Perceive Their Situation...A Student Surveys His Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogness, Hal

    1976-01-01

    Men nurse stereotypes (former corpsmen, homosexuals, or those seeking administrative positions) were challenged by results of an open-ended questionnaire survey of 15 male nursing students. In addition to the role conflicts all nurses experience, men in nursing face: isolation and loneliness, lack of role models, and others' stereotyped ideas.…

  7. Success for Students and Nurses With Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Marks, Beth; McCulloh, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a "call to action" for nurse educators to identify and implement best practices supporting the success of students with disabilities given recent federal legislative changes. Best practices for educating students with disabilities in nursing education are discussed. Increasing our understanding of disability from a variety of models--not just the medical model--will promote greater diversity and inclusivity within the nursing profession, which will enhance patient care.

  8. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  9. Success of Underrepresented Nursing Students at Selected Southwest Institutions: Impact of a Nursing Retention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattab, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This study examined retention initiatives and strategies provided to underserved students in the nursing programs at three community colleges in the Southwest region. This research addressed nursing student retention, as well as ways to increase retention among underrepresented populations in the three community colleges, representing a unique…

  10. Attitudes of Nursing Faculty towards Nursing Students with Disabilities: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990) and Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA, 2008) provide students with disabilities access to postsecondary institutions and are applicable to nursing education in all learning environments. Nursing faculty members are charged with admitting, educating, and graduating students, with…

  11. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  12. Nursing Students' Knowledge of and Views about Children in Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salantera, Sanna; Lauri, Sirkka

    2000-01-01

    Finnish nursing students (n=85) specializing in child nursing had mainly positive attitudes about caring for children in pain, but lacked knowledge of medications and pain assessment. There were no knowledge differences between older and younger students or those with more or less work experience. (SK)

  13. Characteristics Students View as Important in Nurse Faculty Role Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Geneva

    Nursing students' views concerning the behavior of faculty role models were studied. The sample consisted of 75 senior-level baccalaureate nursing students, 69 females and 6 males. The theoretical framework for the research was role theory and Bandura's social learning and modeling theory. The Clinical Instructor Characteristics Ranking Scale…

  14. Predictors of Successful Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. Students (n = 56) from 5 associate degree in nursing (ADN) schools in 2 Northeastern states participated in the study. Findings demonstrated significant relationships among EI, self-efficacy, and student-rated clinical competence. The findings from this study support the importance of fostering clinical self-efficacy and building EI abilities in ADN students. PMID:25628244

  15. Practice nurses experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Peters, Kath; McInnes, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Internationally, the delivery of health services has shifted from secondary to primary care, necessitating an exponential growth of the nursing workforce and expansion of the nursing role in general practice. This growth, and the subsequent need to develop this workforce, has created a need to expose undergraduate nurses to general practice nursing as a viable career option. Concurrently, universities are struggling to find sufficient clinical places for their undergraduate students to gain clinical experience. It is logical, therefore, to increase the number of undergraduate nursing student placements in general practice. Through qualitative research methods, this paper seeks to explore the experiences of practice nurses mentoring undergraduate students on clinical placements within the general practice setting. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Promoting Practice Nursing: We really need to get students in, (2) Mentoring future co-workers: Patience and reassurance, and (3) Reciprocity in learning: It's a bit of a two way street, which show the benefits of such placements. Clinical placements in general practice settings can be mutually beneficial in terms of providing quality teaching and learning experiences for students. Conversely, the experience provides an impetus for practice nurses to maintain currency of their clinical skills and knowledge through mentoring student nurses. PMID:21908081

  16. Cooperative m-learning with nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Krauskopf, Patricia B; Gaylord, Nan M; Ward, Andrew; Huffstutler-Hawkins, Shelley; Goodwin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    New technologies give nurse academicians the opportunity to incorporate innovative teaching-learning strategies into the nursing curricula. Mobile technology for learning, or m-learning, has considerable potential for the nursing classroom but lacks sufficient empirical evidence to support its use. Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, the effect of using cooperative and interactive m-learning techniques in enhancing classroom and clinical learning was explored. The relationship between m-learning and students' learning styles was determined through a multimethod educational research study involving nurse practitioner students at two mid-Atlantic universities. During the 16-month period, nurse practitioner students and their faculty used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to participate in various m-learning activities. Findings from focus group and survey responses concluded that PDAs, specifically the Pocket PC, are useful reference tools in the clinical setting and that all students, regardless of learning style, benefited from using PDAs. It was also demonstrated that connecting students with classmates and other nurse practitioner students at distant universities created a cooperative learning community providing additional support and knowledge acquisition. The authors concluded that in order to successfully prepare nurse practitioner graduates with the skills necessary to function in the present and future health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must be creative and innovative, incorporating various revolutionary technologies into their nurse practitioner curricula.

  17. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants... institution to sign such transcripts on behalf of the institution. (b) Selection of nursing student...

  18. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants... institution to sign such transcripts on behalf of the institution. (b) Selection of nursing student...

  19. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants... institution to sign such transcripts on behalf of the institution. (b) Selection of nursing student...

  20. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants... institution to sign such transcripts on behalf of the institution. (b) Selection of nursing student...

  1. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants... institution to sign such transcripts on behalf of the institution. (b) Selection of nursing student...

  2. Nursing students' preconceptions of the community health clinical experience: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Leh, Sandra Kundrik

    2011-11-01

    It is essential that nurse educators identify and attempt to understand students' preconceptions related to upcoming clinical experiences to develop strategies that are effective in preparing the students for entry into new and unique settings. This qualitative study described nursing students' preconceptions as they entered the community health clinical rotation. Six major themes emerged: feeling insecure and unprepared for the community health clinical experience; contemplating risks to personal and client safety in the community; anticipating a change of pace; sensing a loss of control; envisioning isolation; and interpreting the value of community health nursing. Findings from this study provide nurse educators and preceptors with insight into understanding students' needs as they enter the community setting. Facilitating a positive transition for students supports efforts to improve the image of and create favorable attitudes toward community health nursing practice. PMID:21790102

  3. Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight.

  4. Factors influencing development of professional values among nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Renginar Ozturk; Ozsoy, Suheyla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the professional values of Turkish nursing students, and to explore the relationships between their characteristics. Methods: The cross-sectional study participants consisted of 416 nursing students who were studying in a nursing faculty in Western Turkey. A questionnaire was used to identify socio-demographic and educational characteristics and the Nursing Professional Values Scale- Revised (NPVS-R) was used for this study.. Results: The total mean score of the NPVS-R was found to be 99.45±1.96, and items mean score was 3.82±0.62. The NPVS-R score was significantly higher in students who were female, and who chose their profession willingly, had information about values, and who were members of a professional organization. Conclusion: The students were found to have strong professional values, and professional values affected some of the personal and educational characteristics of nursing students. PMID:27648054

  5. Korean nursing students' ethical problems and ethical decision making.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Cameron, Miriam E; Han, Sung-Suk; Ahn, Sung-Hee; Oh, Hyo-Sook; Kim, Kyeong-Uoon

    2003-11-01

    This Korean study replicated a previously published American study. The conceptual framework and method combined ethical enquiry and phenomenology. The research questions were: (1) What is nursing students' experience of ethical problems involving nursing practice? and, (2) What is nursing students' experience of using an ethical decision-making model? The participants were 97 senior baccalaureate nursing students, each of whom described one ethical problem and chose to use one of five ethical decision-making models. From 97 ethical problems, five content categories emerged, the largest being health professionals (69%). The basic nature of the ethical problems was the students' experience of conflict, resolution and rationale. Using an ethical decision-making model helped 94% of the students. A comparison of the Korean and American results yields important implications for nursing ethics education, practice and research. PMID:14650482

  6. Perceived barriers for ethnically diverse students in nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Debra J; Abriam-Yago, Katherine; Yoder, Marian

    2006-07-01

    This qualitative research study examined the perceived barriers and factors that hindered or facilitated ethnically diverse students' completing their nursing education. It builds on a large qualitative study conducted by Yoder in 1996, describing the processes nurse educators use when teaching ethnically diverse students and the perceived special needs of these students. Seventeen recently graduated ethnic minority RNs in Central Coastal California were interviewed using an open-ended questionnaire. These nurses represented Latino, Portuguese, Asian, and African-American population groups. Grounded theory methodology was used for data analysis. The findings identified the needs and barriers that ethnically diverse nursing students may encounter while completing their nursing education. In addition, data revealed supportive factors that helped these students cope with the barriers.

  7. Factors influencing development of professional values among nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Renginar Ozturk; Ozsoy, Suheyla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the professional values of Turkish nursing students, and to explore the relationships between their characteristics. Methods: The cross-sectional study participants consisted of 416 nursing students who were studying in a nursing faculty in Western Turkey. A questionnaire was used to identify socio-demographic and educational characteristics and the Nursing Professional Values Scale- Revised (NPVS-R) was used for this study.. Results: The total mean score of the NPVS-R was found to be 99.45±1.96, and items mean score was 3.82±0.62. The NPVS-R score was significantly higher in students who were female, and who chose their profession willingly, had information about values, and who were members of a professional organization. Conclusion: The students were found to have strong professional values, and professional values affected some of the personal and educational characteristics of nursing students.

  8. Analysis of a Proposed Student Laboratory to Study Nonuniform Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowat, J. Richard

    1991-01-01

    Considered is an experiment used to investigate one-dimensional, nonuniform acceleration. Presented is the correct expression for the acceleration, generalized to include friction and describe simulations supporting student data. The feasibility of the experiment is questioned. (CW)

  9. Female Arab-Muslim nursing students' reentry transitions.

    PubMed

    McDermott-Levy, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    As nursing students are increasingly studying abroad and returning to their home countries to practice, it is important to identify international nursing students' reentry transition to understand their reentry needs. Phenomenological inquiry was used to describe the reentry experience of seven Omani nurses after studying in the United States. The nurses' reentry experience was influenced by the personal and professional transformation from studying abroad and included themes of adaptation to cultural differences and service to themselves, their profession, and their nation. These nurses returned home to resume previous roles; they were changed and this required them to redefine and adapt to their roles within their families and workplace. Nurses returning from international study could benefit from a formal reentry program to assist their transition to family, community, and professional life and to enhance the nurses' contribution from their international education. PMID:23832951

  10. Female Arab-Muslim nursing students' reentry transitions.

    PubMed

    McDermott-Levy, Ruth

    2013-07-04

    As nursing students are increasingly studying abroad and returning to their home countries to practice, it is important to identify international nursing students' reentry transition to understand their reentry needs. Phenomenological inquiry was used to describe the reentry experience of seven Omani nurses after studying in the United States. The nurses' reentry experience was influenced by the personal and professional transformation from studying abroad and included themes of adaptation to cultural differences and service to themselves, their profession, and their nation. These nurses returned home to resume previous roles; they were changed and this required them to redefine and adapt to their roles within their families and workplace. Nurses returning from international study could benefit from a formal reentry program to assist their transition to family, community, and professional life and to enhance the nurses' contribution from their international education.

  11. Innovations in the public policy education of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Houck, Noreen M; Bongiorno, Anne Watson

    2006-01-01

    Nurses are the voice of patients. Nurses speak for those who cannot speak for themselves. Today's nurses need to find their voice and discover the power of public policy as a vehicle for patient-centered care. New York is a vast and varied state with multiple, competing healthcare interests. Nurses in New York need to be prepared to navigate the halls of power as patient-centered advocates. Nurses benefit from an education that teaches them to move comfortably in complex healthcare environments. This article describes the integration of an innovative, curricula-wide, public policy initiative with senior nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program. We discuss the overall goals of the learning-centered program and the specific classroom and field assignments. Students described the results of this innovative teaching strategy as a life-changing event where they find their voice as an agent for their patients.

  12. Nursing student anxiety as a context for teaching/learning.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Terri L; Janiszewski Goodin, Heather

    2013-03-01

    Experiential learning in nursing programs includes role-play, simulation, and live clinical experiences. Anxiety levels can heighten during experiential learning as students attempt to gain psychomotor skills and transfer knowledge into critical thinking. Nursing students may experience anxiety that can interfere with learning and critical thinking. However, the presence of student anxiety can be used to initiate a purposeful caring transaction between nursing faculty and student. The caring transaction is a way for faculty to model both caring and presence, create experiential learning of caring by students, and lead students to initiate self-care interventions to manage anxiety through the nursing program and beyond. Multiple learning outcomes can be achieved as the students integrate faculty-modeled concepts of caring and presence into simulated or real clinical situations, reduce or manage their anxiety, and improve their clinical judgment and critical thinking skills. PMID:23065057

  13. Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

  14. Predictors of Improvement in Critical Thinking Skills among Nursing Students in an Online Graduate Nursing Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine predictors of improvement in critical thinking skills among online graduate nursing students in a graduate nursing research course. Thirty-five students who had taken an online Nursing research course within the prior 12 months and who were currently enrolled in the online graduate Nursing program at…

  15. "It's All Connected!" Nursing Students' Experiences of a New Form of Case Seminar Integrating Medical and Nursing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turunen Olsson, Pernilla; Weurlander, Maria; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine; Wärn Hede, Gunnel; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Broberger, Eva; Hult, Håkan; Wernerson, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nursing students learn medical subjects and nursing separately, which makes it difficult to develop an integrated understanding. This study aimed to explore nursing students' experiences of participating in a case seminar integrating medical and nursing sciences and if, and how, it contributed to their learning. A case seminar…

  16. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in research: the students' experience of a summer internship program pilot project.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Clarke, Diana; Plohman, James; Gerard, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Educators continue to struggle with ways to foster an interest in and a passion for nursing research among undergraduate students. The purpose of this article is to describe the introduction of undergraduate student internships at the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, as an innovation in education that allowed students to be employed while engaging them in student learning, scientific inquiry, and scholarship through one-to-one faculty-student research mentorships. In this article, the key components of the summer internship program are described, along with five nursing students' experiences of their participation in the program. PMID:23855343

  17. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in research: the students' experience of a summer internship program pilot project.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Clarke, Diana; Plohman, James; Gerard, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Educators continue to struggle with ways to foster an interest in and a passion for nursing research among undergraduate students. The purpose of this article is to describe the introduction of undergraduate student internships at the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, as an innovation in education that allowed students to be employed while engaging them in student learning, scientific inquiry, and scholarship through one-to-one faculty-student research mentorships. In this article, the key components of the summer internship program are described, along with five nursing students' experiences of their participation in the program.

  18. Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Begeny, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education.

  19. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  20. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  1. Organized music instruction as a predictor of nursing student success.

    PubMed

    Cesario, Sandra K; Cesario, Robert J; Cesario, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Stringent admission criteria exist for nursing programs in the United States, but better predictors of success are needed to reduce student attrition. Research indicates that organized music experiences are associated with greater academic success. This exploratory study examined the association between early music experiences and undergraduate nursing student success. Findings suggest that students with a music background were more likely to graduate, have higher grade point averages, and pass the licensure examination. Previous music education might be considered as an additional predictor of nursing student success.

  2. Evaluating an interview preparation process for student nurses.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Penny; Harrison, Penny; Moriarty, Abigail

    The aim of this article is to share innovative practice in relation to the recruitment process for nurses. Quality of preparation offered to student nurses prior to interview was variable, therefore, a study day to equip student nurses with the necessary knowledge and skills for interviews was devised. The strategies employed include a range of teaching approaches. Student evaluation indicates that this interview preparation day was successful and popular, with a majority of students receiving immediate offers of posts. Recommendations for educators include addressing the recruitment process earlier within the curriculum and adopting some of the practises of a business school.

  3. Adult student satisfaction in an accelerated RN-to-BSN program: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Mary T; Jackson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This mixed-method study revealed accelerated RN-to-BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) students' levels of satisfaction with a wide range of college services in a small university. Building on seminal research on the topic [Boylston, M. T., Peters, M. A., & Lacey, M. (2004). Adult student satisfaction in traditional and accelerated RN-to-BSN programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20, 23-32.], the Noel-Levitz Adult Student Priorities Survey (ASPS) and qualitative interview data revealed primary factors involved in nontraditional (adult) accelerated RN-to-BSN student satisfaction. The ASPS assesses both satisfaction with and importance of the following factors: academic advising effectiveness, academic services, admissions and financial aid effectiveness, campus climate, instructional effectiveness, registration effectiveness, safety and security, and service excellence. Of these factors, participants considered instructional effectiveness and academic advising effectiveness as most important and concomitantly gave high satisfaction ratings to each. In contrast, convenience of the bookstore, counseling services, vending machines, and computer laboratories were given low importance ratings. The participants cited convenience as a strong marketing factor. Loss of financial aid or family crisis was given as a reason for withdrawal and, for most students, would be the only reason for not completing the BSN program. Outcomes of this investigation may guide faculty, staff, and administrators in proactively creating an educational environment in which a nontraditional student can succeed. PMID:18804082

  4. A qualitative study of nursing student experiences of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Masoumi, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Background Nursing student's experiences of their clinical practice provide greater insight to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' experience about their clinical practice. Methods Focus groups were used to obtain students' opinion and experiences about their clinical practice. 90 baccalaureate nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery) were selected randomly from two hundred students and were arranged in 9 groups of ten students. To analyze the data the method used to code and categories focus group data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the focus group data. From the students' point of view," initial clinical anxiety", "theory-practice gap"," clinical supervision", professional role", were considered as important factors in clinical experience. Conclusion The result of this study showed that nursing students were not satisfied with the clinical component of their education. They experienced anxiety as a result of feeling incompetent and lack of professional nursing skills and knowledge to take care of various patients in the clinical setting. PMID:16280087

  5. Growing gratitude in undergraduate nursing students: Applying findings from social and psychological domains to nursing education.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Ann; Sheehan, Caryn

    2015-12-01

    Millennial students are often characterized as technology focused multitaskers, yet young nursing students are expected to focus on and thoughtfully engage with the person at the center of their caring efforts. Developing gratitude practices requires quiet contemplation and focus. Cultivating an attitude of gratitude in millennial nursing students may be one avenue to address concerns surrounding the provision of relationship based person-centered care by young nurses. In other disciplines, gratitude work has been studied extensively and is associated with several positive outcomes. Assignments included in most nursing programs can easily be modified to include a gratitude focus. Examples of gratitude assignments and the student reflection of these assignments are included here as a call for nurse educators to further study this concept.

