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Sample records for accelerated nursing students

  1. Comparison of Generic Accelerated Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaddorura, Mahmood; Williams, Collette

    2012-01-01

    Case study pedagogy is a teaching strategy in which teachers hope to help students develop and use critical thinking (CT) abilities. This study compared CT skills of 75 second year generic accelerated baccalaureate nursing students during their Fundamentals of Nursing course before and after being educated using case study pedagogical method.…

  2. Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Perceptions of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozen, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Although there are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated nursing students, few empirical studies have been undertaken to examine these students' success, despite this type of programs' existence for more than a decade, and only three studies have sought to examine the perspective of the…

  3. Becoming a nurse: role formation among accelerated baccalaureate students.

    PubMed

    Ostrogorsky, Tanya L; Raber, Anjanette M; McKinley Yoder, Claire; Nielsen, Ann E; Lutz, Kristin F; Wros, Peggy L

    2015-01-01

    To understand nursing role formation for students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, end-of-term narrative reflections from 34 students were analyzed over the course of the 15-month program. Using thematic analysis, 4 major themes were identified: evolving role perception, extending nursing student-patient interaction, engaging with health care team and systems of care, and expanding clinical thinking.

  4. Accelerated nursing students and theater students: creating a safe environment by acting the part.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Pamela R

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to teaching basic nursing skills are being questioned for accelerated, or second-degree, nursing students. Since accelerated nursing students have demonstrated the ability to quickly assimilate new information and to transfer skills from a previous career into a new field, it is thought that they may benefit from teaching strategies that promote experiential learning. Through a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, this study inquired into the experiences of 22 accelerated baccalaureate nursing students to determine if narrative learning in a campus laboratory setting helped them integrate content from classroom and clinical practica and move quickly along the pathway to the competencies that are needed for safe nursing practice. Data analysis revealed the teaching/learning significance of narratives for these students and is identified in the theme, "Creating a Safe Environment".

  5. A Nationwide Comparison of Academic Achievement between Accelerated and Traditional BSN Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    A call for more baccalaureate-prepared nurses to assuage the predicted nursing shortage has resulted in the rapid proliferation of accelerated Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN) programs in the United States. Academic success of accelerated students has not been adequately measured nor compared to traditional BSN students on a national level.…

  6. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  7. Using student satisfaction data to evaluate a new online accelerated nursing education program.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Matthias, April

    2016-10-01

    As increasing numbers of students enroll in online education, institutions of higher education are responsible for delivering quality online courses and programs. Agencies that accredit institutions and programs require evidence of program quality, including student satisfaction. A large state university in the Southeastern United States transitioned an online nursing education degree completion, or Registered Nurse-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing, program to an online accelerated format in order to meet the needs of working nurses and ultimately, increase the number of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level. This article describes a descriptive, cross-sectional study that evaluated the effectiveness of the new online accelerated program using the quality indicator of student satisfaction. Ninety-one (32%) of the 284 students who were enrolled or had been enrolled in a course within the online accelerated degree completion program between fall 2013 session 1 and summer 2014 session participated in the study. The electronic Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners™ was used to measure student satisfaction with the program and associated services. Results provided insight into the students' satisfaction with the new program format and served as the basis for an interdepartmental program enhancement plan aimed at maintaining and enhancing student satisfaction and overall program quality. Findings indicated that measuring and evaluating student satisfaction can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of an online program. Recommendations for using the measurement tool in online program planning and studying student satisfaction in relation to retention and program completion were identified.

  8. Curriculum design to promote the critical thinking of accelerated bachelor's degree nursing students.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, Barbara B

    2006-01-01

    This project describes the curriculum design of an accelerated bachelor's degree nursing program intended to promote the critical thinking of its students. Course objectives and teaching-learning strategies are described. Rogers' unitary view of human beings supports critical thinking as a developing process that should be measured in the context of nursing practice. Pre- and post-program critical thinking test scores indicated significant growth for the 38 graduates in the first 4 consecutive classes tested.

  9. Accelerated second-degree nursing students: predictors of graduation and NCLEX-RN first-time pass rates.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara B; Harris, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand and identify factors that affect students' academic performance before entry into a nursing program and as they progress through the program. The authors discuss a study, and its outcomes, that assessed accelerated second-degree nursing students' prenursing and core nursing grades that served to predict their success at completing the nursing program and passing NCLEX-RN on first attempt. Strategies were identified to help at-risk students to be successful in the program and with first-time passage of NCLEX-RN.

  10. Nurses on the move: evaluation of a program to assist international students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing program.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Carmel; Rolls, Colleen; Campbell, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Scheme (TALES) program designed to meet the unique need of the 2005 cohort of international nursing students undertaking an accelerated Bachelor of Nursing (BN) program at the Victorian campus of Australian Catholic University (ACU) National. The program involved a team approach with three academic mentors and the international students working together to produce satisfactory learning outcomes through fortnightly meetings and provision of additional assistance including compiling a portfolio, reflective writing, English, including colloquial English and pronunciation, as well as familiarisation with handover and abbreviations common in the clinical field, general communication, assistance with preparing a resume and participation in simulated interviews. This relatively small group of international students (20) confirmed the findings of other studies from other countries of international nursing students' in terms of concerns in regard to studying in a foreign country, namely English proficiency, communication difficulties, cultural differences and unfamiliarity with the health care environment. The assistance provided by the program was identified by the completing students as invaluable in helping them settle into study and successfully complete the theoretical and clinical components of the course.

  11. Using a dedicated education unit clinical education model with second-degree accelerated nursing program students.

    PubMed

    Sharpnack, Patricia A; Koppelman, Catherine; Fellows, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    Rising health care costs have underscored the need for new graduates to effectively transition to professional practice. Effective academic-practice partnerships, such as dedicated education units (DEUs), can be useful in facilitating the transfer of knowledge from the classroom to the clinical setting. This randomized experimental study found the DEU clinical model to be valuable in facilitating the transfer of knowledge in second-degree accelerated program students as evaluated by course, simulation, and standardized assessment scores and self-evaluations. Successful transition to clinical practice is reported by practice partners; time allotted for orientation program requirements was reduced and retention on the unit of hire was improved. Additional research is needed to understand the effectiveness of second-degree accelerated nursing programs and how to revise the clinical education element of the program to meet the unique needs of these students.

  12. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  13. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  14. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  15. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  16. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  17. Competence of accelerated second degree students after studying in a collaborative model of nursing practice education.

    PubMed

    Raines, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    The article, "CAN-Care: An Innovative Model of Practice-Based Learning" was published in the International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship in 2006 (Article 20). Reported in this paper are the findings of a program evaluation study with 58 participants who completed a survey questionnaire at the end of the program of study and six-months post graduation. The data reveal that the model resulted in graduates who perceived themselves to be competent and effectively prepared for real-world nursing practice. This is contrary to the existing literature which reports graduates' perceived lack of readiness for RN practice. The participants in this study also identified the opportunity to work with a consistent unit-based nurse and having the nursing practice course experiences on consecutive days and for the entire 12-hour shift as significant factors in the effectiveness of their learning experience.

  18. Nursing students and Haiku.

    PubMed

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  19. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  20. Meeting the nursing faculty shortage challenge: an accelerated doctoral program in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Teresa; Stotts, Nancy A; Fontaine, Dorrie

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation partnered with a major west coast school of nursing to create an accelerated doctoral program in nursing. The program's chief aim was to address the nursing shortage by increasing the number of nurse faculty by funding 42 doctoral students in five cohorts. Students accepted into the accelerated program receive a generous stipend and commit to earn their doctorate in 3 years and teach for 3 years after graduation at 1 of 17 area nursing programs. Two cohorts have graduated from the accelerated program and are currently in faculty positions. This article describes the accelerated doctoral program and the academic progression and postgraduation employment of the first two cohorts.

  1. Learning preference as a predictor of academic performance in first year accelerated graduate entry nursing students: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jane; Salamonson, Yenna; Rolley, John X; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-08-01

    The growth of accelerated graduate entry nursing programs has challenged traditional approaches to teaching and learning. To date, limited research has been undertaken in the role of learning preferences, language proficiency and academic performance in accelerated programs. Sixty-two first year accelerated graduate entry nursing students, in a single cohort at a university in the western region of Sydney, Australia, were surveyed to assess their learning preference using the Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinaesthetic (VARK) learning preference questionnaire, together with sociodemographic data, English language acculturation and perceived academic control. Six months following course commencement, the participant's grade point average (GPA) was studied as a measurement of academic performance. A 93% response rate was achieved. The majority of students (62%) reported preference for multiple approaches to learning with the kinaesthetic sensory mode a significant (p=0.009) predictor of academic performance. Students who spoke only English at home had higher mean scores across two of the four categories of VARK sensory modalities, visual and kinaesthetic compared to those who spoke non-English. Further research is warranted to investigate the reasons why the kinaesthetic sensory mode is a predictor of academic performance and to what extent the VARK mean scores of the four learning preference(s) change with improved English language proficiency.

  2. Nursing student attitudes toward statistics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lizy; Aktan, Nadine M

    2014-04-01

    Nursing is guided by evidence-based practice. To understand and apply research to practice, nurses must be knowledgeable in statistics; therefore, it is crucial to promote a positive attitude toward statistics among nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative cross-sectional study was to assess differences in attitudes toward statistics among undergraduate nursing, graduate nursing, and undergraduate non-nursing students. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics Scale-36 (SATS-36) was used to measure student attitudes, with higher scores denoting more positive attitudes. The convenience sample was composed of 175 students from a public university in the northeastern United States. Statistically significant relationships were found among some of the key demographic variables. Graduate nursing students had a significantly lower score on the SATS-36, compared with baccalaureate nursing and non-nursing students. Therefore, an innovative nursing curriculum that incorporates knowledge of student attitudes and key demographic variables may result in favorable outcomes.

  3. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  4. Classroom performance system use in an accelerated graduate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Corinne; Joiner Rogers, Glenda; Volker, Deborah; Ramberg, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Many students who enter accelerated nursing programs have not been exposed to the analysis, prediction, and decision-making skills needed by today's RN. To foster practice with complex concepts in the classroom and to give teachers immediate feedback about student in-class mastery of core material, use of an audience participation system within the classroom may be useful. This article reports the implementation of a classroom performance system and the results ofa program evaluation project designed to capture the system's impact on student and faculty satisfaction and student learning outcomes. Project results and implications for further work are presented.

  5. Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs: Insights into Teaching and Learning Experiences. New Careers in Nursing. Research Report. ETS RR-15-29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millett, Catherine M.; Stickler, Leslie M.; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-01-01

    The Study of Teaching and Learning in Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs explores how nurse educators are adapting their teaching practices for accelerated, second-degree nursing program students. To provide findings on topics including instructional practices and the roles and attitudes of faculty, a web survey was administered to almost 100…

  6. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  7. Funding an accelerated baccalaureate nursing track for non-nursing college graduates: an academic/practice collaboration.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, Gail P; Oberleitner, Melinda G

    2011-01-01

    To expand nursing programs to better meet workforce demands, nursing education must offer nontraditional students more educational opportunities that are flexible, streamlined, and low cost. Accelerated programs, particularly programs tailored to attract individuals with degrees in other fields and looking for career changes, are great examples. The cost factors related to a successful accelerated degree program designed for non-nursing college graduates are described. Based on the experiences with a previously implemented accelerated BSN program offered from 1987-1994 at one university, a revised accelerated option model was developed that included ongoing involvement with four community hospitals, shared budget responsibilities, student stipends, and a 3-year work commitment by graduates at a sponsoring hospital. The investment of approximately $1.6 million over 7 years resulted in the education and graduation of 75 new registered nursing professionals to meet the health care needs of the citizens of the community.

  8. Nursing students with latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Harshberger, Lorri A

    2012-11-01

    Latex allergy affects millions of people in the general population and a higher percentage of health care workers. Nursing students with a latex sensitivity pose a unique challenge for the nurse educator. Students may enter the program with pre-existing latex allergy or develop the allergy during the educational process. This manuscript explores the implications of latex allergies exhibited by the nursing student. It addresses the responsibilities of the educator in the skills or simulation laboratory and during clinical learning experiences. It also offers suggestions for ensuring the safety of the student while reducing the legal liabilities of the educational program. The article addresses possible policy ramifications for nursing schools.

  9. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  14. [Compassionate care for student nurses].

    PubMed

    Cann, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are practising in a work environment which is sometimes difficult and which can affect their capacity to supervise students. They may sometimes find themselves taking out their frustration on these students. By being better trained in the specificities of adult learning, frontline professionals and tutors could find it easier to adopt a compassionate care attitude towards nursing students, an essential condition for the development of their skills.

  15. High Test Anxiety among Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard; Evans, Ginger; Ramsey, Gary; Wheeler, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Nursing programs can be highly stressful, and the investigation was undertaken to see if nursing students are more test anxious than students in other fields. The Westside Test Anxiety Scale has administered to 298 nursing students at two colleges, and to a comparison group of 471 high school and college students. Fully 30% of nursing students…

  16. How do nursing students perceive substance abusing nurses?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Martha A; Nosek, Laura J

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse among nurses was recognized by nurse leaders and professional nursing organizations as a growing threat to patient safety and to the health of the abusing nurse more than 30years ago. Although numerous studies on nurse impairment were published in the 1980s and 1990s, there was minimal focus on student nurses' perceptions about impaired nurses and less research has been published more recently, despite a growing rate of substance abuse. A quasi-experimental study to explore the perceptions of student nurses toward nurses who are chemically dependent was conducted using a two-group, pretest-posttest design. The Perception of Nurse Impairment Inventory (PNII) was completed by student nurses at the beginning of their junior course work, prior to formal education about substance abuse. The PNII was repeated after the students received substance abuse education. The PNII was also completed by a control group of sophomore student nurses who did not receive the formal substance abuse education. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to measure the differences between the two groups of students. Students who received the education chose more compassionate responses on the PNII and were more likely to respond that an impaired nurse's supervisor is responsible for supporting and guiding the impaired nurse to access professional care. Discrepancies in study findings about the efficacy of education for effecting positive attitudes of student nurses toward impaired nurses may be related to the length and type of the education.

  17. Teaching Ethics to Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Joyce E.; Thompson, Henry O.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the ethics content to be taught in nursing education and the goals of ethics education for both undergraduate and graduate students. Teacher qualifications and evaluation of learning are also considered. (CH)

  18. Recruiting Students into Nursing: Prior Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Opal S.

    1983-01-01

    Raises fundamental questions regarding student recruitment: (1) why recruit students into nursing? (2) what are the issues that determine whether a school should have a nursing program? and (3) what are students being recruited into? (JOW)

  19. Student Immersion in Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Monahan, Janean; Poly-Droulard, Lynda; Prechowski, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    The aging workforce and the lack of perioperative clinical practice and theoretical content in nursing education programs are factors contributing to the perioperative nursing shortage. This article discusses the implementation of a creatively designed perioperative program, which includes a didactic course and a 210-hour clinical course, developed by the faculty members of a Michigan school of nursing in collaboration with administrators at area hospitals. The didactic content covers materials presented during the first three months of orientation for newly employed perioperative nurses. Interested baccalaureate nursing students in their senior year are selected to participate in the program after being interviewed by hospital personnel and university faculty members. To date, the program has 18 student graduates in two semesters; all have been offered positions in the perioperative setting, and 14 have accepted positions. The active learning strategies used in the course are described with examples.

  20. Program Evaluation: Accelerating Retained Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juneau, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the first year of an acceleration program that allowed students who were retained a grade level for not performing on academic level in early elementary school an opportunity to rejoin their age appropriate class. The primary focus of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an…

  1. Nursing students' mathematic calculation skills.

    PubMed

    Rainboth, Lynde; DeMasi, Chris

    2006-12-01

    This mixed method study used a pre-test/post-test design to evaluate the efficacy of a teaching strategy in improving beginning nursing student learning outcomes. During a 4-week student teaching period, a convenience sample of 54 sophomore level nursing students were required to complete calculation assignments, taught one calculation method, and mandated to attend medication calculation classes. These students completed pre- and post-math tests and a major medication mathematic exam. Scores from the intervention student group were compared to those achieved by the previous sophomore class. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-test and the students who received the intervention had statistically significantly higher scores on the major medication calculation exam than did the students in the control group. The evaluation completed by the intervention group showed that the students were satisfied with the method and outcome.

  2. Implementing Collaborative Learning in Prelicensure Nursing Curricula: Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schoening, Anne M; Selde, M Susan; Goodman, Joely T; Tow, Joyce C; Selig, Cindy L; Wichman, Chris; Cosimano, Amy; Galt, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated learning outcomes and student perceptions of collaborative learning in an undergraduate nursing program. Participants in this 3-phase action research study included students enrolled in a traditional and an accelerated nursing program. The number of students who passed the unit examination was not significantly different between the 3 phases. Students had positive and negative perceptions about the use of collaborative learning.

  3. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  4. Understanding Nursing Students' Stress: A Proposed Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V.

    1998-01-01

    The Adaptation Nursing Model suggests that nursing students' level of adaptation to stress is influenced by their hardiness and use of social resources. Faculty can use the information to facilitate students' coping. (SK)

  5. [The student nurse faced with ethical dilemmas].

    PubMed

    Coudurier, Doriane

    2015-12-01

    Although student nurses are taught ethics, the theoretical dimension is not enough. Students must be given support and guidance in their practice to enable them to carry out ethical reflection and to adapt their nursing approach.

  6. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Dianati, Mansur

    2005-01-01

    Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care. PMID:16011800

  7. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  8. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  9. The Stress Sources of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oner Altiok, Hatice; Ustun, Besti

    2013-01-01

    Overall, nursing training is a stressful process. Especially when second year nursing students are evaluated within the professional socialization theory, they are stated to be affected by these sources of stress more negatively. This research was carried out in order to determine the stress sources of second year nursing students. 15 nursing…

  10. Student Nurses' Perception of Death and Dying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederriter, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    Student nurses are involved in caring for patients who are actively dying or who have been told they have a terminal illness and are faced with the process of dying. Students encounter these patients in hospitals, nursing homes, at home or in hospice care settings. According to Robinson (2004), "nurses are the healthcare providers that are most…

  11. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them.

  12. Patient Deception: Nursing Students' Beliefs and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Drew A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined nursing students' beliefs about indicators of deception and their attitudes toward patient deception. Fifty-eight participants from various nursing programs at a southwestern university completed a Detection of Deception Questionnaire and Attitudes Toward Patient Deception Scale. Findings indicated that nursing students have a number of inaccurate beliefs about deception and possess a number of negative attitudes toward patients who lie. Implications for nursing education are discussed.

  13. Factors affecting assertiveness among student nurses.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sanaa Abd El Azim

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting assertiveness among student nurses. The study was carried out at Faculty of Nursing, Port-Said University, on 207 student nurses from four different grades. Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, consisted of 30 items, was used to measure the students' assertiveness level and a 12-item scale developed by Spreitzer was used to measure students' psychological empowerment. The study results showed that 60.4% of the students were assertive, while about half of the students were empowered. A positive relation between student assertiveness and psychological empowerment was detected. Moreover, positive relations regarding family income and students' assertiveness and psychological empowerment were determined. The study recommended introduction of specific courses aiming at enhancing the acquisition of assertiveness skills, in addition, nurse educators must motivate their students to express their opinion and personal rights and also they must pay attention for students' empowerment and enhance students' autonomy.

  14. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses…

  15. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  16. Nursing as career choice: perceptions of Turkish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Başkale, Hatice; Serçekuş, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of nursing influence their choice of nursing as a career and whether they remain in the profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of entry-level male and female nursing students and the reasons for choosing nursing as a career. A qualitative approach was used by focus group interviews with 31 nursing students, and socio-demographic data were collected by questionnaire. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data, and findings were grouped into categories and themes. The first category was 'choosing', which included the themes of 'desire to help', 'satisfactory income, and guaranteed employment', 'influence of family and friends' and 'being in a health-related profession'. The second category was 'others' reactions, which included the single theme 'response'. The third category was 'the image of nursing' which included the themes of 'job description' and 'gender'. The study concluded that although a growing amount of male students are enrolling in nursing programs, stereotypical ideas persist, and nursing is considered a female-dominated profession. There is further need to track student experiences during or after clinical practice and explore whether students' perceptions change over time.

  17. Professional nursing values among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, May H L; Lam, Lai Wah; Lee, Iris F K; Chien, Wai Tong; Chau, Janita P C; Ip, Wan Yim

    2008-01-01

    The development of a nursing code of professional conduct is to guide nurses to make appropriate clinical decision, in particular when facing ethical dilemma. It is of paramount importance that nurse educators understand baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the importance of the code of professional conduct and the level of difficulties in implementing this code while preparing them for future practicing nurses. The Code of Professional Conduct in Hong Kong has been developed to guide nursing practice for over two decades. Nevertheless, no study has examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' perception about this professional code. The aim of this paper was to examine the perceptions of 263 baccalaureate nursing students about this professional code using a cross sectional survey design. The results indicated that most items in the professional code were rated as important and "provide safe and competent care" was rated as the most important one. A few areas that the students perceived as difficult to implement were discussed and future research was recommended. The significant differences identified among students from different years of study also highlighted areas for consideration in planning educational program to further equip students with the ability to deal with challenges in professional practice.

  18. Nursing students' perceptions about nursing care plans: a Turkish perspective.

    PubMed

    Can, Gulbeyaz; Erol, Ozgul

    2012-02-01

    This descriptive study was planned in order to assess self-perceived sufficiency levels of nursing students at preparing nursing care plans and also determine the effect of these plans on students' occupational development. Sample of the study was consisted of 55 nursing students who were taking oncological training. Data were collected by using Personal Information Form and Student Care Plan Evaluation Form. Non-parametric tests were used in data analysis. Students perceived themselves 'insufficient' although assessing reproductive neurological and cardiovascular systems, respectively, and also interpreting results of hemogram and urine tests. No significant difference was found between the initial and last nursing care plans prepared by the students during clinical training. Sixty % of students reported that preparing and implementing nursing care plans had favourable effects on their occupational development. Results suggest that students should be well prepared before clinical training programmes and also nursing care plans should be revised and used in more proper and practical ways in order to enhance students' occupational development.

  19. Nursing students' expectations of the college experience.

    PubMed

    Zysberg, Leehu; Zisberg, Anna

    2008-09-01

    Nursing students' expectations of college have not received much attention in the empirical literature. These expectations may be important in better understanding nurses' motivations, role acquisition, and academic and professional success. The first study discussed in this article examined the reliability and construct validity of an instrument designed to assess students' (N = 95) expectations of their college experience. The results indicate good reliability and validity. The second study discussed in this article examined differences in expectations, comparing nursing and non-nursing students (N = 160) in an urban college setting. The results suggest expectations emphasizing practical and professional aspects (i.e., acquiring a profession, earning more money), followed by self-betterment and social life expectations. Nursing students differed from non-nursing students by reporting higher self-betterment and professional expectations but lower academic expectations. Implications for application and further research are discussed.

  20. [Nursing tutor, working closely with students].

    PubMed

    Pilot, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Appreciating the chance to work independently as well as interacting with the different nursing teams in her hospital, a nursing tutor tells us of the pleasure she gets out of dedicating herself to supporting student nurses. A way of approaching care from a different perspective.

  1. Fundraising for Accelerated Study for the PhD in Nursing: A Community Partnership.

    PubMed

    Starck, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    This article describes fundraising strategies by a School of Nursing to support a post-master's accelerated (3-year) PhD degree program. A sample proposal to solicit funds is included, as well as a contract that students sign before accepting the scholarship and agreeing to teach for 3 years or repay the money. The first campaign raised $2.3 million for ten students, and the second campaign raised $1.3 million for six students. One useful marketing strategy is to show the impact of an investment in educating ten doctoral students who will become faculty and teach 100 additional students per year, who will then become professionals caring for thousands of patients during their careers. Over a 10 year period, the impact of an accelerated program is enormous, with 660 students taught who in their lifetime will care for 2.4 million patients. The article also discusses motivation and mind sets for giving to promote success in fundraising.

  2. Experiences and emotions of faculty teaching in accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Cheryl L; Boellaard, Melissa R; Zorn, Cecelia R

    2013-07-01

    The number of accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing (ASBSN) programs has mushroomed over recent decades, with more than 225 currently in existence. Scholars have described students and programs, but research examining the faculty experience is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and emotions of faculty teaching students in ASBSN programs. Using a descriptive qualitative survey design, faculty (N = 138) from 25 randomly selected programs in 11 midwestern states were surveyed using an instrument developed for this study and distributed online. Ten themes emerged, including (a) Engaging With Motivated, Mature, and Diverse Students, (b) Students Choosing Nursing for the "Wrong Reasons," (c) Too Much Work, Too Little Time for Students and Faculty, (d) Amazement, (e) Pride, and (f) Frustration. These findings will help novice and seasoned ASBSN faculty interpret their experiences, strengthen precepting and mentoring activities, and support administrators in determining staffing plans and designing ASBSN programs.

  3. Incorporating a built environment module into an accelerated second-degree community health nursing course.

    PubMed

    Hays, Judith C; Davis, Jeffrey A; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Environmental quality is a leading indicator of population health. Environmental health content has been integrated into the curriculum of an Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program for second-degree students through development of an environmental health nursing module for the final-semester community health nursing course. The module was developed through collaboration between two professional schools at Duke University (the School of Nursing and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences). It focused on the role of the built environment in community health and featured a mix of teaching strategies, including five components: (1) classroom lecture with associated readings, (2) two rounds of online small-group student discussions, (3) assessment of the built environment in local neighborhoods by student teams, (4) team presentation of the neighborhood assessments, and (5) individual student papers synthesizing the conclusions from all team presentations. The goal of the module was to provide nursing students with an organizing framework for integrating environmental health into clinical practice and an innovative tool for understanding community-level components of public health.

  4. New Careers in Nursing: Optimizing Diversity and Student Success for the Future of Nursing.

    PubMed

    DeWitty, Vernell P; Huerta, Carolina G; Downing, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to create the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholarship program. Two goals of the program were to alleviate the nursing shortage and to increase diversity of the workforce. During this 7-year program (i.e., seven funding cycles), 130 schools of nursing in 41 states and the District of Columbia were selected as grantees, and they awarded 3,517 scholarships to second-degree accelerated nursing students who were members of groups underrepresented in nursing or who were economically disadvantaged. This article describes the demographic characteristics of the NCIN students, degree of satisfaction with their learning environment, perceptions of their mentoring experiences, and self-identified facilitators and barriers to program completion. Data sources for this article resulted from three surveys completed by scholars during their academic programs: the beginning, the midpoint, and within 6 months postgraduate. Results of analysis indicated that NCIN scholars are significantly more diverse compared with the national nurse population, and they reported high levels of satisfaction with their learning environments. Student relationships with peers and faculty improved during the period of program enrollment. Faculty support was the greatest facilitator for program completion, and competing priorities of finances and family responsibilities were the greatest challenges.

  5. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  6. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  7. Undergraduate college students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Wantz, Richard A; Firmin, Michael W; Stolzfus, Melissa J; Ray, Brigitte N; Holmes, Hannah J; Geib, Ellen F

    2012-11-01

    We surveyed undergraduate students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses' effectiveness and analyzed other sources of data. Students reported that psychiatric nurses' strengths include helping in situations that involve psychiatric symptoms, mental health evaluation, and drug abuse. Psychiatric nurses also were said to be effective when helping an individual with psychiatric symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations. Friends or associates, common knowledge, school and education, and movies are some sources by which students learn about psychiatric nurses. Sources that provided less influential information include insurance carriers, newspapers, and personal experience.

  8. Fairness and respect in nurse educators' work- nursing students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Leena; Rinne, Jenni; Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-03-01

    This study describes how the ethical principles of fairness and respect come true in the work of nurse educators from the perspective of nursing students. Nurse educators' competence of professional ethics is important in providing an ethical role model to nursing students and to professionals in the field of health care. The descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. The data were collected from graduating nursing students (n = 202) in Finland with an internet-based questionnaire consisting of 22 structured questions with 5-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed that educators' fairness and respect towards others (colleagues, superiors, mentors, nursing leaders) was good but towards students their fairness did not achieve as good a level. Also, according to the students' assessment, the educators did not respect the students' individual opinions in all cases. Educators' fairness and respect towards their colleagues was satisfactory. The appreciation of educators in the society was reasonably good, but in the opinion of the students the views of educators were not respected very much. As a conclusion, can be said that educators need to put more emphasis on their action.

  9. [Do nursing students have entrepreneur profile?].

    PubMed

    Roncon, Paulo Fernando; Munhoz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Descriptive-exploratory study that aimed at knowing the profile of nursing students regarding entrepreneurship. The General Entrepreneurship Trend Test with 54 questions was applied to 41 students. Results demonstrated that 14% present five entrepreneur tendencies, 12% present four entrepreneur tendencies, and 80% do not present entrepreneur tendencies. The majority of student intent to work as clinical nurses, while none of them intent to work in management activities. It was concluded that students have low grade of the entrepreneurship characteristics.

  10. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  11. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  12. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  13. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  14. 42 CFR 57.309 - Payment of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of nursing student loans. 57.309 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.309 Payment of nursing student loans. (a) Nursing student loans from any fund may be paid...