  6. Growing gratitude in undergraduate nursing students: Applying findings from social and psychological domains to nursing education.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Ann; Sheehan, Caryn

    2015-12-01

    Millennial students are often characterized as technology focused multitaskers, yet young nursing students are expected to focus on and thoughtfully engage with the person at the center of their caring efforts. Developing gratitude practices requires quiet contemplation and focus. Cultivating an attitude of gratitude in millennial nursing students may be one avenue to address concerns surrounding the provision of relationship based person-centered care by young nurses. In other disciplines, gratitude work has been studied extensively and is associated with several positive outcomes. Assignments included in most nursing programs can easily be modified to include a gratitude focus. Examples of gratitude assignments and the student reflection of these assignments are included here as a call for nurse educators to further study this concept. PMID:26362068

  7. International exchange program: findings from Taiwanese graduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Carol

    2004-01-01

    This study explored Taiwanese graduate nursing students' transcultural experiences in the United States during an international exchange program. A qualitative method with content analysis was used to analyze journal entries on perceptions of American culture, American nursing, and reflections on personal and professional growth written by nine graduate nursing students from Taiwan. The mean age of the participants was 32 (range, 29-45). Taiwanese nursing students perceived American culture as full of hospitality and patriotism, valuing human rights and social welfare, and favoring direct and expressive affection. American nursing was viewed as a combination of independence, confidence, autonomy, and knowledge, with caring being the core element, fostered by an environment conducive to patient care. In personal and professional growth, three themes surfaced: reinforcement of holistic care, nursing without borders, and lifelong learning and changing. American culture and nursing were perceived by Taiwanese students as a paradigm of Western culture valuing individual rights, autonomy, and independence. A caring and supportive patient care environment was a positive perception of American nursing; it was the desired practice standard that was lacking in these students' homeland. Overall, the exchange program was thought by these students to foster their personal and professional growth.

  8. International exchange program: findings from Taiwanese graduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Carol

    2004-01-01

    This study explored Taiwanese graduate nursing students' transcultural experiences in the United States during an international exchange program. A qualitative method with content analysis was used to analyze journal entries on perceptions of American culture, American nursing, and reflections on personal and professional growth written by nine graduate nursing students from Taiwan. The mean age of the participants was 32 (range, 29-45). Taiwanese nursing students perceived American culture as full of hospitality and patriotism, valuing human rights and social welfare, and favoring direct and expressive affection. American nursing was viewed as a combination of independence, confidence, autonomy, and knowledge, with caring being the core element, fostered by an environment conducive to patient care. In personal and professional growth, three themes surfaced: reinforcement of holistic care, nursing without borders, and lifelong learning and changing. American culture and nursing were perceived by Taiwanese students as a paradigm of Western culture valuing individual rights, autonomy, and independence. A caring and supportive patient care environment was a positive perception of American nursing; it was the desired practice standard that was lacking in these students' homeland. Overall, the exchange program was thought by these students to foster their personal and professional growth. PMID:15011191

  9. Comparison of nurse educators' and nursing students' descriptions of teaching codes of ethics.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; van der Arend, Arie; Katajisto, Jouko

    2011-09-01

    This study analysed teaching of nurses' codes of ethics in basic nursing education in Finland. A total of 183 educators and 214 students responded to a structured questionnaire. The data was analysed by SPSS. Teaching of nurses' codes was rather extensive. The nurse-patient relationship was highlighted. Educators assessed their teaching statistically significantly more extensive than what students' perceptions were. The use of teaching and evaluation methods was conventional, but differences between the groups concerning the use of these methods were statistically significant. Students' knowledge of and their ability to apply the codes was mediocre. Most educators and students assessed educators' knowledge of the codes as adequate for teaching. These educators also taught the codes more extensively and these students perceived the teaching as more extensive. Otherwise educators' and students' socio-demographic variables had little association with the teaching. Research should focus on the organization and effectiveness of ethics education, and on educators' competence.

  10. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  11. Training nurses and nursing students about prevention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Roger J; Durkin, Kristy M; Gonzalez, Sandra J; Adams, Susie

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can result in birth defects known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. This study examined whether 1-h training sessions on alcohol screening, brief intervention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders could increase practical knowledge and confidence in nurses and student nurses. Data were collected from 420 nurses (n = 95) and student nurses (n = 325) in the southeastern United States, from 2009 to 2011. Pre- and post-test data were analyzed using chi-square tests and t-tests. The post-training response rate was 84%. Nurses were more likely to know what constitutes binge drinking, facial abnormalities associated with fetal alcohol syndrome, and criteria for diagnosis. Nurses were also more confident in educating about effects of prenatal alcohol use, identifying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and utilizing resources. Training materials may need to be improved and/or longer training programs developed for student nurses, and nursing school programs should place more emphasis on educating and preparing student nurses regarding this topic area.

  12. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing...

  13. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing...

  14. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing...

  15. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing student loan, including accrued interest, will be repayable in equal or graduated periodic installments...

  16. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing student loan, including accrued interest, will be repayable in equal or graduated periodic installments...

  17. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing...

  18. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing student loan, including accrued interest, will be repayable in equal or graduated periodic installments...

  19. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing...

  20. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing student loan, including accrued interest, will be repayable in equal or graduated periodic installments...

  1. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing student loan, including accrued interest, will be repayable in equal or graduated periodic installments...

  2. Nursing Students' Nonverbal Reactions to Malodor in Wound Care Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gloria Waters

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound care is an essential competency which nursing students are expected to acquire. To foster students' competency, nurse educators use high fidelity simulation to expose nursing students to various wound characteristics. Problem: Little is known about how nursing students react to simulated wound characteristics. Malodor is a…

  3. Feeling at hospitals: perspective-taking, empathy and personal distress among professional nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Belén; Ambrona, Tamara; Gregory, Jennifer; Stocks, Eric; Oceja, Luis

    2013-04-01

    When facing a person in need, professional nurses will tend to adopt an objective perspective compared to nursing students who, instead, will tend to adopt an imagine-other perspective. Consequently, professional nurses will show lower vicarious emotional reaction such as empathy and distress. Using samples from Spain (Studies 1 and 2) and United states (Study 3), we compared perspective taking strategies and the emotional responses of nurses and nursing students when perceiving a sick child (Study 1) and a sick adult (Studies 2 and 3). Taken together, the results supported our hypotheses. We discuss the applied value of considering the relationship between perspective-taking and its emotional consequences for the nursing profession.

  4. Development of Critical Thinking: Career Ladder P.N. and A.D. Nursing Students, Pre-Health Science Freshmen, Generic Baccalaureate Sophomore Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintgen-Andrews, Jean

    A study compared career ladder practical nursing (PN) and associate degree (AD) nursing students with their university counterparts with regard to the development of critical thinking over an academic year. The sample included 55 PN students, 55 AD students, 38 pre-health science freshmen, and 29 generic baccalaureate sophomore nursing students.…

  5. Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

  6. Nursing education challenges: students with English as an additional language.

    PubMed

    Starr, Kimberly

    2009-09-01

    Nurse educators are challenged by students who did not learn Standard American English as a primary language. It is not only language that makes these students stand out-cultural beliefs, values and practices need to be appreciated as well. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the current qualitative literature on challenges faced in nursing education for students with English as an additional language. Ten qualitative studies regarding educational issues of nursing students with EAL were included in the synthesis. The study was conducted using the ethnographic metasynthesis model of Noblit and Hare. Two major reciprocal translations of educational issues emerged: challenges and reinforcements. Challenges included language, academics, resources, and culture. Reinforcements included resources, academics, and culture. The results may be used by nurse educators for developing interventions to help culturally diverse students succeed. Interventions are directed toward issues surrounding language and culture.

  7. A model to support nursing students with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, John

    2016-07-20

    Dyslexia is one of the most commonly declared disabilities in higher educational institutions in the UK. This article explores the effects of specific learning difficulties, in particular dyslexia, on pre-registration nursing students on practice placements in clinical environments. The author proposes use of the OPEL model, which provides a simple, structured framework for supporting nursing students with specific learning difficulties in practice placements. This model could be applied to clinical situations where constructive support is necessary to enable the student to achieve the standards and requirements set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. PMID:27440364

  8. Impact of Interprofessional Education Among Nursing and Paramedic Students.

    PubMed

    Furseth, Paula A; Taylor, Barbara; Kim, Son Chae

    2016-01-01

    Simulation-based interprofessional education is beneficial, but it is not clear whether the nature of the simulation has any impact. A pretest and posttest study was conducted among nursing (n = 131) and paramedic (n = 58) students participating in mass casualty incident (MCI) simulations versus handoff communication simulations. Nursing students had better attitudes toward interprofessional education, as well as higher levels of satisfaction and self-confidence, after handoff communication simulations in comparison with MCI simulations. Active participation in clinical simulations appears to have a greater positive impact on nursing students.

  9. Integrating Simulations Into Perioperative Education for Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Incorporating high-fidelity simulations into an undergraduate nursing program's perioperative elective course capitalizes on students' active learning. Simulations allow students the opportunity to assess and participate in clinical scenarios, apply standards, and demonstrate correct nursing actions without compromising patient safety. Incorporating a high-risk, low-volume malignant hyperthermia simulation experience into the undergraduate nursing curriculum emphasizes active learning and provides an opportunity for students to experience an uncommon emergency perioperative event. A high-fidelity malignant hyperthermia simulation links a scenario with course content, incorporates didactic information from previous courses, and emphasizes the importance of debriefing. PMID:26849993

  10. Overview of teaching strategies for cultural competence in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Long, Tracey B

    2012-01-01

    Multiple curricular approaches are being used to teach cultural competency to nursing students in the United States in accordance with accrediting board standards. As nurse educators are searching for evidence based teaching practices, this article reviews the most commonly current teaching methods being used. Although a variety of methods are being implemented, little empirical evidence exists to suggest any one methodology for teaching cultural competency for nursing students produces significantly better outcomes. The use of clinical experiences, standardized patients and immersion experiences have produced the most favorable results which increase student awareness, knowledge and confidence in working with ethnically diverse patients.

  11. School Nurse Workload: Students Are More Than Just Numbers.

    PubMed

    Combe, Laurie G; Bachman, Mary Beth; Dolatowski, Rosemary; Endsley, Patricia E; Hassey, Kathy; Maughan, Erin; Minchella, Lindsey; Shanks, Bobbi; Trefry, Sharonlee; Zeno, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    NASN has found a lack of research-based evidence to support the caseload ratio model of school nurse staffing. In keeping with the practices of school administrators, other school support personnel, and community health care providers, NASN is transitioning to the workload model to guide safe school nurse staffing. The workload model considers more than ratio and acuity; instead, it provides a full description of school nurse activities and other influences on student health. PMID:26219906

  12. Cultivating a Culture of Medication Safety in Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bush, Peggy A; Hueckel, Rémi M; Robinson, Dana; Seelinger, Terry A; Molloy, Margory A

    2015-01-01

    Safety education in nursing has traditionally focused at the level of individual nurse-patient interactions. Students and novice clinicians lack clinical experience to create context and understand the complexity of the health care system and safety science. Using the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses quality and safety competency as a framework, the objective of this education project was to design comprehensive, engaging, learner-centered, online modules that increase knowledge, skills, and attitudes about medication safety. PMID:25719569

  13. Cultivating a Culture of Medication Safety in Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bush, Peggy A; Hueckel, Rémi M; Robinson, Dana; Seelinger, Terry A; Molloy, Margory A

    2015-01-01

    Safety education in nursing has traditionally focused at the level of individual nurse-patient interactions. Students and novice clinicians lack clinical experience to create context and understand the complexity of the health care system and safety science. Using the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses quality and safety competency as a framework, the objective of this education project was to design comprehensive, engaging, learner-centered, online modules that increase knowledge, skills, and attitudes about medication safety.

  14. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  15. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  16. Influence of the type of patient in the emotional response of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Belén; Ambrona, Tamara; Hanoch, Yaniv

    2016-07-01

    Nurses are playing a vital role in caring for patients. However, this can be very emotionally taxing. In two studies, professional nurses and nursing students from two different countries (Spain and United States) were compared on different measures-objective and self-perspective-taking, personal distress, and emotional impact-when facing different types of patients who suffered from the same illness: One terminally ill and one non-terminal. Results showed that the type of patient (terminal vs. non-terminal) only affected significantly the nursing students, who reported a higher self-perspective taking, personal distress, and emotional impact when the patient was terminal. Nursing students, compared to professional ones, seem to be more vulnerable to the type of patient they care for as they exhibited higher levels of negative emotional experience when the patient described was terminal. The significant implications are discussed.

  17. "Tell it as it is'--qualitative methodology and nursing research: understanding the student nurse's world.

    PubMed

    Melia, K M

    1982-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of qualitative methods for nursing research, to this end a case is made for the use of fieldwork methods. The paper focuses upon a study which was concerned with student nurses' accounts of their experience of being learners of nursing. An overview of the students' construction of their nursing world is given and then the discussion moves to one particular aspect described as "nursing in the dark'. This is a conceptual category which deals with the data pertaining to the student's difficulties concerning what they could say to patients. The reader is thus furnished with a substantive as well as a methodological view of the study. The analysis draws upon the work of Glaser & Strauss, both in the attempt to generate ground theory and by reference to their work concerning awareness contexts.

  18. [Survey on the lifestyle of nurses, nursing students and young adolescent].

    PubMed

    Nappini, Valentina; Fedi, Marcello; Millarini, Valentina; Fabbri, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Prevention and health promotion are based on the amendment of unhealthy lifestyles. The purpose of this work is to identify and highlight unhealthy habits and behaviours of nursing students and nurses professionals, in order to explore possible correlations between unhealthy choices and culture, knowledge and skills in health education. The study population is represented by three separate samples: a) Students from high schools in the province of Pistoia, b) Nursing Undergraduate students of the University of Florence (campus of Pistoia), c) Nurses employed within the Health Services 3 of Pistoia. Investigated behaviours were smoking and alcohol habits, painkiller and inflammatory consumption. Data gathered through the questionnaires were useful to identify and classify educational needs for each of the three samples . This study helps to bring out important aspects of nurses' role on health promotion within the society.

  19. [Survey on the lifestyle of nurses, nursing students and young adolescent].

    PubMed

    Nappini, Valentina; Fedi, Marcello; Millarini, Valentina; Fabbri, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Prevention and health promotion are based on the amendment of unhealthy lifestyles. The purpose of this work is to identify and highlight unhealthy habits and behaviours of nursing students and nurses professionals, in order to explore possible correlations between unhealthy choices and culture, knowledge and skills in health education. The study population is represented by three separate samples: a) Students from high schools in the province of Pistoia, b) Nursing Undergraduate students of the University of Florence (campus of Pistoia), c) Nurses employed within the Health Services 3 of Pistoia. Investigated behaviours were smoking and alcohol habits, painkiller and inflammatory consumption. Data gathered through the questionnaires were useful to identify and classify educational needs for each of the three samples . This study helps to bring out important aspects of nurses' role on health promotion within the society. PMID:26402235

  20. Students' academic performance in nursing as a function of student and faculty learning style congruency.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Nagata, B

    1996-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify learning styles of traditional baccalaureate nursing students, registered nurse baccalaureate students, baccalaureate nursing students holding a previous non-nursing degree, and nursing educators and to determine the effects of teacher/student learning style congruency on academic performance, when controlled for students' previous academic achievement. Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and a Descriptive Data Questionnaire were administered to 334 nursing students and their respective nurse educators from two nursing schools in Mississippi. Learning style scores were computed and faculty and student learning style congruency was described as: 1) matched on both abstract-concrete and active-reflective dimensions; 2) matched on only the abstract-concrete dimension; 3) matched on only the active-reflective dimension; or 4) not matched on either dimension. There were no significant differences in learning style among the three groups of nursing students, and learning style congruency between student and faculty did not appear to significantly affect academic performance of students. PMID:8926523

  1. An intervention aimed at reducing plagiarism in undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Alison; Crawford, Tonia; Cloete, Linda

    2015-05-01

    Plagiarism is a current and developing problem in the tertiary education sector where students access information and reproduce it as their own. It is identified as occurring in many tertiary level degrees including nursing and allied health profession degrees. Nursing specifically, is a profession where standards and ethics are required and honesty is paramount. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in nursing student's knowledge and understanding of plagiarism before and after an educational intervention in their first semester of the Bachelor of nursing degree at a private college of higher education in Sydney, Australia. This study concluded that an educational intervention can increase knowledge and awareness of plagiarism among nursing students.

  2. Factors influencing the publishing efforts of graduate students in nursing.

    PubMed

    Whitley, G G; Oddi, L F; Terrell, D

    1998-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify factors influencing publication efforts of graduate students in nursing and determine the extent to which graduate students' scholarly activities contribute to the creation and dissemination of knowledge in nursing, as evidenced by publication in a professional journal. Authors of articles in Nursing Research were surveyed to assess their status as graduate students during the conceptualization, development, and publication of nursing research studies. The sample consisted of 633 authors of manuscripts published in Nursing Research from 1987 to 1991. The study design was descriptive. A survey questionnaire elicited data on graduate student status and factors that influenced the initiation and completion of the project. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques. The results of the study suggest that graduate students in nursing make important contributions to the advancement and dissemination of nursing knowledge. Factors that influence graduate students to engage in the process include academic requirements (e.g., thesis, dissertation, coursework), faculty involvement and support, and the ability to self-select the research topic.

  3. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  4. Leadership and empowerment: the value of the National Student Nurses Association for beginning students.

    PubMed

    Logan, J; Franzen, D

    2001-01-01

    Leadership development has long been emphasized in nursing curricula, but how can it be effectively taught and learned? The authors discuss how beginning student experiences with the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) promotes colleagueship, research utilization, policy development, political activity, and advocacy. Student reflections on their experience illuminate how they were empowered to effect change and understand their social responsibility.

  5. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  6. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  7. The Efficacy of Academic Acceleration for Gifted Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Peternel, George

    2010-01-01

    This study supported the use of acceleration for gifted minority students in math. The gifted minority students in this study viewed taking accelerated math courses as exciting and beneficial for preparation for high school and college and particularly liked the challenges they encountered while taking advanced classes. They enjoyed working ahead…

  8. Three Accelerated Developmental Education Programs: Features, Student Outcomes, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Hodara, Michelle; Cho, Sung-Woo; Xu, Di

    2015-01-01

    To support the long-term success of underprepared students, many community colleges are experimenting with accelerated developmental education models, which allow students to complete remediation and enroll in college-level math and English within a shorter time frame. This study examines three developmental acceleration programs, including two in…

  9. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  10. Critical Thinking Dispositions of Undergraduate Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojewole, Foluso O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students and nursing faculty in Southwestern Nigeria. Critical thinking dispositions are required for critical thinking skills. People who have critical thinking disposition exhibit seven traits: truth-seeking,…

  11. "You Have to Know Why": The Influence of Different Curricula on Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredholm Nilsson, Angelica; Silen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The need in modern healthcare for professionals who are self-directed and autonomous has increased in recent decades. Problem-based learning is spreading in nursing education as one strategy for meeting these demands. This article deals with the relationship between the design and execution of nursing education curricula and students'…

  12. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  13. Perceptions of Clinical Stress in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Linda; Bourke, Mary P; Tormoehlen, Lucy J; Poe-Greskamp, Marlene V

    2015-07-16

    The Nursing Students' Clinical Stress Scale, a Likert-type survey by Whang (2002), translated from Korean into English, was used to identify perceptions of stress in baccalaureate nursing students. Data was collected from a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university. Students ranked their perceived stress level from clinical situations. One open-ended item asked students to describe their most stressful clinical experience. Rasch Model analysis/diagnostics were used to check the instrument for validity and reliability. Quantitative data were analyzed for descriptive statistics (means). Information from open-ended question was analyzed for themes. Qualitative themes were consistent with results from quantitative analysis and well-aligned with the literature. Students were stressed by incivility by healthcare staff and instructors, inconsistencies and time constraints. Research shows that stress can interfere with learning. It is imperative to determine causes of stress so educators can help decrease stress and improve student learning.

  14. Enabling Student Nurses to Use the Information Superhighway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jean A.; Panzarine, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Twenty nursing graduate students in an Internet-based course were compared with 23 who did not take the course. The former were more likely to be connected to nursing networks, used Internet-based health information in practice, used computer skills for other classes, and understood the relevance of telemedicine. (SK)

  15. Identifying Maths Anxiety in Student Nurses and Focusing Remedial Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Maths anxiety interferes with maths cognition and thereby increases the risk of maths errors. To initiate strategies for preventing anxiety-related errors progressing into nursing practice, this study explored the hypothesis that student nurses experience high maths anxiety in association with poor maths performance, and that high maths anxiety is…

  16. Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Elizabeth; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance education nursing programs were interviewed.…

  17. Computer Competency of Nursing Students at a University in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niyomkar, Srimana

    2012-01-01

    During the past years, computer and information technology has been rapidly integrated into the education and healthcare fields. In the 21st century, computers are more powerful than ever, and are used in all aspects of nursing, including education, practice, policy, and research. Consequently, student nurses will need to utilize computer…

  18. Implementation of Problem Based Learning among Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Kwan, Chan Li; Khan, Aqeel; Ghafar, Mohamed Najib Abdul; Sihes, Ahmad Johari

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking and effective problem solving skills have been regarded as an important element and as an educational outcome in professional nursing. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of Problem Based Learning (PBL) among nursing students. More specifically, it compares pretest and post test scores of the implementation…

  19. Among the Missing: The Experience of Vietnamese American Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilby, Mary Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Non-traditional nursing students, including Vietnamese Americans often face challenges that differ from those of their white counterparts. These challenges have significant impact on academic success and contribute to underrepresentation of minorities in nursing. This study explored the lived experience of 12 Vietnamese American undergraduate…

  20. Attitudes toward Poverty of Upper Midwestern Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is widespread and its consequence of poorer health increases the likelihood that nurses will provide care for poor clients and their families in many health care settings. Although the importance of understanding attitudes toward the poor is recognized, there have been few studies of attitudes of nursing students. The purpose of this…

  1. Teaching Strategies to Increase Cultural Awareness in Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Lonneman, William

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence education is essential for all nurses to better prepare them to address the underlying social environment of patients, families, and communities. This article describes a study with second degree nursing students that tested 6 teaching strategies for their effectiveness in raising cultural awareness, a key aspect of cultural competence. The results demonstrated that the interventions had a positive effect.

  2. Communication and nursing: a study-abroad student's reflections.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anna Karina Martins; Tuohy, Dympna

    Globalisation in the academic context provides the opportunity for sharing knowledge and innovations between institutions in different countries, through the creation of study abroad and academic mobility programmes. For nursing students, studying abroad facilitates the development of cultural sensitivity so that they may care appropriately for an increasingly multicultural patient population in their own countries. This article describes a Brazilian 'study abroad' student nurse's experience of studying a 'communication and therapeutic relationships' module in an Irish university. Johns' model of structured reflection was used to frame, describe and reflect on the experience. This reflection informs 'study abroad' students and their universities about the student experience through a personal account of one such student.

  3. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status. PMID:18706741

  4. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status.

  5. English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing student success: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mary Angela

    2012-01-01

    Many English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students struggle in nursing school for a multitude of reasons. The purpose of this critical review of the literature is to identify barriers and discover bridges to ESL nursing student success. Twenty-five articles were identified for the review. Language barriers were identified as the single most significant obstacle facing the ESL nursing student. Bridges to ESL nursing student success include enhancing language development and acculturation into the American mainstream culture. A broad range of strategies to promote student success are outlined and the role of the nurse educator in ESL nursing student success is also addressed.

  6. "I Was Actually a Nurse": The Meaning of Professionalism for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secrest, Janet A.; Norwood, Barbara R.; Keatley, Virginia M.

    2003-01-01

    In a phenomenological study, 69 nursing students discussed their experience of being professional, which was grounded in their concept of self and others. Three interrelated figural themes emerged from this ground: belonging, knowing, and affirmation. (SK)

  7. Mentoring nursing career pathways: the Maryvale High School Student Nurse Academy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Randall M

    2002-12-01

    The health care system faces a critical challenge in recruiting younger and more ethnically diverse students into the nursing profession. The innovative Maryvale High School Student Nurse Academy was developed as a collaborative partnership among the public school system, the community college system, public and private universities, and the hospital industry, with guidance from Arizona Nursing Associations and Sigma Theta Tau. The program provides at-risk, minority teens exposure to the health system, professional nurses in a variety of roles, and employment opportunities that can expand in a number of directions within the health industry. Results of the first year pilot are encouraging, resulting in a 100% completion of the program with high student satisfaction ratings. Students demonstrated an increase in overall grade point average and a decrease in school absence rates.

  8. Accompaniment needs of nursing students related to the dying patient.

    PubMed

    Van Rooyen, D; Laing, R; Kotzé, W J

    2005-11-01

    Nurse educators are responsible for accompanying students towards becoming capable, competent professional nurses who are a credit to themselves, their patients, colleagues and profession. Student nurses need, therefore, to be taught to render comprehensive nursing care to patients in all stages of their lives, including when they are dying. Being confronted with human suffering and death is challenging and traumatic. Those exposed to such events on a daily basis need to have a solid foundation of self preservation to see past the pain of suffering and to bring light and hope to those in need. A young student nurse will only experience positive growth and development in these circumstances if she is also cared for and guided with understanding. The researcher utilized a qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design based on the phenomenological approach to enquiry. The following question was asked at the beginning of each unstructured phenomenological interview: "How was if for you to care for a dying or deceased patient?" The central theme identified that student nurses experience turmoil in their different relationships in their accompaniment of the dying patient. Guidelines based on the central theme and sub-themes that emerged from raw data, as well as literature, are offered as strategies to promote/enhance optimal accompaniment of student nurses caring for the dying patient.

  9. A Probabilistic Model of Student Nurses' Knowledge of Normal Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, David Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Vocational and technical education researchers need to be aware of the uses and limits of various statistical models. The author reviews the Rasch Model and applies it to results from a nutrition test given to student nurses. (Author)

  10. Failure to fail: assessing nursing students' competence during practice placements.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of the issues relating to the reluctance of registered nurses or mentors to fail students in their competencies and to identify possible causes for this at the practice level.

  11. Web-based testing procedure for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Mary Jo; Murley, Jerry; Kyzer, Emily

    2003-08-01

    Web-based testing has been used to assess achievement of course objectives in a nursing school. Initial logistical challenges were met with collaboration and problem solving. Students and faculty reported satisfaction with Web-based testing. PMID:12938902

  12. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Anecdotal Notes as Formative Feedback.

    PubMed

    Quance, Margaret Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal notes are a method of providing formative feedback to nursing students following clinical experiences. The extant literature on anecdotal notes is written only from the educator perspective, focusing on rationale for and methods of production, rather than on evaluation of effectiveness. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out with a cohort of 283 third year baccalaureate nursing students to explore their perceptions of anecdotal notes as effective formative feedback. The majority of students valued verbal as well as anecdotal note feedback. They preferred to receive feedback before the next learning experience. Students found the quality of feedback varied by instructor. The anecdotal note process was found to meet identified formative feedback requirements as well as the nursing program's requirement for transparency of evaluation and due process. It is necessary to provide professional development to clinical nurse educators to assist them develop high quality formative feedback using anecdotal notes. PMID:27564701

  13. Performance of Student Nurses on the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Harry

    1976-01-01

    Female nursing students maintained a profile of needs consistent with the traditional view of those in their profession while reflecting some of the significant changes occurring among college women between 1959 and 1973. (RL)

  14. Involvement of Nursing Students in Unethical Classroom and Clinical Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Gail A.

    1985-01-01

    A study to determine the incidence of unethical classroom and clinical behaviors among nursing students, to find out their opinions, and to investigate the relationships among demographic data, unethical behaviors and opinions about the behaviors is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  15. Use of Workshops to Develop Nurses' and Nursing Students' Writing Skills.

    PubMed

    Derouin, Anne L; Hueckel, Rémi M; Turner, Kathleen M; Hawks, Sharon J; Leonardelli, Adrianne K; Oermann, Marilyn H

    2015-08-01

    Workshops have been described in the literature as a strategy for preparing nurses to publish their work and develop their writing skills. Articles about the use of workshops for these purposes have not been integrated systematically. Seventeen articles were included in the current review. The workshop method has been found to be effective for preparing nurses to write for publication and for improving nurses' and nursing students' writing skills. However, workshops must be combined with one-to-one mentoring and feedback on writing to be successful.

  16. A Review of the Characteristics of Practical Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goard, Dean S.

    This paper describes the first part of a study concerned with student success in a practical nursing course offered in the British Columbia Vocational School in Nelson. The study resulted from a concern about the increased number of students who did not complete the training during the year 1969. The procedure involved transfering student data…

  17. Predictors of Persistence in Online Graduate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauble, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Persistence is an important measure of success for individual students and institutions of higher learning. The purpose of this study was to explore personal and academic factors that influence persistence in online graduate nursing students. A predictive correlational study design was used. Data were extracted from existing student records in two…

  18. The Effectiveness of Using a Student Response System on Baccalaureate Nursing Student Dominant Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeschi, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional nurses are challenged to provide high quality, evidence-based care in today's increasingly complex healthcare environment. Thus, nurses need to develop an appreciation for life-long learning. Understanding student approach to learning may provide nurse educators with empirical evidence to support specific teaching/learning…

  19. Hand hygiene knowledge and practices of nursing students in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Nasirudeen, A M A; Koh, Josephine W N; Lau, Adeline Lee Chin; Li, Wenjie; Lim, Lay Seng; Ow, Cynthia Yi Xuan

    2012-10-01

    Hand hygiene is an important means of preventing nosocomial infections. Studies have shown a <50% compliance rate for hand hygiene among health care workers. A hand hygiene survey was administered to nursing students in a tertiary institution in Singapore. The results of this survey strongly indicate that nursing students understand the importance of hand hygiene compliance and perceive clinical internship programs and practical laboratory sessions to be effective methods of hand hygiene education.

  20. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  1. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  2. Early identification of at-risk nursing students: a student support model.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, T Hampton

    2008-06-01

    Due to the shortage of nurses in the health care industry, colleges offering associate-degree nursing programs are beginning to pay more attention to attrition and the factors contributing to success. Alogistic regression model was used to explain the cognitive and noncognitive variables that contribute to success in a nursing fundamentals course. Although much work is necessary to fully understand first-semester nursing students' retention and success, an early identification model is explored to better support students as they enter associate-degree nursing programs.

  3. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students.

  4. Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

    2013-06-01

    Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p < 0.05) was found between nursing students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses.

  5. Using deconstruction to educate Generation Y nursing students.

    PubMed

    Arhin, Afua O; Cormier, Eileen

    2007-12-01

    Nurse educators are obligated to use creative strategies to educate a post-modern generation of students who possess distinct characteristics, particularly related to teaching and learning. The complexity of today's health care system, related to changing sociological factors and the differences in this generation, gives reason to tap into the strengths of this generation and consider how a postmodern perspective can influence nursing and nursing education. Derrida, to whom deconstruction is attributed, approached postmodern philosophy as a form of textual criticism. Deconstruction denotes a particular practice of reading, criticism, and analytical inquiry, factors that are important to nursing education. This article describes how deconstruction can be used to enhance nursing education of Generation Y students, and its application to reading comprehension and writing skills is explored. PMID:18196840

  6. Using deconstruction to educate Generation Y nursing students.

    PubMed

    Arhin, Afua O; Cormier, Eileen

    2007-12-01

    Nurse educators are obligated to use creative strategies to educate a post-modern generation of students who possess distinct characteristics, particularly related to teaching and learning. The complexity of today's health care system, related to changing sociological factors and the differences in this generation, gives reason to tap into the strengths of this generation and consider how a postmodern perspective can influence nursing and nursing education. Derrida, to whom deconstruction is attributed, approached postmodern philosophy as a form of textual criticism. Deconstruction denotes a particular practice of reading, criticism, and analytical inquiry, factors that are important to nursing education. This article describes how deconstruction can be used to enhance nursing education of Generation Y students, and its application to reading comprehension and writing skills is explored.

  7. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  8. Public policy for health manpower: nursing student loans.

    PubMed

    McKibbin, R C

    1977-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine the extent to which the Nursing Student Loan program (NSL) has accomplished its primary objectives of increasing the supply and effecting a more equitable geographic distribution of nurses. The history and provisions of the program are discussed and data from a survey of nursing schools on students' incomes, borrowing practices and withdrawal rates are analyzed. The major conclusion of the paper is that although NSL has fallen far short of its principal goals, it has produced some secondary benefits. A review of the program is recommended as a means of determining which activities should be emphasized to maximize its overall effectiveness.

  9. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland. PMID:27610908

  10. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  11. Improving nursing students' communication skills using crew resource management strategies.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Tschannen, Dana; Sculli, Gary

    2013-03-01

    To provide optimal patient care, all members of the health care team must effectively communicate patient status and the current plan of care. The Crew Resource Management (CRM) training system has been successfully used in the aviation industry to manage human error and reduce risk in the operational environment. CRM focuses on behaviors that support communication and teamwork and is modifiable to be used in nursing education. A version of CRM-nursing crew resource management-was implemented in a group of senior undergraduate nursing students. Students were satisfied with the program, and in a subsequent simulation they demonstrated the ability to use the communication techniques learned. PMID:23380022

  12. Orthodox Christian beliefs and homophobia in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Schlub, S M; Martsolf, D S

    1999-01-01

    Religion is an important factor in attitudes formed about groups, specifically homosexuals. Nursing education does little to inhibit homophobia in students. Sophomore (n = 87) and senior (n = 87) nursing students completed a demographic questionnaire, the Index of Homophobia (IHP), the Christian Orthodoxy Scale, and the Intrinsic Religious Motivation Scale. Half the students had IHP scores indicative of high-grade nonhomophobia. IHP scores and frequency of church attendance were significantly correlated, as were Christian orthodoxy and homophobia scores. Intrinsic religious motivation and homophobia were inversely related. Implications include the need to provide opportunities for students to discuss religion and attitudes toward homosexuals.