  15. Competence areas of nursing students in Europe.

    PubMed

    Satu, Kajander-Unkuri; Leena, Salminen; Mikko, Saarikoski; Riitta, Suhonen; Helena, Leino-Kilpi

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this study is on European nursing education, where there have been several reforms over the last two decades attempting to harmonise curricula and degree structures. One of the most powerful reforms was started by the Bologna Declaration in 1999; since then, significant progress has been made towards achieving the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the implementation of the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) in education practice. The Directive of recognition of professional qualifications (2005/36/EC) regulates nursing education. All these strategies aim to harmonise nursing education, but specific competence areas in nursing are still missing within the European Union (EU). The purpose of this review was to seek competence areas for nursing students within the EU as identified in previous studies and other documents. Altogether, 67 competence areas were identified and classified into eight main categories: (1) professional and ethical values and practice, (2) nursing skills and intervention, (3) communication and interpersonal skills, (4) knowledge and cognitive ability, (5) assessment and improving quality in nursing, (6) professional development, (7) leadership, management and teamwork, and (8) research utilisation. In order to obtain a comprehensive concept of competence, more research is needed on nursing students' competence areas across the EU due to the fact that the EU is a common labour market and nurses are educated for the EU as a whole. Nursing is a global profession and nurse competence is central to patient care outcomes, so it is also internationally important that nurses have good competence.

  16. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  17. [Nursing students' perceptions on HIV serodiscordant partnerships].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hugo; Horta, Ana Lúcia de Moraes

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative research aimed to identify undergraduate nursing students' perceptions on mixed-HIV-status couples. Social Representation Theory was used to get to know how the students feel, think and act towards HIV/aids serodiscordance. Six fourth-year nursing students were interviewed. Participants were between 20 and 26 years old. The "Projective Thematic Drawing" and a structure interview were used for data collection. Data were analyzed by means of "Thematic Content Analysis". The obtained data revealed the students' perceptions on serodiscordant couples. This study triggered future reflections/discussions on health education for mixed-HIV-status couples and nursing care.

  18. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care.

  19. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  20. Baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward poverty: implications for nursing curricula.

    PubMed

    Sword, Wendy; Reutter, Linda; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Rideout, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Given the link between poverty and health, nurses, in their work in hospitals and in the community, often come into contact with people who are poor. To be effective care providers, nurses must have an adequate understanding of poverty and a positive attitude toward people who are poor. This study examined attitudes toward poverty among baccalaureate nursing students (N = 740) at three Canadian universities. Students' attitudes were neutral to slightly positive. Personal experiences appeared to have an important influence on the development of favorable attitudes. The findings point to several considerations for nursing curricula. Students should not only be provided with classroom opportunities for critical exploration of poverty and its negative effects on individuals and society, but also have clinical learning experiences that bring them face-to-face with people who are poor, their health concerns, and the realities of their circumstances. Thoughtful critique of poverty-related issues and interpersonal contact may be effective strategies to foster attitude change.

  1. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form. Each nursing student loan must be evidenced by a properly executed promissory note in a form approved by...

  2. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form. Each nursing student loan must be evidenced by a properly executed promissory note in a form approved by...

  3. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form. Each nursing student loan must be evidenced by a properly executed promissory note in a form approved by...

  4. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form. Each nursing student loan must be evidenced by a properly executed promissory note in a form approved by...

  5. 42 CFR 57.308 - Nursing student loan promissory note.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing student loan promissory note. 57.308... Nursing Student Loans § 57.308 Nursing student loan promissory note. (a) Promissory note form. Each nursing student loan must be evidenced by a properly executed promissory note in a form approved by...

  6. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  7. Assessment tool for nursing student computer competencies.

    PubMed

    Elder, Betty L; Koehn, Mary L

    2009-01-01

    Computer skills have been established as important for nursing students and for graduate nurses. No current research was found on the best method to evaluate the skills of incoming nursing students. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to compare student ratings of their computer competency to their performance of those skills on a computer-graded assessment. A convenience sample of 87 nursing students was used. There was a low, but significant correlation between the scores on the survey and the assessment. The results suggest that students rate themselves higher on their skills than their actual performance of computer skills. Implications for educators are presented, and the value of using a computer-graded assessment is discussed.

  8. Attracting and Retaining Learning Disability Student Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Sara; Standen, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Recruitment onto pre-registration learning disability nursing courses has decreased considerably over the last decade. This paper reports the findings of the first stage of a longitudinal study that investigated the factors that influence students to train as learning disability nurses, and those that influence their decision to continue or leave…

  9. Simulation Technology in Nursing Education: Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panunto, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education programs are faced with the challenge of providing students with the necessary skills to function in a fast paced, high technological environment. To address this challenge, the current trend in nursing education is to integrate the use of high-fidelity simulation technology into the curricula although there has been limited…

  10. Providing Relevance in Chemistry for Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Theodore H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an introductory chemistry course for nurses in which students learn basic chemical principles by performing 12 chemical analyses that are routinely conducted on body fluids and listed on a patient's clinical laboratory chart. (MLH)

  11. Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Science in the Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    2013-01-01

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students'…

  12. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  13. [Opinion survey among nursing students on family].

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Akemi

    2002-12-01

    Earlier discharges of patients from hospital are increasing needs for supports for home medical care, which is causing changes in the activities of medical providers for patients and family members. Meanwhile, it is suggested that the younger generation is more indifferent to family members along with the increase of nuclear families or households consisting of only one member. This time, the author conducted an opinion survey among nursing students for the purpose of understanding how nursing students think of the family and using the data as a reference for the education. The survey was conducted in FY2000 and FY2001 for the questions selected from the "National Lifestyle Popularity Survey". The results indicate that nursing students intend to have families while keeping working and are willing to fulfill their responsibilities as a family member of which relation is close. It is considered possible to guide nursing students to practice nursing respecting the position and feeling of the patient by letting them understand social changes and the individuality of the patient based on the way nursing students think of the family.

  14. Summer Learning: Accelerating Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitcock, Sarah; Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As numerous studies from 1906 on have confirmed, children lose ground in learning if they lack opportunities for building skills over the summer. Nonetheless, summer learning loss comes up but rarely in the national discussion of education reform. By the end of summer, students perform on average one month behind where they left off in the spring.…

  15. Student nurse stress in the preceptorship experience.

    PubMed

    Yonge, Olive; Myrick, Florence; Haase, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Student nurses appear to experience significantly more stress during their academic preparation than they do during the first year of employment. Preceptorship is among the most stressful of student experiences. It is within the context of a challenging and at times daunting work environment that two complete strangers (preceptor and student) strive to accommodate one another within a professional capacity. If the relationship between preceptor and student is less than successful, not only can it be frustrating and disheartening, but it can result in student stress and disillusionment about nursing and an inability to integrate and learn. Using a hypothetical case, the authors discuss the importance of student assessment, close communication between faculty and preceptors, and quick responses to student stress as a means by which to circumvent the serious potential of student burnout in the practice setting.

  16. Filling the gaps: immersing student nurses in specialty nursing and professional associations.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N

    2011-09-01

    The national nursing shortage demands innovative strategies to attract students to the nursing profession. This article provides a potential solution for recruiting and retaining nurses for specialty areas of nursing as well as professional nursing associations by pairing student nurses with professional nurses who belong to nursing associations. An immersion program such as the one described in this article provides a strategy that addresses the nursing work force shortage and professional association membership. The experiential knowledge gained through this type of program may advance the profession throughout the country.

  17. An exploration into the role of humour in the nursing student-nurse teacher relationship.

    PubMed

    Struthers, J

    1994-03-01

    Nurse teachers can often find themselves in various situations where they resort to using humour. An exploration of the role of humour within the educational relationship between nurse teachers and nursing students is the focus of this paper. Consideration is given to the nurse teachers' requirement to develop self-awareness in their own understanding of humour in order to facilitate and recognize the reasons for the nursing students' use of humour. The development of the appropriate use of humour by nursing students may lead to enhanced nursing practice, thereby reinforcing the need for inclusion of the theory of humour in both teacher training and the nursing curriculum.

  18. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  19. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  20. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  1. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  2. 42 CFR 57.305 - Nursing student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing student loan funds. 57.305 Section 57.305... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.305 Nursing student loan funds. (a) Funds established with Federal capital contributions....

  3. Integrating Just Culture into nursing student error policy.

    PubMed

    Penn, Cathy E

    2014-09-01

    Errors in health care settings are common and potentially dangerous to patients. Errors will arise as novice nursing students practice skills in complex health care settings. This article describes one baccalaureate nursing program's approach toward student errors that integrates core competencies described in the Institute of Medicine's Health Professions Education report, the Quality and Safety in Education for Nurses project, and the position statement on Just Culture by the American Nurses Association. A consistent approach to defining and categorizing data about nursing student errors provides faculty with a framework for coaching students to safer nursing practice. Aggregate data may be used to identify gaps in the nursing program's curriculum.

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Nursing Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Victoria Jane

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the constructs of a Multi-Intelligence Model of Retention with four constructs: cognitive and emotional-social intelligence, student characteristics, and environmental factors. Data were obtained from sophomore students entering two diploma, nine associate, and five baccalaureate nursing programs. One year later, retention and…

  5. Recruiting Middle School Students into Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matutina, Robin E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to illustrate the importance of initiating nursing recruitment during the middle school years. Data sources included citations from the years 1989 to 2006. The study focused on middle school students 9 to 13 years of age in Grades 6 to 8. One survey compared middle school students' perceptions of an ideal…

  6. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  7. Teaching Design of Cultivating Nursing Students' Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xi-wen, Liu; Chun-ping, Ni; Rui, Yang; Xiu-chuan, Li; Cheng, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Chinese nursing education levels have developed fast over the past few years. Many nursing educators are devoted to the research of nursing teaching. How to cultivate nursing students, creative thinking is one of the principle researches and has received increasing attention. In the course of nursing teaching, we renewed the teaching design based…

  8. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Perceptions Regarding Factors That Affect Math Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyo, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study…

  9. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  10. The Lived Experience of How Adult Nursing Students Blend Lifestyle Obligations with Nursing School Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutrier, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Many adult nursing students have lifestyle obligations that require integration with nursing school programs in order to graduate and fulfill their dreams of becoming a nurse. Fourteen participants shared their stories of how they were able to blend their lifestyles commitments with nursing school. Student interaction between lifestyle obligations…

  11. Student Nurse in the War Zone.

    PubMed

    2016-12-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.In this month's article, from the September 1942 issue, senior nursing student Frances Carr writes vividly about life and work in Honolulu after Pearl Harbor. "Students… have had seared into their memories scenes of such horror as cannot be imagined…. When night fell, the nursing staff faced its first test of caring for hundreds of patients in a blackout that had to be absolute." And in this issue, see "Remembering Pearl Harbor at 75 Years," which tells the stories of five nurses from the Army and Navy Nurse Corps who were stationed nearby at the time of the attack.

  12. Undergraduate nursing student experiences with faculty bullies.

    PubMed

    Mott, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility, whereas less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive phenomenology, this study explored these lived experiences. Themes emerged including the emotional experience of bullying, the giving and gaining of mutual respect, the value of resilience and persistence, and that perception is reality.

  13. Student Nurses View an Abortion Client: Attitude and Context Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Edward H.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two studies of the relationship between student nurses' attitudes and patient perception with regard to abortion. Results indicate that the student nurses' judgments were related to their prevailing attitude toward abortion and to their religiosity. (Author/MA)

  14. Factors Related to Homophobia Among Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rowniak, Stefan R

    2015-01-01

    A convenience sample of 90 nursing students participated in an online survey measuring homophobia or sexual prejudice. Significantly higher scores were seen among those who endorsed the belief that being gay was a matter of personal choice, did not have a friend or family member who was gay or lesbian, and endorsed religiosity. A significantly higher level of sexual prejudice was seen among those who identified as non-Catholic Christians when compared to other religions. Asian/Pacific Islanders showed significantly higher scores on the scales compared to non-Hispanic Caucasian students. Nursing education should focus on those aspects of homophobia amenable to change.

  15. Beliefs Held by Associate Degree Nursing Students about Role Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellinger, Kathleen; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a study of the professional socialization of associate degree nursing (ADN) students. Reviews previous research on the process of nursing socialization. Presents study findings based on responses from 1,877 nursing students in 20 ADN programs, focusing on students' characteristics and ideal and actual role models. (DMM)

  16. Diploma Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatric Nursing, Role Models, and Clinical Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, Elizabeth; Mark, Tony

    A study was conducted at Humber College to investigate the attitudes of college-prepared diploma nursing students towards psychiatric nursing. Specifically, the study sought to determine the effect of psychiatric nursing role models on student attitudes, and whether a relationship existed between clinical placement and student attitudes. The study…

  17. Addressing the mental health nurse shortage: undergraduate nursing students working as assistants in nursing in inpatient mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Browne, Graeme; Cashin, Andrew; Graham, Iain; Shaw, Warren

    2013-10-01

    The population of mental health nurses is ageing and in the next few years we can expect many to retire. This paper makes an argument for the employment of undergraduate nursing students as Assistants in Nursing (AINs) in mental health settings as a strategy to encourage them to consider a career in mental health nursing. Skill mix in nursing has been debated since at least the 1980s. It appears that the use of AINs in general nursing is established and will continue. The research suggests that with the right skill mix, nursing outcomes and safety are not compromised. It seems inevitable that assistants in nursing will increasingly be part of the mental health nursing workforce; it is timely for mental health nurses to lead these changes so nursing care and the future mental health nursing workforce stay in control of nursing.

  18. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  19. Student nurses' personality traits and the nursing profession: part 2.

    PubMed

    Baldacchino, Donia R; Galea, Paul

    Individuals' attitudes stem partly from their personality traits, which may influence their interpersonal relationships with patients. Although personality traits are somewhat genetically determined, research has found that there are other factors that may influence this, such as self-esteem, family, social and clinical environments, and education. Part one of this article explained the research process of this cross-sectional descriptive study, which assessed the personality traits of two cohorts of nursing/midwifery students (n=116, aged 19-44 years) in their third year of the Diploma/BSc (Hons) programme at the University of Malta (Baldacchino and Galea, 2012). Data were collected in 2006 using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (Costa and McCrae, 1992c). In part two, the authors demonstrate that students obtained low neuroticism scores, average openness scores, and high agreeableness, extraversion and conscientiousness scores. Irrespective of nursing/midwifery programmes, age and gender, similar mean scores were identified in all five personality domains. These findings are consistent with previous studies, with some exceptions related to significant differences in gender and religiosity. Further larger scale longitudinal research is recommended on nursing/midwifery and allied healthcare students, to exhibit a possible profile pattern across time and other influencing factors.

  20. Levels of empathy in undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm; Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Molloy, Andrew; Lewis, Belinda; Molloy, Liz

    2012-06-01

    Empathy and absence of prejudice and stigma are instrumental in facilitating effective nurse-patient relations. This study assessed empathy levels and regard for specific medical conditions in undergraduate nursing students. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using paper-based versions of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) and Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS), along with a brief set of demographic questions. Participants reported good empathy levels on JSPE. Attitudes towards intellectual disability, chronic pain, acute mental illness and terminal illness rated well on MCRS. Attitudes towards substance abuse, however, were lower. There were no significant differences between age groups, gender or year level of study. Overall results of this study were positive. Nursing students demonstrated acceptable empathy levels. Attitudes towards patients who abuse substances highlight an area that needs both further exploration and addressing. Attitudes towards mental health diagnoses were particularly favourable given that these often attract stigma and negative attitudes.

  1. Perception of nursing students towards internship.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Hema

    2012-04-01

    The study, undertaken to assess the perception of students regarding integrated internship in the preparation of staff nurse position among the BSc (N) final year undergraduate students included 43 students (21, 47% female and 22, 53% male) in the hospital setting of Chennai (TN). Majority of students (96%) perceived that there was significant enrichment in preparation in the three aspects: knowledge, skill and attitude and that due to their learning in the internship period, they would confidently function independently in the ward in discharge of their duties.

  2. Making Chemistry Activities Meaningful to Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanitski, Conrad L.; Sears, Curtis T.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the use of bio-medically significant materials to teach a self-pacing chemistry laboratory course to nursing majors. Indicates that the student can learn from the course to determine values of body fluid constituents, about their variations among healthy populations, and about difficulties inherent in making such measurements. (CC)

  3. International Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pross, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Results of a survey of 16 nursing students and interviews with 11 regarding international education experience were distilled into 4 themes--preparing, adjusting, caring, and transforming--that were influenced by culture, values, and ethics. All participants experienced shock related to culture or to the poverty they encountered. (Contains 19…

  4. Stress Management Skill for Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlesworth, Edward A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of a stress management program for nursing students. The stress management group effectively reduced trait anxiety and showed a reduction in state (test-taking) anxiety from mid-semester to final examinations, while the control group showed a slight increase. (Author)

  5. Being a Nursing Aide; Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Hospital Association, Chicago, IL.

    Developed for students receiving on-the-job training as nursing aides, this illustrated manual contains these chapters: (1) Orientation, (2) Introduction to the Patient, (3) Your Working Environment, (4) The Patient's Unit: Making the Unoccupied Bed, (5) Lifting, Moving, and Transporting Patients: Making the Occupied Bed, (6) Personal Care of the…

  6. Nursing Students Benefit from Video Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Rich

    2006-01-01

    At Renton Technical College in Renton, Washington, a video system that captures and records live images is enhancing the educational experience for students in the nursing program. Capturing and recording live images from the rooms has proven to be one of the most successful teaching methods instituted at Renton Tech. Instructors are able to…

  7. Nursing faculty experiences of students' academic dishonesty.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2009-04-01

    Student academic dishonesty was examined using a qualitative critical method to determine the effects of this experience on nurse educators. Twelve faculty members were interviewed about confronting and reporting academic misconduct. Results indicated that educators perceived significant personal and professional risks associated with addressing academic dishonesty, including damage to their relationships with students and colleagues. Participants identified their primary responsibility as gatekeepers of the profession and therefore noted their willingness to bear the burden of being the accuser.

  8. Nursing Students' Experience of Bullying: Prevalence, Impact, and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Bowllan, Nancy Meierdierks

    2015-01-01

    Studies examining nursing students' unique experience of bullying are increasingly evident. This article explores national and international literature over the past decade on prevalence rates, potential impact on nursing students, and relevance to socialization to the profession of nursing. Historical considerations are provided along with policies and interventions to empower nursing leaders, academicians, clinicians, and students to prevent or minimize the destructive nature of bullying.

  9. Leadership experiences for baccalaureate nursing students: improving quality in a nurse-managed rural health clinic.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Roy Ann; Morrison, Ruby Shaw

    2008-01-01

    Nurse educators need practical, effective methods to help nursing students understand the importance of quality improvement activities and their relationship to the financial viability of organizations. This article describes a project designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply quality improvement principles in a rural, nurse-managed clinic with the ultimate goal of improving potential reimbursement for services through improved documentation. Implications for students, nurse educators, and rural clinics are provided.

  10. Perceived Rewards of Nursing Among Christian Nursing Students in Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Prater, Llewellyn S; Putturaj, Meena; Raj, Leena

    2015-12-01

    Nurses in India face significant challenges and often migrate to practice nursing abroad. Few studies have focused on the rewards of nursing in India. The aim of this study was to illuminate perceived rewards of nursing among Christian student nurses in Bangalore, India. Photovoice, a participatory action methodology was used, and 14 Christian student nurses participated in the study. Thematic interpretation of photographs, journals, critical group dialog sessions, and observational field notes resulted in the identification of two main themes. These themes included intrinsic rewards and lifelong benefits of nursing in India.

  11. How Do Students Learn on a Primary Nursing Care Unit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mary Barbera

    1977-01-01

    When a unit's staff changed from a team nursing to a primary nursing approach to care, the role of students gaining experience there changed to that of associate nurse, who is accountable for providing continuity of care to the primary nurses' patients. (Editor/TA)

  12. Medication Administration: Measuring Associate Degree Nursing Student Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The American Nurse Association's (ANA) provisions outline the commitment expected of nurses to protect the community from harm. Medication administration coincides with patient safety as a compelling obligation in nursing practice. The study's purpose was to examine retention of medication safety knowledge among first year nursing students, after…

  13. Precepting student nurses in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ihlenfeld, Janet T

    2007-01-01

    Nurses in critical care units are often asked to precept a student nurse. To make this a valuable learning experience, careful planning should be done. The preceptor and the nursing faculty member need to collaborate to plan and carry out the nursing experience.

  14. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  15. Student nurses' personality traits and the nursing profession: part 1.

    PubMed

    Baldacchino, Donia R

    Individuals' attitudes stem partly from their personality traits, which may influence their interpersonal relationships with patients. Although personality traits are somewhat genetically determined, research has found that there are other factors, which may influence this, such as self-esteem, family, social and clinical environments and education. Part one of this article presents the methodology of a cross-sectional descriptive study that assessed the personality traits of two cohorts (n=116) of nursing/midwifery students aged 19-44 years (mean=21.5) in their third year of the nursing diploma/BSc (Hons) at the University of Malta. Data were collected by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (Costa and McCrae, 1992a) in 2006. While acknowledging that this study limits generalisation of the findings such as, collection of data in the third year of the course, following an attrition rate of 47% (Diploma) and 23% (BSc) since the start of the course programme, the findings presented in part two shed light on the nature of personality traits of students who are attracted towards the nursing profession.

  16. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

    PubMed

    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  17. Nursing students' experience of practice placements.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kathleen; Paterson, Kirstie; Wallar, Jessica

    2016-11-02

    Clinical practice placements are an essential component of pre-registration nursing programmes. Integration into a new team in an unfamiliar setting, which has its own values, practices, culture and language, can be stressful for nursing students. This article presents and discusses students' reflections on preparing for, entering and leaving practice placements. Ten students who participated in fortnightly group reflective sessions, discussed and analysed their learning experiences while on practice placements in an acute hospital. The challenges the students encountered were deconstructed using a group narrative approach. The students experienced ethical dilemmas around patient dignity, consent and advocacy as well as factors external to the practice setting, such as navigating systems and processes to access information before starting practice placements, managing household duties and academic workloads while working long shifts, and managing fatigue and loneliness. The students devised recommendations for other students to enable them to navigate their practice placements effectively and enhance their learning experience. Raising awareness among academic and practice placement staff of the challenges students encounter before and during their practice placement is essential to assist students to succeed and maximise their learning potential.

  18. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  19. Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

    The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

  20. Smoking behavior among student nurses: a survey.

    PubMed Central

    Haughey, B P; O'Shea, R M; Dittmar, S S; Bahn, P; Mathewson, M; Smith, S; Brasure, J

    1986-01-01

    The study describes the smoking habits of student nurses and determines the correlates of smoking initiation, continuation, and cessation. The sample included 1,163 students attending 10 nursing schools in Buffalo, NY. Data were gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Approximately 30 percent of the students were current smokers, 25 percent were exsmokers, and 45 percent had never smoked. More than half of the smokers (57 percent) expressed the desire to quit, and 81 percent had tried to do so in the past. Major reasons for trying to quit were to protect future health, save money, self-discipline, and pressure from significant others. Most (90 percent) of the students who had tried to quit had attempted to do so on their own and all at once. Knowledge of the health consequences of smoking was not significantly related to smoking behavior. These data suggest the need for health educators to promote personal health practices among their students that are congruent with the goals of the nursing profession of health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:3097747

  1. Impact of School Nurse Case Management on Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Howard; Wright, Sandra; Brennan, Jesse; Campana, Jack; Lofgren, RoseMarie

    2004-01-01

    This project determined asthma prevalence in a large school district, absentee rates, and potential effects of school nurse case management for student asthma over three years. Data were derived from an asthma tracking tool used by nurses in one school district for every student reported as having asthma by their parent. School nurses began…

  2. Facilitating Trust Engenderment in Secondary School Nurse Interactions with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summach, Anne H. J.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses are involved in a complex framework of interactions with students, other professionals, parents, and administrators. Trust between nurse and student is critical for interaction effectiveness. The goal of this study was to understand through phenomenology the process of engendering trust in school nurse-high school student…

  3. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  4. First Year Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Reasons for Drop-Out?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, S. C. D.; Maree, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Improving throughput in the B. Tech. Nursing Sciences programme is a complex issue as not only the theoretical but also the practical component and undefined inner strengths of the student influence success. The purpose of this article is to report factors in the prospective students' social background, their perceptions of nursing and nurses and…

  5. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean T.; Winters, Karen; Williams, P. Renee; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental descriptive study was to explore types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours that nursing students experience while in nursing school. The study also evaluated resources utilised by nursing students to cope with these bullying behaviours. Six hundred thirty-six participants completed the…

  6. Fostering creativity in nursing students: a blending of nursing and the arts.

    PubMed

    Pavill, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Integrating nursing and fine arts can evoke a more holistic view of clients as well as foster creativity in students. Presented is an overview of The Creative Project assignment that culminates with nursing students developing a creative self-expression of a clinical experience through the lens of liberal arts and nursing.

  7. Differential Dimensions of Death Anxiety in Nursing Students with and without Nursing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yi-Chuen; Ben, Kevin S. Del; Fortson, Beverly L.; Lewis, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated death anxiety in nursing professionals; however, it is unclear as to when this anxiety develops. This study used a multidimensional measure to investigate death anxiety in a group of experienced (n = 53) and inexperienced (n = 49) nursing students and a control group of non-nursing students (n = 50). Experienced…

  8. Mentoring disadvantaged nursing students through technical writing workshops.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Molly K; Symes, Lene; Bernard, Lillian; Landson, Margie J; Carroll, Theresa L

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a problematic gap for nursing students between terse clinical writing and formal academic writing. This gap can create a potential barrier to academic and workplace success, especially for disadvantaged nursing students who have not acquired the disciplinary conventions and sophisticated writing required in upper-level nursing courses. The authors demonstrate the need for writing-in-the-discipline activities to enhance the writing skills of nursing students, describe the technical writing workshops they developed to mentor minority and disadvantaged nursing students, and provide recommendations to stimulate educator dialogue across disciplines and institutions.

  9. Literature Update on Academic Performance of Minority Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearing, Arleen D.

    This report reviews the literature on minority nursing students including the identification of high risk students, admission policies, evaluation methods and prediction of success of nursing students since the mid-1980s. The review finds that many variables have been used in research studies to identify at-risk students, to predict nursing…

  10. Broadening horizons: engaging advanced practice nursing students in faculty research.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A

    2009-01-01

    Inviting advanced practice nursing students to participate in faculty research can be an innovative way to interest students in using current evidence as the basis for their practice. The author discusses strategies for effectively engaging graduate nursing students into research projects in ways that broaden the students' perspectives and strengthen their healthcare decision-making skills.

  11. Nursing students' experiences with incivility in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Yastik, Joanne

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students as targets of incivility in clinical settings, to describe their perceptions of specific uncivil and favorable behaviors by nurses, and to examine how nursing students think schools of nursing should address incivility in clinical settings. Four focus groups were conducted comprising 21 prelicensure nursing students. Data were collected with semi-structured interviews. Uncivil behaviors fell into three themes: exclusionary, hostile or rude, and dismissive. Positive experiences occurred when students felt included by the staff nurses in patient care. Schools of nursing should prepare students through discussion. Our research suggests that incivility occurs in clinical education. Further research on a larger scale is needed to provide qualitative and generalizable findings. All health care team members, including students, should be educated about the organization's code of conduct.

  12. Nursing students' perceptions of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Karin; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2010-01-01

    Clinical placements are important in the learning processes of nursing students. In Norway, clinical placement in nursing homes is obligatory for nursing students, and this is a demanding and complex setting for learning. This study aimed to assess how first-year nursing students perceived their learning environment in nursing homes and to explore which factors in the clinical learning environment had the greatest influence on students' overall satisfaction with their clinical placement. Students rated their perceptions of the psychosocial learning environment using the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. Students perceived the learning environment as moderately positive. Mean scores were the highest on the Personalization subscale and the lowest on the Innovation subscale. Students who highly valued Innovation, Involvement, and Personalization had higher scores on the Satisfaction sub-scale. The results of this study indicate that major work is needed to develop the learning context for students in nursing homes.

  13. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience.

  14. Telling the story of role conflict among Black nurses and Black nursing students: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ora V

    2013-09-01

    Racism continues to affect minority nursing students and nurses in professional roles. A selective review of the literature published from 1992 to 2011 was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Literature in Nursing and Allied Health, ScienceDirect, and EBSCOhost. Keywords used included racism within nursing, minority nurses and role conflict, cultural diversity within nursing, racism, and diversity. The purpose of this review is to describe Black nurses' and Black nursing students' experiences of role conflict as an outcome of perceived racism within the nursing profession to gain an understanding of factors that contribute to perceived racism and role conflict. Noblit's and Hare's framework for metasynthesis of the data was used to identify and synthesize key concepts. The role perspectives of Hardy and Conway guided the review to develop a conceptual framework for minority role conflict and the nursing implications discussed herein.

  15. Developing a sense of community among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Foli, Karen J; Karagory, Pamela M; Gibson, Gregory; Kirkpatrick, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    For beginning students, becoming a member of the nursing profession starts with experiences in nursing school. Better understanding of the experiences that contribute to sense of community for students can guide faculty efforts and curricular decisions. Using the sense of community model as a framework, the authors assessed the influence of a freshman-level class and other leadership and student organization experiences on the students' perceptions of the school of nursing as community. The authors discuss the study and its outcomes.