  13. Lived Experiences of Female Undergraduate Students, at a Nursing College in Abu Dhabi, about Nursing as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantash, Dania Abu; Van Belkum, Corrien

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the lived experiences of female undergraduate nursing students about nursing as a profession and the circumstances that have influenced their experience. Introduction: Nursing as a profession is a relatively new practice, and thus in the developmental stage, in the UAE. The number of national students (Emirati) who enrol in the…

  14. Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions regarding factors that affect math abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Katrina A.

    2011-07-01

    A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of math abilities, factors that affect math abilities, the use of math in nursing, and the extent to which specific math skills were addressed throughout a nursing curriculum. Polya’s Model for Problem Solving and the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Affective Domain served as the theoretical background for the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to obtain data from a purposive sample of undergraduate nursing students from a private university in western Pennsylvania. Participants were selected based on the proficiency level with math skills, as determined by a score on the Elsevier’s HESI™ Admission Assessment (A2) Exam, Math Portion. Ten students from the “Excellent” benchmark group and eleven students from the “Needing Additional Assistance or Improvement” benchmark group participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, and completed a 25-item, 4-point Likert scale survey that rated confidence levels with specific math skills and the extent to which these skills were perceived to be addressed in the nursing curriculum. Responses from the two benchmark groups were compared and contrasted. Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Findings related to mathematical approach and confidence levels with specific math skills were determined to be statistically significant.

  15. Nursing student medication errors: a snapshot view from a school of nursing's quality and safety officer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common types of errors in the health care arena. For more than a decade, health care providers have been challenged to improve patient safety outcomes, including medication administration issues. Nurse educators are challenged to provide didactic content and clinical experiences that will ensure students gain the knowledge necessary to administer medications in a safe manner. The aim of this article is to discuss nursing student medication errors identified at a university school of nursing, looking to categorize the errors into three areas: administration rights, system issues, and knowledge and understanding. Introducing nursing students to a reporting system early in their educational process can lead to increased transparency in error reporting and increased patient safety.

  16. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme. PMID:24199114

  17. Learning to care: gender issues for male nursing students.

    PubMed

    Paterson, B L; Tschikota, S; Crawford, M; Saydak, M; Venkatesh, P; Aronowitz, T

    1996-01-01

    The following article is a description of one aspect of a phenomenological research study designed to investigate the lived experience of male nursing students as they learned to care as nurses. Data-collection strategies included paradigm case narratives and interviews. Data analysis was characterized by four major strategies: analysis, synthesis, criticism, and understanding. These strategies were used to identify meanings of the text of transcribed interviews and to generate interpretive commentary. Learning to care was described by the participants as a complex entity that incorporates the gender of the student, the patient, the teacher, and the nurse. As students progressed through the program, their experience of gender issues in learning to care was shaped by personal experiences, the expectations of a predominantly female faculty and nursing staff, and their evolving understanding of the ways of caring that are gender based.

  18. Usability Assessment of Moodle by Brazilian and Portuguese Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Carlos Alberto; de Godoy, Simone; Martins, JoséÉ Carlos Amado; Mazzo, Alessandra; Baptista, Rui Carlos Negrão; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-06-01

    Distance education has turned into an important tool for nursing education. The virtual learning environments contribute toward an interactive and attractive educational process. In this study, we assess the usability of a virtual learning environment that was developed to teach nursing students how to care for patients with urinary retention. A multicenter and descriptive study was undertaken, which involved nursing students from the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Brazil, and the Escola Superior de Enfermagem de Coimbra, Portugal. The participants were 79 students, mostly female, between 20 and 24 years of age. The virtual learning environment revealed good properties in terms of usability on most criteria. Future research will help to confirm the results. PMID:27058673

  19. Stressors, academic performance, and learned resourcefulness in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Goff, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    High stress levels in nursing students may affect memory, concentration, and problem-solving ability, and may lead to decreased learning, coping, academic performance, and retention. College students with higher levels of learned resourcefulness develop greater self-confidence, motivation, and academic persistence, and are less likely to become anxious, depressed, and frustrated, but no studies specifically involve nursing students. This explanatory correlational study used Gadzella's Student-life Stress Inventory (SSI) and Rosenbaum's Self Control Scale (SCS) to explore learned resourcefulness, stressors, and academic performance in 53 baccalaureate nursing students. High levels of personal and academic stressors were evident, but not significant predictors of academic performance (p = .90). Age was a significant predictor of academic performance (p = < .01) and males and African-American/Black participants had higher learned resourcefulness scores than females and Caucasians. Studies in larger, more diverse samples are necessary to validate these findings.

  20. Causes of Incivility in Iranian Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Mostafa; Ildarabadi, Es-hagh; Moharreri, Fatemeh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incivility among nursing students is a common academic problem. Knowing the causes of students’ incivility will enable the faculty members and academic institutions to select correct strategies to deal with this problem. This study was conducted to explore the causes of incivility among nursing students from both educators’ and students’ points of view. Methods: gThis qualitative content analysis study was applied in order to explore experiences and insights of 17 nursing lecturers and 9 nursing students who were selected through purposeful sampling and interviewed on the causes of incivility. Participants were selected among students and lecturers of nursing schools in Khorasan Razavi. The inclusion criteria for the students were having passed one educational term and for the lecturers having one year experience of teaching respectively. Data gathering was done using deep semi-structured interviews starting from March 2014 to March 2015. Results: Three main categories extracted from the data were student related factors, teacher related factors, and organizational factors. Non-educational engagement, attracting attentions, lack of motivation, students’ personality, and lack of experience were the subcategories of student related factors. Subcategories of teacher related factors included lack of skills, teachers’ personal qualities, lack of experience, and incivility of teachers. Finally, the subcategories of organizational factors included no evaluation system for teachers and lack of understanding the organizational rules and regulations. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that factors related to students, teachers, and organization may lead to nursing students’ incivility and clarified its dimensions. In order to develop a civil environment in nursing college, managers and educators’ awareness should be promoted via various ways such as workshops. PMID:26793730

  1. Contextualisation and Learning: A Comparative Study of Student Teachers and Student Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vågan, André; Heggen, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    This article uses an activity-theoretical perspective on context to explore final-year student nurses' and student teachers' perceptions of learning in their professional programmes. We analyse focus group interviews about critical aspects of teaching and nursing preparation and articulate processes of learning within and across…

  2. Community-based student practice: a transformational model of nursing education.

    PubMed

    Thies, Kathleen M; Ayers, Lea R

    2004-01-01

    Nursing and nursing faculty shortages demand innovation of nurse-educators and nursing leaders to prepare nursing students for the environment in which they will practice. This article outlines the process of curricular revision undertaken by a department of nursing in a small rural liberal arts college, in partnership with clinical affiliates, based on a structure-process-outcome framework. An expanding literature base promotes service learning in nursing education. Comparison of service-learning and community-based nursing education led the partners to view community-based nursing education experience as practice, and, as such, an emerging model that transcends service learning. Community-based student nursing experiences that meet student, program, and community outcomes are planned and implemented in collaboration with community partners. This model provides students with opportunities to develop a rich understanding of the professional nursing role, while promoting nursing workforce development at both the individual and organizational levels.

  3. Human rights education for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M

    2001-05-01

    This article is based largely on a research study undertaken by the author into the teaching of human rights in nursing courses in the UK on behalf of the national section of the human rights organization Amnesty International. It attempts to provide a baseline estimate of human rights education in nursing curricula in the UK while making suggestions on how the teaching of human rights issues could be more clearly incorporated into nursing curricula, ending with some recommendations for further research.

  4. The ethics of nursing student international clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Levi, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the motivations for offering international nursing student experiences and the reasons students choose to participate. Students should prepare by learning cultural humility rather than cultural competency, and they should be oriented to the ethical responsibility implicit in caring for those in developing countries. Programs that provide these experiences need to be developed with an eye to sustainability so the lives of those receiving care will be enriched after the students go home.

  5. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Evidence Based Practice among Nurses and Nursing Students in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, S; Acharya, R; Budhwani, H; Shrestha, P; Chalise, P; Shrestha, U; Gautam, K; Wilson, L

    2015-01-01

    Background As the evidence based practice (EBP) movement expands, there is a need for health leaders and educators in each country to assess the extent to which health professional students and practitioners are prepared to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence to guide their practice. Objective The study objective was to explore nurses' and nursing students' perceptions and attitudes towards EBP. Method This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey administered to all 273 nurses and nursing students from Nepal who attended an EBP conference. The survey instrument that was used by Majid in Singapore was adapted for use in this study with permission from the author. Result In total, 121 nurses participated in the study. The majority (93%) of respondents reported that they had no previous training in EBP. The respondents' perceptions of their EBP knowledge and skills were variable, but most of them demonstrated positive attitudes toward EBP. Respondents identified a number of barriers that limit the implementation of EBP in Nepal. The greatest barriers were lack of time and resources, difficulty understanding research articles and translating the findings to practice, and limited autonomy to change practice based on evidence. Conclusion Although respondents had positive attitudes towards EBP, their knowledge and skills were limited and barriers to implementation existed. Nursing faculty can use the findings to guide implementation of EBP into curricula, and nursing administrators and clinicians can use the findings to guide practice to promote EBP. PMID:27423280

  6. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The

  7. The Effect of a Self-Reflection and Insight Program on the Nursing Competence of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have to solve complex problems for their patients and their families, and as such, nursing care capability has become a focus of attention. The aim of this longitudinal study was to develop a self-reflection practice exercise program for nursing students to be used during clinical practice and to evaluate the effects of this program empirically and longitudinally on change in students' clinical competence, self-reflection, stress, and perceived teaching quality. An additional aim was to determine the predictors important to nursing competence. We sampled 260 nursing students from a total of 377 practicum students to participate in this study. A total of 245 students nurse completed 4 questionnaires, Holistic Nursing Competence Scale, Self-Reflection and Insight Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Clinical Teaching Quality Scale, at 2, 4, and 6 months after clinical practice experience. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the change in scores on each of the questionnaires. The findings showed that, at 6 months after clinical practice, nursing competence was significantly higher than at 2 and 4 months, was positively related to self-reflection and insight, and was negatively related to practice stress. Nursing students' competence at each time period was positively related to clinical teachers' instructional quality at 4 and 6 months. These results indicate that a clinical practice program with self-reflection learning exercise improves nursing students' clinical competence and that nursing students' self-reflection and perceived practice stress affect their nursing competence. Nursing core competencies are enhanced with a self-reflection program, which helps nursing students to improve self-awareness and decrease stress that may interfere with learning. Further, clinical practice experience, self-reflection and insight, and practice stress are predictors of nursing students' clinical competence. PMID:26428348

  8. The Effect of a Self-Reflection and Insight Program on the Nursing Competence of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have to solve complex problems for their patients and their families, and as such, nursing care capability has become a focus of attention. The aim of this longitudinal study was to develop a self-reflection practice exercise program for nursing students to be used during clinical practice and to evaluate the effects of this program empirically and longitudinally on change in students' clinical competence, self-reflection, stress, and perceived teaching quality. An additional aim was to determine the predictors important to nursing competence. We sampled 260 nursing students from a total of 377 practicum students to participate in this study. A total of 245 students nurse completed 4 questionnaires, Holistic Nursing Competence Scale, Self-Reflection and Insight Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Clinical Teaching Quality Scale, at 2, 4, and 6 months after clinical practice experience. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the change in scores on each of the questionnaires. The findings showed that, at 6 months after clinical practice, nursing competence was significantly higher than at 2 and 4 months, was positively related to self-reflection and insight, and was negatively related to practice stress. Nursing students' competence at each time period was positively related to clinical teachers' instructional quality at 4 and 6 months. These results indicate that a clinical practice program with self-reflection learning exercise improves nursing students' clinical competence and that nursing students' self-reflection and perceived practice stress affect their nursing competence. Nursing core competencies are enhanced with a self-reflection program, which helps nursing students to improve self-awareness and decrease stress that may interfere with learning. Further, clinical practice experience, self-reflection and insight, and practice stress are predictors of nursing students' clinical competence.

  9. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  10. Evaluation of nursing students' training in medical law.

    PubMed

    Kurban, Nevin Kuzu; Savaş, Halide; Cetinkaya, Bengü; Turan, Türkan; Kartal, Asiye

    2010-11-01

    There is no co-ordinated focus on liabilities arising from nurses' medical interventions in terms of occupational, administrative, civil legal and criminal activities. However, the Turkish Criminal Code, the Turkish Medical Ethics Code of Practice, and guidelines for patients' rights offer some framework for the relevant ethical principles and responsibilities of nurses. The aim of this study was to investigate the evaluation of nursing students' training in their legal liabilities. The sample consisted of 309 students who were taking a course entitled 'Nurses' legal liabilities under Turkish criminal and civil law arising from medical interventions'. Data were obtained by means of self-administered questionnaires and McNemar's test was used to evaluate the answers. In conclusion, after their training, a great majority of the students demonstrated an improvement in terms of their percentage of correct answers relating to malpractice. This does not, however, mean that they will not face malpractice charges after graduating, but their increased awareness of the issue may encourage them to make more effort to reduce the risk of mistakes. It is recommended that nursing faculty carry out studies into medical malpractice, that they focus more on this subject in nursing education, and that all nursing schools review their curricula from the point of view of malpractice.

  11. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    PubMed

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  13. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  14. Placement of undergraduate students in nursing homes: careful consideration versus convenience.

    PubMed

    Lane, Annette M; Hirst, Sandra P

    2012-03-01

    Several decades ago, concerns were raised about using nursing homes as clinical placement sites for undergraduate nursing students. As a result, some nursing programs moved away from using these clinical sites. However, within the past 15 years, a shift back toward reconsidering nursing homes as viable placement options has begun. What has brought about this shift, and what must happen to ensure that nursing homes provide positive learning experiences for students? This article reviews the literature on placing students in nursing home environments and presents a model that is designed to enhance gerontological competence in undergraduate nursing students, as well as to enhance students' learning in nursing home placements. If programs use nursing homes for student placements, a carefully constructed plan that encompasses gerontological education throughout the nursing degree program is recommended.

  15. Chronic Student Absenteeism: The Critical Role of School Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathleen; Meeder, Linda; Voskuil, Vicki R

    2016-05-01

    Routine school attendance is necessary for youth to develop into well-educated, successful adult citizens who will make significant contributions to society. Yet over 5 million students in the United States are chronically absent missing more than 10% of school in a year. The growing problem of chronic absenteeism among youth can be linked to increases in chronic health conditions in childhood such as allergies, asthma, diabetes, and obesity. School nurses are in an ideal position to play a vital role in reducing chronic student absenteeism, enabling youth to achieve their maximum learning potential. However, the role of the school nurse has not historically been recognized as a key factor for assisting youth to be present and regularly engaged in school. This feature article highlights a hospital-funded school nurse program within the state of Michigan that has reduced chronic absenteeism rates by placing school nurses into schools where previously there were none. The program implemented a number of initiatives that were instrumental in increasing the health and safety of students and provides a unique "before and after" glimpse of how school nursing reduces chronic student absenteeism rates and validates the essential role of the nurse within the educational system. PMID:27013340

  16. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  17. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  18. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  19. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  20. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  1. Ethics Education for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryden, Muriel B.; Duckett, Laura

    The final report of a 3-year project which involved the development, implementation, and evaluation of Multi-Course Sequential Learning, a model for integrating ethics education into the curriculum of the undergraduate programs in nursing at the University of Minnesota (UM) in Minneapolis is provided. The project focused on nursing students…

  2. [TUTORS AND NURSING STUDENTS WITH FOCUS ON PRIMARY CARE].

    PubMed

    Berlanga Fernández, Sofía; Solà Pola, M Montserrat; Fabrellas-Padrgs, Nuria; Berlanga Fernández, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Primary Health Care sets up an area influenced by the relationship between professionals and users, in which different disciplines, such as nursing, develop their learning procedures both in graduate and postgraduate training. In this context, students are tutored by professionals who have developed teaching skills. Along these lines, this manuscript aims to identifying the different types of nursing students and tutors who develop their teaching skills in Primary Health Centers. To this purpose, we invite the reader to know the historical and current milestones that characterize teaching systems and influence learning profiles of students and teachers.

  3. [TUTORS AND NURSING STUDENTS WITH FOCUS ON PRIMARY CARE].