  16. Nursing care at the end of life: a service learning course for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Stephanie; Ferry, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    An elective course titled "Nursing Care at the End of Life" was designed for fourth-year nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program. This course, taught by the authors, was designed to teach students about caring for the dying patient. Students were required to complete service learning with patients in a hospice or hospital setting. Students reported having a positive learning experience and gaining new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the needs of dying patients and their families.

  17. Providing Preceptors for Nursing Students: What Questions Should You Ask?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limon, Sharlene; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Discusses elements of a nursing preceptor program: specific expected outcomes, legal accountability for students, educational accountability, the preceptor's role, preceptor preparation, resource persons, responsibilities of the nursing administration, and benefits for staff and agency. (CT)

  18. Knowing nursing through inquiry: engaging students in knowledge creation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Fabiola; Lindsay, Gail

    2011-12-01

    Two nurse educators share a nursing knowledge course, which was created as a forum for questioning and discovery, thereby revealing a process of knowing nursing through inquiry. The process of inquiry in nursing praxis is emphasized, facilitating students' understanding that they are knowledge-users and creators. With students, we explore the construction of praxis, which includes being/becoming (ontology), knowing (epistemology), and doing (actions with consequences). Nursing knowledge is understood to arise from philosophy, world views, nursing theories, patterns of knowing, evidence-based research, and standards of practice. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on and use what is congruent with their praxis and to construct new knowledge. Exemplars from nurse educators and students are presented as evidence of our claim for furthering the science of nursing education.

  19. A selected bibliography for nursing faculty and students.

    PubMed

    Craig, Paula

    2009-01-01

    This bibliography is prepared for nursing faculty and nursing students to acquaint them with some resources which might contribute to their success. The bibliography is divided into two parts: (1) resources for nursing faculty; and (2) resources for nursing students. The major content of the resources for nursing faculty are: mentoring; research and publishing; tenure and new information technologies. The resources for nursing students contain: study tips and skills; success of the NCLEX-RN exam and informational monographs. With the time constraints of nursing faculty and nursing students and the abundance of materials available, this bibliography provides a set of resources for them to peruse. Electronic resources, journal articles, and monographs are included.

  20. Fitness to practise for student nurses: principles, standards and procedures.

    PubMed

    David, Timothy I; Lee-Woolf, Elizabeth

    Since 2009, all schools of nursing have been required to establish a fitness to practise committee to consider any pre-registration student health or character issues (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2008). In 2009, fitness to practice standards were published (NMC, 2009a). This article outlines how fitness to practise procedures apply to nursing and midwifery students in the U.K. and explains the key differences between how they are applied to trainees and to registered nurses.

  1. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected.

  2. Army Nurses’ Experiences as Faculty and Students’ Perceptions of Military Nursing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-05

    students and provided ANC faculty with significant learning experiences to utilize in the Army. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nursing education , military...their baccalaureate nursing education ? Question #2 – Is there a difference in the students’ perceptions of personal characteristics (e.g., family and...The experiences of nursing teachers, students, and clinicians. Nursing Education Perspectives, 26 (2), 78 – 85. Jacobs, M. B. (2005). Career path

  3. Perceptions of leadership among final-year undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Francis-Shama, Jayne

    2016-11-01

    Aim The promotion of a distributed leadership model in health care means there is an expectation that undergraduate training should contribute to the development of nursing students' leadership capabilities. However, there is concern that the nursing degree programme is not sufficiently preparing students. This study explored nursing students' perceptions of leadership before qualifying, and how prepared they felt to take on leadership roles. Method Data were collected from 20 undergraduate nursing students, using a Straussian grounded theory approach, through three focus groups and six semi-structured interviews. Findings These suggest students are disengaged from the learning of leadership, and preparation for leadership in clinical areas is problematic, as students are exposed to flawed role modelling. Conclusion Discrepancies between nurse education and the realities of clinical practice mean that successfully preparing nursing students for leadership roles will be challenging within current provision.

  4. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  5. Identifying and managing underperformance in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Chris

    Student nurses are the future of the profession and require high levels of commitment and skill from the registered nurses charged with mentoring and guiding them on the road to registration. Evidence suggests that mentors are failing to recognise underperformance and as such are missing opportunities to effectively manage and encourage improvement in failing students. The literature is also demonstrative of mentors failing to fail students who do not achieve requisite standards, thus allowing sub-optimal students to progress on towards registration. This article examines literature relating to effective management of underperforming students in clinical practice and the need to fail those who do not meet the required standards. The article seeks to provide mentors with an understanding of why some are 'failing to fail', as well as highlighting implications for skill improvement. It is the result of an ongoing local skill-improvement project. Key themes for improvement are discussed including issues of mentor confidence, early identification of underperformance, improving mentor-student relationships and the need for open, honest communication.

  6. Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

  7. Teaching international nursing students: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Carty, R M; Hale, J F; Carty, G M; Williams, J; Rigney, D; Principato, J J

    1998-01-01

    Cross-cultural education presents many challenges and focuses attention on the significant differences in teaching and learning styles around the world. In 1995, the George Mason University College of Nursing and Health Science embarked on the Saudi-US University Project, an effort that brought these theoretical differences to life. The stark contrast between the Saudi Arabian and Western cultures provided administration, faculty, and students the opportunity to develop creative strategies to accommodate learning across cultures.

  8. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print.

  9. Nurses' experiences working with nursing students in a hospital: a phenomenological enquiry

    PubMed Central

    Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda Raquel; Cibanal-Juan, Luis; Orts-Cortés, Mª Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Mª Loreto; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this paper explores the experiences of registered nurses working with Spanish nursing students within the hospital. Methods: a qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Purposeful sampling was employed. Twenty-one registered nurses, from a public hospital located in Spain, were included in the study. Data were collected by means of unstructured and semi-structured interviews and were analysed using Giorgi's proposal. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research were followed. Results: three main themes described the experience of registered nurses: "The nurse's relationship with nursing students"; most nurses emphasized the importance of the first contact with students and they considered students' attitude to be key. "Defining the role of the student in clinical practice"; it is necessary to unify the nurse's role and interventions to avoid misleading students and establish priorities in clinical practice. "Building bridges between clinical settings and the University"; the need to establish a common ground and connection between the university and hospital clinical settings was emphasized. Nurses felt that the training program should also be designed by the clinical settings themselves. Conclusions: understanding the meaning of nursing students with registered nurses might gain a deeper insight into their expectations. PMID:27463112

  10. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing.

  11. Teaching statistics to nursing students: an expert panel consensus.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Matthew J; Eckardt, Patricia; Higgins, Melinda; Kim, MyoungJin; Schmiege, Sarah J

    2013-06-01

    Statistics education is a necessary element of nursing education, and its inclusion is recommended in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing guidelines for nurse training at all levels. This article presents a cohesive summary of an expert panel discussion, "Teaching Statistics to Nursing Students," held at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings. All panelists were statistics experts, had extensive teaching and consulting experience, and held faculty appointments in a U.S.-based nursing college or school. The panel discussed degree-specific curriculum requirements, course content, how to ensure nursing students understand the relevance of statistics, approaches to integrating statistics consulting knowledge, experience with classroom instruction, use of knowledge from the statistics education research field to make improvements in statistics education for nursing students, and classroom pedagogy and instruction on the use of statistical software. Panelists also discussed the need for evidence to make data-informed decisions about statistics education and training for nurses.

  12. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  13. Avoiding plagiarism: guidance for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    The pressures of study, diversity of source materials, past assumptions relating to good writing practice, ambiguous writing guidance on best practice and students' insecurity about their reasoning ability, can lead to plagiarism. With the use of source checking software, there is an increased chance that plagiarised work will be identified and investigated, and penalties given. In extreme cases, plagiarised work may be reported to the Nursing and Midwifery Council and professional as well as academic penalties may apply. This article provides information on how students can avoid plagiarism when preparing their coursework for submission.

  14. Discontinued students in nursing education - Who and why?

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, Pia; Suhonen, Riitta; Salminen, Leena

    2016-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in student nurse attrition due to the high level of attrition rates in many countries. Studies about nursing education and attrition have been conducted internationally, but only a few have explored attrition from the perspective of the students' own experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe who is a discontinued student in nursing education and the students' own experiences of reasons for leaving a nursing school. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. 25 nursing students were interviewed at two different universities of applied sciences in Finland. Four different types of discontinued nursing students were identified: those who moved to another school, those who faced a life crisis, those who made the wrong career choice and those who lived 'busy years'. The results show that the nursing student population is diverse, which has an effect on the students' career intentions, their learning and their ability to cope with studies. In nursing education, it is important to identify students who are at risk of discontinue their studies and develop individual support systems to help nursing students complete their studies and enter into the workforce.

  15. Health Behaviors of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Madeleine; Jankowski, Louis W.; Bouchard, Louise; Perreault, Michel; Lepage, Yves

    2002-01-01

    A 3-year study compared 52 undergraduate nursing students with 93 education majors and with the general population. No significant differences among students on 9 health behaviors appeared. Compared with the general population, nursing students had inadequate time for sleep, exercise, and eating breakfast. (Contains 77 references.) (SK)

  16. Nursing students' perceptions of nursing as a subject and a function.

    PubMed

    Granum, Vigdis

    2004-07-01

    This study, conducted at one University College in Norway, describes nursing students' perceptions of nursing as a theoretical subject and as a function. A descriptive/explorative design was selected. Thirty students from the first year and 30 students from the third year wrote down their perceptions in response to four open-ended questions. Fifteen students from each year (n = 30) were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed. According to the results, the content of the subject of nursing encompasses various fields of knowledge; therefore, the subject of nursing is unclear. The findings indicate that the third-year students either did not gain new insights on the subject or were still unable to verbalize such insights, contrary to the expectations expressed in the curriculum. Regarding the functions of nursing, the first-year students believed there is considerable report writing, which affected their nursing care, but the third-year students believed nurses are obliged to lead and plan nursing care. The students' perceptions of the content of the subject of nursing related only in part to professional functions, both at the beginning and end of their nursing education.

  17. Journal clubs: a strategy to teach civility to nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy; Jenkins, Sheryl; Woith, Wendy; Kim, Myoungjin

    2012-05-01

    Incivility affects nurses and nursing students and can negatively influence patient care and the quality of nursing education. The Institute of Medicine, The Joint Commission, and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommended implementation of strategies to manage incivility and build social capital. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the influence of a journal club as an educational intervention to build civility and academic integrity among nursing students. Seventy-nine nursing students completed the Nurses' Intervention for Civility Education Questionnaire and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire before and after the Civility Journal Club intervention. Students involved in the Civility Journal Club were more aware of civility and incivility, more likely to be helpful to their peers, and better equipped to cope with episodes of incivility.

  18. [Nursing students knowledge about alcohol and drugs].

    PubMed

    Vilela, Miriam Vargas; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; da Silva, Edilaine Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the knowledge of nursing students regarding the use of alcohol and other drugs, particularly addiction, tolerance, withdrawal and intoxication, the reasons students give for drug addiction and commencement, and personal interest in the issue of drug use. A descriptive-exploratory design was used, with a sample of 44 students, by applying a semi-structured questionnaire, constructed by the researchers based on the objectives, with open and closed questions, totaling 24 points. Ethical procedures were followed and data were submitted to exploratory descriptive analysis. It was shown that students knowledge is still limited, comprehension about a patients reasons for using and becoming addicted is incomplete and the interest is current.

  19. Adult student satisfaction in an accelerated RN-to-BSN program: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Mary T; Jackson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This mixed-method study revealed accelerated RN-to-BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) students' levels of satisfaction with a wide range of college services in a small university. Building on seminal research on the topic [Boylston, M. T., Peters, M. A., & Lacey, M. (2004). Adult student satisfaction in traditional and accelerated RN-to-BSN programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20, 23-32.], the Noel-Levitz Adult Student Priorities Survey (ASPS) and qualitative interview data revealed primary factors involved in nontraditional (adult) accelerated RN-to-BSN student satisfaction. The ASPS assesses both satisfaction with and importance of the following factors: academic advising effectiveness, academic services, admissions and financial aid effectiveness, campus climate, instructional effectiveness, registration effectiveness, safety and security, and service excellence. Of these factors, participants considered instructional effectiveness and academic advising effectiveness as most important and concomitantly gave high satisfaction ratings to each. In contrast, convenience of the bookstore, counseling services, vending machines, and computer laboratories were given low importance ratings. The participants cited convenience as a strong marketing factor. Loss of financial aid or family crisis was given as a reason for withdrawal and, for most students, would be the only reason for not completing the BSN program. Outcomes of this investigation may guide faculty, staff, and administrators in proactively creating an educational environment in which a nontraditional student can succeed.

  20. Simulation and Its Effect on Anxiety in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Pamela M

    2016-01-01

    Nursing students are known to have increased anxiety levels when they provide patient care during clinical rotations. The use of simulation as a teaching strategy for nursing students has been documented both for clinicians and nursing students. In spring 2013, two cohorts of junior-level baccalaureate nursing students participated in a simulation workshop. Anxiety levels were measured using the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory before and after a simulation workshop and one week later before an initial clinical experience. Anxiety levels were lower after the workshop but anxiety levels were unchanged or higher before initial obstetric clinical experiences.

  1. Caring behaviours of student nurses: Effects of pre-registration nursing education.

    PubMed

    Loke, Jennifer C F; Lee, Kah Wai; Lee, Bryant K; Mohd Noor, Asmah

    2015-11-01

    In an increasing technologised and cost-constrained healthcare environment, the role of pre-registration nursing education in nurturing and developing the professional caring disposition of students is becoming far more critical than before. In view of this growing demand, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Singapore's pre-registration nursing programmes on students' concept of caring. A descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey collected data using the Caring Behaviour Inventory from first and final year student nurses, nurse lecturers and nurses in practice. The findings based on student surveys indicated a statistically significant reduction in the overall level of caring behaviour in first to final year students. When compared with the findings of lecturers and nurses, less variance to lecturers than to nurses was found amongst the first years' score, and the lowest variance to nurses was demonstrated amongst the final year. A greater reduction was evidenced amongst Singaporean students, which was exaggerated with exposure to pre-enrolled nursing education and magnified with caring job experience. This study indicates more effort is necessary to harness student caring attributes in students' entire educational journey so that expressive caring is not subsumed in the teaching of students to meet demands of complicated contemporary care.

  2. Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

  3. Nursing students' attitudes towards sustainability and health care.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Janet; Grose, Jane; O'Connor, Anita; Bradbury, Martyn; Kelsey, Janet; Doman, Maggie

    2015-06-17

    Aim To evaluate attitudes towards embedding sustainability and climate change in nursing curricula among nursing students, some of whom had participated in a sustainability and health skills session, and determine whether the session could improve knowledge of sustainability. Methods Three months after the sustainability session, students who had participated along with a sample of students who had not, completed a Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey questionnaire. This investigated attitudes towards climate change and sustainability in nursing curricula and the costs of clinical and domestic waste disposal. Results Nursing students were positive about sustainability and climate change and its inclusion in the curriculum, irrespective of their participation in the sustainability scenario session. Participants in the sustainability session were more likely to identify correctly the cost of clinical waste disposal in the NHS. Conclusion The sustainability and health skills session has the potential to improve nursing students' knowledge of the cost of clinical waste disposal.

  4. Psychological distress, personality, and adjustment among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Warbah, L; Sathiyaseelan, M; Vijayakumar, C; Vasantharaj, B; Russell, S; Jacob, K S

    2007-08-01

    Psychological distress and poor adjustment among a significant number of nursing students is an important issue facing nursing education. The concerns need to be studied in detail and solutions need to be built into the nursing course in order to help students with such difficulty. This study used a cross-sectional survey design to study psychological distress, personality and adjustment among nursing students attending the College of Nursing, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. One hundred and forty five nursing students were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire 12, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and the Bell's Adjustment Inventory to investigate psychological distress, personality profile and adjustment, respectively. Thirty participants (20.7%) of the 145 students assessed reported high scores on the General Health Questionnaire. Psychological distress was significantly associated with having neurotic personality and adjustment difficulties in different areas of functioning.

  5. Exploring nursing students' level of preparedness for disaster response.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Cheryl K; Davis, Jennifer M; Sanders, Jenna L; Chapman, Laura A; Cisco, Mary Catherine; Hady, Arlene R

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study explores students' perceptions of personal and program preparedness for disasters. Participants in this online survey included 1,348 nursing students from every state plus Guam, Puerto Rico, and theVirgin Islands. The study explored three questions: a) the level of preparedness, including learning about different types of disasters, preparing disaster plans, creating disaster kits, and participating in community disaster response efforts; b) the impact of disasters on nursing students; and c) strategies to assist nursing students during disasters. Results indicated that nursing students throughout the country are generally not well prepared for disasters. Nurse educators need to develop strategies to prepare their students for disasters. The American Red Cross provides templates for organizations, including colleges and universities, to prepare their campuses for emergencies. Faculty need to collaborate with staff and students to develop and implement plans appropriate for their programs.

  6. Differences in Drinking Patterns Between Female Nursing and Nonnursing Students.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree; Engs, Ruth C; Middleton, Mary Jean

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the drinking patterns of 123 female nursing students with those of 185 female students of other majors enrolled beyond the freshman year at a large public university. High-risk drinking patterns did not vary significantly between the 2 groups, suggesting that students' drinking patterns reflected the norms of their institution. Prevention strategies geared at campus culture and that target students still enrolled in prerequisites may be needed to reduce alcohol abuse in nursing students.

  7. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing with Bullying Situations among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-01-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed…

  8. Toward a Grounded Theory of Nursing Student Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lenora

    2010-01-01

    Attrition of students from a nursing program is a significant concern. It is even more critical now because there are not enough nurses to fill all open positions in the healthcare industry. It is predicted the shortage will worsen in the next decade as an aging society increases the number of people requiring nursing care. While increasing the…

  9. Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.; McNair, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours encountered by nursing students in their final year of nursing education. Six hundred thirty-six respondents reported encountering at least one bullying behaviour from School of Nursing (SON) Faculty during one year of classroom or clinical course work. The results of…

  10. The Meaning of Visual Thinking Strategies for Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators are called upon to provide creative, innovative experiences for students in order to prepare nurses to work in complex healthcare settings. As part of this preparation, teaching observational and communication skills is critical for nurses and can directly affect patient outcomes. Visual thinking strategies (VTS) are a teaching…

  11. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing student... longer than the 9-month academic year may be proportionately increased. The total of all nursing...

  12. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing student... longer than the 9-month academic year may be proportionately increased. The total of all nursing...

  13. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing student... longer than the 9-month academic year may be proportionately increased. The total of all nursing...

  14. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing student... longer than the 9-month academic year may be proportionately increased. The total of all nursing...

  15. 42 CFR 57.307 - Maximum amount of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum amount of nursing student loans. 57.307... Nursing Student Loans § 57.307 Maximum amount of nursing student loans. The total of the nursing student... longer than the 9-month academic year may be proportionately increased. The total of all nursing...

  16. Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Aging among Nursing and Non-Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Meredith Troutman; Clark, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing life expectancies and more years spent living with chronic illnesses mean that increasing numbers of older adults will require nursing care. However, most nurses prefer not to work with older adults, and many nursing students have limited knowledge and negative attitudes towards aging and older adults. This study examined the knowledge…

  17. Nursing Student Retention in Associate Degree Nursing Programs Utilizing a Retention Specialist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, Ronna A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine specific variables associated with nursing student retention in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs. Jeffreys (2004) Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) conceptual model provided the framework for this descriptive correlational study. One hundred sixty eight pre-licensure associate degree…

  18. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  19. Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future.

  20. Student perceptions of incivility in nursing education: implications for educators.

    PubMed

    Altmiller, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of incivility in nursing education from the perspective of undergraduate nursing students and compared it to perspectives of educators as found in the literature. The sample consisted of 24 undergraduate junior and senior nursing students from four universities in the mid-Atlantic states. Data from four focus groups were transcribed and content analyzed to reveal themes and subthemes. Students perceived that incivility in nursing education exists. They shared a common view with findings in the literature regarding incivility from the faculty perspective. Notably, an emerging student view was that faculty may contribute to the escalating incivility in nursing education, and that student incivility is justified when faculty are seen as uncivil. The implications for educators, consistent with the literature, are that students want professors to maintain classroom decorum and set the example for civility.

  1. Collaborative learning among undergraduate students in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyeongra; Woomer, Gail R; Matthews, Judith T

    2012-03-01

    Teamwork can benefit students, enhancing their ability to think critically, solve problems creatively, and collaborate effectively. We piloted a collaborative learning project with undergraduate community health nursing students (N = 83) that entailed working in teams to explore epidemiologic data, synthesize the literature, and develop an evidence-based plan for nursing intervention and evaluation pertaining to a public health issue. Project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-project surveys by students, peer evaluation, and formative and summative evaluation by faculty. Having students work in teams, while challenging both for faculty and students, may be a viable strategy for preparing the next generation of nurses for inter- and intraprofessional collaboration. Our experience suggests that instituting a collaborative learning experience as part of an undergraduate course in community health nursing can be an effective way to expose students to constructive approaches to teamwork and prepare them for evidence-based nursing practice in the future.

  2. The Nursing Students' Experience of Psychiatric Practice in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju

    2015-10-01

    In 1995, South Korea passed the Mental Health Act, and since this time it has developed many mental health policies and facilities. The aim of this study is to understand and explore the experience of nursing students in the changed psychiatric practice environment since 1995. The present study is a qualitative thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 11 third and fourth grade nursing students who had experienced psychiatric practice in South Korea. A thematic analysis of 11 in-depth student interviews identified three themes: 'orientation before psychiatric practice', 'facing the mental hospital', and 'change and choice'. After practicing, nursing students developed positive attitude regarding psychiatry. Educators will have to focus more on education and support in order for the students to maintain positive attitude throughout their experience. The research herein shows that the role of the educators and psychiatric nurses is extremely important for nursing students in the elimination of a negative attitude towards psychiatry.

  3. Comparison of demographics, professional outcomes, and career satisfaction in accelerated and traditional baccalaureate nursing graduates.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joanne; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-03-01

    This cross-sectional study examined accelerated second-degree (n = 117) and traditional (n = 71) baccalaureate nursing (BSN) graduates from a large, private, urban university in the mid-Atlantic United States regarding demographics, professional outcomes, and career satisfaction using an electronic survey. Results showed a statistically significant difference in two professional development variables: plans to return for an advanced nursing degree and membership in nursing professional organizations. There was no statistically significant difference in career satisfaction between accelerated second-degree and traditional BSN graduates. These findings indicated that both accelerated second-degree and traditional BSN graduates, despite matriculation in different nursing curricular models, have similar professional outcomes and career satisfaction.

  4. The Efficacy of Academic Acceleration for Gifted Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Peternel, George

    2010-01-01

    This study supported the use of acceleration for gifted minority students in math. The gifted minority students in this study viewed taking accelerated math courses as exciting and beneficial for preparation for high school and college and particularly liked the challenges they encountered while taking advanced classes. They enjoyed working ahead…

  5. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  6. Three Accelerated Developmental Education Programs: Features, Student Outcomes, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Hodara, Michelle; Cho, Sung-Woo; Xu, Di

    2015-01-01

    To support the long-term success of underprepared students, many community colleges are experimenting with accelerated developmental education models, which allow students to complete remediation and enroll in college-level math and English within a shorter time frame. This study examines three developmental acceleration programs, including two in…

  7. Male Nurses in Israel: Barriers, Motivation, and How They Are Perceived by Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Liat; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Romem, Pnina; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    The current worldwide nursing shortage remains a challenge for the nursing profession. Encouraging men to become nurses and, thereby, increasing the number of practitioners are crucial factors in facing this challenge. The historiography of nursing presents nursing as "women's work," based on the assumption that it is inherently appropriate for women only. Although men were employed as nurses even before nursing was recognized as a profession, male nurses were always a minority in the field. Over the years, the proportion of male nurses has increased, but they still comprise only 5 to 10% of the nursing workforce in the western world. This study examined men's motives for a career choice of nursing, how male nurses are perceived, and the barriers that they face. The study was conducted among 336 nursing students studying in a co-educational program in various academic tracks at a public, nonsectarian university in the south of Israel. Participants completed the following questionnaires in one study session: sociodemographic questionnaire; Attitudes Towards Men in Nursing Scale; motives for career choice questionnaire; and the questionnaire of the perceptions of the professional status of nursing. Study findings revealed that men tended to choose nursing because of financial constraints significantly more frequently than women (P=.001). Among the participants, there was no significant between-sex difference in the perception nursing as women's work (P=.002) or in perception of male nurses as homosexuals. Results of the study showed that the status of the nursing profession is considered low, and the low status deters men from choosing nursing as a career. The motivation for men's career choice must be understood, and men must be empowered to improve their work conditions and financial remuneration in order to recruit men to the field and to improve the perception of the profession and its public status.

  8. [Bachelor and teaching degree in nursing: experiences and expectations of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Santos, Sueli Maria dos Reis; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; da Silva, Marcelo Henrique; Carneiro, Carla Toscano; Aquino, Priscila Sanches

    2011-12-01

    This is a phenomenological study that aimed to understand the experience of the student enrolled in both the Bachelor and the teaching undergraduate degree in nursing at the same time. Interviews with eight nursing students from a public university of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were undertaken. Analyses were conducted based on the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz. Results showed that according to the pupils, there is no connection between the teaching courses and the Bachelor ones, but they also highlighted that the teaching degree helps educational activities in nursing. The students have interest in working with health education and to become nursing teachers. They also consider that the dual degree allows the expansion of knowledge and generates better expectations related to professional practice. However, it has gaps which need to be reviewed by those who work in nursing education, addressing the specific theoretical and practical needs of nursing students.

  9. The nursing student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Martha J; Salzer, Judith Schurr

    2003-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in college-age students presents a complex challenge of coping with academic coursework, refining life skills, and addressing self-limitations. Behaviors that characterize ADHD are particularly problematic for nursing students, especially when the student has difficulty with behaviors that exemplify executive functioning. The authors discuss symptoms and treatments associated with the diagnosis of ADHD and evaluation and interventions for college students, based on guidelines from the Americans With Disabilities Act. Nursing faculty can facilitate academic success by recognizing the problem in nursing students and implementing strategies useful for self-management of ADHD.

  10. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks.

  11. An Epidemiological Approach to Addressing Student Attrition in Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Marcia I.

    2003-01-01

    In place of Tinto's model of student retention, an epidemiological approach is recommended for nursing education. It includes primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions for preventing student attrition. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  12. The learning experiences of Taiwanese nursing students studying in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiu-Wen; Singh, Charanjit; Bird, Beverly; Ives, Glenice

    2008-04-01

    Increasing numbers of international students from Asia are attracted to Australian higher education institutions. For many of these students, English is their second language (ESL). This article describes the experiences of 21 Taiwanese baccalaureate and graduate nursing students studying at Australian universities. Using a qualitative framework, semistructured interviews were conducted in the students'first language. The Chinese and English translations of the transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis. A picture emerges of Taiwanese nursing students who, despite obstacles, found a "joy of learning" in Australia. They developed strategies to overcome obstacles to their learning and advocated greater institutional and faculty support, including mentorship, for international students. The findings reinforce the unique difficulties ESL nursing students experience and highlight institutional and nursing faculties' responsibilities to develop a curriculum framework that addresses the language, pedagogical, academic, clinical, and sociocultural needs of this unique group of international students.

  13. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  14. Success for Students and Nurses With Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Marks, Beth; McCulloh, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a "call to action" for nurse educators to identify and implement best practices supporting the success of students with disabilities given recent federal legislative changes. Best practices for educating students with disabilities in nursing education are discussed. Increasing our understanding of disability from a variety of models--not just the medical model--will promote greater diversity and inclusivity within the nursing profession, which will enhance patient care.

  15. Faculty support for ESL nursing students: action plan for success.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eileen; Beaver, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students whose first language is not English have lower retention and NCLEX-RN pass rates. This review identifies four areas of difficulty and recommends strategies that can be employed by supportive faculty to assist these students and help ensure a more diverse nursing workforce to care for our increasingly diverse patient population.

  16. Academic dishonesty among Italian nursing students: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Macale, Loreana; Ghezzi, Valerio; Rocco, Gennaro; Fida, Roberta; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2017-03-01

    Considering the ethical issues related to nursing and that Ethics is an integral part of the nursing education in the degree course, one would suppose that academic dishonesty might be less frequent in nursing students than in students of other disciplines. However, several studies show that this trend of deceitful behaviour seems to be similar among the university nursing students and those of other disciplines. The aim of this study is to investigate the phenomenon of academic dishonesty in the classroom from a longitudinal perspective within a cohort of Italian nursing students. A non-experimental longitudinal design was used. All nursing students were recruited from the Nursing Science Bachelor Degree Program of a big Italian university in the centre of Italy and participants were part of an ongoing longitudinal research project which started in 2011 on nursing students' wellbeing. The results show that students get accustomed to taking academically deceitful actions. They come to consider their behaviours acceptable and normal, thereby stabilizing them, which increases the probability of stabilizing subsequent deceitful behaviours. The stability through time of academic cheating behaviours committed during higher education, within the study's timeframe, provides important perspectives into the establishment of rigorous standards of ethical and moral behaviours by the students.

  17. Attitudes of Nursing Faculty towards Nursing Students with Disabilities: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990) and Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA, 2008) provide students with disabilities access to postsecondary institutions and are applicable to nursing education in all learning environments. Nursing faculty members are charged with admitting, educating, and graduating students, with…

  18. Health Habits of Nursing versus Non-nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, Cathy B.; Scott-Stiles, Anne

    2000-01-01

    The Health Habits Inventory was completed at two time intervals by 71 nursing and 83 other students. Nursing students scored higher in health habits and improved significantly over 2 years, especially in such behaviors as eating breakfast, performing self-exams, reading food labels, wearing seatbelts, and exercising. (SK)

  19. Differences in critical thinking of nontraditional and traditional nursing students.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, C A

    1999-01-01

    This study is part of a larger study describing the differences in critical thinking between nontraditional and traditional beginning baccalaureate nursing students during the first clinical nursing course. Descriptive data analysis from student journals, interviews, and researcher observations revealed three major dimensions of reasoning to describe students' critical thinking: exploration of thoughts and feelings, demonstration of humility, and use of analogous experiences. Nontraditional beginning students do think critically and value the opportunity to share their subjective clinical experiences.

  20. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  1. Cooperative m-learning with nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Krauskopf, Patricia B; Gaylord, Nan M; Ward, Andrew; Huffstutler-Hawkins, Shelley; Goodwin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    New technologies give nurse academicians the opportunity to incorporate innovative teaching-learning strategies into the nursing curricula. Mobile technology for learning, or m-learning, has considerable potential for the nursing classroom but lacks sufficient empirical evidence to support its use. Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, the effect of using cooperative and interactive m-learning techniques in enhancing classroom and clinical learning was explored. The relationship between m-learning and students' learning styles was determined through a multimethod educational research study involving nurse practitioner students at two mid-Atlantic universities. During the 16-month period, nurse practitioner students and their faculty used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to participate in various m-learning activities. Findings from focus group and survey responses concluded that PDAs, specifically the Pocket PC, are useful reference tools in the clinical setting and that all students, regardless of learning style, benefited from using PDAs. It was also demonstrated that connecting students with classmates and other nurse practitioner students at distant universities created a cooperative learning community providing additional support and knowledge acquisition. The authors concluded that in order to successfully prepare nurse practitioner graduates with the skills necessary to function in the present and future health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must be creative and innovative, incorporating various revolutionary technologies into their nurse practitioner curricula.

  2. The experience of nursing students who make mistakes in clinical.

    PubMed

    Zieber, Mark Pijl; Williams, Beverley

    2015-05-07

    The experience of nursing students who make mistakes during clinical practice is poorly understood. The literature identifies clinical practice mistakes as a significant issue in nursing practice and education but there is very little research on the topic. This study used a grounded theory approach to explore the experience of undergraduate nursing students who had made at least one mistake in their clinical practice. What emerged is a theory that illuminates the process of how students move through the positive and negative elements of the mistake experience the core variable that emerged from the study was "living through the mistake experience." The mistake experience was clearly a traumatic process for nursing students and students reported feeling unprepared and lacking the capability to manage the mistake experience. A number of recommendations for nursing education are proposed.

  3. Student Nurses in the OR: Improving Recruitment and Retention.

    PubMed

    Helzer Doroh, Holly M; Monahan, Janean Carter

    2016-01-01

    Changes in nursing education have made it difficult for students to find or participate in perioperative clinical experiences, which makes it difficult for employers to find experienced perioperative nurses. We developed a perioperative preceptorship for senior-level nursing students, to provide them with the opportunity to learn RN circulator skills based on AORN's Guidelines for Perioperative Practice. Senior nursing students had the opportunity to demonstrate critical thinking skills within the context of patient-centered care while integrating knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. The students applied the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in the OR setting during a required minimum 210-hour clinical commitment. We believe the course has been successful in providing the foundation needed to become a competent perioperative nurse, because, to date, all students who were hired are still employed in the OR.

  4. Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight.

  5. Effects of using the developing nurses' thinking model on nursing students' diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, Mary Gay

    2012-08-01

    This quasi-experimental study tested the effectiveness of an educational model, Developing Nurses' Thinking (DNT), on nursing students' clinical reasoning to achieve patient safety. Teaching nursing students to develop effective thinking habits that promote positive patient outcomes and patient safety is a challenging endeavor. Positive patient outcomes and safety are achieved when nurses accurately interpret data and subsequently implement appropriate plans of care. This study's pretest-posttest design determined whether use of the DNT model during 2 weeks of clinical postconferences improved nursing students' (N = 83) diagnostic accuracy. The DNT model helps students to integrate four constructs-patient safety, domain knowledge, critical thinking processes, and repeated practice-to guide their thinking when interpreting patient data and developing effective plans of care. The posttest scores of students from the intervention group showed statistically significant improvement in accuracy.

  6. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing...-time course of study at a school leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing or an equivalent...

  7. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing...-time course of study at a school leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing or an equivalent...

  8. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing...-time course of study at a school leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing or an equivalent...

  9. 42 CFR 57.310 - Repayment and collection of nursing student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repayment and collection of nursing student loans... LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.310 Repayment and collection of nursing student loans. (a) Each nursing...-time course of study at a school leading to a baccalaureate degree in nursing or an equivalent...

  10. Nursing student anxiety as a context for teaching/learning.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Terri L; Janiszewski Goodin, Heather

    2013-03-01

    Experiential learning in nursing programs includes role-play, simulation, and live clinical experiences. Anxiety levels can heighten during experiential learning as students attempt to gain psychomotor skills and transfer knowledge into critical thinking. Nursing students may experience anxiety that can interfere with learning and critical thinking. However, the presence of student anxiety can be used to initiate a purposeful caring transaction between nursing faculty and student. The caring transaction is a way for faculty to model both caring and presence, create experiential learning of caring by students, and lead students to initiate self-care interventions to manage anxiety through the nursing program and beyond. Multiple learning outcomes can be achieved as the students integrate faculty-modeled concepts of caring and presence into simulated or real clinical situations, reduce or manage their anxiety, and improve their clinical judgment and critical thinking skills.

  11. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  12. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in research: the students' experience of a summer internship program pilot project.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Clarke, Diana; Plohman, James; Gerard, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Educators continue to struggle with ways to foster an interest in and a passion for nursing research among undergraduate students. The purpose of this article is to describe the introduction of undergraduate student internships at the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, as an innovation in education that allowed students to be employed while engaging them in student learning, scientific inquiry, and scholarship through one-to-one faculty-student research mentorships. In this article, the key components of the summer internship program are described, along with five nursing students' experiences of their participation in the program.

  13. [The application of student-centered teaching to nursing education].

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Ping

    2006-12-01

    Nursing education in Taiwan is currently facing an extensive reform toward student-centeredness. However, few articles were found in the Taiwanese nursing literature focusing on student-centered teaching and nurse educators in Taiwan may have different interpretations of it. Misinterpretation of the term 'student-centeredness' may lead educational reform into inconsistency or ineffectiveness. This study aims to expand student-centered teaching's application to nursing education, stressing that not only the teaching techniques but also a consistent thinking approach is essential for educational reform. The content of this article addresses the meaning of student-centeredness and the differences between teacher-centeredness and student-centeredness. The article also advocates Weimers' five key changes toward student-centered teaching: the balance of power, the function of content, the role of the teacher, the responsibility for learning, and the purpose and process of evaluation, and further expounds their application to nursing education. Hopefully this article can provide Taiwanese nursing educators and students with an explicit view of student-centeredness and facilitate a more effective application of it to educational reform in nursing.

  14. [Alcohol use and spirituality among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Pillon, Sandra Cristina; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; de Souza Gonçalves, Angélica Martins; de Araújo, Keila Maria

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate alcohol use and the levels of spirituality among nursing students. The tests used were the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Spirituality Scale. Participants were 191 (80.2%) nursing undergraduates from a city in the state of Minas Gerais, 75.4% of which were female, average age 25 years, and 149 (78%) were Catholic. As for alcohol use per gender, 117 (75%) women used alcoholic beverages and 33 (56.9%) had a drinking problem (p?0.05), against 25 men (431%). Low scores for spirituality levels were found in the sample: in average, women had lower scores compared to men (12.7 against 13.5). Comparing the level of spirituality with having a drinking problem, it was observed that students with low risk alcohol use had lower levels of spirituality. In conclusion, spirituality may not function as a protecting factor for alcohol use, hence this behavior may be under the control of other variables.

  15. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  16. Being cabezona: success strategies of Hispanic nursing students.

    PubMed

    Moceri, Joane T

    2010-01-01

    Hispanic registered nurses (RNs) are poorly represented in professional nursing, comprising only 1.7% of RNs despite representing 15% of the population of the United States. Furthermore, their numbers are actually decreasing in nursing at the same time the Hispanic population is experiencing serious health disparities. This descriptive, interpretive study explores strategies used by Hispanic nursing students to overcome obstacles from the perspectives of 13 currently enrolled students and recent graduates through focus groups and individual interviews. Successful students were highly motivated to succeed, while at the same time able to maintain strong cultural ties and family responsibilities, and used a strategy they called being cabezona(stubborn) in the face of numerous obstacles, including discrimination. Recommendations for nurse educators are presented, including the need for increased flexibility, mentoring support, and including curricular content about issues of privilege and oppression in nursing programs.

  17. Predictors of Improvement in Critical Thinking Skills among Nursing Students in an Online Graduate Nursing Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine predictors of improvement in critical thinking skills among online graduate nursing students in a graduate nursing research course. Thirty-five students who had taken an online Nursing research course within the prior 12 months and who were currently enrolled in the online graduate Nursing program at…

  18. "It's All Connected!" Nursing Students' Experiences of a New Form of Case Seminar Integrating Medical and Nursing Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turunen Olsson, Pernilla; Weurlander, Maria; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine; Wärn Hede, Gunnel; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Broberger, Eva; Hult, Håkan; Wernerson, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nursing students learn medical subjects and nursing separately, which makes it difficult to develop an integrated understanding. This study aimed to explore nursing students' experiences of participating in a case seminar integrating medical and nursing sciences and if, and how, it contributed to their learning. A case seminar…

  19. Role ambiguity in nursing: undergraduate students' struggle for direction.

    PubMed

    Gagan, Alex

    2002-06-01

    An experience common to many undergraduate nursing students, particularly whilst on placement in the clinical area, is a sense of aimlessness, lack of direction and standard role, and an overall ambiguity about what nursing is and does. Research in the nursing literature contributes to and supports the concept of the lack of clarity of the nursing role. Whilst the discourse of nursing is diverse and covers many aspects of nursing, a number of core issues may be seen to emerge. These contribute to form a concept that may be identified as the ambiguity of nursing. This paper identifies those issues and represents this concept of role ambiguity. These issues include the concept of caring and the apparent lack of clarity over what this actually is in a nursing context.

  20. Chemical Dependency and Nursing Students: A Complicated Process Calling for Nurse Educator Involvement.

    PubMed

    Dittman, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Chemical use and dependency is a prevalent problem in society and among the members of the nursing profession. Nursing students, as the novice representatives of the profession, may be particularly vulnerable to chemical use. Nursing leaders in both educational institutions and practice settings must recognize highly vulnerable individuals, which nursing activities are most vulnerable, and interventions to assist and support the vulnerable individual while assuring a safe practice environment. As nurses, it is our responsibility, both ethically and legally, to provide a safe working environment not only for our patients but also for ourselves by reporting the behaviors of nurses who may be impaired through the proper channels according to your state's Nurse Practice Act. Through a united approach, nurse leaders from both the academic and practice environments should provide a safe and effective rehabilitation approach.

  1. Is nursing profession my first choice? A follow up survey in pre-registeration student nurses.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hui-Ling; Lin, Ya-Ping; Chang, Hui-Kuan; Chen, Chia-Jung; Peng, Tai-Chu; Chang, Fwu-Mei

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing students' value factors, motivational factors, institutional factors and competence factors contributed to career intent. All fifth-year nursing students (n=231) in a college in eastern Taiwan completed a survey which followed-up a study done 1 year previously in the same population were followed for 1 year. A validated and reliable self-administered questionnaire developed by the investigators in 2004 and modified in 2005 was used in the study. Data on value factors, competence factors, motivational factors, and situational factors were collected. The overall response rate was 87.4%. The rates of considering nursing as their first choice improved from 19.1% at the point of college-entry to 34.6% in 2004 and 46.5% in 2005 in the same cohort students. Past experience with being ill, degree of stress, self-rated clinical competency, perceived support from staff nurses, and perceived value were associated with career decision after the completion of a whole year of clinical practice (p<0.05-0.01). In multivariate analysis, perceived support from staff nurses, past experience with being ill, and perceived value proved to be significant predictors of the career intent of pre-registration student nurses. Nursing faculty and nurse administrators need to provide assistance to reduce nursing students' career attrition.

  2. Organized music instruction as a predictor of nursing student success.

    PubMed

    Cesario, Sandra K; Cesario, Robert J; Cesario, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Stringent admission criteria exist for nursing programs in the United States, but better predictors of success are needed to reduce student attrition. Research indicates that organized music experiences are associated with greater academic success. This exploratory study examined the association between early music experiences and undergraduate nursing student success. Findings suggest that students with a music background were more likely to graduate, have higher grade point averages, and pass the licensure examination. Previous music education might be considered as an additional predictor of nursing student success.

  3. Personal values of baccalaureate nursing students in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hülya; Kaya, Nurten; Şenyuva, Emine; Işık, Burçin

    2012-12-01

    Value education is aimed at helping students develop a mode of reasoning, enabling them to make decisions and deal with conflicts on a daily basis. For this, it should firstly be assessment personal values of nursing students. The purpose of the study was to determine the personal values of nursing students with respect to certain variables. The population of the study, which had a cross-sectional design, included all undergraduate students (n = 525) attending the nursing school. The sample group comprised 397 nursing students selected from among the nursing students attending a baccalaureate programme in Turkey using the disproportional cluster sampling method. Data were collected utilizing the Personal Information Form and Value Preferences Scale. The personal values of the students were found to be moral, social, financial/economic, aesthetic, political, religious and scientific/theoretical values. The study suggested that the age, year at school and economic level of the family affected the students' values. Values influence behaviours that are an essential component of humanistic nursing care. They are integral to professional socialization, evident in nursing care and fundamental decisions that affect practice.

  4. The effects of student incivility on nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Luparell, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 21 nursing faculty who experienced uncivil encounters with nursing students were interviewed to determine what effects those encounters had on them. The uncivil encounters ranged from relatively mild to highly aggressive, including overt threats to the faculty members' well-being. The effects of the uncivil encounters on the nursing faculty involved were significant and included both short-term and long-term sequelae, such as physical and emotional reactions, decreased self-esteem, loss of confidence in their teaching abilities, significant time expenditures, and negative effects on the educational process. Three faculty members left nursing education and cited their interactions with students as an influential factor.

  5. The dance of incivility in nursing education as described by nursing faculty and students.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Uncivil and disruptive behaviors in nursing education are serious problems requiring ongoing attention and research. Academic incivility jeopardizes the welfare of faculty, students, and the campus community. This article describes a qualitative study involving 289 nursing faculty members and students from 41 states who responded to 4 open-ended questions included in the Incivility in Nursing Education survey. A conceptual model is introduced to illustrate the study findings. The model depicts how stress, attitude, and a lack of effective communication and intentional engagement may contribute to the "dance" of incivility in nursing education.

  6. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  7. Changes in stress and nurse self-concept among baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree; Stoelting-Gettelfinger, Wendy

    2011-05-01

    This pilot study's purpose was to investigate the relationship between stress and nurse self-concept. Specifically, it examined whether enrollment in a wellness course affected stress levels and self-concept acquisition among sophomore baccalaureate nursing students (N = 52). The findings showed that early in the curriculum these students had a fairly well developed sense of professional self-concept but made gains in facets of leadership and communication over the course of the semester. Students demonstrated high levels of stress that remained unchanged over the semester, regardless of self-concept acquisition. This study concluded that enrollment in a wellness course was insufficient to prepare nursing students to manage stress as they transition to professional roles, and it was possible that undergraduate education perpetuated the internalization of stress as part of a nurse's professional identity. Future studies are needed to determine effective ways to teach stress management and best design nursing curricula to reduce stressors.

  8. Comparison of nurse educators' and nursing students' descriptions of teaching codes of ethics.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; van der Arend, Arie; Katajisto, Jouko

    2011-09-01

    This study analysed teaching of nurses' codes of ethics in basic nursing education in Finland. A total of 183 educators and 214 students responded to a structured questionnaire. The data was analysed by SPSS. Teaching of nurses' codes was rather extensive. The nurse-patient relationship was highlighted. Educators assessed their teaching statistically significantly more extensive than what students' perceptions were. The use of teaching and evaluation methods was conventional, but differences between the groups concerning the use of these methods were statistically significant. Students' knowledge of and their ability to apply the codes was mediocre. Most educators and students assessed educators' knowledge of the codes as adequate for teaching. These educators also taught the codes more extensively and these students perceived the teaching as more extensive. Otherwise educators' and students' socio-demographic variables had little association with the teaching. Research should focus on the organization and effectiveness of ethics education, and on educators' competence.

  9. Assessing the attitudes and perceptions towards nursing profession among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Poreddi, Vijayalakshmi; Ramachandra; Konduru, Reddemma; Math, Suresh Bada

    2012-02-01

    Nursing education is a challenge in a developing country like India. This cross sectional study assessed the attitudes and perceptions of nursing professionals and their desired future practices. The study was conducted using a modified version of Beliefs, Attitudes and Perceived Practice questionnaire among 129 students who were undergoing undergraduate nursing programme at a selected college of nursing in Bangalore. Data was analysed and interpreted by using descriptive and inferential statistics. Forty-four (34.1%) of the subjects agreed that they were enrolled of their own interest; 43 (33.3%) of them reported that they enrolled in nursing out of their own interest and also to improve their financial situations. Only 4 (3.1%) stated that they have to protect the rights and dignity of the patients. 45 (34.9%) of the subjects indicated that the nurse-patient relationship should be both professional and a relation of sympathy. Upon graduation 69 (53.5%) of the subjects preferred to pursue the nursing career, 36 (27.9%) in academics, 12 (9.30%) wanted to change the profession. Nearly 63 (48.8%) of the subjects agreed that social prejudice has a great influence on nursing students in choosing nursing profession as their career. An urgent need is seen in the area of educating nursing students regarding patient's rights. There is also a need to improve the image of nurses in the society to attract more number of students into this noble profession. Counselling and introduction to nursing course should be introduced by all the universities, to develop positive attitudes towards nursing profession.

  10. Intravenous drug administration: a skill for student nurses?

    PubMed

    Morris, Ruth

    2006-04-01

    This article explores issues related to children's nursing students learning about preparation and administration of IV drugs, considering professional and organisational issues. The competencies required for safe practice are discussed, and the question of who is in the best position to teach and assess students in this skill is considered. Organisations need to ensure that clear guidelines exist for student nurses' involvement in IV therapy.

  11. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible for consideration for a nursing...

  12. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible for consideration for a nursing...

  13. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible for consideration for a nursing...

  14. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible for consideration for a nursing...

  15. 42 CFR 57.306 - Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.306 Eligibility and selection of nursing student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible for consideration for a nursing...

  16. A Pilot Study To Measure the Caring Efficacy of Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Judith

    2003-01-01

    Results of the Coates Caring Efficacy Scale for 193 preentry to final-semester nursing students indicated that mean scores were higher than in Coates' sample of novice student nurses. Students were able to articulate the role of caring in nursing. Even preentry students scored well, suggesting that factors other than nursing education contribute…

  17. Nursing Students' Nonverbal Reactions to Malodor in Wound Care Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gloria Waters

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound care is an essential competency which nursing students are expected to acquire. To foster students' competency, nurse educators use high fidelity simulation to expose nursing students to various wound characteristics. Problem: Little is known about how nursing students react to simulated wound characteristics. Malodor is a…

  18. Increasing student nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding in baccalaureate education.

    PubMed

    Bozzette, Maryann; Posner, Tricia

    2013-05-01

    Nurses are the largest group of health care professionals capable of providing crucial support to new parents (Marzalik, 2004). However, studies show that nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding is inadequate and most nursing programs do not include breastfeeding in their curriculum. Therefore nursing graduates enter the field of maternal child care with little or no ability to assist new mothers. A pilot program was implemented at a major university to evaluate the effect of adding specific breastfeeding content to the nursing curriculum. A pre-post-test method was used to evaluate nursing students who were provided a comprehensive lecture on evidence-based breastfeeding information with audiovisual components and resources. This education pilot showed the inclusion of breastfeeding education significantly increased student knowledge of the benefits and nutritional value of breastfeeding and management of lactation complications.

  19. Feeling at hospitals: perspective-taking, empathy and personal distress among professional nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Belén; Ambrona, Tamara; Gregory, Jennifer; Stocks, Eric; Oceja, Luis

    2013-04-01

    When facing a person in need, professional nurses will tend to adopt an objective perspective compared to nursing students who, instead, will tend to adopt an imagine-other perspective. Consequently, professional nurses will show lower vicarious emotional reaction such as empathy and distress. Using samples from Spain (Studies 1 and 2) and United states (Study 3), we compared perspective taking strategies and the emotional responses of nurses and nursing students when perceiving a sick child (Study 1) and a sick adult (Studies 2 and 3). Taken together, the results supported our hypotheses. We discuss the applied value of considering the relationship between perspective-taking and its emotional consequences for the nursing profession.

  20. Professional image and intention to emigrate among Israeli nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Tova; Kagan, Ilya

    2011-04-01

    Under globalization, nurse migration has become an increasingly widespread phenomenon. One factor motivating it might be nurses' perception of the profession's image. The purpose of this study was to examine the connection between Israeli working nurses' and student nurses' perceptions of nursing's professional image and their intention to emigrate. One hundred thirty-two nurses and students participated in this cross-sectional study, the data collected by means of a structured questionnaire. Fifty-five percent of the sample were considering emigration or definitely intended to emigrate. Significantly more participants under the age of 35 were considering or had decided to emigrate than older participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between intention to migrate and perception of the profession's image. However, perceived professional image, as a component of professional reasons for emigrating (to get a better salary, working conditions, etc.), did contribute to the intention to emigrate.

  1. Nursing education challenges: students with English as an additional language.

    PubMed

    Starr, Kimberly

    2009-09-01

    Nurse educators are challenged by students who did not learn Standard American English as a primary language. It is not only language that makes these students stand out-cultural beliefs, values and practices need to be appreciated as well. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the current qualitative literature on challenges faced in nursing education for students with English as an additional language. Ten qualitative studies regarding educational issues of nursing students with EAL were included in the synthesis. The study was conducted using the ethnographic metasynthesis model of Noblit and Hare. Two major reciprocal translations of educational issues emerged: challenges and reinforcements. Challenges included language, academics, resources, and culture. Reinforcements included resources, academics, and culture. The results may be used by nurse educators for developing interventions to help culturally diverse students succeed. Interventions are directed toward issues surrounding language and culture.

  2. Clinical placements and nursing students' career planning: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; McCall, Louise; Wray, Natalie

    2010-04-01

    Many nursing students enter undergraduate programmes with preconceived ideas about their future nursing careers, and intend to practice in particular areas such as midwifery or paediatrics. Through clinical placements, students are exposed to different clinical areas and professional socialization is facilitated. However, little is known about the influence of clinical placements on students' career intentions. This paper reports nursing findings drawn from a large qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia that sought to explore the influence of health professional students' clinical placements on their future career intentions. Participants were invited to be involved in either face-to-face or focus group interviews depending upon their own preference. Thematic data analysis revealed three main themes: 're-affirming career choice', 'working in a particular area' and 'work location'. Findings from the study add to our understanding of factors influencing nursing students' planning for their future careers including the impact of clinical placements.

  3. Feasibility and outcomes of paid undergraduate student nurse positions.

    PubMed

    Gamroth, Lucia; Budgen, Claire; Lougheed, Mary

    2006-09-01

    An Undergraduate Nurse Employment Demonstration Project (UNDP) was implemented in four Health Service Areas in British Columbia with a concurrent evaluation study. This demonstration project comprised the development and implementation of a new position in the BC healthcare system. The position enabled third- and fourth-year nursing students to be employed at their level of education. The purposes of the evaluation were to explore the feasibility and outcomes of this type of paid undergraduate student nurse employment. The three-year project and evaluation included both implementation and outcome analysis. The implementation evaluation design was descriptive and prospective, involving multiple data sources. The outcome evaluation design was quasi-experimental, with intervention and comparison groups. Learning outcomes for undergraduate nurses were increased confidence, organizational ability, competency and ability to work with a team. Workplace outcomes were increased unit morale, help with workload and improved patient care. New graduates with undergraduate nurse experience reported less time required for orientation and transition than other graduates who did not have this experience, and workplace nurses viewed these new graduates as more job-ready than other new graduates. After 21 months, new graduates with undergraduate nurse experience were less likely to move to other employment than other new graduates. Results from the four Health Service Areas indicated that the paid undergraduate nurse position was feasible and that outcomes benefited students, new graduates and workplaces. The undergraduate nurse position is now being implemented throughout all Health Service Areas in British Columbia.By 2000, concerns in British Columbia about the nursing workforce, workplace and patient safety had escalated to the point where diverse stakeholder groups were prepared to work together in new ways to prepare nursing graduates to be more job-ready, to recruit and retain

  4. Overview of teaching strategies for cultural competence in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Long, Tracey B

    2012-01-01

    Multiple curricular approaches are being used to teach cultural competency to nursing students in the United States in accordance with accrediting board standards. As nurse educators are searching for evidence based teaching practices, this article reviews the most commonly current teaching methods being used. Although a variety of methods are being implemented, little empirical evidence exists to suggest any one methodology for teaching cultural competency for nursing students produces significantly better outcomes. The use of clinical experiences, standardized patients and immersion experiences have produced the most favorable results which increase student awareness, knowledge and confidence in working with ethnically diverse patients.

  5. Students' academic performance in nursing as a function of student and faculty learning style congruency.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Nagata, B

    1996-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify learning styles of traditional baccalaureate nursing students, registered nurse baccalaureate students, baccalaureate nursing students holding a previous non-nursing degree, and nursing educators and to determine the effects of teacher/student learning style congruency on academic performance, when controlled for students' previous academic achievement. Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and a Descriptive Data Questionnaire were administered to 334 nursing students and their respective nurse educators from two nursing schools in Mississippi. Learning style scores were computed and faculty and student learning style congruency was described as: 1) matched on both abstract-concrete and active-reflective dimensions; 2) matched on only the abstract-concrete dimension; 3) matched on only the active-reflective dimension; or 4) not matched on either dimension. There were no significant differences in learning style among the three groups of nursing students, and learning style congruency between student and faculty did not appear to significantly affect academic performance of students.

  6. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  7. Cultivating a Culture of Medication Safety in Prelicensure Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bush, Peggy A; Hueckel, Rémi M; Robinson, Dana; Seelinger, Terry A; Molloy, Margory A

    2015-01-01

    Safety education in nursing has traditionally focused at the level of individual nurse-patient interactions. Students and novice clinicians lack clinical experience to create context and understand the complexity of the health care system and safety science. Using the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses quality and safety competency as a framework, the objective of this education project was to design comprehensive, engaging, learner-centered, online modules that increase knowledge, skills, and attitudes about medication safety.

  8. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  9. The relationship between leadership styles and empathy among student nurses.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Mary; Evans, Ginger; Mefford, Linda; Coe, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Much of the nursing literature on leadership describes the qualities of existing nursing leaders, while emphasizing the need for leadership development in student nurses for both managerial and clinical practice. However, there is a lack of research literature on the characteristics of current students. Conducted by the University of Tennessee College of Nursing Empathy Research Group, this pilot study explores the relationship between leadership styles and empathy (cognitive and affective) levels. This correlational descriptive study involved self-report using 3 instruments. Hogan Empathy Scale (HES) and Emotional Empathy Tendency Scale (EETS) measured cognitive and affective empathy levels. The Multifactoral Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ-5x) was used to determine leadership style. Data analysis yielded evidence of a weak positive correlation between the predominant transformational leadership style and empathy levels in both junior and senior students. This correlation has implications for both nurse educators and future employers.

  10. Development of clinical assessment criteria for postgraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, B G; Bonner, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper explores the development and implementation of specific criteria to determine the level of clinical performance of postgraduate nursing students during the first year of a Master of Nursing course. The authors describe two commonly used clinical skill assessment tools and identify limitations of these tools for postgraduate nursing students. As a result of these limitations, Clinical Assessment Criteria (CAC) utilising the framework of Benner (1984) was developed. Inherent within the CAC is four levels of clinical nursing performance, which enable the nurse teacher and student to monitor the progression from novice to proficient levels of practice within a specialty area. Following a successful pilot study, the CAC was incorporated into clinical assessments in nine specialty postgraduate courses. Furthermore, the framework developed for the CAC can also be integrated into a variety of professional development domains.

  11. An intervention aimed at reducing plagiarism in undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Alison; Crawford, Tonia; Cloete, Linda

    2015-05-01

    Plagiarism is a current and developing problem in the tertiary education sector where students access information and reproduce it as their own. It is identified as occurring in many tertiary level degrees including nursing and allied health profession degrees. Nursing specifically, is a profession where standards and ethics are required and honesty is paramount. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in nursing student's knowledge and understanding of plagiarism before and after an educational intervention in their first semester of the Bachelor of nursing degree at a private college of higher education in Sydney, Australia. This study concluded that an educational intervention can increase knowledge and awareness of plagiarism among nursing students.