    PubMed

    Berlanga Fernández, Sofía; Solà Pola, M Montserrat; Fabrellas-Padrgs, Nuria; Berlanga Fernández, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Primary Health Care sets up an area influenced by the relationship between professionals and users, in which different disciplines, such as nursing, develop their learning procedures both in graduate and postgraduate training. In this context, students are tutored by professionals who have developed teaching skills. Along these lines, this manuscript aims to identifying the different types of nursing students and tutors who develop their teaching skills in Primary Health Centers. To this purpose, we invite the reader to know the historical and current milestones that characterize teaching systems and influence learning profiles of students and teachers. PMID:26738232

  4. Experiences of Transfer Students in a Collaborative Baccalaureate Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Cherylyn

    2005-01-01

    Community college students who transfer to universities face innumerable challenges. While documented in the American literature on transfer, there has been relatively little published research on transfer in Canada. This paper explores the experience of nursing students transferring from three community colleges to a large urban university in…

  5. Nursing Student Anxiety in Simulation Settings: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cato, Mary Louise

    2013-01-01

    The use of simulation as a clinical learning activity is growing in nursing programs across the country. Using simulation, educators can provide students with a realistic patient situation using mannequins or actors as patients in a simulated environment. Students can practice multiple aspects of patient care without the risk of making mistakes…

  6. An Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Student Experiences with Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heale, Roberta; Gorham, Robyn; Fournier, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Many nurse practitioner (NP) education programs have embraced distance education opportunities. A comparison of the experiences of NP students in one course delivered across nine sites was undertaken. Some sites offer traditional face-to-face sessions and others provide tutorials online. A survey of all the students evaluated barriers with respect…

  7. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student... other funds, providing a clear audit trail for all transactions. At all times the fund must contain... Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as appropriate. (Approved by the Office...

  8. Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.

    PubMed

    Morley, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication.

  9. Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Linda Riggs

    2012-01-01

    This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

  10. Calculating Dosages: A Programed Learner for Student Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary

    Intended for nursing students, this programed workbook contains learning exercises and study tests on using household, apothecary, and metric systems in calculating medication dosages. The material, organized in six learning units, was designed to help students meet six objectives: correctly interpret and use accepted symbols and abbreviations in…

  11. Group Experiential Learning with Undergraduate Nursing Students: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Kinyon, Jane; Keith, Cynthia Bozich

    2008-01-01

    This research examined an interdisciplinary, collaborative experiential group learning approach, in which undergraduate nursing students met in small groups led by counseling doctoral student co-leaders. Statistical analysis suggests that the teaching method lead to learning of group concepts. Discussion addresses anecdotal observations,…

  12. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  13. Health Promotion and Tobacco Control: Student Nurses' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Karen; Seguire, Marilyn; Brown, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of 272 Manitoba nursing students yielded 5 themes related to health promotion and tobacco use: identity, central beliefs/attitudes, learning the facts, limited practice options, and role conflict. Students expressed considerable uncertainty about individual autonomy, themselves as role models, and their use of health…

  14. Socializing Students toward a Career in Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Dorothy L.; Green, Pauline M.; Slade, Diann S.

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduate nursing students at an historically black college were socialized to research in three projects: (1) collaboration with a community coalition on environmental justice, involving a large-scale survey; (2) study of compliance with a health advisory; and (3) 6-week summer immersion at a research university. Many students developed an…

  15. Medical and Nursing Students' Attitudes about AIDS Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesch, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A 12-item questionnaire was administered in 1987-88 to 445 medical students, 133 medical school applicants, and 111 nursing students to assess any differences in their attitudes toward medicine-related AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) issues. The findings suggest that education has an important role in changing attitudes. (Author/MLW)

  16. The Relationship between Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Student Retention in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larmon, Brandy H.

    2015-01-01

    Retention in higher education, especially nursing education, is a concern for nurse educators. Due to the needs of nurse graduates and practicing nurses, the characteristic of self-directed learning in students is often an educational goal of a rigorous nursing curriculum. Program retention is often impacted by such demands. This study, based upon…

  17. [Computer-mediated teaching of didactics in nursing: students evaluation].

    PubMed

    Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Meira, Karina Cardoso; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2007-06-01

    This exploratory descriptive study's purpose is to describe what students think regarding the form and content of an educational site and its application as an instructional resource for the discipline of Didactics in Nursing in the undergraduate course in Nursing at a school in the city of São Paulo. The study's subjects were students enrolled in that discipline during the first semester of the school year of 2003. The results show promptness regarding the use of computers on the part of the students, who are favorable to the adoption of new computer-mediated teaching methodologies in Nursing as a means to increase and diversify the forms of communication between instructors and students.

  18. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning. PMID:26599594

  19. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning.

  20. Accelerated Professional Development and Peer Consultation: Two Strategies for Continuing Professional Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Gail; Clinton, Michael; Edwards, Helen; Evans, Katie; Lunney, Paul; Posner, Natasha; Tooth, Barbara; Weir, Derek; Ryan, Yoni

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of accelerated professional development (APD) for nurses (n=64), involving peer consultation and reflective practice, and peer consultation alone (n=30). Although APD participants had a higher completion rate, improvements in caregiver behaviors and work environment were not significantly different. (SK)

  1. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed.

  2. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed. PMID:25271572

  3. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method.

  4. The covered wagon journey: student chronicles in advanced holistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Marguerite J; Lange, Bernadette; Bailey, Christie; Drozdowicz, Aleida; Eckes, Shirley; Kinchen, Elizabeth; Smith-Atkinson, Nikkisha

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts the experiences of a first cohort of graduate students in a newly implemented advanced holistic nursing (AHN) track, one of only a handful in the nation, and the first in Florida. The increasing popularity of complementary and alternative healing processes represents the insufficiency of a health system of fragmented care and a desire for holistic healing that is beyond mainstream allopathic care. Graduate holistic nurse education equips nurses to explore the commitment needed to advance the evolution of health care. The covered wagon journey is a metaphor for this meaningful participation. Students journaled their experiences as cotravelers in a lone wagon: embarking on a courageous journey, forging a path of discovery, and reaching their destination as pioneers. This cohort experience embodied the central tenets of holistic nursing, thus creating conscious change and unity within a learning community. The future of AHN is addressed in the context of the contemporary health care environment.

  5. Teaching Reflection to Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study in an Irish Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Aideen; Hyde, Abbey

    2005-01-01

    Teaching nursing students to reflect on their practice is now officially considered an essential component of nursing education in a number of countries. The aim of this study was to explore nurse teachers' perceptions and experiences of using reflection with diploma nursing students in an Irish context. One of the central themes to emerge, upon…

  6. Influence of international service-learning on nursing student self-efficacy toward cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Long, Tracey

    2014-08-01

    One method of gaining knowledge, skills, and experience with different cultures for nurses and nursing students is through an international immersion program of training in language, culture, and community nursing. This article presents a qualitative and quantitative research study of the influence of a 2-week service-learning medical experience of a nursing student group who traveled abroad to Belize, Central America.

  7. INFLUENCE OF INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING ON NURSING STUDENTS' SELF EFFICACY TOWARDS CULTURAL COMPETENCE.

    PubMed

    Long, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    One method of gaining knowledge, skills and experience with different cultures for nurses and nursing students is through an international immersion experience with training in language, culture and community nursing. This study is a qualitative and quantitative measurement of the influence of a two-week service learning medical experience on a student-nursing group who traveled abroad to Belize, Central America.

  8. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Perceptions Regarding Factors That Affect Math Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyo, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study…

  9. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  10. Dreams Deferred but not Deterred: A Qualitative Study on Undergraduate Nursing Student Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Marcia I.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study using grounded theory was conducted to examine the reasons that a sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students withdrew from their nursing programs. The sample consisted of 11 nursing students who left generic baccalaureate nursing programs located in an urban area of a southeastern state. A semi-structured interview…

  11. Too much knowledge for a nurse? Use of physical assessment by final-semester nursing students.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Windsor, Carol; Lewis, Peter

    2015-12-01

    There is debate around the scope of physical assessment skills that should be taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Yet this debate is largely uninformed by evidence on what is learned and practiced by nursing students. This study examined the pattern and correlates of physical assessment skill utilization by 208 graduating nursing students at an Australian university, including measures of knowledge, frequency of use, and perceived barriers to physical assessment skills during clinical practice. Of the 126 skills surveyed, on average, only five were used every time students practiced. Core skills reflected inspection or general observation of the patient; none involved complex palpation, percussion, or auscultation. Skill utilization was also shaped by specialty area. Most skills (70%) were, on average, never performed or learned and students perceived nursing physical assessment was marginalized in both university and workplace contexts. Lack of confidence was, thus, a significant barrier to use of skills. Based on these findings, we argue that the current debate must shift to how we might best support students to integrate comprehensive physical assessment into nursing practice.

  12. Eating Attitudes and Related Factors in Turkish Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sevim; Ugur, Bayram Ali; Aykurt, Fethi Ahmet; Bektas, Muammer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changing eating behaviors might trigger obesity, deficiency, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and reactive eating disorders. Objectives: This study aimed to determine eating attitudes of nursing students in the western Black-Sea region of Turkey as well as to examine the effects of demographic features, self-esteem, body image, income level, and family structure on their eating attitudes. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 310 nursing students between January and February 2014. Data were collected using the personal information form, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Beck Depression Scale (BDS), Body-Cathexis Scale (BCS), and Body Mass Index (BMI). Data were evaluated by descriptive statistics, independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson correlation analysis. Results: About 30.0% of Turkish nursing students had negative eating attitudes. There was a significant positive correlation between the BDS and EAT scores (P < 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between RSES scores and EAT scores of nursing students (P < 0.001). A statistically significant difference was found between the father’s occupation (P < 0.05) and mother’s working condition (P < 0.05), and the students’ eating attitudes. Conclusions: Psychological status, self-esteem, economic level, and place of residence of nursing students may be the potential factors for eating disorders. PMID:26339662

  13. Active and emotional student engagement: a nationwide, prospective, longitudinal study of Swedish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Malin; Omne-Pontã N, Marianne; Gustavsson, Petter J

    2010-01-01

    The researchers surveyed nursing students yearly during their three-year education, and examined active and emotional engagement. We examined the association of these properties with seven independent variables: higher educational institution, class size, age, gender, prior assistant nurse education, study experience and self-rated health. This longitudinal study included 1,334 students from 24 universities and university colleges in Sweden. Active engagement increased and emotional engagement decreased during the study years. Male students, older students and those with prior assistant nurse education had higher active engagement than other students. Older students, females, students with good self-rated health and those attending universities had higher emotional engagement. Study results suggest that higher educational institutions should pay more attention to students' active and emotional engagement in learning situations, since this may increase the ability of the students to cope with stressful events during their education, giving them an extra resource on which they can draw.

  14. Nursing students' perceptions of adoption: educational preparation needed.

    PubMed

    Foli, Karen J; Forster, Anna; Lim, Eunjung

    2014-01-01

    Adoption is a worldwide practice; most know someone who has been adopted, has adopted a child, or has relinquished a child for adoption. Healthcare professionals will have contact with patients who have a connection to adoption. This study examined the overall perceptions, current knowledge, and gaps in a nursing curriculum as reported by undergraduate nursing students and offers insight into caring for those impacted by adoption.

  15. Nursing Students With Physical Disabilities: Dispelling Myths and Correcting Misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Smith, Donna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe barriers and facilitators faced by nursing students with disabilities (SWDs) to dispel myths and correct misconceptions, promote the utilization of the campus disability office, and make the case that current technical standards may be obsolete. While there is no "one size fits all" approach, there are resources and methods that are available to nurse educators that should be used to end discrimination against SWDs. PMID:26218008

  16. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  17. [Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].

    PubMed

    Jubin, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship.

  18. [Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].

    PubMed

    Jubin, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship. PMID:23671991

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nurses and nursing students towards HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Irma Conejeros; Sánchez, Helga Emig; Lagunas, Lilian Ferrer; Valdés, Báltica Cabieses; Acosta, Rosina Cianelli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe attitudes, knowledge and perceptions of nurses and nursing students towards the people who live with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methodology Bibliographic study in which six electronic databases were searched using the key words: “attitude”, “knowledge”, “nursing”, perceptions”, “HIV/AIDS”. Publications between 1998 and 2007 were considered. Results 560 articles limited by scientific researches or ministerial reports membership were retrieved. Finally a total of 38 publications were selected, the analysis showed that the level of knowledge of nurses and nursing students about PLWHA is good and the attitudes towards HIV/AIDS have improved over time. Nurses and nursing students have been able to identify both positive and negative aspects in the PLWHA care personally and professionally because there is a more favourable perception. Conclusion There are few studies in Latin America and Chile that study the attitudes and knowledge of the studied population towards PLWHA. According to publications found the knowledge and attitudes have improved because the perception is more favourable. PMID:27499563

  20. Teaching nursing students about terminating professional relationships, boundaries, and social media.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Nurse educators should teach students about the nature of the nurse-patient relationship, which is a professional relationship and different from other relationships they have. In addition to teaching students how to establish relationships with their patients, nurse educators should also teach students about terminating relationships with patients. Without this professional guidance, nursing students may be tempted to use social media to maintain a relationship with patients. This may inadvertently lead to professional boundary violations, causing harm to patients and problems for nursing students or nurses.

  1. Exploring commitment, professional identity, and support for student nurses.

    PubMed

    Clements, Andrew James; Kinman, Gail; Leggetter, Sandra; Teoh, Kevin; Guppy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Problems with the recruitment and retention of nurses globally mean that insight into the factors that might increase retention in qualified staff and students is crucial. Despite clear links between work commitment and retention, there is little research exploring commitment in student nurses and midwives. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study designed to provide insight into commitment using semi-structured interviews conducted with nine pre-registration students and a qualitative survey completed by 171 pre-registration students. Thematic analysis of the data emphasised the impact of placement experiences on commitment via interpersonal relationships. Students typically emphasised their professional identity as the basis for commitment, although many participants also highlighted a lack of acceptance by qualified practitioners, which reduced it. There was evidence that suggested that practitioner workload may impact the student experience due to challenges in making sufficient time to provide support. Implications for retention strategies are discussed.

  2. You have no credibility: nursing students' experiences of horizontal violence.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Janette; Bowen, Isla; Reid, Amanda

    2007-05-01

    Horizontal violence is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession both in Australia and internationally. The term horizontal violence is used to describe bullying and aggression involving inter-group conflict. Some evidence suggests that nursing students commonly experience this during clinical placement(s). Despite the current shortage of nurses and the fact that clinical placement experiences may influence whether students remain in the nursing profession, there has been little research undertaken on this topic. This study used a questionnaire to investigate 152 second and third year nursing student's experiences of horizontal violence (either directly experienced or witnessed). Analysis identified five major themes: humiliation and lack of respect; powerlessness and becoming invisible; hierarchical nature of horizontal violence; coping strategies; and future employment choices. More than half of the sample indicated that they had experienced or witnessed horizontal violence; importantly, most of these (51% of the total sample) also indicated that it would impact on their future career and/or their employment choices. Strategies are discussed that could be implemented to reduce the effect of horizontal violence, including giving a higher priority to debriefing within a supportive university environment, and teaching assertiveness and conflict resolution skills within the Bachelor of Nursing Degree. PMID:17689439

  3. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  4. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice. PMID:19751934

  5. Multidisciplinarity in nursing research: a challenge for today's doctoral student.

    PubMed

    Bryanton, Janet; Gillam, Susan; Snelgrove-Clarke, Erna

    2002-12-01

    Doctorally prepared nurses entering today's research environment must be adept at transcending the research chasm that exists across disciplines and within nursing and be prepared to play leadership roles in multidisciplinary and nursing research. In order to fulfill these roles and meet the need for well-educated nurse scientists, doctoral students must be exposed to research from a multidisciplinary perspective and be able to think across disciplines so as to become familiar with the differences in design language. This paper compares research terminology across the disciplines of epidemiology, psychology, and nursing based on a sample of four research textbooks. It is apparent that although similarities exist, there is also diversity in the language used in research. Doctoral students preparing for comprehensive examinations must avoid becoming caught up in semantics and instead focus on the broad issues with each of the designs. With that knowledge, students will be not only more successful in their examinations but also more effective as leaders in nursing and multidisciplinary research. PMID:12619484

  6. Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-En; Lin, Ping-Yi

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing" found on pages 25-31, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Identify the worldwide shortage of nurses specializing in

  7. Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-En; Lin, Ping-Yi

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing" found on pages 25-31, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Identify the worldwide shortage of nurses specializing in

  8. Using clinical nurses as preceptors to teach leadership and management to senior nursing students: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Lillibridge, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The preceptor model of clinical education uses nurses to fulfill the role of 'teacher' in a one-on-one relationship with students. The current nursing shortage, however, places increased demands on nurses and threatens their continuation in this role. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to gain a better understanding of the nurse preceptor's experience. Five themes evolved during data analysis: (1) making it worthwhile for the nurse, (2) making a difference, (3) engaging in the process, (4) "I love being a preceptor, but..., and (5) accepting the role, taking responsibility. Making it worthwhile for the nurse included how nurses saw personal and professional rewards and benefits in precepting. Making a difference described how nurses felt they made a difference in student learning. Engaging in the process described how nurses created learning opportunities for students by being a good role model and protecting students from negative experiences. "I love being a preceptor, but..." identified aspects of the precepting role that were difficult. Accepting the role, taking responsibility identified the different people involved in the complex precepting experience; the preceptor, nursing faculty, students, and the nurse manager that all had to work together if students were to have a good experience. Findings can be used to develop better support for preceptors as well as more structured and consistent orientation to the role. PMID:17689423

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale for use with Brazilian nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Carolina Domingues; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Barlem, Jamila Geri Tomaschewski; Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Pereira, Liliane Alves; Ferreira, Amanda Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale (NSSS) for use with nursing students in the Brazilian context. Method: this was a quantitative exploratory and descriptive study using a cross-sectional design conducted with 123 undergraduate nursing students studying at a public university in the south of Brazil. The cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to international guidelines. Validation for use in a Brazilian context was performed using factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. Results: based on the expert committee assessment and pre-test, face and content validity were considered satisfactory. Factor analysis resulted in three constructs: curriculum and teaching; professional social interaction, and learning environment. The internal consistency of the instrument was satisfactory: the value of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93 for the instrument as a whole, and between 0.88 and 0.89 for the constructs. Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale was shown to be reliable and validated for the evaluation of student satisfaction with undergraduate nursing programs, considering the aspects teaching activities, curriculum, professional social interaction, and learning environment. PMID:27579931

  10. Nursing Student Loan Debt: A Secondary Analysis of the National Student Nurses' Association Annual Survey of New Graduates.

    PubMed

    Feeg, Veronica D; Mancino, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nursing student loan debt and financial choices from a secondary analysis of the National Student Nurses Association Annual New Graduate Survey. The findings in the secondary analysis show loan debt incurred by nursing students comparable to loan debt reported recently for all new college graduates in general. However, comparing types of programs and types of schools yielded clear variations. More than one-third of new graduates who reported having loans to repay were unemployed; more than one-quarter of those who worked part-time and one-quarter of those who worked full-time to finance their education were unemployed; and almost one-third of students whose parents had paid for their education were unemployed. New graduates from for-profit schools were more likely to report they had accumulated high debt to pay for school than all new graduates combined. Nursing students enter the job market with substantial financial debt that may impact their future. Educators and policymakers need to address these growing concerns to sustain a healthy supply of nurses.

  11. Nursing student perceptions of community in online learning.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet; Killion, Cheryl M

    2009-01-01

    Nursing faculty need to understand the unique aspects of online learning environments and develop new pedagogies for teaching in the virtual classroom. The concept of community is important in online learning and a strong sense of community can enhance student engagement and improve learning outcomes in online courses. Student perceptions of community in online learning environments were explored in this study. Five focus group sessions were held and online nursing students were asked to give examples of experiences related to sense of community. Fifteen major themes emerged: class structure, required participation, teamwork, technology, becoming, commonalities, disconnects, mutual exchange, online etiquette, informal discussions, aloneness, trepidation, unknowns, nonverbal communication and anonymity. Themes sorted into the categories of structural, processual and emotional factors. Theme descriptions show how sense of community can be enhanced and/or diminished in online courses. This study adds depth and detail to the limited body of research on sense of community in distance education in nursing courses.

  12. Nursing student perceptions of community in online learning.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet; Killion, Cheryl M

    2009-01-01

    Nursing faculty need to understand the unique aspects of online learning environments and develop new pedagogies for teaching in the virtual classroom. The concept of community is important in online learning and a strong sense of community can enhance student engagement and improve learning outcomes in online courses. Student perceptions of community in online learning environments were explored in this study. Five focus group sessions were held and online nursing students were asked to give examples of experiences related to sense of community. Fifteen major themes emerged: class structure, required participation, teamwork, technology, becoming, commonalities, disconnects, mutual exchange, online etiquette, informal discussions, aloneness, trepidation, unknowns, nonverbal communication and anonymity. Themes sorted into the categories of structural, processual and emotional factors. Theme descriptions show how sense of community can be enhanced and/or diminished in online courses. This study adds depth and detail to the limited body of research on sense of community in distance education in nursing courses. PMID:19697984

  13. Self-efficacy and resilience in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Heidi; Reyes, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of admitted students from nursing programs has been attributed to the perceived stress of nursing school. Students who possess the characteristics of self-efficacy and resilience may be persistent and therefore academically successful as demonstrated by test scores over the course of their education. In this article, the authors report on a study that explored self efficacy and resilience in relation to test scores among 136 baccalaureate nursing students in multiple courses during one, 16 week semester. No statistically significant differences were found in perceived self-efficacy or resilience total scores between early semester and late semester measurements. Significant differences were found on the Resilience Scale subscales of Perseverence and Existential Aloneness. Test scores were weakly correlated with resilience and self-efficacy scores. PMID:22499714

  14. Reducing HIV Stigma Among Nursing Students: A Brief Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shilpa M.; Heylen, Elsa; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Perumpil, Sheeja; Ekstrand, Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV stigma can be devastating and is common among health care providers, particularly nurses. The objectives of this study were to (a) assess the acceptability and feasibility of a brief stigma-reduction curriculum among a convenience sample of Indian nursing students and (b) examine the preliminary effect of this curriculum on their knowledge, attitudes, and intent to discriminate. At baseline, 57% of students had at least one misconception about HIV transmission, 38% blamed people living with HIV for their infection, and 87% and 95% demonstrated intent to discriminate while dispensing medications and drawing blood, respectively. Following the curriculum, HIV-related knowledge increased while blame, endorsement of coercive policies, and intent to discriminate decreased significantly. In addition, more than 95% of participants described the curriculum as practice changing. This brief intervention resulted in decreased stigma levels and was also highly acceptable to the nursing students. Next steps include rigorous evaluation in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:24569699

  15. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing With Bullying Situations Among Students.

    PubMed

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-06-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed and supported by NVivo 10 software. Five main themes arose from the analysis: (1) understanding about bullying, (2) how they identified bullying, (3) strategies, (4) support at the workplace, and (5) SNs' role. SNs have a reasonable knowledge about this issue and are capable of helping students through dialogue. However, there is a need to be trained and have more time to be able to give proper help to the students, also using other different strategies. SNs must work more actively on this issue with schools and be supported in terms of staff numbers. PMID:26502929

  16. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates. PMID:25150417

  17. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates.

  18. Developing and evaluating effective bioscience learning activities for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Salvage-Jones, Judith; Hamill, Jessie; Todorovic, Michael; Barton, Matthew J; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-07-01

    Effective engagement of nursing students in the study of biosciences remains a challenge for many tertiary institutes. In this study we attempted to implement and then evaluate a simple hands-on intervention, consisting of a series of hands-on games and puzzles, to increase nursing student engagement with core concepts and anatomical learning involved in clinical anatomy and physiology. The study used a quazi-experimental longitudinal before and after design, to explore the effect of a learning intervention on student performance. Set across three different campuses of the same University, it included 1320 first year undergraduate nursing students from 2013 to 2014 who were studying Anatomy and Physiology. Students were exposed to the interventions or not, and concomitant academic performance, weekly quiz scores, performance in fortnightly worksheets and, across the semester, exam performance were compared. The results show that while the intervention appeared to increase academic performance in students on one campus (2013) compared to the other two, this difference was not sustained into 2014 when a bigger cohort was examined. Despite significant subjective student satisfaction and enthusiasm about these learning and teaching interventions, the data does not support the capacity of these activities to enhance student academic performance. Tertiary entrance scores, being a non-native English speakers and socio-economic status all had a bigger impact on student performance than engagement with fun anatomy and physiology activities. PMID:27428695

  19. Student Attitudes toward Accelerated Reader: "Thanks for Asking!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Amy; Westberg, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerated Reader program was designed by Renaissance Learning to increase students' motivation to read and students' achievement in reading; however, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent findings about its outcomes. The Renaissance Learning company reports several research studies on their website that suggest the program is…

  20. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  1. Stepping up, stepping back, stepping forward: Student nurses' experiences as peer mentors in a pre-nursing scholarship.

    PubMed

    Smith, Annetta; Beattie, Michelle; Kyle, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mentorship is an essential part of the registered nurse's role, yet few opportunities exist for student nurses to mentor others during pre-registration programmes. This paper reports student nurses' experiences of mentoring school pupils during a pre-nursing scholarship. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen final year student nurses (14 female, 1 male) in two university campuses in Scotland. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data analysed thematically. Three interconnected themes emerged: 1) stepping up; 2) stepping back; 3) stepping forward. 'Stepping up' was a process through which student nurses rapidly assumed responsibility for mentoring pupils, facilitated through the attitudes and actions of students' mentors and students' control over pupils' practice experiences. 'Stepping back' encapsulated attitudes and behaviours that enabled student nurses to mentor pupils that involved considerable judgement around how unfolding events in practice could provide learning and development opportunities, and emotional acuity to support pupils through, sometimes challenging, practice situations. 'Stepping forward' described how students' mentoring experience allowed them to appraise and affirm nursing knowledge and skills, and gain greater appreciation of the reality and complexity of mentorship in clinical practice. Peer mentoring may prepare student nurses for future mentoring roles and aid their transition into clinical practice.

  2. Nursing students' confidence in medication calculations predicts math exam performance.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Sharon; Salamonson, Yenna; Halcomb, Elizabeth J

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties, including predictive validity, of the newly-developed nursing self-efficacy for mathematics (NSE-Math). The NSE-Math is a 12 item scale that comprises items related to mathematic and arithmetic concepts underpinning medication calculations. The NSE-Math instrument was administered to second year Bachelor of Nursing students enrolled in a nursing practice subject. Students' academic results for a compulsory medication calculation examination for this subject were collected. One-hundred and twelve students (73%) completed both the NSE-Math instrument and the drug calculation assessment task. The NSE-Math demonstrated two factors 'Confidence in application of mathematic concepts to nursing practice' and 'Confidence in arithmetic concepts' with 63.5% of variance explained. Cronbach alpha for the scale was 0.90. The NSE-Math demonstrated predictive validity with the medication calculation examination results (p=0.009). Psychometric testing suggests the NSE-Math is a valid measure of mathematics self-efficacy of second year nursing students.

  3. Nursing student experiences with face-to-face learning.

    PubMed

    Gruendemann, Barbara J

    2011-12-01

    Face-to-face learning has been the mainstay of nursing student learning. Despite moves to online learning, face-to-face learning persists. This study focuses on how nursing students experience face-to-face learning and why it not only survives, but thrives. This study was anchored in a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, with Gadamerian concepts and van Manen's lifeworlds as frameworks to understand students' experiences of face-to-face learning. Patterns and themes were extracted from audiore-corded face-to-face interviews. Participants confirmed that face-to-face learning continues to be valued as a strong methodology in nursing education. Their experiences focused on humanism, the importance of "presence," physical proximity, classroom as "the real thing," immediacy of feedback, and learning and knowing by human connections and interaction. The study findings were a rich source for understanding how nursing students process learning experiences. Increased understanding of the meaning and essence of face-to-face learning is essential as we decide how nursing content will be taught. PMID:21956259

  4. The views of patients, mentors and adult field nursing students on patients' participation in student nurse assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon-Parkes, Kate; Chapman, Linda; James, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, changes to undergraduate nursing curricula in the United Kingdom have been coupled with increasing expectations that service users be involved in assessment of student nurses. These factors lead to the development of a tool to facilitate gathering of feedback from patients/carers on the competency of adult field student nurses in practice. This study evaluated experiences of those involved in the process of using the feedback tool. Using an exploratory qualitative research design, four patients, four mentors and five pre-registration adult field nursing students were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data identified three interconnecting themes; value of the patient's voice, caring and protection, and authenticity of feedback. A sub-theme of timing of giving feedback was also identified. Patients felt they should be involved in giving feedback, were comfortable in doing so, and felt best placed to judge students' performance in several aspects of care. Students and mentors shared these opinions. Additionally they felt service user feedback potentially helped improve students' competence and confidence, and facilitated mentors in their assessment of students' professional values, communication and interpersonal skills. However, mentors were more reticent about the possibility of receiving feedback from service users on their own practice.

  5. The views of patients, mentors and adult field nursing students on patients' participation in student nurse assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon-Parkes, Kate; Chapman, Linda; James, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, changes to undergraduate nursing curricula in the United Kingdom have been coupled with increasing expectations that service users be involved in assessment of student nurses. These factors lead to the development of a tool to facilitate gathering of feedback from patients/carers on the competency of adult field student nurses in practice. This study evaluated experiences of those involved in the process of using the feedback tool. Using an exploratory qualitative research design, four patients, four mentors and five pre-registration adult field nursing students were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data identified three interconnecting themes; value of the patient's voice, caring and protection, and authenticity of feedback. A sub-theme of timing of giving feedback was also identified. Patients felt they should be involved in giving feedback, were comfortable in doing so, and felt best placed to judge students' performance in several aspects of care. Students and mentors shared these opinions. Additionally they felt service user feedback potentially helped improve students' competence and confidence, and facilitated mentors in their assessment of students' professional values, communication and interpersonal skills. However, mentors were more reticent about the possibility of receiving feedback from service users on their own practice. PMID:26347448

  6. Accelerated Learning, Suggestopedia, and the Adult Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlisk-Renner, Monique; Truscott, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of suggestopedia and accelerated learning (AL) techniques in a 10-week French-as-a-Second-Language course for 13 adult learners. Course organization, lesson plans, and results, focusing on the effectiveness of AL techniques in short-term courses, are examined. (two references) (MDM)

  7. Righting writing: strategies for improving nursing student papers.

    PubMed

    Bickes, Joan T; Schim, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to clearly express complex ideas in writing is necessary for nurses in professional practice at all levels from novice to expert. The community health nursing course is specially designated as writing intensive to provide students with the experience of preparing a major scholarly paper. To address issues of poor paper quality and grade inflation we implemented a program including a writing workshop for faculty, a revision of the grading rubric, and a system of blind review for grading student papers. Changes resulted in a major shift in paper grades which more closely reflects the actual quality of the work.

  8. [How to follow communicative competence progress in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Braga, Eliana Mara; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2006-09-01

    This work is aimed at suggesting methodological foundations for following Nursing student's progress in communicative competence. Using qualitative methodology and theoretical reference of interpersonal communication, the research was developed through interviews with 13 professors with experience both in teaching activities and communication research in Nursing. Interviewees reported that they follow their students' progress in communicative competence through the observation of their communicative abilities with patients; by fostering moments for the expression of thoughts, feelings and perceptions; by giving feedback on the development of communicative abilities; by stimulating their communication abilities; by performing formative assessments and tutoring.

  9. Twitter: An Application to Encourage Information Seeking Among Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Julee; Wink, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is a social networking application that has seen limited evaluation in nursing education. The aim of this study was to determine if Twitter could be used to stimulate further exploration about current clinical and professional topics with nurse practitioner students. The students used Twitter to receive tweets on clinical and professional topics from the instructor throughout the semester: 75% demonstrated willingness to follow the links in the tweets to seek more information, and 87% expressed a desire to receive the tweets even after the semester was over. PMID:26673316

  10. Righting writing: strategies for improving nursing student papers.

    PubMed

    Bickes, Joan T; Schim, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to clearly express complex ideas in writing is necessary for nurses in professional practice at all levels from novice to expert. The community health nursing course is specially designated as writing intensive to provide students with the experience of preparing a major scholarly paper. To address issues of poor paper quality and grade inflation we implemented a program including a writing workshop for faculty, a revision of the grading rubric, and a system of blind review for grading student papers. Changes resulted in a major shift in paper grades which more closely reflects the actual quality of the work. PMID:20196767

  11. Communication and nursing: a study-abroad student's reflections.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anna Karina Martins; Tuohy, Dympna

    Globalisation in the academic context provides the opportunity for sharing knowledge and innovations between institutions in different countries, through the creation of study abroad and academic mobility programmes. For nursing students, studying abroad facilitates the development of cultural sensitivity so that they may care appropriately for an increasingly multicultural patient population in their own countries. This article describes a Brazilian 'study abroad' student nurse's experience of studying a 'communication and therapeutic relationships' module in an Irish university. Johns' model of structured reflection was used to frame, describe and reflect on the experience. This reflection informs 'study abroad' students and their universities about the student experience through a personal account of one such student. PMID:26618679

  12. Transformative learning through a research practicum for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Helen; Tweedell, Donna; Semogas, Dyanne

    2011-10-01

    In their final year of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) program, students are required to take a research practicum related to clinical practice in a new or ongoing research project, supervised by nursing faculty. This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the research process. The student's potential role as a research collaborator is emphasized. Involvement in an interdisciplinary narrative study with formerly homeless individuals challenged by severe alcohol dependence, in general poor health and living in a harm reduction environment, transformed students' values, assumptions, and beliefs. Not only did students gain confidence in their beginning skills as potential research collaborators, but they also felt that their future practice would be enhanced by new perspectives gained by studying a marginalized and stigmatized group, thus enabling them to appreciate cultural diversity and improve their competence.

  13. The Lifestyle Behaviours and Exercise Beliefs of Undergraduate Student Nurses: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Eimear; McCarthy, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Only limited published research is available exploring the lifestyle practices of student nurses. The purpose of this paper is to explore the lifestyle behaviours and exercise beliefs of Irish student nurses. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive survey design was used. First-year and third-year undergraduate student nurses (n=182)…

  14. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  15. Nursing Students' Experiences of the Empathy of Their Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Kristina; Kyngäs, Helvi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing students' experiences of empathy of nursing teachers with the emphasis on how experiencing empathy from their teachers influences students, their learning and professional development. This research was a qualitative descriptive study conducted through face-to-face interviews with nursing students.…

  16. Student Persistence in Associate Degree Nursing Programs at Mississippi Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kathryn Lee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors of student persistence and attrition in addition to strategies that may help students persist in associate degree nursing programs at community colleges. Data were collected from nursing students enrolled in first-year associate degree nursing programs at participating Mississippi community colleges…

  17. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice. PMID:27275914

  18. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice.