  12. Factors influencing the publishing efforts of graduate students in nursing.

    PubMed

    Whitley, G G; Oddi, L F; Terrell, D

    1998-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify factors influencing publication efforts of graduate students in nursing and determine the extent to which graduate students' scholarly activities contribute to the creation and dissemination of knowledge in nursing, as evidenced by publication in a professional journal. Authors of articles in Nursing Research were surveyed to assess their status as graduate students during the conceptualization, development, and publication of nursing research studies. The sample consisted of 633 authors of manuscripts published in Nursing Research from 1987 to 1991. The study design was descriptive. A survey questionnaire elicited data on graduate student status and factors that influenced the initiation and completion of the project. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques. The results of the study suggest that graduate students in nursing make important contributions to the advancement and dissemination of nursing knowledge. Factors that influence graduate students to engage in the process include academic requirements (e.g., thesis, dissertation, coursework), faculty involvement and support, and the ability to self-select the research topic.

  13. Using portfolios to evaluate achievement of population-based public health nursing competencies in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Nelson, Pamela; Litt, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Public health nurses from 13 local public health agencies and nurse educators from five schools of nursing developed population-based public health nursing competencies for new graduates and novice public health nurses. Educators in one nursing program used a portfolio assignment to measure achievement of the competencies by traditional and RN to BSN students in a community health nursing course. Data were collected from surveys and focus groups to determine students' responses to the portfolio and their use of population-based public health nursing concepts. The assignment enhanced students' critical thinking skills; however, concerns about the structure and evaluation of the portfolio decreased student satisfaction. Recommendations are made for improving the portfolio format, increasing students' valuing of the portfolio, managing the tension between assessment and learning, and orienting clinical agency staff and nursing instructors.

  14. [Survey on the lifestyle of nurses, nursing students and young adolescent].

    PubMed

    Nappini, Valentina; Fedi, Marcello; Millarini, Valentina; Fabbri, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Prevention and health promotion are based on the amendment of unhealthy lifestyles. The purpose of this work is to identify and highlight unhealthy habits and behaviours of nursing students and nurses professionals, in order to explore possible correlations between unhealthy choices and culture, knowledge and skills in health education. The study population is represented by three separate samples: a) Students from high schools in the province of Pistoia, b) Nursing Undergraduate students of the University of Florence (campus of Pistoia), c) Nurses employed within the Health Services 3 of Pistoia. Investigated behaviours were smoking and alcohol habits, painkiller and inflammatory consumption. Data gathered through the questionnaires were useful to identify and classify educational needs for each of the three samples . This study helps to bring out important aspects of nurses' role on health promotion within the society.

  15. Learning styles of nursing students and environmental press perceptions of two clinical nursing settings.

    PubMed

    Laschinger, H K

    1986-05-01

    Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and Environmental Press Questionnaire were used to study 68 third-year baccalaureate nursing students' learning styles and perceptions of environmental press differences in medical-surgical and psychiatric nursing settings from the experiential learning theory perspective. Evidence for a hypothesized match between predominating student learning styles and predominating environmental press was sought. As hypothesized, student learning styles were found to be predominantly concrete as was the predominating environmental press in both nursing settings. Medical-surgical and psychiatric nursing settings did not differ significantly from environmental press. A profile of competencies felt to be important in nursing emerged with concrete people-oriented competencies rating higher than abstract competencies.

  16. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  17. Perceptions of Clinical Stress in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Linda; Bourke, Mary P; Tormoehlen, Lucy J; Poe-Greskamp, Marlene V

    2015-07-16

    The Nursing Students' Clinical Stress Scale, a Likert-type survey by Whang (2002), translated from Korean into English, was used to identify perceptions of stress in baccalaureate nursing students. Data was collected from a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university. Students ranked their perceived stress level from clinical situations. One open-ended item asked students to describe their most stressful clinical experience. Rasch Model analysis/diagnostics were used to check the instrument for validity and reliability. Quantitative data were analyzed for descriptive statistics (means). Information from open-ended question was analyzed for themes. Qualitative themes were consistent with results from quantitative analysis and well-aligned with the literature. Students were stressed by incivility by healthcare staff and instructors, inconsistencies and time constraints. Research shows that stress can interfere with learning. It is imperative to determine causes of stress so educators can help decrease stress and improve student learning.

  18. Effect of Clinical Teaching Associate Model on Nursing Students' Clinical Skills and Nurses' Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Rahnavard, Zahra; Eybpoosh, Sana; Alianmoghaddam, Narges

    2013-10-02

    Abstract Background and Objectives: The credit of the practice nurses in developing countries, due to gap between theory and practice in nursing education and health care delivery has been questioned by nursing professionals. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of the application of the CTA model in nursing students' clinical skills and to assess the participants' (faculty members, staff nurses, and nursing students) level of satisfaction with the CTA model and with achieving the educational goals in Iran, as a developing country. Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, random sampling was used to assess 104 nursing students' clinical skills, and assess 6 faculty members and 6 staff nurses. After obtaining informed consent, the level of satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire and clinical skills were evaluated by standard checklists. Data were assessed and analyzed with SPSS version 15. Results: The results showed that the mean scores of all clinical skills of the students were significantly higher after intervention (p<0.01). Moreover, the mean scores of instructors' satisfaction with applying the CTA model was significantly higher (p = 0.004), but their satisfaction with achieving clinical education outcomes did not show a significant difference (p = 0.109). Similarly, students' satisfaction with achieving educational outcomes did not show any significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.058). Conclusion: According to this study, the CTA model is an effective method for developing clinical skills in nursing students in Iran as a developing country. Therefore, application of the method is recommended in clinical nursing education systems of such counties.

  19. Performance, satisfaction, and transition into practice of graduates of accelerated nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Alvarez, Mimi T; O'Sullivan, Rita; Foster, Beverly B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined differences in performance, job satisfaction, and transition into the professional role of new graduates of accelerated nursing programs compared with graduates of other types of prelicensure programs. The setting was a major medical center in the Southeast. The mean ratings for graduates' self-assessment of performance improved significantly from the beginning of their orientation to Year 1, except for competencies in research. There were no differences between accelerated and traditional baccalaureate program graduates.

  20. Implementation of Problem Based Learning among Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Kwan, Chan Li; Khan, Aqeel; Ghafar, Mohamed Najib Abdul; Sihes, Ahmad Johari

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking and effective problem solving skills have been regarded as an important element and as an educational outcome in professional nursing. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of Problem Based Learning (PBL) among nursing students. More specifically, it compares pretest and post test scores of the implementation…

  1. Building joint commission continuous readiness in partnership with nursing students.

    PubMed

    Baas, Donna; Bryant, Keneshia; Sadaka, Heba; Henderson, Tamisha

    2014-01-01

    A partnership between an academic medical center and a college of nursing has proven to be an equally beneficial opportunity for continuous readiness for The Joint Commission. Nursing students learn the principles of regulatory compliance and accreditation through simulated surveys in their leadership and management course. The medical center receives continuous feedback and achieves survey readiness and fluency with better-prepared new graduates.

  2. Teaching Strategies to Increase Cultural Awareness in Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Lonneman, William

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence education is essential for all nurses to better prepare them to address the underlying social environment of patients, families, and communities. This article describes a study with second degree nursing students that tested 6 teaching strategies for their effectiveness in raising cultural awareness, a key aspect of cultural competence. The results demonstrated that the interventions had a positive effect.

  3. Among the Missing: The Experience of Vietnamese American Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilby, Mary Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Non-traditional nursing students, including Vietnamese Americans often face challenges that differ from those of their white counterparts. These challenges have significant impact on academic success and contribute to underrepresentation of minorities in nursing. This study explored the lived experience of 12 Vietnamese American undergraduate…

  4. Identifying Maths Anxiety in Student Nurses and Focusing Remedial Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Maths anxiety interferes with maths cognition and thereby increases the risk of maths errors. To initiate strategies for preventing anxiety-related errors progressing into nursing practice, this study explored the hypothesis that student nurses experience high maths anxiety in association with poor maths performance, and that high maths anxiety is…

  5. Student Perceptions of Nurse Doctorates: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudacek, Sharon; Carpenter, Dona Rinaldi

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 341 doctor of philosophy, 47 doctorate of nursing science, and 13 doctor of education nursing students found that Ph.D. candidates perceived a stronger research preparation, which they would not receive in the other two doctoral programs. They did not perceive the Ph.D. as preparing them to be educators, practitioners, or…

  6. Computer Competency of Nursing Students at a University in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niyomkar, Srimana

    2012-01-01

    During the past years, computer and information technology has been rapidly integrated into the education and healthcare fields. In the 21st century, computers are more powerful than ever, and are used in all aspects of nursing, including education, practice, policy, and research. Consequently, student nurses will need to utilize computer…

  7. Correlates and Predictors of Resilience among Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Balaram; Rajesh, Sasidharan K

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A growing body of literature recognizes the importance of resilience in the nursing profession. Both mindfulness and resilience aid in handling stress, stress increases the risk of rumination and/or worry especially in females and they are more empathetic than other healthcare students. Aim To identify correlates and predictors of the resilience among nursing students. Materials and Methods This is a descriptive correlation study and we have recruited 194 participants (1-4th year B.Sc Nursing) from Government College of Nursing and NIMHANS College of Nursing in Bangalore, India. The following instruments were used to collect the data, Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI), Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ), Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire (PTQ) and Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Data was analysed using Pearson’s correlation test and multiple regression analysis. Results Resilience is significantly correlated with mindfulness, perseverative thinking and empathy in nursing students. Based on regression analysis this model accounted for almost 33% of variance in resilience. This result is of interest as mindfulness alone explained 23% of the variance and unproductive Repeated Negative Thinking (RNT) and RNT consuming mental capacity predicted 8% and 2% respectively. Conclusion These results support the importance of resilience and mindfulness in nursing students. Hence, resilience and/or mindfulness enhancing interventions should be inculcated in nursing education. PMID:28384889

  8. Enabling Student Nurses to Use the Information Superhighway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jean A.; Panzarine, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Twenty nursing graduate students in an Internet-based course were compared with 23 who did not take the course. The former were more likely to be connected to nursing networks, used Internet-based health information in practice, used computer skills for other classes, and understood the relevance of telemedicine. (SK)

  9. Attitudes toward Poverty of Upper Midwestern Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is widespread and its consequence of poorer health increases the likelihood that nurses will provide care for poor clients and their families in many health care settings. Although the importance of understanding attitudes toward the poor is recognized, there have been few studies of attitudes of nursing students. The purpose of this…

  10. Survival Strategies for the Learning-Disabled Nursing Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumminia, Patricia A.; Weinfield, Ann Marie

    1986-01-01

    Nursing education can accommodate learning disabled nursing students if programs are flexible and teaching methods are adjusted to include choice of learning modality, the self-paced learning mastery approach, simulation of patient problem-solving modules, use of the computer to aid record keeping, and testing accommodations. (Author/DB)

  11. Communication and nursing: a study-abroad student's reflections.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anna Karina Martins; Tuohy, Dympna

    Globalisation in the academic context provides the opportunity for sharing knowledge and innovations between institutions in different countries, through the creation of study abroad and academic mobility programmes. For nursing students, studying abroad facilitates the development of cultural sensitivity so that they may care appropriately for an increasingly multicultural patient population in their own countries. This article describes a Brazilian 'study abroad' student nurse's experience of studying a 'communication and therapeutic relationships' module in an Irish university. Johns' model of structured reflection was used to frame, describe and reflect on the experience. This reflection informs 'study abroad' students and their universities about the student experience through a personal account of one such student.

  12. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  13. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  14. "You Have to Know Why": The Influence of Different Curricula on Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredholm Nilsson, Angelica; Silen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The need in modern healthcare for professionals who are self-directed and autonomous has increased in recent decades. Problem-based learning is spreading in nursing education as one strategy for meeting these demands. This article deals with the relationship between the design and execution of nursing education curricula and students'…

  15. Critical Thinking Dispositions of Undergraduate Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojewole, Foluso O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students and nursing faculty in Southwestern Nigeria. Critical thinking dispositions are required for critical thinking skills. People who have critical thinking disposition exhibit seven traits: truth-seeking,…

  16. English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing student success: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mary Angela

    2012-01-01

    Many English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students struggle in nursing school for a multitude of reasons. The purpose of this critical review of the literature is to identify barriers and discover bridges to ESL nursing student success. Twenty-five articles were identified for the review. Language barriers were identified as the single most significant obstacle facing the ESL nursing student. Bridges to ESL nursing student success include enhancing language development and acculturation into the American mainstream culture. A broad range of strategies to promote student success are outlined and the role of the nurse educator in ESL nursing student success is also addressed.

  17. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status.

  18. Student nurses' experiences and perceptions of envy in one nurse education environment in Finland.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Eija; Isola, Arja

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the different definitions of envy in a nurse education environment. Answers are sought to questions concerning student nurses' experiences and perceptions of envy and their ways of coping with envy in one polytechnic of health and welfare in Finland. Conclusions are presented to illuminate the concept of envy based on student nurses' perceptions in one polytechnic, where 64 (N = 100) student nurses were recruited from among the available (attending classes) students in 1998. The research material was collected using an instrument of 15 open-ended questions. The phenomenographic approach was used to analyze the data. According to this paper, envy appears different, depending on whether students are talking about their personal feelings of envy or envy shown by others. Furthermore, envy is described differently at the general level and in health care. Student nurses described their own envy as mild nuances of feelings, while envy at the general level was described as consisting of aggressive feelings. The most general way of coping with envy is rationalization. These findings can be used to help student nurses identify envy as a concept and also to recognize emotions as part of personal knowledge.

  19. The Effectiveness of Using a Student Response System on Baccalaureate Nursing Student Dominant Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeschi, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional nurses are challenged to provide high quality, evidence-based care in today's increasingly complex healthcare environment. Thus, nurses need to develop an appreciation for life-long learning. Understanding student approach to learning may provide nurse educators with empirical evidence to support specific teaching/learning strategies…

  20. A just culture for nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Barnsteiner, Jane; Disch, Joanne

    2012-09-01

    This article provides an overview of current safety science related to just cultures, the tracking of errors and near misses, and individual and system responsibilities for promoting safe practice; and applies these principles to schools of nursing.

  1. Predictors of Persistence in Online Graduate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauble, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Persistence is an important measure of success for individual students and institutions of higher learning. The purpose of this study was to explore personal and academic factors that influence persistence in online graduate nursing students. A predictive correlational study design was used. Data were extracted from existing student records in two…

  2. Student Civility in Nursing Programs: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Felissa R.; de Meneses, Mary

    2001-01-01

    In survey responses from 409 of 611 nursing schools, all respondents identified student disruptive behaviors, including inattentiveness, attendance problems, and lateness; 24.8% cited objectionable physical contact of teachers by students; and 42.8% reported verbal abuse of clinical instructors by students. (SK)

  3. Involvement of Nursing Students in Unethical Classroom and Clinical Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Gail A.

    1985-01-01

    A study to determine the incidence of unethical classroom and clinical behaviors among nursing students, to find out their opinions, and to investigate the relationships among demographic data, unethical behaviors and opinions about the behaviors is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  4. Library Orientation for Student Nurses; A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Elizabeth F.

    1970-01-01

    Student nurses at Scott and White Memorial Hospital (Temple, Texas) were given a library orientation lecture, followed up by a project of compiling a bibliography on a topic illustrating different forms of library materials and using library tools. (JS)

  5. Values grading among nursing students - differences between the ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Michal Rassin, R N

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed at measuring professional and personal values among nursing students. The participants were 180 students tested according to 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The findings indicated that passing time has not harmed the fundamental values on which the nursing profession is based: human dignity, the prevention of suffering, reliability, and faithful relationships. Devaluation was observed in the values of equality among patients, and altruism, which were graded only in fifth and sixth place, respectively. It is necessary to consider the regression in the values: imagination, ambition, and cleanliness, which were graded among the bottom values on the list. Significant differences were found in the grading of several personal and professional values, as a function of ethnic origin. Results may help understand motives of nursing students and assist in promoting bachelor of nursing programmes while taking into consideration the unique characteristics of the student group.

  6. Collaborative Learning Experiences for Nursing Students in Environmental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dolores J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental health learning experience involved collaborative activities of graduate public health and undergraduate nursing students. Pre/postcourse measures (n=31) showed increased awareness of issues and competence in interdisciplinary teamwork. (Contains 13 references.) (SK)

  7. [Supervising student nurses in the provision of home care].

    PubMed

    Talon-Chrétien, Marie-Claire; Prigent, Alexane; Thirion, Lucille

    2016-01-01

    The private practice nurse may be required to supervise a student during their provision of care to patients in their home. These situations can be mutually rewarding and open the way for discussion around the quality of care.

  8. Performance of Student Nurses on the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Harry

    1976-01-01

    Female nursing students maintained a profile of needs consistent with the traditional view of those in their profession while reflecting some of the significant changes occurring among college women between 1959 and 1973. (RL)

  9. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Anecdotal Notes as Formative Feedback.

    PubMed

    Quance, Margaret Ann

    2016-08-24

    Anecdotal notes are a method of providing formative feedback to nursing students following clinical experiences. The extant literature on anecdotal notes is written only from the educator perspective, focusing on rationale for and methods of production, rather than on evaluation of effectiveness. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out with a cohort of 283 third year baccalaureate nursing students to explore their perceptions of anecdotal notes as effective formative feedback. The majority of students valued verbal as well as anecdotal note feedback. They preferred to receive feedback before the next learning experience. Students found the quality of feedback varied by instructor. The anecdotal note process was found to meet identified formative feedback requirements as well as the nursing program's requirement for transparency of evaluation and due process. It is necessary to provide professional development to clinical nurse educators to assist them develop high quality formative feedback using anecdotal notes.

  10. Companionship and education: a nursing student experience in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Vahl, Cheryl; Eland, Joann

    2005-04-01

    Currently, major deficiencies exist in undergraduate nursing education for end-of-life care. Nursing students report feeling anxious and unprepared to be with patients who are dying. A Palliative Care Companion program that allows undergraduate nursing students to volunteer to spend time with patients at the end of life provides a unique educational opportunity to enhance students' knowledge and attitudes toward palliative care. In addition, the program offers a service to patients and families by providing a nonmedical, caring human presence to patients who may be alone, lonely, or bored. In accordance with tenets of Experiential Learning Theory, a Palliative Care Companion program was developed and revised using feedback from initial participants and facilitators. Data collected during the first two semesters indicated increased knowledge of palliative care, improved attitudes about care at the end of life, and fewer concerns about providing nursing care to dying patients, when participating students were compared to their undergraduate peers.

  11. Accelerated Professional Development and Peer Consultation: Two Strategies for Continuing Professional Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Gail; Clinton, Michael; Edwards, Helen; Evans, Katie; Lunney, Paul; Posner, Natasha; Tooth, Barbara; Weir, Derek; Ryan, Yoni

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of accelerated professional development (APD) for nurses (n=64), involving peer consultation and reflective practice, and peer consultation alone (n=30). Although APD participants had a higher completion rate, improvements in caregiver behaviors and work environment were not significantly different. (SK)

  12. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  17. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  18. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  19. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted from employment, if...

  20. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  1. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student nurse in the employ of a hospital or a nurses' training school are excepted...

  2. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  3. Student Attitudes toward Accelerated Reader: "Thanks for Asking!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Amy; Westberg, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerated Reader program was designed by Renaissance Learning to increase students' motivation to read and students' achievement in reading; however, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent findings about its outcomes. The Renaissance Learning company reports several research studies on their website that suggest the program is…

  4. Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

    2013-06-01

    Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p < 0.05) was found between nursing students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses.

  5. Nursing students in Iran identify the clinical environment stressors.

    PubMed

    Najafi Doulatabad, Shahla; Mohamadhosaini, Sima; Ghafarian Shirazi, Hamid Reza; Mohebbi, Zinat

    2015-06-01

    Stress at clinical environment is one of the cases that could affect the education quality among nursing students. The study aims to investigate Iranian nursing students' perceptions on the stressors in clinical environment in the South Western part of Iran. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2010 to include 300 nursing students after their completion of second clinical nursing course in a hospital environment. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire, with focus on the clinical environment stressors from personal, educational and training viewpoints. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) and descriptive statistics tests. Among the various stressors, the highest scores were given to the faculty (71 ± 19.77), followed by the students' personal characteristics (43.15 ± 21.79). Given that faculty-related factors provoked more stress in nursing students, nursing administration should diligently evaluate and improve communication skills among faculty to reduce student stress and enhance learning.

  6. An exploration of student nurses' experiences of formative assessment.

    PubMed

    Duers, Lorraine E; Brown, Norrie

    2009-08-01

    The idea that formative assessment has the potential to prepare students, not only to succeed in summative assessments during the course, but also in the world beyond the classroom [Melland, H., Volden, C., 1998. Classroom assessment: linking teaching and learning. Journal of Nursing Education 37(6), 275-277] fuelled the desire to explore student nurses experiences of being assessed formatively. Focus group discussion, within a UK Higher Education setting, captured the holistic, dynamic and individual experiences student nurses (n=14) have of formative assessment. Ethical approval was obtained. Findings from three separate focus group discussions indicate that lecturers do not use the term "formative assessment" in their communication with the student nurses; student preparation and effort is greater when assessment is for summative purposes; oral feedback is preferable to written feedback which can, at times, be illegible and utilise unfamiliar vocabulary; lecturer comments are regarded as being more valuable than grades; student nurses are not being prepared for the critical feedback associated with peer review and they may, therefore, be vulnerable to the process and outcome of peer review. Thus, the UK centric focus of this small qualitative research study need not detract from its ability to add to the global knowledge base on formative assessment in nursing.

  7. Commencing nursing students' perceptions and anxiety of bioscience.

    PubMed

    Craft, Judy; Hudson, Peter; Plenderleith, Mark; Wirihana, Lisa; Gordon, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    It is known that bioscience is perceived to be difficult and causes anxiety within undergraduate nursing students; yet, commencing students' perceptions of bioscience is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain incoming students' perceptions, knowledge and approaches to learning bioscience. Incoming students to the Bachelor of Nursing completed a questionnaire prior to undertaking bioscience. Two hundred and seventy three students completed the questionnaire that explored their expectations, preconceptions of bioscience content, approaches to learning bioscience, and relationship to clinical practice in the context of biosciences. Participant ages ranged from 17 to 53 (mean 23 years), and 78% of students had completed at least one secondary school science subject, of which 60% had studied biology. Overall, students' preconceptions included anxiety about studying bioscience, bioscience being difficult and harder than nursing subjects, and that more content will be required for bioscience than nursing subjects. Analysis using ANOVA revealed the relationships for secondary school science and age on student responses. A significant effect of secondary school science was found for science in school being advantageous for bioscience (p=0.010), understanding what bioscience entails (p=0.002), needing to study science prior to the start of the semester (p=0.009), and that bioscience is considered difficult (p=0.029). A significant effect of age was found for exams being more difficult than other assessments (p=0.000) and for being able to see the relevance of nursing when reaching the workplace (p=0.011). The findings also indicated that perceptions and associated anxieties related to bioscience were present in commencing students, similar to those which have been reported previously in established student groups. This strongly suggests that the faculty should attempt to dispel preconceptions about bioscience and target improved supports to facilitate

  8. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students.

  9. Using deconstruction to educate Generation Y nursing students.

    PubMed

    Arhin, Afua O; Cormier, Eileen

    2007-12-01

    Nurse educators are obligated to use creative strategies to educate a post-modern generation of students who possess distinct characteristics, particularly related to teaching and learning. The complexity of today's health care system, related to changing sociological factors and the differences in this generation, gives reason to tap into the strengths of this generation and consider how a postmodern perspective can influence nursing and nursing education. Derrida, to whom deconstruction is attributed, approached postmodern philosophy as a form of textual criticism. Deconstruction denotes a particular practice of reading, criticism, and analytical inquiry, factors that are important to nursing education. This article describes how deconstruction can be used to enhance nursing education of Generation Y students, and its application to reading comprehension and writing skills is explored.

  10. The overall impact of emotional intelligence on nursing students and nursing

    PubMed Central

    Michelangelo, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare employers often criticize the lack of emotional competency and critical thinking skills demonstrated by newly licensed nurses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether emotional intelligence (EI) training for nurses improves critical thinking and emotional competence enough to justify including EI in nursing curricula. A meta-analysis was conducted inclusive of EI related nursing abilities and traits such as leadership, health, reflection, ethical behavior, nursing student performance, and job retention/satisfaction. Studies of EI constructs, test instruments, and contrary viewpoints were also examined. The analysis included 395 EI studies of approximately 65,300 participants. All the studies reported a positive correlation with EI ranging from weak to strong with a moderate cumulative effect size of r = 0.3022 across all studies. This study may contribute to positive social change by reducing employers time and cost for training newly licensed nurses, thereby decreasing the overall cost of health care to the public. PMID:27981103

  11. The overall impact of emotional intelligence on nursing students and nursing.

    PubMed

    Michelangelo, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare employers often criticize the lack of emotional competency and critical thinking skills demonstrated by newly licensed nurses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether emotional intelligence (EI) training for nurses improves critical thinking and emotional competence enough to justify including EI in nursing curricula. A meta-analysis was conducted inclusive of EI related nursing abilities and traits such as leadership, health, reflection, ethical behavior, nursing student performance, and job retention/satisfaction. Studies of EI constructs, test instruments, and contrary viewpoints were also examined. The analysis included 395 EI studies of approximately 65,300 participants. All the studies reported a positive correlation with EI ranging from weak to strong with a moderate cumulative effect size of r = 0.3022 across all studies. This study may contribute to positive social change by reducing employers time and cost for training newly licensed nurses, thereby decreasing the overall cost of health care to the public.

  12. Factors influencing quality of chest compression depth in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Lim, Eun Ju

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing quality of chest compression depth in nursing students. A convenience sample of 102 female nursing students enrolled in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills training session. Each student performed 3 min of chest compression skills on a Resusci Anne SkillReporter manikin for measurements of both depth and rate. Nursing students with correct compression depth (50-60 mm) had higher body weight (t = -2.02, P = 0.046) and body mass index (t = -2.19, P = 0.031) compared with students in the incorrect depth group. Mean chest compression depth was shallower in underweight nursing students compared with normal weight or overweight students (F = 8.89, P < 0.001). Body weight was a significant factor influencing quality of chest compression depth (F = 4.25, P = 0.003). Educational intervention targeting underweight nursing students might need to enhance the quality of chest compression skills.

  13. Improving nursing students' communication skills using crew resource management strategies.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Tschannen, Dana; Sculli, Gary

    2013-03-01

    To provide optimal patient care, all members of the health care team must effectively communicate patient status and the current plan of care. The Crew Resource Management (CRM) training system has been successfully used in the aviation industry to manage human error and reduce risk in the operational environment. CRM focuses on behaviors that support communication and teamwork and is modifiable to be used in nursing education. A version of CRM-nursing crew resource management-was implemented in a group of senior undergraduate nursing students. Students were satisfied with the program, and in a subsequent simulation they demonstrated the ability to use the communication techniques learned.

  14. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  15. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  16. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration: a study with undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Ward, Julia; Schaal, Mary; Sullivan, Jacqueline; Bowen, Mary E; Erdmann, James B; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2008-08-01

    The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) was administered to 333 undergraduate nursing students. The underlying factors, item-total score correlations and reliability of the JSAPNC were examined. A significant correlation was observed between scores of the JSAPNC and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (r = 0.38). It was hypothesized that: (1) Women would score higher than men on the JSAPNC, (2) Scores on the JSAPNC would increase as students progress in their nursing education, (3) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for students with work experiences in health care, and (4) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for those with a higher level of education prior to nursing school. Hypotheses 1, 3 and 4 were confirmed at a conventional statistical level of significance (p < 0.05), and hypothesis 2 was confirmed at a marginal significance level (p = 0.06). No significant differences were observed on scores of the JSAPNC among undergraduate nursing students grouped by ethnic minority, specialty plan, academic major prior to nursing school, or marital status. Implications for future studies in nursing education are discussed.

  17. Supporting undergraduate nursing students through structured personal tutoring: Some reflections.

    PubMed

    Watts, Tessa E

    2011-02-01

    Support is imperative for nursing students worldwide as they face the many challenges associated with learning and working. Moreover enhancing student retention is an increasing concern for institutions across the globe. The personal tutor is a frequently hidden yet potentially significant figure in many students' experience of higher education. This paper offers some critical reflections on a structured approach to personal tutoring within an undergraduate nursing programme in a research focused Welsh university. Structured personal tutoring can provide an organised, coherent and proactive support system throughout students' educational programmes. However the approach changes the shape of personal tutoring and has the potential to increase academics' workloads and with it costs.

  18. Lived Experiences of Female Undergraduate Students, at a Nursing College in Abu Dhabi, about Nursing as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantash, Dania Abu; Van Belkum, Corrien

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the lived experiences of female undergraduate nursing students about nursing as a profession and the circumstances that have influenced their experience. Introduction: Nursing as a profession is a relatively new practice, and thus in the developmental stage, in the UAE. The number of national students (Emirati) who enrol in the…

  19. The Impact of a Reflective Thinking Intervention on Nursing Students in a Child and Family Nursing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becherer, Vicky H.