  19. Violence against female student nurses in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Hinchberger, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Violence, harassment, and bullying in the workplace are not new phenomena. However, the growing epidemic of violence in the health sector workplace is raising great concern among workers, employers, and governmental agencies across Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. National and international literature reveals that the prevalence of violence experienced by graduate and undergraduate female nursing students in the college and workplace settings is largely unknown. Moreover, the prevalence of violence is now recognized as a major health priority by the World Health Organization, the International Council of Nurses, and Public Services International. Even so, the number of nursing personnel affected by this problem continues to rise. A modified self-report online survey was used to ascertain the level of violence experienced by nursing students in their clinical placements. One hundred percent of those surveyed had experienced some type of workplace violence and the perpetrators were most often other staff members followed closely by patients. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement recommends that all faculty prepare nurses to recognize and prevent all forms of violence in the workplace. This research seeks to develop practical approaches to better understand and prevent this global public health issue. PMID:19187052

  20. [Nurses' perceptions about a conference of students during a clinical nursing practicum].

    PubMed

    Muroya, Kazuko; Kawachi, Shinobu

    2011-03-01

    We conducted an investigation of students in a nursing practice leadership workshop for the purpose of understanding their perceptions about a student conference that was held during a clinical nursing practicum. As a result, we found that, at the time of the conference, a large proportion of students felt difficulty related to "Inexperience in discussion procedures" and "Students' inability to have an active exchange of opinions". A large proportion also thought that "Cooperation among students" and "The theme" had an effect on the conference. Compared to the group that had had experience as clinical practice leaders, the group that had not had such experience felt troubled by "Silence" during the conference. The group that had had experience as clinical practice leaders thought that "The physical environment of the setting" had an effect on the conference. In free descriptions of the learning, the following three categories were discovered: "Acquisition of problem-solving techniques", "Widening of the perspectives of nursing", and "Cultivation of an attitude toward the nursing profession".

  1. Practising for progression into nursing: a collaborative approach to the preparation of potential nursing students.

    PubMed

    Rush, Susan; Shepherd, Lindsay; Firth, Terry; Marks-Maran, Di

    2013-09-01

    A collaborative project was undertaken between the Clinical Skills Laboratory at the Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences (FHSCS) at Kingston University/St George's University of London (KU/SGUL) and Kingston Borough Schools Vocational Development Service. The project was designed to address the challenge of preparing potential health care students to make informed decisions about a career in health care through the development of a strong interface between the FHSCS and local schools and colleges. School students were invited to attend sessions in the clinical skills/simulation laboratory working alongside student nurses to learn fundamental nursing skills. An evaluative study undertaken into the project showed that the experience in the simulation laboratory was viewed very positively by students and helped them to learn new skills as well as to make or affirm positive career choices for nursing. Of the 30 school students participating in this study, 12 applied for and were accepted into the pre-registration nursing programme at this university.

  2. Stereotyping by nurses and nursing students: a critical review of research.

    PubMed

    Ganong, L H; Bzdek, V; Manderino, M A

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-eight empirical studies of stereotyping by nurses and nursing students were critically examined and discussed. The review was conducted and reported as though it were primary research. Subjects were the studies examined, methods were the reviewing procedure, data were attributes of the studies, and results were the conclusions drawn. The research on nurses' stereotypes has been characterized by: the use of one method of data collection, usually questionnaires; the measurement of the presence or absence of specific stereotypes; and nonprobability sampling techniques. There is some evidence that nurses stereotype other people based on age, sex, attractiveness, personality, diagnosis, social class, and family structure. Suggestions for adding to this body of knowledge are made.

  3. Reporting Misconduct of a Coworker to Protect a Patient: A Comparison between Experienced Nurses and Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Mansbach, Abraham; Kushnir, Talma; Ziedenberg, Hana; Bachner, Yaacov G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Whistleblowing is the reporting of illegal, immoral, or illegitimate practices to persons or organizations that may affect the action. The current study compares experienced nurses to nursing students regarding their willingness to blow the whistle to protect a patient's interests. Methods. 165 participants were divided into two groups: 82 undergraduate nursing students and 83 experienced nurses. Participants responded to two vignettes that described a colleague's and a manager's misconduct at work. Results. The nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower compared to the experienced nurses. The nursing students also ranked the internal and external whistleblowing indices higher than the nurses, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. For each of the examined internal and external indices, professional experience was found to be significant in multivariate regression analyses. Conclusions. Even though nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower than the experienced nurses, the students demonstrated a greater readiness to blow the whistle, both internally and externally. Recommendations for handling comparable situations are offered. PMID:25379527

  4. The mandala: first-year undergraduate nursing students' learning experiences.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Diane J; Iwasiw, Carroll L; Evans, Marilyn K

    2012-12-05

    The mandala is a circular art form used by psychologists to access subconscious thought through symbolism and it has recently been adopted by nurse educators as a learning strategy for self-awareness. The lived experiences of six first-year undergraduate nursing students who completed a mandala assignment for emotional learning were explored using hermeneutic phenomenology. Participants experiences diverged from their original expectations that the mandala assignment would allow for a fun and free expression of 'self'. Participants did describe experiences of self-discovery; however, their experiences also resembled those associated with socialization in nursing education. Participants described both self-reflection and critical-reflection while completing the mandala assignment. Nurse educators and researchers can gain insight regarding the use of this assignment as an integrated transformative learning approach for emotional learning.

  5. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes.

  6. Undergraduate nursing students' learning styles: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Sandra; McKee, Gabrielle; Huntley-Moore, Sylvia

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports on the main findings of a longitudinal study of the learning styles of one cohort of undergraduate pre-registration nursing students at an Irish university. The Honey and Mumford (2000a) Learning Styles Questionnaire was administered to a sample of students in their first (n=202) and final year of study (n=166), the final sample number (58) was based on matched pairs. The most common dominant learning style in first year was the dual learning category (35%) while a large proportion of the students (53%) in their final year had no dominant learning style. The preferred learning style of students in their first (69%) and final (57%) year was reflector. Learning styles were significantly different at the two time points and there was a significant relationship between some learning styles and students' age but not with academic achievement. Total scores of all learning styles showed significant improvements across the two time points of the study. An important implication for nurse education practice is the need for nurse educators to be aware of students' learning styles and in an attempt to maximise students' learning potential, utilise a range of teaching and learning methodologies and assessments that develop all learning styles.

  7. Pre-registration nursing students' perceptions and experiences of violence in a nursing education institution in South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Tania; Mayers, Pat M; Khalil, Doris

    2014-11-01

    Violence is a growing problem worldwide in the field of health care and within the nursing profession. A study comprising a survey and focus groups with nursing students, and interviews with nurse educators was conducted to examine nursing students' perceptions and experiences of violence at a nursing education institution in the Western Cape, South Africa. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all nursing students. Two hundred and twenty three (n = 223) respondents completed the questionnaire. Focus groups were conducted with purposively sampled student participants and semi-structured interviews with nurse educators. The findings indicated that the nature of the violent incidents experienced by students on campus, especially in the residences, ranged from verbal abuse to violation of students' property and personal space, and could be attributed primarily to substance abuse. Violence among student nurses could negatively affect learning. In a profession in which nurses are exposed to violence in the workplace, it is important that violence in the learning environment is actively prevented and respect of individual rights, tolerance and co-operation are promoted.

  8. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students. PMID:25960063

  9. Nursing Informatics Competencies Among Nursing Students and Their Relationship to Patient Safety Competencies: Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills.

    PubMed

    Abdrbo, Amany Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    With implementation of information technology in healthcare settings to promote safety and evidence-based nursing care, a growing emphasis on the importance of nursing informatics competencies has emerged. This study assessed the relationship between nursing informatics and patient safety competencies among nursing students and nursing interns. A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design with a convenience sample of 154 participants (99 nursing students and 55 interns) completed the Self-assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Patient Safety Competencies. The nursing students and interns were similar in age and years of computer experience, and more than half of the participants in both groups had taken a nursing informatics course. There were no significant differences between competencies in nursing informatics and patient safety except for clinical informatics role and applied computer skills in the two groups of participants. Nursing informatics competencies and patient safety competencies were significantly correlated except for clinical informatics role both with patient safety knowledge and attitude. These results provided feedback to adjust and incorporate informatics competencies in the baccalaureate program and to recommend embracing the nursing informatics course as one of the core courses, not as an elective course, in the curriculum.

  10. An Interview and an Observation Study of Nurses and Student Nurses' Electronic Clinical Documentation Behaviors in a OB/GYN Nursing Ward.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Chiao Angel; Lin, Yen-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of a clinical nursing information system to document their patient care activities in an OB/GYN nursing ward at a medical center in central Taiwan. A semi-structure interview and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. The results showed that the majority of participants regarded the clinical nursing information system as a useful system in terms of saving documentation time and improving communication among healthcare providers. This study provided some empirical evidence of the attitudes/behaviors of nurses and student nurses about electronic documentation. However, more studies were recommended to evaluate the impact of electronic nursing documentation on the quality of care delivered to patients.

  11. Student perceptions of the links between nursing and the liberal arts.

    PubMed

    Peck, M L; Jennings, S

    1989-11-01

    This article examines the extent to which nursing students are aware of the importance of liberal arts in their professional education. Based on a survey of nursing students and alumnae from a small, New York state college, the project further explored the channels through which they became aware of the significant links between these two aspects of their education. One finding is that nursing students give a relatively high weight to the importance of the liberal arts in their total learning process. The more important conclusion is that students, on the whole, believe that they have made the links between liberal arts and nursing themselves. To the extent that other agents help forge these links, the most important seem to be nursing labs and clinicals, other nursing students, and nursing texts and modules. Students perceive that nursing faculty help draw links more often than liberal arts faculty, but neither rank very high.

  12. Literature review: issues surrounding education of English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students.

    PubMed

    Choi, Liza Lai Shan

    2005-07-01

    Examined in this article are the challenges faced by English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students. Nursing faculties need to address these challenges to meet the increasing diversity of the health care system. A key concern is the ability of ESL nursing students to communicate effectively in English. The Cummins model for English language acquisition provides a template for ESL nursing students to bridge this communication barrier. The literature suggests some particular needs of ESL nursing students can be met through modification of nursing programs. Further research into factors affecting the quality of nursing education for ESL students is warranted. A quantitative analysis is required to see if there exists a positive correlation between improved English language acquisition and academic success by ESL nursing students.

  13. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice.

  14. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice. PMID:25042741

  15. [Education-learning strategies according to nursing students' perception].

    PubMed

    Moura, Elaine Cristina Carvalho; Mesquita, Lúcia de Fátima Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    The process of teaching consists in determining the entire procedure of education seeking more efficient methods to provide the society of formation. The objective was to evaluate the perception of students of the nursing undergraduate program on the teaching learning strategies experienced. The research is qualitative research which data were collected by a semi-structured interview applied to 12 nursing students. It was made by the content analysis. The data collected led to two categories with their units of analysis. The results showed that the practice of alternative education enable the student beyond the scientific-technical teaching for the education of the professional as a human being by participation of students, group interaction and technological innovations.

  16. Clinically Speaking: ESP for Refugee Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Adele G.; Marston, John

    A program designed to provide instruction in specialized English for Southeast Asian and other refugees redeveloping their skills as licensed practical nurses (LPNs) contained two language proficiency tracks and provided language instruction incorporating high school equivalency test practice material in the specialized English course. Technical…

  17. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Student Incivility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Myrna Milwee

    2011-01-01

    Incivility is currently a topic of concern in nursing and higher education. There is a serious and growing concern on college campuses across the United States as many forms of incivility are occurring, ranging from offensive language and rude behavior to hostility and violent behavior. The problem this study addresses is the need for specific…

  18. It's the anxiety: facilitators and inhibitors to nursing students' career interests in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Harris, Scott; Bradshaw, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the rate of recruitment of nursing students into mental health nursing (MHN) is vital to long-term sustainability of health care system support for people diagnosed with mental illness. However MHN is not a popular career path; this raises questions about what attitudes and beliefs may divert or attract students to this specialisation. The current research involved a survey of undergraduate nursing students at a regional university in Australia to clarify the nature of relationships between attitudes (e.g., the value of mental health nursing, stereotypes of people with mental illness) and how they may be antecedents to considering MHN as a career path. Through a structural equation model, it was ascertained that anxiety surrounding mental illness leads to less interest in MHN as a future career and suggests that anxiety is (a) partly due to negative stereotypes, and (b) countered by preparedness for a MHN role. Beliefs on how MHN can make a valuable contribution to people's well-being did not affect interest in pursuing MHN. These findings reconfirm the need to reduce anxiety about mental illness by educational approaches that effectively prepare students for MHN, combined with challenging negative stereotypes. PMID:24350751

  19. Impact of Nursing Learning Environments on Adaptive Competency Development in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laschinger, Heather K. Spence

    1992-01-01

    Kolb's experiential learning theory was used as a framework to study 179 generic baccalaureate students' perceptions of the different types of learning environments and adaptive competencies. Clinical experience and preceptorships contributed more to competency development than did nursing or nonnursing classes. (JOW)

  20. Learning Styles Relevant to Identified Personality Types of Selected Nursing Students and Selected Successful Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Harriette B.

    A study was conducted to determine the Jungian personality types of selected groups of student and registered nurses, to identify their preferred learning styles, to ascertain the relationship between personality type and preferred learning style, and to identify the most productive learning styles for given personality types. Subjects'…

  1. Italian clinical guides' perceptions of their role in student nurses' clinical practicum.

    PubMed

    Quattrin, Rosanna; Zanini, Antonietta; Bulfone, Giampiera; Medves, Antonella; Panariti, Mateo; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is an examination of the clinical guides' views and their role in student nurses' learning. The descriptive survey was conducted in July-September 2006. The sample was composed of 120 clinical guides who answered a questionnaire regarding the last student nurses' clinical practice experience during 2006. Clinical guides are nurses working in the wards who are available to supervise the clinical practice of nursing students, similar to preceptors in the United States. Clinical guides used different teaching strategies to stimulate students in various activities. The study revealed that the role of clinical guide is very important for the students as they develop into professional nurses.

  2. Using Gaming To Help Nursing Students Understand Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Barbara L.; Yankou, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    An ethics game involves nursing students in defending actions in ethics-based scenarios. Benefits include increased confidence, ability to see multiple perspectives, values clarification, and exposure to decision-making models, professional responsibilities, ethical principles, social expectations, and legal requirements. Difficulties include…

  3. Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Communication Process in the Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotecki, Catherine Nuss

    2002-01-01

    Interviews (n=22) and observations (n=14) in clinical settings were coded and analyzed to identify student nurses' problems in communicating with patients and the process of learning solutions. The process involved affirming the self, engaging the patient, experiencing communication breakdown, and refining the repertoire of communication…

  4. Debriefing after Human Patient Simulation and Nursing Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benhuri, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) exercises with life-like computerized manikins provide clinical experiences for nursing students in a safe environment followed by debriefing that promotes learning. Quantitative research in techniques to support learning from debriefing is limited. The purpose of the quantitative quasi-experimental study using a…

  5. Attitudes toward a Simulation Based Chemistry Curriculum for Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit

    Chemistry anxiety exists among nursing students as well as other allied health professions. The causes for this anxiety may be attributed to three variables. Chemistry: (1) is perceived as difficult; (2) involves a multitude of facts; and (3) is not connected to reality. A curriculum with a simulation format has been developed to help Israeli…

  6. Caring for Students with Type 1 Diabetes: School Nurses' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yueh-Ling; Volker, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study used a Husserlian phenomenological approach to obtain an understanding of the essences of five experienced Taiwanese school nurses' lived experience of caring for students with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis entailed a modified method from…

  7. Can YouTube enhance student nurse learning?

    PubMed

    Clifton, Andrew; Mann, Claire

    2011-05-01

    The delivery of nurse education has changed radically in the past two decades. Increasingly, nurse educators are using new technology in the classroom to enhance their teaching and learning. One recent technological development to emerge is the user-generated content website YouTube. Originally YouTube was used as a repository for sharing home-made videos, more recently online content is being generated by political parties, businesses and educationalists. We recently delivered a module to undergraduate student nurses in which the teaching and learning were highly populated with YouTube resources. We found that the use of YouTube videos increased student engagement, critical awareness and facilitated deep learning. Furthermore, these videos could be accessed at any time of the day and from a place to suit the student. We acknowledge that there are some constraints to using YouTube for teaching and learning particularly around the issue of unregulated content which is often misleading, inaccurate or biased. However, we strongly urge nurse educators to consider using YouTube for teaching and learning, in and outside the classroom, to a generation of students who are native of a rapidly changing digital world.

  8. Academic Misconduct among Nursing Students: A Multivariate Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Larry G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using Maslow's Need-Goal Motivation Model, data from 190 nursing students showed moderately high correlation between perceptions of peers' maturity, commitment, and neutralizing attitude and perceptions of peers' engagement in academic misconduct. Neutralization (rationalizing behavior) was the strongest predictor. (SK)

  9. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    PubMed

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team. PMID:27123599

  10. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  11. [The preparatory education of electronic patient record for nursing students before practical nursing training].