    2011-01-01

    With the ever-changing healthcare systems, nursing students need to think at a high level by applying their knowledge from theory to the clinical setting by prioritizing, delegating, and problem solving to provide safe, competent, quality nursing care. Using action research, nursing students participated in R.A.V.E. (Reflective Thinking Allows…

  20. Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions regarding factors that affect math abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Katrina A.

    2011-07-01

    A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of math abilities, factors that affect math abilities, the use of math in nursing, and the extent to which specific math skills were addressed throughout a nursing curriculum. Polya’s Model for Problem Solving and the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Affective Domain served as the theoretical background for the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to obtain data from a purposive sample of undergraduate nursing students from a private university in western Pennsylvania. Participants were selected based on the proficiency level with math skills, as determined by a score on the Elsevier’s HESI™ Admission Assessment (A2) Exam, Math Portion. Ten students from the “Excellent” benchmark group and eleven students from the “Needing Additional Assistance or Improvement” benchmark group participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, and completed a 25-item, 4-point Likert scale survey that rated confidence levels with specific math skills and the extent to which these skills were perceived to be addressed in the nursing curriculum. Responses from the two benchmark groups were compared and contrasted. Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Findings related to mathematical approach and confidence levels with specific math skills were determined to be statistically significant.

  1. Selecting doctoral programs in nursing: resources for students and faculty.

    PubMed

    Jones, K D; Lutz, K F

    1999-01-01

    Sixty-nine doctoral programs in nursing are currently offered at 75 universities in the United States. Resources to assist prospective doctoral students in making decisions concerning successfully pursuing doctoral education are collected and organized by a variety of nursing organizations. Nurses in academic settings access these lists and specialty publications through their deans' offices and professional affiliations. Prospective students, on the other hand, are largely employed in clinical settings and are often unaware of the existence of this information, which could assist them in their decisions. The purpose of this article is to provide prospective doctoral students and the faculty that may advise them with a current information to use in selecting a doctoral program in nursing.

  2. Codependency in nursing students: recognition and modification of behavioral characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, F M

    1998-01-01

    Recent literature estimates that there are approximately 2 1/2 million nurses; of these a significant number may exhibit signs of codependency, a behavior pattern that impedes an individual's ability to relate to others on mature level. Codependency develops in dysfunctional family systems and manifests itself in compulsive behaviors that make life painful and work emotionally difficult. Often, constructive communication is difficult as codependent persons tend to feel low self-esteem and low self-worth. Nursing students may exhibit characteristic codependency traits among fellow students in the classroom, in the clinical setting, and in interactions with faculty. Nurse educators, through their own self-awareness, introspection, and knowledge of the behaviors and characteristics of codependency, can facilitate more effective communication with all nursing students to promote healthier interactions and relationships. Techniques to modify one's method of interacting with others have clear potential for improving professional as well as personal relationships.

  3. Using the Hidden Curriculum to Teach Professionalism in Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Zohreh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Mohammadi, Easa; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Professionalism in nursing is critical for creating credibility and a positive image. Objectives: This study was carried out to explain the use of hidden curriculum in teaching professionalism in nursing students. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted through purposeful sampling strategy by the participation of 32 nursing students. The data were collected by using semi-structured interviews, and this process was continued until achieving data saturation and themes’ emergence. Content analysis method was used for data analysis. Results: Data analysis revealed three main themes: Development of understanding the professionalism elements, Variety of influenceability strategies, and Influenceability to various resources. Each theme consisted of some subthemes. Conclusions: The nursing students learnt the professionalism elements by different methods from different resources through the hidden curriculum. Therefore, exploration of the currently administered hidden curricula is suggested. PMID:24829784

  4. Usability Assessment of Moodle by Brazilian and Portuguese Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Carlos Alberto; de Godoy, Simone; Martins, JoséÉ Carlos Amado; Mazzo, Alessandra; Baptista, Rui Carlos Negrão; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-06-01

    Distance education has turned into an important tool for nursing education. The virtual learning environments contribute toward an interactive and attractive educational process. In this study, we assess the usability of a virtual learning environment that was developed to teach nursing students how to care for patients with urinary retention. A multicenter and descriptive study was undertaken, which involved nursing students from the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Brazil, and the Escola Superior de Enfermagem de Coimbra, Portugal. The participants were 79 students, mostly female, between 20 and 24 years of age. The virtual learning environment revealed good properties in terms of usability on most criteria. Future research will help to confirm the results.

  5. Improving communication among healthcare providers: preparing student nurses for practice.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2008-01-01

    Communication errors are identified by the Joint Commission as the primary root cause of sentinel events across all categories. In addition, improving the effectiveness of communication among healthcare providers is listed as one of the Joint Commission's 2008 National Patient Safety Goals. Nursing programs are expected to graduate practice-ready nurses who demonstrate quality and safety in patient care, which includes interdisciplinary communication. Through objectively structured clinical assessment simulations, faculty evaluate each nursing student's ability to perform many aspects of care, including the ability to communicate effectively with physicians via telephone in an emergent situation. This quality improvement project reports the results of a three-year review of undergraduate student nurse performance (n = 285) related to effective clinical communication. Changes in teaching-learning strategies, implementation of a standardized communication tool, and clinical enhancements which resulted in improved student competency, will be presented.

  6. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme. PMID:24199114

  7. Nursing students' perceptions of learning nursing skills in the ambulance service.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Tomas; Lindström, Veronica

    2017-03-02

    Several previous studies have explored nursing students' perceptions of clinical learning at hospitals and in other health care facilities, but there are few studies exploring nursing students' perceptions of the clinical learning in the ambulance service. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore nursing students' perceptions of learning nursing skills in the ambulance service. An inductive qualitative study design with two focus group interviews and content analysis was used. Two themes were identified. The first theme, professional skills, included: Assessment, Prioritizing and initiating care, and Medical treatment and evaluation of interventions. The second theme, a holistic approach to the care included: Cultural, social, and ethical aspects of caring, Decision-making in collaboration with patients, and Care provided in the patients' home.

  8. Causes of Incivility in Iranian Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Mostafa; Ildarabadi, Es-hagh; Moharreri, Fatemeh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incivility among nursing students is a common academic problem. Knowing the causes of students’ incivility will enable the faculty members and academic institutions to select correct strategies to deal with this problem. This study was conducted to explore the causes of incivility among nursing students from both educators’ and students’ points of view. Methods: gThis qualitative content analysis study was applied in order to explore experiences and insights of 17 nursing lecturers and 9 nursing students who were selected through purposeful sampling and interviewed on the causes of incivility. Participants were selected among students and lecturers of nursing schools in Khorasan Razavi. The inclusion criteria for the students were having passed one educational term and for the lecturers having one year experience of teaching respectively. Data gathering was done using deep semi-structured interviews starting from March 2014 to March 2015. Results: Three main categories extracted from the data were student related factors, teacher related factors, and organizational factors. Non-educational engagement, attracting attentions, lack of motivation, students’ personality, and lack of experience were the subcategories of student related factors. Subcategories of teacher related factors included lack of skills, teachers’ personal qualities, lack of experience, and incivility of teachers. Finally, the subcategories of organizational factors included no evaluation system for teachers and lack of understanding the organizational rules and regulations. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that factors related to students, teachers, and organization may lead to nursing students’ incivility and clarified its dimensions. In order to develop a civil environment in nursing college, managers and educators’ awareness should be promoted via various ways such as workshops. PMID:26793730

  9. Nursing students' level of autonomy: a study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karagözoğlu, Serife

    2009-02-01

    Nursing curriculum programs developed to train future professional nurses, methods of teaching and learning and practice can either prepare or be an obstacle to the students' thinking and acting like independent professionals. This study was conducted for the purpose of determining the level of autonomy of nursing students in the baccalaureate degree program at Cumhuriyet University School of Nursing. The research was conducted with a total of 326 students. Two forms were used for data collection in the research. The first was a 15-question personal information form. The second was the 30 item autonomy subscale from the Sociotropy/Autonomy Scale (SAS). The research data were entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.0 and frequency distribution, arithmetic mean, variance analysis (One-Way ANOVA) and Independent Samples t-test were used in the analysis of data. According to the General Autonomy (GA) score mean from the SAS administered in this study the nursing students' GA score mean was 83.03+/-14.51 and the highest level of autonomy was found to be in the 1st year students (84.87+/-14.44), followed consecutively by 2nd year (83.18+/-15.09), 3rd year (82.72+/-15.80) and 4th year (81.47+/-12.81) students. The conclusion of the study is that the autonomy levels of the students who regarded the professional qualities given them by the nursing education as enough have been remarkably high. This suggests that the nursing curriculum program being used is not adequately supporting the development of autonomy in students.

  10. Nursing student math aptitude and success on a medication calculation assessment.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E; Harris, Margaret; Pittilgio, Laura; Moore, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the relationship between nursing student math aptitude and success on a medication calculation assessment given during the second year of the nursing curriculum. The importance of understanding this relationship to nursing education is highlighted.

  11. The ethics of nursing student international clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Levi, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the motivations for offering international nursing student experiences and the reasons students choose to participate. Students should prepare by learning cultural humility rather than cultural competency, and they should be oriented to the ethical responsibility implicit in caring for those in developing countries. Programs that provide these experiences need to be developed with an eye to sustainability so the lives of those receiving care will be enriched after the students go home.

  12. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The

  13. Teaching nursing students and newly registered nurses strategies to deal with violent behaviors in the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cynthia M

    2010-07-01

    Direct and indirect violent behaviors toward nursing students and newly registered nurses must be eliminated. Nursing students and newly registered nurses are particularly vulnerable to acts of violence. The article discusses the effect of violence on students and newly registered nurses, the role of the continuing education nurse in eliminating violence, examples of aggressive situations, and strategies to educate and support students and new nurses and empower them to eliminate violence directed toward them. Strategies include confrontation tips, implementation of violence-free contracts, participation in role-play activities, adoption of a professional communication technique, reflection journaling and cognitive recognition, promotion of carefronting, introduction of dialogue through the World Café, and use of nurse preceptors, practice partnerships, residency programs.

  14. A Comparison of Self-Reported Cultural Competency Skills among Two Groups of Nursing Students: Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napholtz, Linda

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of 49 clinical nursing students taught traditionally with 17 for whom traditional methods were supplemented with consultations with an expert on cultural nursing showed that attitudes toward culturally different clients improved much more among the second group. (SK)

  15. Are international nursing students disadvantaged by UK patients?

    PubMed

    De, Diana

    International students bring billions of pounds annually to the UK through higher education. Although nursing students may not contribute as significantly in monetary terms as traditional graduate and postgraduate learners, they do, however, bring with them other benefits in terms of wealth of experience, diversity and cultural capital, often looking after client groups sometimes marginalized by mainstream society. The reality is that many nursing homes and care homes simply would not function without internationally recruited nurses contributing to our health service and the wellbeing of society. The author of this article is a module manager for a Nursing and Midwifery Council regulated Overseas Nurses Programme, which runs up to four times per year at a large Faculty of Health, Sports and Science in South Wales. Anecdotal evidence from class disclosures by international nursing students provided the rationale for this independent enquiry. Listening to verbal accounts suggested that internationally-recruited nurses were experiencing episodes of 'unfair treatment' by patients under their care when undertaking the clinical practice component of the programme.

  16. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  17. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Marvos, Chelsea; Hale, Frankie B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. Methods: After approval by the university's Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI) instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Conclusions: Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI a nontraditional intelligence measure relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well. PMID:27981096

  18. [Changes in interpersonal values in student nurses: a longitudinal study].

    PubMed

    Nagata, H; Kondo, M; Ogawa, S

    1994-01-01

    Our cross-sectional studies of interpersonal values in female student nurses showed that (1) third graders attached more importance to the values of Support and Independence and less to those of Benevolence and Leadership than did first graders, and (2) the discrepancy between the ratings of what they were and those of what their ideal nurses were was greater in the third than in the first graders. We interpreted these differences between the two graders as indicating a developmental change brought about during the three years. This study examined the internal validity of this interpretation through the use of a longitudinal method. The KG-SIV (Kikuchi-Gordon Survey of Interpersonal Values) was administered twice to 85 female student nurses: immediately after entering their nursing schools and immediately before finishing them, with a testing interval of approximately three years. For each testing, subjects were asked to rate what they were and then what their ideal nurses were. Analyses produced almost the same results as obtained in cross-sectional studies: perceived values of Benevolence and Leadership decrease while those of Support and Independence increase over the three years, with the discrepancy increasing from the first to the second testing. Findings thus support the internal validity of our prior interpretation. The changes in interpersonal values found for the student nurses suggest a socialization process they undertake in nurse training and imply an increase of stress they experience in that process.

  19. The Effect of a Self-Reflection and Insight Program on the Nursing Competence of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have to solve complex problems for their patients and their families, and as such, nursing care capability has become a focus of attention. The aim of this longitudinal study was to develop a self-reflection practice exercise program for nursing students to be used during clinical practice and to evaluate the effects of this program empirically and longitudinally on change in students' clinical competence, self-reflection, stress, and perceived teaching quality. An additional aim was to determine the predictors important to nursing competence. We sampled 260 nursing students from a total of 377 practicum students to participate in this study. A total of 245 students nurse completed 4 questionnaires, Holistic Nursing Competence Scale, Self-Reflection and Insight Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Clinical Teaching Quality Scale, at 2, 4, and 6 months after clinical practice experience. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the change in scores on each of the questionnaires. The findings showed that, at 6 months after clinical practice, nursing competence was significantly higher than at 2 and 4 months, was positively related to self-reflection and insight, and was negatively related to practice stress. Nursing students' competence at each time period was positively related to clinical teachers' instructional quality at 4 and 6 months. These results indicate that a clinical practice program with self-reflection learning exercise improves nursing students' clinical competence and that nursing students' self-reflection and perceived practice stress affect their nursing competence. Nursing core competencies are enhanced with a self-reflection program, which helps nursing students to improve self-awareness and decrease stress that may interfere with learning. Further, clinical practice experience, self-reflection and insight, and practice stress are predictors of nursing students' clinical competence.

  20. Parent-nursing student communication practice: role-play and learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark J; Taylor, Erin A; High, Patricia L

    2012-02-01

    Parents accompanying their child's hospitalization can experience stress associated with the child's illness, treatments, and major alterations in family life. Nurses often serve as the primary communicator and cultural broker because of their constant presence at the child's bedside. Nursing students may not have essential parent-nurse communication competencies. In an innovative method of teaching nursing students about communicating with parents, 64 undergraduate nursing students participated in a parent-led postconference with a nursing instructor. The parents provided background and led role-play activities and debriefing sessions with students. Feedback provided by students before and after the parent session included requests for additional parents' experiences, appreciation and exceeded expectations of hands-on experience, recognized value of information provided, and the recommendation that all students attend. We demonstrate that empathy is a teachable skill, nursing students are apprehensive about communicating with parents, and nursing students do not understand how much families rely on nurses.

  1. Chinese baccalaureate nursing students' readiness for self-directed learning.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hao Bin; Williams, Beverly A; Fang, Jin Bo; Pang, Dong

    2012-05-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 536 Chinese nursing students to explore students' readiness for self-directed learning (SDL). The Self-Directed Learning Readiness (SDLR) Scale for nursing education (Chinese translation version) was used. The value of the content validity index tested by five experts was 0.915. A measure of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.925 on the total scale. Students possessed readiness for SDL with a mean score of 157.72 (S.D.=15.08, 62.3% in high level, and 37.7% in low level). The attributes of Chinese students, such as a strong sense of responsibility and perseverance, due diligence and rigorous self-discipline, enable students to take the initiative and responsibility for their own learning. The existing variation in students' readiness for SDL is helpful in identifying student characteristics that might be used to modify learning activities for these students. Senior students had higher scores for SDLR than junior students. This finding likely reflects the maturational process of developing self-directedness. Promoting SDL skills is a challenging process for faculty members and students. It is helpful if nurse educators assess the learning styles and preferences of their students in order to determine the level of SDL activities to include from year to year in the curriculum.

  2. Peer bullying in a pre-registration student nursing population.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Brenda; Curzio, Joan

    2012-11-01

    Peer bullying is a major problem in schools and workplaces including the National Health Service. Although there are a few published studies exploring the incidence of peer bullying among university students, none is specific to pre-registration nursing students. Nursing programmes are delivered across two campuses of the university however students registered at individual campuses do not mix which makes the experiences of each campus individual. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and manifestation of peer bullying amongst pre-registration nursing students in the university setting. The study describes the reported incidence of the three types of peer bullying behaviour: physical, verbal and non-verbal bullying. Participants in their final year of adult nurse education were asked to explore their perceptions of peer bullying, the frequency of witnessed or experienced behaviour and the location of where this behaviour occurred on the university campuses via a quantitative questionnaire. In total 190 students were surveyed with 156 (82%) responding. Participants reported peer bullying is experienced by student nurses on university premises and that academic members of staff are sometimes present when this behaviour is demonstrated. Reported levels of bullying decreased during their 2nd and 3rd years of the course compared to the foundation year. This decrease may have been in response to the university's strong anti-bullying stance.

  3. Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Nurse Faculty Careers for PhD Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D; Arietti, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of doctorally educated nurses pursuing faculty careers is a major concern regarding the development of the nurse faculty workforce. This cross-sectional study aims to identify barriers and facilitators to academic careers for doctoral (PhD) nursing students. A total of 1,500 PhD students were randomly selected from nursing schools across the country to participate in our survey, and a 62.8% response rate was achieved. The study found that 72% of respondents planned to pursue faculty careers after graduating. Students with postgraduation plans for academic careers, nonacademic careers, and undecided careers showed distinct profiles of demographic and academic characteristics. They also perceived facilitators and barriers to faculty careers differently. The most influential facilitators were interest in teaching and an appreciation of the impact of nursing research on patient care, and the most considered barriers were poor financial compensation and a negative perception of academia. Minority students were more likely than White students to have plans for academic careers. Various experiences during doctoral education appeared to have a positive impact on students' decisions to pursue academic careers.

  4. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  5. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  6. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  7. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  8. 42 CFR 57.311 - Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation of nursing student loans for disability or death. 57.311 Section 57.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.311 Cancellation of nursing student loans...

  9. Comparison of Efficacy and Age Discrimination between Psychology and Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Nancy J.; Emick, Jessica; Mehls, Elizabeth Emick; Murry, Francie R.

    2005-01-01

    This study considered two types of age discrimination (youth and elder) and related scale scores for 108 psychology students and 81 nursing students. The current study found that although the nursing students had a significantly larger number of courses related to aging, both nursing and psychology students reported low levels of age…

  10. Chronic Student Absenteeism: The Critical Role of School Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathleen; Meeder, Linda; Voskuil, Vicki R

    2016-05-01

    Routine school attendance is necessary for youth to develop into well-educated, successful adult citizens who will make significant contributions to society. Yet over 5 million students in the United States are chronically absent missing more than 10% of school in a year. The growing problem of chronic absenteeism among youth can be linked to increases in chronic health conditions in childhood such as allergies, asthma, diabetes, and obesity. School nurses are in an ideal position to play a vital role in reducing chronic student absenteeism, enabling youth to achieve their maximum learning potential. However, the role of the school nurse has not historically been recognized as a key factor for assisting youth to be present and regularly engaged in school. This feature article highlights a hospital-funded school nurse program within the state of Michigan that has reduced chronic absenteeism rates by placing school nurses into schools where previously there were none. The program implemented a number of initiatives that were instrumental in increasing the health and safety of students and provides a unique "before and after" glimpse of how school nursing reduces chronic student absenteeism rates and validates the essential role of the nurse within the educational system.

  11. Nursing students' perceptions of learning in practice environments: a review.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra K; Walker, Rachel

    2012-04-01

    Effective clinical learning requires integration of nursing students into ward activities, staff engagement to address individual student learning needs, and innovative teaching approaches. Assessing characteristics of practice environments can provide useful insights for development. This study identified predominant features of clinical learning environments from nursing students' perspectives across studies using the same measure in different countries over the last decade. Six studies, from three different countries, using the Clinical Leaning Environment Inventory (CLEI) were reviewed. Studies explored consistent trends about learning environment. Students rated sense of task accomplishment high. Affiliation also rated highly though was influenced by models of care. Feedback measuring whether students' individual needs and views were accommodated consistently rated lower. Across different countries students report similar perceptions about learning environments. Clinical learning environments are most effective in promoting safe practice and are inclusive of student learners, but not readily open to innovation and challenges to routine practices.

  12. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  13. Calculating Dosages: A Programed Learner for Student Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary

    Intended for nursing students, this programed workbook contains learning exercises and study tests on using household, apothecary, and metric systems in calculating medication dosages. The material, organized in six learning units, was designed to help students meet six objectives: correctly interpret and use accepted symbols and abbreviations in…

  14. Why Do Student Nurses Leave? Suggestions from a Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Last, Lynn; Fulbrook, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews gathered professional opinions about why students leave nursing; results were formulated into a questionnaire administered to 32 students in a three-round Delphi. Factors contributing to attrition included theory-practice gap, university-clinical site relationships, unmet expectations, stress, and not feeling valued.…

  15. An Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Student Experiences with Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heale, Roberta; Gorham, Robyn; Fournier, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Many nurse practitioner (NP) education programs have embraced distance education opportunities. A comparison of the experiences of NP students in one course delivered across nine sites was undertaken. Some sites offer traditional face-to-face sessions and others provide tutorials online. A survey of all the students evaluated barriers with respect…

  16. Nursing Student Anxiety in Simulation Settings: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cato, Mary Louise

    2013-01-01

    The use of simulation as a clinical learning activity is growing in nursing programs across the country. Using simulation, educators can provide students with a realistic patient situation using mannequins or actors as patients in a simulated environment. Students can practice multiple aspects of patient care without the risk of making mistakes…

  17. Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Linda Riggs

    2012-01-01

    This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

  18. Group Experiential Learning with Undergraduate Nursing Students: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Kinyon, Jane; Keith, Cynthia Bozich

    2008-01-01

    This research examined an interdisciplinary, collaborative experiential group learning approach, in which undergraduate nursing students met in small groups led by counseling doctoral student co-leaders. Statistical analysis suggests that the teaching method lead to learning of group concepts. Discussion addresses anecdotal observations,…

  19. Nursing teaching strategies by encouraging students' questioning, argumentation and explanation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Dayse Neri de; Souza, Francislê Neri de

    2014-12-01

    Nursing students need to develop competences in the field of explanation, argumentation and questioning as they are pivotal to foster a relationship with their patients and achieve a greater humanisation of care. The objective of this paper is to analyse the perception of 1st-year nursing students with regard to the humanisation of care provided to patients by encouraging them to discuss real-life episodes. The study is qualitative and content analysis used the students' questions, explanations and argumentation as core discourses. Among other conclusions, results point towards the importance of promoting activities that encourage the different nursing students' discourses and the ability to understand the humanisation and dehumanisation patterns arising from the real-life episodes used as case study.

  20. [Nursing students' opinions about health, spirituality and religiosity].

    PubMed

    Espinha, Daniele Corcioli Mendes; de Camargo, Stéphanie Marques; Silva, Sabrina Piccinelli Zanchettin; Pavelqueires, Shirlene; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2013-12-01

    The present study aimed to identify the opinions of nursing students in relation to the interface between health, spirituality and religiosity and the information provided during their undergraduate formation. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 011 (May to October) through interviews on 120 students from a nursing school (82.1%) located at São Paulo State, Brazil. From these, 76% believe that spirituality have an influence on health. However, only 10% consider themselves very prepared to address patients' spiritual aspects and 54% stated that university education does not provide enough information to develop this competence. The fear of imposing religious beliefs is the main barrier related to this issue. Most students (83%) indicated that issues related to health and spirituality should be part of the nursing curricula. Therefore, it's necessary to implement learning scenarios during their academic training to help students in spiritual care.

  1. Anatomy for nurses: providing students with the best learning experience.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amy N B

    2010-07-01

    A good understanding of human anatomy is clinically relevant for many health care professionals. A detailed knowledge of where, as well as how, to palpate, percuss or auscultate is essential for adequate assessment, provision of treatment and ongoing care of patients. Thus, the linking of human anatomy and clinical assessment is essential. However, Australian nursing students are often excluded from experiences, such as exposure to cadaveric material, which might enable them to gain a good working knowledge of internal human anatomy. Herein systematic student feedback from nursing students who were provided with a single exposure to prosected human anatomical material and were able to manipulate and interact with that material is presented, in the context of the integrative educational aims and goals of this learning and teaching activity. Thus, this study aims to add to the literature informing ongoing dialog regarding the best set of tools to teach anatomy to students of nursing.

  2. [Computer-mediated teaching of didactics in nursing: students evaluation].

    PubMed

    Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Meira, Karina Cardoso; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2007-06-01

    This exploratory descriptive study's purpose is to describe what students think regarding the form and content of an educational site and its application as an instructional resource for the discipline of Didactics in Nursing in the undergraduate course in Nursing at a school in the city of São Paulo. The study's subjects were students enrolled in that discipline during the first semester of the school year of 2003. The results show promptness regarding the use of computers on the part of the students, who are favorable to the adoption of new computer-mediated teaching methodologies in Nursing as a means to increase and diversify the forms of communication between instructors and students.

  3. The Relationship between Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Student Retention in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larmon, Brandy H.

    2015-01-01

    Retention in higher education, especially nursing education, is a concern for nurse educators. Due to the needs of nurse graduates and practicing nurses, the characteristic of self-directed learning in students is often an educational goal of a rigorous nursing curriculum. Program retention is often impacted by such demands. This study, based upon…

  4. Ethics Education for Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryden, Muriel B.; Duckett, Laura

    The final report of a 3-year project which involved the development, implementation, and evaluation of Multi-Course Sequential Learning, a model for integrating ethics education into the curriculum of the undergraduate programs in nursing at the University of Minnesota (UM) in Minneapolis is provided. The project focused on nursing students…

  5. [Knowledge and truths about nursing: discourse of new students].

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; Eidt, Olga Rosaria; Canabarro, Simone; Corbellini, Valéria Lamb; Creutzberg, Marion

    2008-01-01

    It is a study with a qualitative approach that proposes to analyze truths regimes that pass by and along Nursing as a profession, as manifested by students entering in the Graduate Course 2004/2, 2005/1 and 2005/2. The Discourse Analysis has been used as a methodological option for analyzing the data, under Michel Foucault's approaches. Three great themes have come out of such context of analysis and discussion: the traversing of gender knowledges in Nursing practice; Nursing as a knowledge made hierarchical; making as a might in Nursing's academic and professional day-by-day. Social conceptions became self evident, going through invisible knowledges that legitimate health and nursing practices, making them unquestionable.

  6. Cultivating authentic concern: exploring how Norwegian students learn this key nursing skill.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Bjørg

    2009-08-01

    The importance of interpersonal and expressive qualities has long been recognized in nursing. Drawing on data from a qualitative study among nursing students in Norway, this article discusses how nursing students cultivate authentic concern with patients. Because the nursing role has become more ambiguous, it must be created and formed in a personal way. Nursing students need to learn how to use their subjectivity in a way that promotes caring and compassionate conduct.

  7. Dreams Deferred but not Deterred: A Qualitative Study on Undergraduate Nursing Student Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Marcia I.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study using grounded theory was conducted to examine the reasons that a sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students withdrew from their nursing programs. The sample consisted of 11 nursing students who left generic baccalaureate nursing programs located in an urban area of a southeastern state. A semi-structured interview…

  8. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  9. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method.

  10. The covered wagon journey: student chronicles in advanced holistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Marguerite J; Lange, Bernadette; Bailey, Christie; Drozdowicz, Aleida; Eckes, Shirley; Kinchen, Elizabeth; Smith-Atkinson, Nikkisha

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts the experiences of a first cohort of graduate students in a newly implemented advanced holistic nursing (AHN) track, one of only a handful in the nation, and the first in Florida. The increasing popularity of complementary and alternative healing processes represents the insufficiency of a health system of fragmented care and a desire for holistic healing that is beyond mainstream allopathic care. Graduate holistic nurse education equips nurses to explore the commitment needed to advance the evolution of health care. The covered wagon journey is a metaphor for this meaningful participation. Students journaled their experiences as cotravelers in a lone wagon: embarking on a courageous journey, forging a path of discovery, and reaching their destination as pioneers. This cohort experience embodied the central tenets of holistic nursing, thus creating conscious change and unity within a learning community. The future of AHN is addressed in the context of the contemporary health care environment.

  11. Imagining alternative professional identities: reconfiguring professional boundaries between nursing students and medical students.

    PubMed

    Langendyk, Vicki; Hegazi, Iman; Cowin, Leanne; Johnson, Maree; Wilson, Ian

    2015-06-01

    The transition of a medical student or a nursing student into a health care practitioner requires many changes. Among these is the development of an appropriate professional identity, which assists in the establishment of a sound base for professional practice and therefore should be a focus for health professions educators. There is evidence, however, that medical education and nursing education face challenges in guiding students' development of appropriate professional identities. In medicine, there is concern that medical education may contribute to the development of professional identities that alienate patients rather than identities that are patient centered. The nursing profession struggles with poor retention rates in the workforce, which have been attributed in part to discrepancies between the professional identities that students develop during nursing school and the realities of professional practice.In this Perspective, the authors explore the importance of and the pedagogical strategies used to facilitate professional identity formation for medical and nursing students. They argue that medical and nursing educators aim to instill in their students strong occupational identities which may perpetuate hierarchical disciplinary boundaries. They suggest that health professions educators should move beyond current disciplinary silos and create interprofessional education opportunities for medical students and nursing students to learn together to facilitate the development of the collaborative interprofessional identities necessary for the delivery of high-quality, patient-centered health care.

  12. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed.

  13. A fellowship program preparing students for employment as new graduate nurses in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Amanda Bulette; Ghiloni, Carol A

    2009-01-01

    The Carol A. Ghiloni Oncology Fellowship Program (OFP), developed in 2001, provides an opportunity for student nurses between their junior and senior years in a baccalaureate program to learn about the role that nurses play in providing care to patients with cancer. To explore whether former fellows felt prepared for employment in oncology nursing after their fellowship experience, a focus group discussion with former student nurse oncology fellows was conducted. The discussion was audiotaped and transcribed. Content analysis of the transcripts revealed four key findings: OFP provides an opportunity to make informed career choices; OFP provides confidence-building experience; OFP provides an experience of preceptor role modeling; and OFP provides an opportunity to build relationships with staff, patients, and patients' families.

  14. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  15. Eating Attitudes and Related Factors in Turkish Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sevim; Ugur, Bayram Ali; Aykurt, Fethi Ahmet; Bektas, Muammer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changing eating behaviors might trigger obesity, deficiency, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and reactive eating disorders. Objectives: This study aimed to determine eating attitudes of nursing students in the western Black-Sea region of Turkey as well as to examine the effects of demographic features, self-esteem, body image, income level, and family structure on their eating attitudes. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 310 nursing students between January and February 2014. Data were collected using the personal information form, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Beck Depression Scale (BDS), Body-Cathexis Scale (BCS), and Body Mass Index (BMI). Data were evaluated by descriptive statistics, independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson correlation analysis. Results: About 30.0% of Turkish nursing students had negative eating attitudes. There was a significant positive correlation between the BDS and EAT scores (P < 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between RSES scores and EAT scores of nursing students (P < 0.001). A statistically significant difference was found between the father’s occupation (P < 0.05) and mother’s working condition (P < 0.05), and the students’ eating attitudes. Conclusions: Psychological status, self-esteem, economic level, and place of residence of nursing students may be the potential factors for eating disorders. PMID:26339662

  16. Too much knowledge for a nurse? Use of physical assessment by final-semester nursing students.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Windsor, Carol; Lewis, Peter

    2015-12-01

    There is debate around the scope of physical assessment skills that should be taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Yet this debate is largely uninformed by evidence on what is learned and practiced by nursing students. This study examined the pattern and correlates of physical assessment skill utilization by 208 graduating nursing students at an Australian university, including measures of knowledge, frequency of use, and perceived barriers to physical assessment skills during clinical practice. Of the 126 skills surveyed, on average, only five were used every time students practiced. Core skills reflected inspection or general observation of the patient; none involved complex palpation, percussion, or auscultation. Skill utilization was also shaped by specialty area. Most skills (70%) were, on average, never performed or learned and students perceived nursing physical assessment was marginalized in both university and workplace contexts. Lack of confidence was, thus, a significant barrier to use of skills. Based on these findings, we argue that the current debate must shift to how we might best support students to integrate comprehensive physical assessment into nursing practice.

  17. Nursing students' perceptions of adoption: educational preparation needed.

    PubMed

    Foli, Karen J; Forster, Anna; Lim, Eunjung

    2014-01-01

    Adoption is a worldwide practice; most know someone who has been adopted, has adopted a child, or has relinquished a child for adoption. Healthcare professionals will have contact with patients who have a connection to adoption. This study examined the overall perceptions, current knowledge, and gaps in a nursing curriculum as reported by undergraduate nursing students and offers insight into caring for those impacted by adoption.

  18. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  19. [Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].

    PubMed

    Jubin, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship.

  20. Critical thinking of beginning baccalaureate nursing students during the first clinical nursing course.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, C A

    1997-01-01

    The development of critical thinking is an essential component of baccalaureate nursing education and yet little is known about beginning nursing students' critical thinking abilities in making clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to describe the critical thinking of seven beginning baccalaureate nursing students during their first clinical nursing course. Qualitative methodology using the case study approach was used to describe students' critical thinking from their perspectives. Sources of data for describing students' critical thinking included reflective journal writing, interviews, and the researcher's nonparticipatory lab observations. Paul's (1993) dimensions of reasoning were used as a framework to describe students' critical thinking. Four major themes revealed through the data analysis were: development of the professional self-perspective, development of a perfectionist perspective, development of a caring perspective, and development of a self-directed learning perspective. The descriptive nature of the study indicated that beginning students do indeed think critically. Opportunities for dialogue in a supportive environment are instrumental in facilitating students' critical thinking and growth as reflective practitioners.

  1. Teaching nursing students about terminating professional relationships, boundaries, and social media.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Nurse educators should teach students about the nature of the nurse-patient relationship, which is a professional relationship and different from other relationships they have. In addition to teaching students how to establish relationships with their patients, nurse educators should also teach students about terminating relationships with patients. Without this professional guidance, nursing students may be tempted to use social media to maintain a relationship with patients. This may inadvertently lead to professional boundary violations, causing harm to patients and problems for nursing students or nurses.

  2. Identifying and managing underperformance in nursing students: lessons from practice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Chris

    2017-02-09

    This article presents an analysis of the reflective practice of mentors and student nurses who were interviewed as part of a personal skill improvement project. Colleagues and students were asked to provide feedback on their perceptions of how the author demonstrated the skill of identifying and managing underperformance in nursing students. Their narratives were examined with the intention of identifying areas for improving underperformance and how it could be managed in future. Key findings were the requirement for mentors to increase engagement with students, especially in terms of protected time, participatory learning, honest and open dialogue and the need for a commitment to building a supportive and effective mentor-student relationship. This article offers insight into how current mentors and students perceive the management of underperformance and raises awareness of related issues in an attempt to improve mentoring practice.

  3. Exploring commitment, professional identity, and support for student nurses.

    PubMed

    Clements, Andrew James; Kinman, Gail; Leggetter, Sandra; Teoh, Kevin; Guppy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Problems with the recruitment and retention of nurses globally mean that insight into the factors that might increase retention in qualified staff and students is crucial. Despite clear links between work commitment and retention, there is little research exploring commitment in student nurses and midwives. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study designed to provide insight into commitment using semi-structured interviews conducted with nine pre-registration students and a qualitative survey completed by 171 pre-registration students. Thematic analysis of the data emphasised the impact of placement experiences on commitment via interpersonal relationships. Students typically emphasised their professional identity as the basis for commitment, although many participants also highlighted a lack of acceptance by qualified practitioners, which reduced it. There was evidence that suggested that practitioner workload may impact the student experience due to challenges in making sufficient time to provide support. Implications for retention strategies are discussed.

  4. Variables affecting the academic and social integration of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin-Ophir, Iris; Melitz, Osnat; Miller, Rina; Podoshin, Pia; Mesh, Gustavo

    2004-07-01

    This study attempted to analyze the variables that influence the academic integration of nursing students. The theoretical model presented by Leigler was adapted to the existing conditions in a school of nursing in northern Israel. The independent variables included the student's background; amount of support received in the course of studies; extent of outside family and social commitments; satisfaction with the school's facilities and services; and level of social integration. The dependent variable was the student's level of academic integration. The findings substantiated four central hypotheses, with the study model explaining approximately 45% of the variance in the dependent variable. Academic integration is influenced by a number of variables, the most prominent of which is the social integration of the student with colleagues and educational staff. Among the background variables, country of origin was found to be significant to both social and academic integration for two main groups in the sample: Israeli-born students (both Jewish and Arab) and immigrant students.

  5. No place to turn: nursing students' experiences of moral distress in mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad; Van Daalen-Smith, Cheryl

    2014-06-01

    While researchers have documented the significant issue of moral distress among nurses, few have explored moral distress among mental health nurses. In addition, no research to date has explored nursing students' experiences of moral distress during mental health clinical rotations, despite nursing students typically reporting negative attitudes towards mental health nursing. This manuscript reports on a qualitative study involving seven Canadian baccalaureate nursing students, who reported on their experiences of moral distress during a 13-week clinical rotation on inpatient psychiatric units. Overall, nursing students reported significant moral distress related to the perceived lack of nurses talking meaningfully to patients on the unit, a hierarchical power structure for physicians, a lack of information given to patients about their psychiatric medications, and an inability of their nursing instructors to advocate for ethical change on the units. Several students made a specific connection between their moral distress and not wanting to pursue a career in mental health nursing.

  6. Student Success Survey: Supporting Academic Success for At-Risk Nursing Students Through Early Intervention.

    PubMed

    McLain, Rhonda M; Fifolt, Matthew; Dawson, Martha A; Su, Wei; Milligan, Gary; Davis, Sandra; Hites, Lisle

    Diversity in the nursing workforce has a positive impact on the quality of care provided to minority patients. Although the number of students from diverse backgrounds entering nursing programs has increased, the attrition rate of these students remains high. This study assessed the construct validity of a self-assessment tool that can be used by faculty advisors to determine individual academic needs of students.

  7. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  8. From placement to employment: Career preferences of Jordanian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shoqirat, Noordeen; Abu-Qamar, Ma'en Zaid

    2015-09-01

    This study examined employment planning and career preferences of final year nursing students in Jordan. Focus group discussions (n = 4) were conducted by the first author with a convenience sample of 27 nursing students. N-Vivo 9 was used to analyze the qualitative data. The analysis revealed two themes. The first theme focused on "moving from study to work", and comprised two sub-themes: being uncertain and hesitant and being a real nurse. The second theme was "the place where I want to be", and referred to participants' preferences concerning their future career. Participants showed interest in critical care units but they were not optimistic about their future career prospects due to the possibility of being jobless and the perceived low public image of nurses. In addition to the nature of placement atmosphere, gender, family and cultural issues were found to shape participants' preferences. It is therefore important to periodically review the considerations of employment planning and career preferences of nursing students, otherwise devising interventions for sound recruitment of nurses in the future will be flawed.

  9. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nurses and nursing students towards HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Irma Conejeros; Sánchez, Helga Emig; Lagunas, Lilian Ferrer; Valdés, Báltica Cabieses; Acosta, Rosina Cianelli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe attitudes, knowledge and perceptions of nurses and nursing students towards the people who live with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methodology Bibliographic study in which six electronic databases were searched using the key words: “attitude”, “knowledge”, “nursing”, perceptions”, “HIV/AIDS”. Publications between 1998 and 2007 were considered. Results 560 articles limited by scientific researches or ministerial reports membership were retrieved. Finally a total of 38 publications were selected, the analysis showed that the level of knowledge of nurses and nursing students about PLWHA is good and the attitudes towards HIV/AIDS have improved over time. Nurses and nursing students have been able to identify both positive and negative aspects in the PLWHA care personally and professionally because there is a more favourable perception. Conclusion There are few studies in Latin America and Chile that study the attitudes and knowledge of the studied population towards PLWHA. According to publications found the knowledge and attitudes have improved because the perception is more favourable. PMID:27499563

  10. The Student Course Experience among Online, Accelerated, and Traditional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielitz, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The demand by the public for a wider variety of course formats has led to complexity in determining a course's optimal delivery format as many faculty members still believe that online and accelerated courses do not offer students an equivalent experience to traditional face to face instruction. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study…

  11. Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-En; Lin, Ping-Yi

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Music Therapy Training for Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Modality to Foster Interest in Gerontological Nursing" found on pages 25-31, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Identify the worldwide shortage of nurses specializing in

  12. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale for use with Brazilian nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Carolina Domingues; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Barlem, Jamila Geri Tomaschewski; Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Pereira, Liliane Alves; Ferreira, Amanda Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale (NSSS) for use with nursing students in the Brazilian context. Method: this was a quantitative exploratory and descriptive study using a cross-sectional design conducted with 123 undergraduate nursing students studying at a public university in the south of Brazil. The cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to international guidelines. Validation for use in a Brazilian context was performed using factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. Results: based on the expert committee assessment and pre-test, face and content validity were considered satisfactory. Factor analysis resulted in three constructs: curriculum and teaching; professional social interaction, and learning environment. The internal consistency of the instrument was satisfactory: the value of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93 for the instrument as a whole, and between 0.88 and 0.89 for the constructs. Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale was shown to be reliable and validated for the evaluation of student satisfaction with undergraduate nursing programs, considering the aspects teaching activities, curriculum, professional social interaction, and learning environment. PMID:27579931

  13. Nursing Student Loan Debt: A Secondary Analysis of the National Student Nurses' Association Annual Survey of New Graduates.

    PubMed

    Feeg, Veronica D; Mancino, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nursing student loan debt and financial choices from a secondary analysis of the National Student Nurses Association Annual New Graduate Survey. The findings in the secondary analysis show loan debt incurred by nursing students comparable to loan debt reported recently for all new college graduates in general. However, comparing types of programs and types of schools yielded clear variations. More than one-third of new graduates who reported having loans to repay were unemployed; more than one-quarter of those who worked part-time and one-quarter of those who worked full-time to finance their education were unemployed; and almost one-third of students whose parents had paid for their education were unemployed. New graduates from for-profit schools were more likely to report they had accumulated high debt to pay for school than all new graduates combined. Nursing students enter the job market with substantial financial debt that may impact their future. Educators and policymakers need to address these growing concerns to sustain a healthy supply of nurses.

  14. Developing and evaluating effective bioscience learning activities for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Salvage-Jones, Judith; Hamill, Jessie; Todorovic, Michael; Barton, Matthew J; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-07-01

    Effective engagement of nursing students in the study of biosciences remains a challenge for many tertiary institutes. In this study we attempted to implement and then evaluate a simple hands-on intervention, consisting of a series of hands-on games and puzzles, to increase nursing student engagement with core concepts and anatomical learning involved in clinical anatomy and physiology. The study used a quazi-experimental longitudinal before and after design, to explore the effect of a learning intervention on student performance. Set across three different campuses of the same University, it included 1320 first year undergraduate nursing students from 2013 to 2014 who were studying Anatomy and Physiology. Students were exposed to the interventions or not, and concomitant academic performance, weekly quiz scores, performance in fortnightly worksheets and, across the semester, exam performance were compared. The results show that while the intervention appeared to increase academic performance in students on one campus (2013) compared to the other two, this difference was not sustained into 2014 when a bigger cohort was examined. Despite significant subjective student satisfaction and enthusiasm about these learning and teaching interventions, the data does not support the capacity of these activities to enhance student academic performance. Tertiary entrance scores, being a non-native English speakers and socio-economic status all had a bigger impact on student performance than engagement with fun anatomy and physiology activities.

  15. Illness perception of nursing students regarding myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Grankvist, Gunne; Brink, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Health interventions aimed at secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) are important. Patients' illness perceptions influence adherence behaviors and actions. Providing adequate infomation about the disease and lifestyle interventions is an important task for health care professionals. Therefore, a question of interest is how health care professionals perceive myocardial infarction themselves. The aim with the present study was to investigate how nursing students at a Swedish university perceived MI and to determine whether their illness perceptions changed during their six-term program of education. Illness perception was measured using the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) in a sample of 196 students enrolled in terms 2, 4, and 6 of the nursing program. A quasi-experimental design was used. Illness perceptions among nursing students were also compared to illness perceptions in a group of patients with coronary heart disease. The belief that it is possible to control MI through medical treatment became stronger during the course of nursing education. Nursing students were found to view the consequences of MI as serious, but also as medically treatable and responsive to lifestyle changes.

  16. Nursing students' confidence in medication calculations predicts math exam performance.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Sharon; Salamonson, Yenna; Halcomb, Elizabeth J

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties, including predictive validity, of the newly-developed nursing self-efficacy for mathematics (NSE-Math). The NSE-Math is a 12 item scale that comprises items related to mathematic and arithmetic concepts underpinning medication calculations. The NSE-Math instrument was administered to second year Bachelor of Nursing students enrolled in a nursing practice subject. Students' academic results for a compulsory medication calculation examination for this subject were collected. One-hundred and twelve students (73%) completed both the NSE-Math instrument and the drug calculation assessment task. The NSE-Math demonstrated two factors 'Confidence in application of mathematic concepts to nursing practice' and 'Confidence in arithmetic concepts' with 63.5% of variance explained. Cronbach alpha for the scale was 0.90. The NSE-Math demonstrated predictive validity with the medication calculation examination results (p=0.009). Psychometric testing suggests the NSE-Math is a valid measure of mathematics self-efficacy of second year nursing students.

  17. A systematic review of tobacco smoking among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to systematically and critically evaluate the large number of academic publications which have investigated tobacco smoking among nursing students in recent years. It was performed as a state-of-the-art examination of all modern literature published in peer-reviewed, English-language journals since 1990. Although smoking appears to be fairly common among nursing students, its prevalence and distribution varies widely depending on the country of study and time period during which the research was undertaken. Although there is some evidence to suggest that smoking rates increase by year of study in the nursing course, not all research has shown a clear association in this regard. Similarly, the value of anti-smoking interventions for nursing students appears to be limited, based on currently available information. Given these conflicting issues, further research which helps to ascertain why student nurses do not wish to give up their habit is clearly needed both locally and internationally. The development of an international smoking questionnaire may also be useful to help standardize future research on tobacco usage among this vulnerable demographic.

  18. The views of patients, mentors and adult field nursing students on patients' participation in student nurse assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon-Parkes, Kate; Chapman, Linda; James, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, changes to undergraduate nursing curricula in the United Kingdom have been coupled with increasing expectations that service users be involved in assessment of student nurses. These factors lead to the development of a tool to facilitate gathering of feedback from patients/carers on the competency of adult field student nurses in practice. This study evaluated experiences of those involved in the process of using the feedback tool. Using an exploratory qualitative research design, four patients, four mentors and five pre-registration adult field nursing students were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data identified three interconnecting themes; value of the patient's voice, caring and protection, and authenticity of feedback. A sub-theme of timing of giving feedback was also identified. Patients felt they should be involved in giving feedback, were comfortable in doing so, and felt best placed to judge students' performance in several aspects of care. Students and mentors shared these opinions. Additionally they felt service user feedback potentially helped improve students' competence and confidence, and facilitated mentors in their assessment of students' professional values, communication and interpersonal skills. However, mentors were more reticent about the possibility of receiving feedback from service users on their own practice.

  19. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates.

  20. Preferences for teaching methods in a baccalaureate nursing program: how second-degree and traditional students differ.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jean T; Martin, Tina M; Haynie, Lisa; Norwood, Anne; White, Jill; Grant, LaVerne

    2007-01-01

    Accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs are in great demand in the United States. Currently there are 197 such programs, but little research has been conducted on student characteristics and program outcomes. This quantitative study explores preferences of second-degree students and traditional generic students with regard to teaching methods and relationships with faculty. The results indicate that statistically significant differences exist between the two groups of students. Three areas of significance are ability for self-directed learning, expectations of faculty and classroom structure, and obtaining a grade that really matters.

  1. Historical imagination, narrative learning and nursing practice: graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's storytelling from the past.

    PubMed

    Wood, Pamela J

    2014-09-01

    Storytelling and narrative are widely used in nurse education and the value of narrative-based curricula, such as those governed by narrative pedagogy, is well recognised. Storytelling stimulates students' imagination, a central feature of narrative learning. One form of story and imagination yet to be fully considered by educators is the historical story and historical imagination. The use of historical storytelling creates a temporal dissonance between the story and reader that stimulates readers' imagination and response, and enables them to gain rich insights which can be applied to the present. Reader-response theory can support educators when using narrative and storytelling. This article presents an analysis of graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's story from the past. This narrative learning group used their historical imagination in responding to the story and prompted and challenged each other in their interpretation and in translating their responses to their current nursing practice. The article discusses this analysis within the context of reader-response theory and its potential application to narrative-based learning in nurse education. Historical stories stimulate historical imagination and offer a different frame of reference for students' development of textual competence and for applying insights to the present.

  2. Righting writing: strategies for improving nursing student papers.

    PubMed

    Bickes, Joan T; Schim, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to clearly express complex ideas in writing is necessary for nurses in professional practice at all levels from novice to expert. The community health nursing course is specially designated as writing intensive to provide students with the experience of preparing a major scholarly paper. To address issues of poor paper quality and grade inflation we implemented a program including a writing workshop for faculty, a revision of the grading rubric, and a system of blind review for grading student papers. Changes resulted in a major shift in paper grades which more closely reflects the actual quality of the work.

  3. [How to follow communicative competence progress in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Braga, Eliana Mara; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2006-09-01

    This work is aimed at suggesting methodological foundations for following Nursing student's progress in communicative competence. Using qualitative methodology and theoretical reference of interpersonal communication, the research was developed through interviews with 13 professors with experience both in teaching activities and communication research in Nursing. Interviewees reported that they follow their students' progress in communicative competence through the observation of their communicative abilities with patients; by fostering moments for the expression of thoughts, feelings and perceptions; by giving feedback on the development of communicative abilities; by stimulating their communication abilities; by performing formative assessments and tutoring.

  4. Student Persistence in Associate Degree Nursing Programs at Mississippi Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kathryn Lee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors of student persistence and attrition in addition to strategies that may help students persist in associate degree nursing programs at community colleges. Data were collected from nursing students enrolled in first-year associate degree nursing programs at participating Mississippi community colleges…

  5. Nursing Students' Experiences of the Empathy of Their Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Kristina; Kyngäs, Helvi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing students' experiences of empathy of nursing teachers with the emphasis on how experiencing empathy from their teachers influences students, their learning and professional development. This research was a qualitative descriptive study conducted through face-to-face interviews with nursing students.…

  6. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  7. Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward the Aged as a Function of Death Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackie, Norman K.

    A 139-item questionnaire was constructed to account for additional variance in the attitudes and behaviors of student nurses toward the aged. This study was conducted to examine the effects of death anxiety on the attitudes and behaviors of student nurses toward old persons. To this end, 150 student nurses were surveyed. Eight scales were…

  8. The Lifestyle Behaviours and Exercise Beliefs of Undergraduate Student Nurses: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Eimear; McCarthy, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Only limited published research is available exploring the lifestyle practices of student nurses. The purpose of this paper is to explore the lifestyle behaviours and exercise beliefs of Irish student nurses. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive survey design was used. First-year and third-year undergraduate student nurses (n=182)…

  9. Nursing students' perception of class size and its impact on test performance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shirleatha; Dapremont, Jill; Sasser, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The combination of increasing student enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs and the faculty shortage has contributed to larger class sizes that may affect both student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to identify baccalaureate nursing students' satisfaction with enrollment in small and large nursing courses. The authors also sought to determine whether a significant difference existed between test scores of students enrolled in small and large nursing courses. A survey was completed by 110 students, and test scores were compared between students in a small and a large nursing class using analysis of variance. The findings indicated that perceived satisfaction of students was significantly higher for those enrolled in the small nursing course versus the large course; however, no significant difference was found between test scores. To improve student satisfaction that can positively affect student retention, further research is needed on class size in the nursing discipline.

  10. Nursing students' perceptions about clinical learning environment in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Serçekuş, Pınar; Başkale, Hatice

    2016-03-01

    Clinical education has a vital role in nursing curriculum. Clinical education environment can be enhanced by feedbacks provided by students. The purpose of this research was to search factors that affect the clinical learning environment. A qualitative approach was used. 36 nursing students were recruited from school of nursing in Turkey. It was found that students are negatively affected by communication errors and feedbacks given in the presence of patients by instructors. The constant presence of instructors may be the source of stress for some students. Besides peer support and favourable communication with peers have a positive impact on student learning. Communication with hospital staff and instructors are important. The study revealed that student learning is affected by the level of confidence and support displayed by patients. In order to ensure the most favourable learning environment for students, it is essential that cooperation should be increased between school staff and clinical staff, instructor skills should be developed, and students should be supported in the clinical environment.

  11. Nursing students' attitudes toward research and development within nursing: Does writing a bachelor thesis make a difference?

    PubMed

    Uysal Toraman, Aynur; Hamaratçılar, Güler; Tülü, Begüm; Erkin, Özüm

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of writing a bachelor's thesis on nursing students' attitudes towards research and development in nursing. The study sample consisted of 91 nursing students who were required to complete a bachelor's thesis and 89 nursing students who were not required to complete a bachelor's thesis. Data were collected via self-report questionnaire that was distributed in May and June 2012. The questionnaire comprised 3 parts: (1) demographic items; (2) questions about "scientific activities," and (3) the nursing students' attitudes towards and awareness of research and development within nursing scale (version 2). The mean age of the students was 23 (1.3) years. The students who wrote a bachelor's thesis achieved a median score of 110.0, whereas the students in the other group had a median score of 105.0 on the scale. All the items were assigned a 3 or higher. A statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups in their attitudes towards and awareness of research (U = 3265.5; P = .025). The results of this study suggest that writing a thesis in nursing education has a positive influence on nursing students' attitudes towards and awareness of research and development in nursing.

  12. Violence against female student nurses in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Hinchberger, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Violence, harassment, and bullying in the workplace are not new phenomena. However, the growing epidemic of violence in the health sector workplace is raising great concern among workers, employers, and governmental agencies across Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. National and international literature reveals that the prevalence of violence experienced by graduate and undergraduate female nursing students in the college and workplace settings is largely unknown. Moreover, the prevalence of violence is now recognized as a major health priority by the World Health Organization, the International Council of Nurses, and Public Services International. Even so, the number of nursing personnel affected by this problem continues to rise. A modified self-report online survey was used to ascertain the level of violence experienced by nursing students in their clinical placements. One hundred percent of those surveyed had experienced some type of workplace violence and the perpetrators were most often other staff members followed closely by patients. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement recommends that all faculty prepare nurses to recognize and prevent all forms of violence in the workplace. This research seeks to develop practical approaches to better understand and prevent this global public health issue.

  13. Comparing Clinical Competencies between Nursing Students with Degrees and Traditional Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, P. Renee; Walker, Jean T.; Martin, Tina; Northington, LaDonna; Waltman, Patricia; Beacham, Tracilia; Grant, LaVerne

    2008-01-01

    Nursing students with second degrees have become the focus of great interest in the last two decades in terms of being an answer to the nursing shortage. They are thought to possess greater ability to critically think and engage in self directed learning behaviours, and possess greater motivation to master clinical skills. The purpose of this…

  14. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies.

  15. The impact of mental health nursing education on undergraduate nursing students' attitudes to consumer participation.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Moxham, Lorna; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery, including the education of mental health professionals, is now a policy expectation in Australia. Whether education programs introducing nurses to mental health nursing lead to more favourable attitudes towards consumer participation is yet to be examined in pre-registration nursing programs in Australia. The current evaluation examined changes in scores for the Consumer Participation Survey for undergraduate nursing students (n = 68) in an Australian University. Data were analysed, using repeated measures t-test, to compare the pre- and post-test scores. There was a significant improvement in views on consumers participating as staff members. There were no statistically significant changes in attitudes towards consumer capacity and consumer involvement in care processes. Consumer participation in mental health care is now clearly articulated in Australian Government policy. For this to be successfully implemented a more comprehensive understanding of the ability of education to influence attitudes is required.

  16. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes.

  17. Undergraduate nursing students' learning styles: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Sandra; McKee, Gabrielle; Huntley-Moore, Sylvia

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports on the main findings of a longitudinal study of the learning styles of one cohort of undergraduate pre-registration nursing students at an Irish university. The Honey and Mumford (2000a) Learning Styles Questionnaire was administered to a sample of students in their first (n=202) and final year of study (n=166), the final sample number (58) was based on matched pairs. The most common dominant learning style in first year was the dual learning category (35%) while a large proportion of the students (53%) in their final year had no dominant learning style. The preferred learning style of students in their first (69%) and final (57%) year was reflector. Learning styles were significantly different at the two time points and there was a significant relationship between some learning styles and students' age but not with academic achievement. Total scores of all learning styles showed significant improvements across the two time points of the study. An important implication for nurse education practice is the need for nurse educators to be aware of students' learning styles and in an attempt to maximise students' learning potential, utilise a range of teaching and learning methodologies and assessments that develop all learning styles.

  18. Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of clinical practicums is to help nursing students learn from real clinical experiences. In clinical settings, nursing instructors set-aside time at the end of each clinical day for reflective, debriefing discussions that are designed to draw the students' attention to relevant information and help them understand their beliefs and experiences. The students' competence and decision-making skills are enhanced when they are able to reflect on critical incidents or everyday practice events. It is sometimes difficult, however, for instructors to engage students meaningfully in discussions and promote reflection when students are fatigued. In this article, I argue that it is possible to refresh, support, and inspire undergraduate nursing students by engaging them in an activity designed to distract them and occupy their conscious attention, so that their more divergent and less accessible ideas are allowed to surface. Less accessible ideas are associated with the default network; regions in the brain that are most active when the brain is allowed to rest and wander. Congruent with the middle range theory of comfort, a distracting activity will provide comfort to students who are fatigued and/or distressed, and at the same time, will enhance their reflective capacities. A distracting activity that is enjoyable, not too demanding, and can be sustained for more than just a few minutes works best for idea generation and reflection.