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kanayama, Masako; Yoshioka, Makoto; Anan, Ayumi; Takeyama, Yumiko; Kubo, Yoko; Shibata, Hiroko; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2006-12-01

    Preparatory education has been provided for both nursing students and teachers to understand the electronic patient record (EPR) since 2004 when EPR was introduced to the hospitals where students are allocated to undertake their work experience. First, the training and management board contacted our medical information department for an appointment and sent us a working group. They taught the nursing training staff how to use EPR and how to assign students to the proper patient record in the EPR system. Second, as preparatory education for the students, they explained the procedure for the use of EPR and the protection of personal information. Students practiced with training in the EPR system, focusing on the functions which are used frequently in practical tasks. As a result of this preparatory education, students understood the protection of personal information very well, although their understanding of the operation and management of the equipment was relatively poor and adversely affected their practice. We need to review our education contents more often. We also need to examine the present state of understanding of EPR and the problems of teaching in practical nursing training.

  12. Student nurses' attitudes and beliefs about breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Cricco-Lizza, Roberta

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the breast-feeding attitudes and beliefs of students newly enrolled in an urban university baccalaureate nursing program. A qualitative approach was used to conduct in-depth semistructured interviews with 12 students prior to their formal course work in maternal-child nursing. Four themes emerged from the data analysis: 1. Personal experiences are important in the development of breast-feeding attitudes and beliefs. 2. The students generally believed that breast-feeding offered benefits for babies and mothers, but the beliefs were stronger for those who grew up with breast-feeding as the norm. 3. All the students believed that there were barriers to breast-feeding in the United States that they identified as the societal view of the breast, dependence/independence conflicts, and concerns about intimacy. 4. The students identified an educational rather than promotional role for nurses in breast-feeding because of conflicts about personal choice. This study suggests that students need help identifying their attitudes and beliefs about breast-feeding and reflecting how their personal experiences influence breast-feeding promotion.

  13. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  14. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  15. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  16. Factors Influencing Career Decisions: Perspectives of Nursing Students in Three Types of Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Pamala D.; McGill, Joan S.; Palmer, Stephanie J.

    2003-01-01

    North Carolina nursing students (99 baccalaureate, 309 associate degree, and 87 diploma) were surveyed. They were motivated to pursue nursing by past experiences with illness, past health-care work experiences, or family member/friend who was a nurse. Career decisions were also influenced by characteristics of nursing. There were no differences by…

  17. Survey of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Attitudes and Behaviors in Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Bartek, Jean K.; Scott, David M.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2009-01-01

    Statewide nursing student alcohol and other drug (AOD) use attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Response was 929/2017 (46%) (practical nursing [n = 173/301] 57.3%; diploma and associate degree in nursing [n = 282/417] 67.6%; bachelor of science in nursing [n = 474/1299] 36.5%). Nearly 44% reported inadequate substance abuse education. Past-year…

  18. Swedish Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Concept of Health: A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Health is a central and important concept in nursing and nursing education, and has been theorised about in both positive and negative terms. The purpose of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of the concept of health. Design: A phenomenographic research approach was used to understand how nursing students…

  19. Comparison of second-degree and traditional undergraduate nursing students' sense of belonging during clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique

    2013-11-01

    Second-degree undergraduate nursing programs are proliferating throughout Canada. Although these shorter programs are attracting students from a variety of disciplines and professions, a sense of belonging and the meaning or implications of belongingness have not been examined for this unique nursing student cohort. A survey design, using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire, explores second-degree nursing students' sense of belonging, compared with that of 4-year undergraduate nursing students. Overall, second-degree nursing students experienced a sense of belonging during clinical placements to a lesser degree than their counterparts in a traditional nursing program. Providing second-degree students with opportunities to know and create partnerships with nurse educators and staff while on placements, as well as providing them with feedback presented in positive terms, will help these students flourish and engender a greater sense of belonging. PMID:24127179

  20. Stagnant perceptions of nursing among high school students: results of a shadowing intervention study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Gloria; Edwards, Pamela B; Granger, Bradi B

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into high school students' perceptions of the role of the nurse and to explore students' impressions of nursing following a nurse-shadowing intervention. Often nurses abandon staffing positions in the first 1-2 years, reporting a "poor fit" with nursing. Few studies have examined expectations and perceptions of nursing among high school students; a population of potential nurses in whom a more accurate view of nursing opportunities and professionalism may be fostered. High school students from two North Carolina counties participated in a nurse-shadowing intervention. Constant comparison and thematic coding were used for analysis of post-intervention in-depth interviews. Sixteen of 24 students completed the study. Misperception of nursing was the dominant theme. Five sub-themes were professional role responsibility, teamwork, caring relationships, tools and technology, and medication management. Experiential knowledge of nursing was a core need for students interested in nursing careers. These data suggest that a nurse shadowing program may positively influence perceptions of nursing, and may result in improved recruitment and retention in the workplace.

  1. [Inclusive education in nursing: analysis of students' needs].

    PubMed

    Faro, Ana Cristina Mancussi E; Gusmai, Luana de Fátima

    2013-02-01

    Inclusive education is based on assisting all students alike, providing an education aimed at everyone equally in order to identify the particular educational needs of each student. The objectives of the present study were to identify the occurrence of disabilities, explore the learning resources that allow for inclusion; identify the architectural, communication, educational and attitudinal barriers that may affect students' performance; and discuss the students' suggestions of how to promote inclusion. This exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed using a quantitative approach. Data collection was performed through interviewing undergraduate nursing students, using a questionnaire containing open- and closed-ended questions. It was found that 66.3% of students have a visual impairment and 1.2% reported having a hearing impairment, but no physical disability was reported. Architectural barriers were the most frequently mentioned by the interviewed students, followed by educational barriers. PMID:23515825

  2. The practice of recruitment and selection of student nurses at a college of nursing in Kwazulu/Natal.

    PubMed

    Mtetwa, T E; Mashaba, T G

    1997-09-01

    This is a report on a study that was conducted to obtain the nurse-educators and student nurses' views regarding recruitment and selection techniques used at a particular college of nursing to attract school leavers for nurse training. A survey was conducted on a sample of forty student nurses at their third and fourth year level of training as well as twenty nurse-educators. Analysis of findings revealed that a substantial number of nurse-educators were not well versed with the selection policy followed at the college. Furthermore, it showed that recruitment was not done and that the selection criteria used were not relevant to the nature and scope of the curriculum of the four year comprehensive diploma course.

  3. [Characteristics of interpersonal skills of nurses: study with undergraduate nursing students].

    PubMed

    Munari, Denize Bouttelet; da Costa, Hérica Kelly; Cardoso, Adriane Helena Alves; Almeida, Carlos Cristiano Oliveira de Faria

    2003-01-01

    This article has a quality and quantity-based approach, performed among nursing undergraduate students, whose objective was to identify features that constitute interpersonal competency, starting with a group laboratory, where data were collected at two points in time by means of a survey. The results have shown hard to perform characteristics obtained through practice, such as: resistance to stress, initiative, flexibility, and conflict resolution. The characteristics easily developed were: self-confidence, ability to listen, and ability to compete. We have reached the conclusion that those characteristics can and must be further explored over undergraduate studies as a means to strengthen nurses' managerial performance. PMID:15199827

  4. Comparison of Students in Three Different Levels of Nursing Education on Biographical, Cognitive Structure, Perception of Environment, Personality-Value Structure and Attitudes toward Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurhellen, Joan H.

    A comparison was made of nursing students entering five nursing schools (three diploma programs, one associate degree program, and one baccalaureate) in the Memphis, Tennessee, area in 1974 and 1975. The study was undertaken to compare nursing students in three levels of nursing education on five clusters of variables deemed to influence learning…

  5. The experience of nursing students in an online doctoral program in nursing: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Halter, Margaret Jordan; Kleiner, Catherine; Hess, Rosanna Formanek

    2006-01-01

    The increased sophistication of technology has led to greater use of distance learning, providing graduate nursing students with increased access to such programs, while more easily maintaining employment. Little information is available regarding the experience for those students enrolled on these programs. This information would be of value to both those who are considering online courses, and to those who are charged with developing and teaching these courses. A phenomenological approach was used in order to examine the experience of five students enrolled in an online doctoral program in nursing in the United States. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed for themes from which three main ones emerged as the essence of the experience: considering the fit, liking the fit, and making it fit. Recommendations are provided for future research pertaining to distance education, particularly in the form of graduate outcomes.

  6. Oral health education for pediatric nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Golinveaux, Jay; Gerbert, Barbara; Cheng, Jing; Duderstadt, Karen; Alkon, Abbey; Mullen, Shirin; Lin, Brent; Miller, Arthur; Zhan, Ling

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners' knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits. PMID:23658403

  7. A collective case study of nursing students with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kolanko, Kathrine M

    2003-01-01

    This collective case study described the meaning of being a nursing student with a learning disability and examined how baccalaureate nursing students with learning disabilities experienced various aspects of the nursing program. It also examined how their disabilities and previous educational and personal experiences influenced the meaning that they gave to their educational experiences. Seven nursing students were interviewed, completed a demographic data form, and submitted various artifacts (test scores, evaluation reports, and curriculum-based material) for document analysis. The researcher used Stake's model for collective case study research and analysis (1). Data analysis revealed five themes: 1) struggle, 2) learning how to learn with LD, 3) issues concerning time, 4) social support, and 5) personal stories. Theme clusters and individual variations were identified for each theme. Document analysis revealed that participants had average to above average intellectual functioning with an ability-achievement discrepancy among standardized test scores. Participants noted that direct instruction, structure, consistency, clear directions, organization, and a positive instructor attitude assisted learning. Anxiety, social isolation from peers, and limited time to process and complete work were problems faced by the participants. PMID:14535146

  8. Problem based learning in mental health nursing: the students' experience.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Carol; Carver, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is well established within the field of health-care education for professionals worldwide, although little has been done to explore the experiences of students undertaking a PBL course in mental health nursing. Without firm evidence of the benefits of PBL, educationalists in mental health might be reluctant to view it as an option in curricula design. This U.K. study examined the experiences of pre-registration post-graduate mental health student nurses undertaking a 2-year educational course in which all teaching and assessment followed a PBL philosophy. Focus groups were used throughout the course to elicit in-depth qualitative data that was analysed by applying a constant comparative method. The analysis of the data uncovered the following broad themes: 'moves to autonomy, 'surviving the groups' and 'the impact of PBL'. The findings show that participants had mainly positive experiences and gained a range of study and interpersonal skills central to mental health nursing. Participants described initial anxieties resulting from engagement in PBL. However, they increasingly gained confidence in this approach, exercising increasing control over the PBL process. Despite this increased autonomy, participants continued to value the input of skilled facilitators. A recurring issue centred on the potential for interpersonal conflict within the student group and its impact on their learning. It is suggested that more research is needed examining the use of PBL in mental health nursing. PMID:22313509

  9. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions

    PubMed Central

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Nurses play a major role in Thailand’s health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1) compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2) explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level. Methods A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents’ background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. Results A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being “confident” or “very confident” in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of “public health competency” than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in “clinical competency” between the two groups. Conclusion Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than those from public institutions, particularly with regard to public health. This phenomenon might have arisen because private nursing students had greater experience of diverse working environments during their training. One of the key limitations of this study was that the results were based on the subjective self-assessment of the respondents, which might risk respondent bias. Further studies that evaluate current nursing curricula in both

  10. Fostering Interdisciplinary Communication between Pharmacy and Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Kiersma, Mary E.; Keib, Carrie N.; Cailor, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate pharmacy and nursing student self-perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, faculty member perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, and changes in those skills after increasing the interdisciplinary education content. Design. Two cohorts of pharmacy and nursing (bachelors of science in nursing, BSN) students in respective, semester-long research courses engaged in active learning on interdisciplinary communication, with the second cohort receiving additional content on the topic. At semester completion, students presented a research project at an interdisciplinary poster session. Assessment. Self-, peer-, and faculty evaluations (4 items; 5-point Likert-type) assessing self-confidence and actual interdisciplinary communication skills were completed during the poster session. Overall, students responded they were “very confident” or “extremely confident” regarding the skills, with greater confidence reported by the second cohort. Faculty members agreed that students exhibited effective interdisciplinary communication skills, with stronger agreement for the second cohort. Conclusion. Including interdisciplinary education and experiences in a curriculum increases students’ interdisciplinary communication skills. Using multiple interdisciplinary experiences may result in greater increases in these skills. PMID:26430270

  11. Evaluating learning opportunities offered to mental health nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nganasurian, W E

    1998-10-01

    This article is based upon a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of Anglia Polytechnic University for the degree of Master of Philosophy. The study, completed in 1997, sought to identify factors making a positive contribution to learning within mental health care settings, and, having done this, to develop a means of auditing. Phase One drew on published work; however, it was necessary to determine the contextual validity of factors shown by colleagues to be conductive to learning, since the focus of this earlier work was, in the main, within general adult nursing. Information on the relevance of these factors was obtained from a sample (n = 146) of mental health nursing students, qualified staff, and teachers who responded to a self-completion postal survey, using a questionnaire as the research instrument. Phase Two drew upon the work completed in Phase One. A Likert-type scale audit instrument was developed and administered to a sample (n = 51) of mental health nursing students. In order to test the reliability of this instrument, students'verbal ratings of the quality of their learning experience were compared to numerical ratings provided by the audit instrument resultant from this study. Findings suggest that the instrument provides an effective, efficient means of evaluating learning environments from an individual student's perspective, and as a cumulative profile of student, practice setting and supervisors operating within it. This enables educationalists to identify standards which may be incorporated into future education/service provider contracting arrangements.

  12. Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.

    PubMed

    Ares, Terri L

    2014-11-01

    Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design.

  13. Physical education issues for students with autism: school nurse challenges.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Elaine M; Brimer, Debbie

    2014-08-01

    Extant studies indicate persons with autism have difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, repetitive behaviors, and poor ability to generalize learned skills. Obesity has also been identified as significantly affecting children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Negative experience in physical education (PE) may be the antecedent behavior to lack of activities that are mediators to sedentary lifestyles and contributors to the chronic illnesses associated with overweight and obesity. Students with ASD often cannot perform required activities to meet required PE standards. It is imperative school nurses be aware of the many challenges students with ASD bring into a PE class. School nurses provide education for the members of the school community, including the Individualized Education Plan team, regarding the need for attention to limitations, including physical activity, of students with ASD.

  14. Mentorship part 2: assessing pre-registration student nurses.

    PubMed

    Vinales, James Jude

    The role of the mentor has been evolving since it was introduced following Project 2000 in 1986. The role that mentors of pre-registration nursing students are tasked with on a daily basis is crucial to the overall assessment of the student nurse. Assessment and the importance of the mentor's role when assessing the students in practice will be discussed in this article. The reliability and validity of assessment and the mentor's responsibility in assessing the competencies in the learning environment is explored, together with the roles of formative and summative assessment. The introduction of the sign-off mentor and the ongoing achievement record as part of the assessment process will also be explored. It can be argued that mentoring is not a simple task, and that there are a number of barriers to successful assessment.

  15. Teaching Psychology to Student Nurses: The Use of "Talking Head" Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Tait, Desiree J. R.; Tait, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a central part of undergraduate nursing curricula in the UK. However, student nurses report difficulties recognising the relevance and value of psychology. We sought to strengthen first-year student nurses' application of psychology by developing a set of digital stories based around "Talking Head" video clips where…

  16. The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Who Study Abroad: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Michelle Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Nurse Researchers need to explore study abroad programs and identify their impact on the development of cultural competence and global perspectives in nursing students. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of nursing students who study abroad and to identify benefits and impediments that may be used to spawn future…

  17. Student Nurses' Cultural Perceptions and Insights Regarding an Educational Experience in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Kodi; Melgard, Margaret; Trebil, Michelle; Meuer, Loretta

    2002-01-01

    Presents the stories of three student nurses who participated in an international nursing experience. They designed a pediatric module and taught it to Russian health care providers, while living with Russian host families. Stresses the importance of taking multicultural courses in order to prepare student nurses for the diverse world in which…

  18. Effectiveness of a Simulated Hospital Day with Undergraduate Student Nurses: A Comparative Descriptive Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholeben, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, outside forces create blocks that affect the quality and quantity of clinical experiences for pre-licensure nursing students. These limitations create an environment in which entry-level nursing students enter the workforce without a solid foundation in nursing concepts or in exposure to situations that they might encounter. To counter…

  19. Bridging Community Generational Gaps through Experiential Learning: A College Nursing Student Practicum for Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Jane D.

    2013-01-01

    At the study site, an elder care practicum was adopted after nursing students demonstrated a lack of interest in the well-being of elderly patients. The purpose of the study was to determine if there was a change in college nursing students' attitudes toward nursing home residents as a result of increased intergenerational exposure following…

  20. Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Florin, Jan; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Bååth, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs) about preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). PU prevention behaviours in the clinical practice of RNs and ANs were also explored. A descriptive, comparative multicentre study was performed. Hospital wards and universities from four Swedish county councils participated. In total, 415 participants (RN, AN and SN) completed the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool. The mean knowledge score for the sample was 58·9%. The highest scores were found in the themes 'nutrition' (83·1%) and 'risk assessment' (75·7%). The lowest scores were found in the themes 'reduction in the amount of pressure and shear' (47·5%) and 'classification and observation' (55·5%). RNs and SNs had higher scores than ANs on 'aetiology and causes'. SNs had higher scores than RNs and ANs on 'nutrition'. It has been concluded that there is a knowledge deficit in PU prevention among nursing staff in Sweden. A major educational campaign needs to be undertaken both in hospital settings and in nursing education.