  19. The impact of a College of Nursing Retention Program on the graduation rates of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tatem, E; Payne, J L

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the impact of a College of Nursing's (CON) Retention Program on students enrolled in a baccalaureate degree nursing program. Within the last ten years, undergraduate nurses increasingly have utilized the CON retention program. These students traditionally face a number of barriers to their academic endeavors. This study was designed to assess the effect of the CON program on the barriers to academic success of students who entered the CON in the Fall classes of 1991, 1992 and 1993. The sample size was 320 students. The control group consisted of 137 students who received no intervention and the experimental group was comprised of 183 students who attended intervention sessions with the Retention Coordinator in the CON. It was hypothesized that the most successful students during this period (1991-1993) were the most frequent attendees of the CON retention program intervention sessions. The alternative hypothesis was that those persons who did not attend the sessions, but were still highly persistent and successful, were enrollees who had entered with high entrance credentials as demonstrated by the transfer grade point averages (GPA). The results of this study indicated the need, use and value of this systematic approach to retention.

  20. The extent, variability, and attitudes towards volunteering among undergraduate nursing students: Implications for pedagogy in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Dyson, S E; Liu, L; van den Akker, O; O'Driscoll, Mike

    2017-03-01

    In the aftermath of the Francis Report nurses are being called to account for an apparent lack of care and compassion, leading to debate around pedagogy in nurse education. Absent from this debate is a consideration of student volunteering within undergraduate nursing programmes and its potential to promote student nurses self-esteem and to enhance the development of critical thinking skills. The aim of this study was therefore to understand the extent of and attitudes towards volunteering among nursing students. A mixed methods approach using a specifically developed questionnaire, followed by in-depth interviews to ascertain extent, variability, and attitudes towards volunteering revealed low levels of volunteering among nursing students. Limited time, limited access, and lack of academic support were cited as reasons. Nevertheless, students displayed positive attitudes towards volunteering. While volunteering has been shown to impact upon students abilities to think critically, to develop personal values and respond to the needs of others, volunteering within the UK undergraduate nursing programme considered here is neither structured nor formalized. Nurse educators should pay attention to the positive benefits of volunteering for nursing students and consider ways in which volunteering might be incorporated into the curriculum.

  1. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students.

  2. The learning experiences of international doctoral students with particular reference to nursing students: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Catrin; Stevenson, Keith

    2010-02-01

    One of the key challenges for the advancement of nursing globally is the development of doctorally prepared educators and leaders in a context where there is a shortage of provision of doctoral nursing programmes. For the short term future, many nurses wishing to undertake a doctorate will need to complete this education in the USA, the UK or Australia. Very little is known however about the nature of their learning experiences in these countries. This paper presents a literature review on the international doctoral student experience, with specific reference to nursing. A thorough review of the literature from 1990 to 2009 was undertaken which yielded only three empirical studies related to nursing. The review was then expanded to include subjects other than nursing which yielded 16 studies in total. This paper presents key themes that appear to be generic to international doctoral students, and draws out specific implications for nursing. The review found that international doctoral students' learning experiences were strongly influenced by the extent to which they could engage with three key elements of doctoral programmes: The first months represented a critical time of transition and most international students seemed to want and expect considerable support and structured in-put during this period. Most studies concluded that there was a need for greater institutional support and supervisor training. The three nursing-specific papers were entirely consistent with these themes. The existing evidence is extremely heterogeneous and of variable methodological quality. In order to ensure that doctoral nursing students are getting a high quality and appropriate PhD experience, there is a need for more research specifically with this group. There is also a need to investigate the different stages of the doctoral process in nursing, including, for example, writing up and examination processes and post-doctoral career outcomes.

  3. Implementing a leadership course and mentor model for students in the National Student Nurses' Association.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Elaine A; Schmidt, Cheryl K

    2007-01-01

    To help student development as responsible and accountable leaders, a mentor model was incorporated into an established voluntary leadership course offered each semester. The student joins the National Student Nurses' Association, completes leadership projects, and contracts for the course grade. The mentor model is a leadership option that pairs senior students wanting to mentor with junior students wishing to be mentored. The authors describe the outcomes of the leadership-mentor experience.

  4. Solution-focused approach therapy for mental health nursing students.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

    Solution-focused therapy is a model of therapy that builds on the client's strengths, is future-focused and can be generally offered as a brief intervention. It can be used across multiple clinical settings and is not limited to being useful for clients accessing mental health services. Learning the underlying principles and developing a foundation level of skill in the approach was found to be achievable in an undergraduate nursing course, with students reporting an increase in their knowledge of the model and confidence in basic therapeutic skills in just one day of training. In this paper, we introduce the solution-focused approach in relation to nursing practice. We describe the template used for the training day offered to undergraduate mental health nurses. Students reported that this method of learning a therapeutic approach was helpful and increased both their knowledge and skill base.

  5. Baccalaureate nursing students' breastfeeding knowledge: a descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Spear, Hila J

    2006-05-01

    This descriptive survey study assessed the breastfeeding knowledge of junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students (N=80) who had successfully completed their obstetric nursing course. With a possible perfect knowledge score of 100, participants' scores ranged from 35 to 85 with a sample mean score of 60. Surprisingly, most (85%) did not know that breastfeeding is recommended for the first year of an infant's life, and only five participants knew the proper management of mastitis. Well over one third (41.3%) of the participants opposed breastfeeding in public. Findings reveal the need to strengthen both the didactic and clinical components of the obstetric course curriculum. The acquisition of breastfeeding knowledge at the student level will better equip novice nurses to provide more effective breastfeeding counsel and support for childbearing women and to promote the achievement of the breastfeeding objectives of both the United States and the World Health Organization.

  6. [The action control scale for diagnosing performance in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Branco, Elen Martins da Silva Castelo; Peixoto, Mauricio Abreu Pinto; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative research aimed to verify the relevance of Action Control Theory for the identification of risk for poor performance in the planning of preventive care for pressure ulcers. The action - state orientation deals with individual differences and the ability to regulate emotions, cognitions and attitudes to complete the intentional actions. The instruments used were the Student Assessment Instrument and HAKEMP 90, derived from this theory, in 46 undergraduate nursing students. The analysis showed high sensitivity (0.84) for the diagnosis of risk for poor performance and high specificity (0.90) for detecting the absence of risk in the care planning. The results suggest the HAKEMP 90 as a diagnostic tool for identifying essential elements of nursing education as active learning, regulation of cognitive processes and relevance of basic nursing care in hospital.

  7. Literature review: issues surrounding education of English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students.

    PubMed

    Choi, Liza Lai Shan

    2005-07-01

    Examined in this article are the challenges faced by English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students. Nursing faculties need to address these challenges to meet the increasing diversity of the health care system. A key concern is the ability of ESL nursing students to communicate effectively in English. The Cummins model for English language acquisition provides a template for ESL nursing students to bridge this communication barrier. The literature suggests some particular needs of ESL nursing students can be met through modification of nursing programs. Further research into factors affecting the quality of nursing education for ESL students is warranted. A quantitative analysis is required to see if there exists a positive correlation between improved English language acquisition and academic success by ESL nursing students.

  8. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice.

  9. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Student Incivility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Myrna Milwee

    2011-01-01

    Incivility is currently a topic of concern in nursing and higher education. There is a serious and growing concern on college campuses across the United States as many forms of incivility are occurring, ranging from offensive language and rude behavior to hostility and violent behavior. The problem this study addresses is the need for specific…

  10. Social Support for Online Learning: Perspectives of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munich, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify supports beyond the educator that contributed to undergraduate and graduate nursing students' ability and motivation to learn online. Case study methodology similar to Stake (2000) was bounded or contained by undergraduate and graduate online courses. Twenty-nine undergraduate and graduate nursing…

  11. Academic Misconduct among Nursing Students: A Multivariate Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Larry G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using Maslow's Need-Goal Motivation Model, data from 190 nursing students showed moderately high correlation between perceptions of peers' maturity, commitment, and neutralizing attitude and perceptions of peers' engagement in academic misconduct. Neutralization (rationalizing behavior) was the strongest predictor. (SK)

  12. Nursing Alumni as Student Mentors: Nurturing Professional Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sword, Wendy; Byrne, Carolyn; Drummond-Young, Michele; Harmer, Maureen; Rush, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduate nursing students at McMaster University are mentored by program alumni. Feedback from surveys and group discussions revealed benefits beyond career and personal development, resulting from having experienced the same educational program. Alumni appreciated the opportunity to reconnect with their alma mater. (SK)

  13. Attitudes toward a Simulation Based Chemistry Curriculum for Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit

    Chemistry anxiety exists among nursing students as well as other allied health professions. The causes for this anxiety may be attributed to three variables. Chemistry: (1) is perceived as difficult; (2) involves a multitude of facts; and (3) is not connected to reality. A curriculum with a simulation format has been developed to help Israeli…

  14. Bearing Witness to Suffering: The Lived Experience of Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifried, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    The primary theme of narratives of 13 nursing students about caring for suffering patients was bearing witness to suffering. Subthemes included grappling with suffering, struggling with the ineffable, getting through, being with patients, embodying the experience of suffering, and seeing possibilities. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

  15. Clinical decision-making in senior nursing students in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jahanpour, Faezeh; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Salsali, Mahvash; Kaveh, Mohammad H; Williams, Leonie M

    2010-12-01

    Clinical decision-making is the basis for professional nursing practice. This can be taught and learned through appropriate teaching and clinical experiences. Unfortunately, it has been observed that many graduates are unable to demonstrate suitable clinical decision-making skills. Research and study on the process of decision-making and factors influencing it assists educators to find the appropriate educational and clinical strategies to teach nursing students. To explore the experience of nursing students and their view points regarding the factors influencing their development of clinical decision-making skills. An exploratory qualitative approach utilizing grounded theory methods was used; focus group interviews were undertaken with 32 fourth year nursing students and data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. Four main themes emerged from the data: clinical instructor incompetency, low self-efficacy, unconducive clinical learning climate and experiencing stress. The data indicated that students could not make clinical decisions independently. The findings of this study support the need to reform aspects of the curriculum in Iran in order to increase theory-practice integration and prepare a conductive clinical learning climate that enhances learning clinical decision-making with less stress.

  16. Using Gaming To Help Nursing Students Understand Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Barbara L.; Yankou, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    An ethics game involves nursing students in defending actions in ethics-based scenarios. Benefits include increased confidence, ability to see multiple perspectives, values clarification, and exposure to decision-making models, professional responsibilities, ethical principles, social expectations, and legal requirements. Difficulties include…

  17. Debriefing after Human Patient Simulation and Nursing Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benhuri, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) exercises with life-like computerized manikins provide clinical experiences for nursing students in a safe environment followed by debriefing that promotes learning. Quantitative research in techniques to support learning from debriefing is limited. The purpose of the quantitative quasi-experimental study using a…

  18. Caring for Students with Type 1 Diabetes: School Nurses' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yueh-Ling; Volker, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study used a Husserlian phenomenological approach to obtain an understanding of the essences of five experienced Taiwanese school nurses' lived experience of caring for students with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis entailed a modified method from…

  19. Can YouTube enhance student nurse learning?

    PubMed

    Clifton, Andrew; Mann, Claire

    2011-05-01

    The delivery of nurse education has changed radically in the past two decades. Increasingly, nurse educators are using new technology in the classroom to enhance their teaching and learning. One recent technological development to emerge is the user-generated content website YouTube. Originally YouTube was used as a repository for sharing home-made videos, more recently online content is being generated by political parties, businesses and educationalists. We recently delivered a module to undergraduate student nurses in which the teaching and learning were highly populated with YouTube resources. We found that the use of YouTube videos increased student engagement, critical awareness and facilitated deep learning. Furthermore, these videos could be accessed at any time of the day and from a place to suit the student. We acknowledge that there are some constraints to using YouTube for teaching and learning particularly around the issue of unregulated content which is often misleading, inaccurate or biased. However, we strongly urge nurse educators to consider using YouTube for teaching and learning, in and outside the classroom, to a generation of students who are native of a rapidly changing digital world.

  20. Pre-Semester Workshops and Student Nurse Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if student confidence levels change when attending a series of five pre-semester orientation success workshops. This research was conducted at a Canadian Community College whose attrition rates for the Practical Nursing program within the host college average 36%. The workshop sessions occur prior to the…

  1. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  2. Student nurses' attitudes and beliefs about breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Cricco-Lizza, Roberta

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the breast-feeding attitudes and beliefs of students newly enrolled in an urban university baccalaureate nursing program. A qualitative approach was used to conduct in-depth semistructured interviews with 12 students prior to their formal course work in maternal-child nursing. Four themes emerged from the data analysis: 1. Personal experiences are important in the development of breast-feeding attitudes and beliefs. 2. The students generally believed that breast-feeding offered benefits for babies and mothers, but the beliefs were stronger for those who grew up with breast-feeding as the norm. 3. All the students believed that there were barriers to breast-feeding in the United States that they identified as the societal view of the breast, dependence/independence conflicts, and concerns about intimacy. 4. The students identified an educational rather than promotional role for nurses in breast-feeding because of conflicts about personal choice. This study suggests that students need help identifying their attitudes and beliefs about breast-feeding and reflecting how their personal experiences influence breast-feeding promotion.

  3. How Do Nursing Students Use Digital Tools during Lectures?

    PubMed Central

    Sebri, Isabelle; Bartier, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Teachers often wonder what students are doing during lectures, behind their computers, mobile phones and other digital tools. This study aimed to document the type of tools used during lectures by nursing students and what they do with them. Methods We carried out a descriptive, prospective, multicentre study including 1446 nursing students in Alsace (France). The students filled in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of a lesson they had just attended. Results 99% of the students had taken at least one digital tool to the lesson. 90% had a mobile phone with them. It was mainly used for entertainment (particularly for sending and/or receiving text messages and consulting emails). 52% had a laptop with them. It was essentially used for academic tasks (taking notes, working on other teaching units or revising for exams). Conclusion Most nursing students take a phone or laptop to lectures with them with the intention of using them for entertainment and learning respectively. These results could guide training establishments in drafting their institutional policy concerning the use of digital tools in class. PMID:27812170

  4. Student nurses as peer-mentors: collegiality in practice.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Jean A; Kopeikin, Anna; Douché, Jeanie

    2007-01-01

    Mentoring is promoted as a key strategy for supporting nursing students and new practitioners in clinical settings. However, mentoring is also a complex process, requiring the development of bounded and purposeful relationships underpinned by knowledge, experience and opportunities for reflection. This paper reports the findings of an evaluation by second-year nursing student mentors and first-year mentee students of a short peer-mentoring programme. The main objective of the programme was to support students making the transition to the university and nursing. At a more focused professional level, the programme also provided the opportunity for students to be a mentor or to be mentored, as a learning precursor to being mentored in the clinical setting. The programme provided rich learning opportunities for the development of the qualities and skills required for mentoring roles and was a vehicle for encouraging collegial interaction and learning. The students' evaluation of the programme also demonstrated that formal mentoring programmes require considerable organisational investment and ongoing commitment in educational and clinical settings. Mentors and mentees require time for face-to-face meetings and discussion, effective and on-going communication channels, and adequate role preparation.

  5. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  6. Moral sensitivity and critical thinking disposition of nursing students in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung-Hee; Yeom, Hye-A

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the level of moral sensitivity and critical thinking disposition among baccalaureate nursing students in Korea. A convenience sample of 142 undergraduate nursing students was surveyed on moral sensitivity using the Korean version of the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire (K-MSQ) and on critical thinking disposition using the Critical Thinking Disposition Questionnaire (CTDQ). Data were collected from June 2009 to July 2010. Mean score was 2.83 out of 7 on the K-MSQ (relatively low) and 3.70 out of 5 on the CTDQ (relatively high), indicating the need for nursing educators to continue to develop and incorporate strategies that enhance moral sensitivity into ethics courses in undergraduate nursing programs in Korea. Nursing students who regarded nursing as a lifelong career exhibited stronger critical thinking disposition than did students who considered nursing to be a temporary or premarital job. Moral sensitivity should be further emphasized in nursing ethics courses in undergraduate nursing programs in Korea.

  7. An Examination of the Impact of Accelerating Community College Students' Progression through Developmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodara, Michelle; Jaggars, Shanna Smith

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve developmental education students' outcomes, community colleges have been experimenting with acceleration strategies. Models of acceleration allow students to complete their developmental requirements in a shorter amount of time. However, there has been limited empirical research on the effects of accelerating students'…

  8. The Effect of Team-Based Learning as an Instructional Strategy on Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniewel, Marla Dawn

    2012-01-01

    National bodies of nursing have identified that nurse educators in undergraduate nursing education need to incorporate student-centered and evidenced-based instructional strategies to promote application of nursing concepts. Team-based learning (TBL) has been identified as an effective method of fostering a deeper understanding of content and…

  9. Packing a Bag for the Journey Ahead: Preparing Nursing Students for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Mary Mullaly

    2005-01-01

    Never has it been more important to nurture and support students pursuing a nursing education. Nursing shortage in the U.S. is a well-documented problem that is worsened by demographic factors such as the aging nursing workforce, the aging of the general population, and a declining number of young people in the workforce. The nursing profession…

  10. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  11. Swedish Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Concept of Health: A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Health is a central and important concept in nursing and nursing education, and has been theorised about in both positive and negative terms. The purpose of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of the concept of health. Design: A phenomenographic research approach was used to understand how nursing students…

  12. Evidence-based instructional strategies: facilitating linguistically diverse nursing student learning.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    As the diversity of US citizens continues to increase, it is incumbent on the profession of nursing to provide adequate numbers of linguistically diverse nursing graduates to meet healthcare demands. Information in the nursing and educational literature provides evidence for instructional strategies that educators can use to develop teaching practices so they are better prepared to teach linguistically diverse nursing students.

  13. Predictors of Success on the NCLEX-RN among Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Thomas W., Jr.; Dufour, Charles A.; Rhodes, Rosemary S.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 81 bachelor of science in nursing students found a strong correlation between performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN)and achievement on standardized National League for Nursing Achievement Tests. There was a significant relationship between NCLEX scores and grades in nursing courses.…

  14. Survey of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Attitudes and Behaviors in Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Bartek, Jean K.; Scott, David M.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2009-01-01

    Statewide nursing student alcohol and other drug (AOD) use attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Response was 929/2017 (46%) (practical nursing [n = 173/301] 57.3%; diploma and associate degree in nursing [n = 282/417] 67.6%; bachelor of science in nursing [n = 474/1299] 36.5%). Nearly 44% reported inadequate substance abuse education. Past-year…

  15. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  16. Clinical teachers as caring mothers from the perspectives of Jordanian nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Violeta

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this transcultural qualitative study was to discover, describe and explain the meaning of a caring student-teacher encounter within the context of clinical education. Clinical teachers are registered nurses who have completed a university undergraduate nursing degree program and at least 1 year of post-registration clinical experience. They are employed as full-time staff of the faculty of nursing. Among the 19 Jordanian undergraduate nursing students interviewed, "clinical nurse teachers as caring mothers," emerged as an important theme. This paper describes the clinical teachers in their mothering roles, such as supporting, negotiating, reinforcing, transforming and releasing nursing students throughout their clinical practice. Understanding students' cultural beliefs and values provides possible predictors that could facilitate positive student-teacher relationships that could be used to plan the clinical education for nursing students. There is also a need to develop workshops in clinical teaching that would incorporate cultural awareness, especially in a multicultural student-teacher groups.

  17. Who should teach clinical skills to nursing students?

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Katherine M

    Nurse education has traditionally relied on clinical placements to provide nursing students with the 'hands-on' experience that is not possible to teach in a classroom setting. However, with changes to the NHS this is becoming increasingly difficult, with fewer resources available and issues of patient safety to consider. Hennman and Cunningham (2005) recognize there is a significant gulf between the theoretical component taught in the classroom and the complex realities of clinical practice. Cave (2005) has suggested the move into higher education has hindered rather than helped the linking of theory and practice in nurse education, because many nurse teachers are far removed from clinical practice and therefore no longer competent or clinically credible to be able to teach up-to-date clinical skills. In Scotland the Practice Education Facilitators role in integrating theory with practice is essential for both the NHS Trusts and higher education institutes. It would appear that these clinicians are the lynchpin between linking university work with the harsh realities of daily practice. If nurse education is to provide effective clinical skill simulation then it must also provide effective teachers who are up to date with current practice. In many cases this will not be the nurse teacher.

  18. Challenging clinical learning environments: experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Linda; McDonald, Jane; Gillespie, Mary; Brown, Helen; Miles, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Clinical learning is an essential component of becoming a nurse. However at times, students report experiencing challenging clinical learning environments (CCLE), raising questions regarding the nature of a challenging clinical learning environment, its impact on students' learning and how students might respond within a CCLE. Using an Interpretive Descriptive study design, researchers held focus groups with 54 students from two Canadian sites, who self-identified as having experienced a CCLE. Students defined a CCLE as affected by relationships in the clinical area and by the context of their learning experiences. CCLE decreased students' learning opportunities and impacted on them as persons. As students determined which relationships were challenging, they tapped other resources and they used strategies to rebuilt, reframe, redirect and/or retreat relative to the specific challenge. Relationships also acted as buffers to unsupportive practice cultures. Implications for practice and research are addressed.

  19. [Inclusive education in nursing: analysis of students' needs].

    PubMed

    Faro, Ana Cristina Mancussi E; Gusmai, Luana de Fátima

    2013-02-01

    Inclusive education is based on assisting all students alike, providing an education aimed at everyone equally in order to identify the particular educational needs of each student. The objectives of the present study were to identify the occurrence of disabilities, explore the learning resources that allow for inclusion; identify the architectural, communication, educational and attitudinal barriers that may affect students' performance; and discuss the students' suggestions of how to promote inclusion. This exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed using a quantitative approach. Data collection was performed through interviewing undergraduate nursing students, using a questionnaire containing open- and closed-ended questions. It was found that 66.3% of students have a visual impairment and 1.2% reported having a hearing impairment, but no physical disability was reported. Architectural barriers were the most frequently mentioned by the interviewed students, followed by educational barriers.

  20. Stagnant perceptions of nursing among high school students: results of a shadowing intervention study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Gloria; Edwards, Pamela B; Granger, Bradi B

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into high school students' perceptions of the role of the nurse and to explore students' impressions of nursing following a nurse-shadowing intervention. Often nurses abandon staffing positions in the first 1-2 years, reporting a "poor fit" with nursing. Few studies have examined expectations and perceptions of nursing among high school students; a population of potential nurses in whom a more accurate view of nursing opportunities and professionalism may be fostered. High school students from two North Carolina counties participated in a nurse-shadowing intervention. Constant comparison and thematic coding were used for analysis of post-intervention in-depth interviews. Sixteen of 24 students completed the study. Misperception of nursing was the dominant theme. Five sub-themes were professional role responsibility, teamwork, caring relationships, tools and technology, and medication management. Experiential knowledge of nursing was a core need for students interested in nursing careers. These data suggest that a nurse shadowing program may positively influence perceptions of nursing, and may result in improved recruitment and retention in the workplace.

  1. Implementation of Free Text Format Nursing Diagnoses at a University Hospital's Medical Department. Exploring Nurses' and Nursing Students' Experiences on Use and Usefulness. A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Frigstad, Sigrun Aasen; Nøst, Torunn Hatlen; André, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nursing documentation has long traditions and represents core element of nursing, but the documentation is often criticized of being incomplete. Nursing diagnoses are an important research topic in nursing in terms of quality of nursing assessment, interventions, and outcome in addition to facilitating communication and continuity. Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the nurses' and nursing students' experiences after implementing free text format nursing diagnoses in a medical department. Method. The study design included educational intervention of free text nursing diagnoses. Data was collected through five focus group interviews with 18 nurses and 6 students as informants. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The informants describe positive experiences concerning free text format nursing diagnoses' use and usefulness; it promotes reflection and discussion and is described as a useful tool in the diagnostic process, though it was challenging to find the diagnosis' appropriate formulation. Conclusion. Our findings indicate a valid usability of free text format nursing diagnoses as it promotes the diagnostic process. The use seems to enhance critical thinking and may serve as valuable preparation towards an implementation of standardized nursing diagnoses. Use and support of key personnel seem valuable in an implementation process.

  2. Experienced stressors and coping strategies among Iranian nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Tafreshi, Maryam; Hagani, Hamid

    2007-01-01

    Background College students are prone to stress due to the transitional nature of college life. High levels of stress are believed to affect students' health and academic functions. If the stress is not dealt with effectively, feelings of loneliness, nervousness, sleeplessness and worrying may result. Effective coping strategies facilitate the return to a balanced state, reducing the negative effects of stress. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed to determine sources of stress and coping strategies in nursing students studying at the Iran Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery. All undergraduate nursing students enrolled in years 1-4 during academic year 2004-2005 were included in this study, with a total of 366 questionnaires fully completed by the students. The Student Stress Survey and the Adolescent Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences Inventory (ACOPE) were used for data collection. Results Most students reported "finding new friends" (76.2%), "working with people they did not know" (63.4%) as interpersonal sources of stress, "new responsibilities" (72.1%), "started college" (65.8%) as intrapersonal sources of stress more than others. The most frequent academic source of stress was "increased class workload" (66.9%) and the most frequent environmental sources of stress were being "placed in unfamiliar situations" (64.2%) and "waiting in long lines" (60.4%). Interpersonal and environmental sources of stress were reported more frequently than intrapersonal and academic sources. Mean interpersonal (P=0.04) and environmental (P=0.04) sources of stress were significantly greater in first year than in fourth year students. Among coping strategies in 12 areas, the family problem solving strategies, "trying to reason with parents and compromise" (73%) and "going along with family rules" (68%) were used "often or always" by most students. To cope with engaging in demanding activity, students often or always used "trying to figure out how to deal

  3. Attachment styles as predictors of empathy in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhsh, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have traced a relationship between the attachment styles of nurses working as in healthcare teams and their empathy which is an essential characteristic required of people concerned with managing relationships, supporting social events, and improving the of nurse-patient relationships. Since determining the effective variables in the quality of nurse-patient relationships in clinical settings is of paramount importance, current investigation is an effort to examine the relationship between attachment styles and empathy in nursing students. 260 university students (male = 130 and female = 130) were chosen as the sample of the study based upon specific inclusion criteria. All participants completed the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Data was collected and analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis with SPSS (v.18). The results showed that secure and insecure attachment styles have significant positive and negative correlation with empathy respectively. Based on the results of regression analysis, it was shown that secure attachment style is predicting 53% of the variance empathy variable, whereas insecure attachment styles are explaining up to 76% of the variance empathy variable collectively. The increase of attention to instructions that focus on empathetic relationships with patients and that are based upon the secure attachment style can result in positive changes in the area of nurse-patient relations and in increasing attention to medical ethics. Findings are consistent with prediction derived from attachment theory and add to our understanding of relationship between attachment styles with empathy in nursing students. The meaning and limitations of this study and suggestions for further research are also discussed.

  4. Operationalizing the Student Electronic Portfolio for Doctoral Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Willmarth-Stec, Melissa; Beery, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing trend toward use of the electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) in Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. E-portfolios can provide documentation of competencies and achievement of program outcomes while showcasing a holistic view of the student achievement. Implementation of the e-portfolio requires careful decision making concerning software selection, set-up, portfolio components, and evaluation. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of an e-portfolio in a Doctor of Nursing Practice program and provide lessons learned during the implementation stage.

  5. Work-Arounds Observed by Fourth-Year Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Judith; Lancaster, Rachelle; Park, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Much has been written about the need for health care professionals to consistently promote policies and best practices that create safe, high-quality care environments. At times, nurses deviate from established policies and procedures to create work-arounds or changes in work patterns to accomplish patient care goals. The purpose of this study was to identify common work-arounds and describe what influenced the nurse to engage in the work-around as observed by fourth-year baccalaureate students in clinical settings. A descriptive qualitative approach was used to describe the findings from a Quality and Safety Education for Nurses-based assignment. Ninety-six individual student assignments were included in this analysis; the themes of infection prevention and control and medication management emerged. The theme of workload emerged as the reason why students believed nurses engaged in work-arounds. Further studies are needed to determine how work-arounds influence short- and long-term patient outcomes.

  6. Accelerating Opportunity: A Portrait of Students and Their Program Experiences from the 2014 Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Shayne; Martin-Caughey, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of students enrolled in Accelerating Opportunity (AO) career pathways in spring 2014. AO provides grants to help community colleges create career pathway programs to enroll students with low basic skills into for-credit career and technical education courses to improve educational and employment…

  7. Caring for students with type 1 diabetes: school nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueh-Ling; Volker, Deborah L

    2013-02-01

    This qualitative study used a Husserlian phenomenological approach to obtain an understanding of the essences of five experienced Taiwanese school nurses' lived experience of caring for students with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Audio-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis entailed a modified method from Colaizzi. Four intertwined themes were discovered: (a) I try to put myself in the parents' and students' shoes, (b) I am not a diabetes expert, (c) managing T1DM requires teamwork, and (d) caring for students with T1DM is a struggle with practical limitations. The findings show that these school nurses encountered many challenges as they implemented their roles and responsibilities in caring for students with T1DM. The findings suggest that increasing school nurses' competence in caring for students with T1DM and developing effective strategies to overcome the challenges faced may be useful. Multidisciplinary teamwork could benefit the diabetes management activities in school settings.

  8. Evaluating learning opportunities offered to mental health nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nganasurian, W E

    1998-10-01

    This article is based upon a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of Anglia Polytechnic University for the degree of Master of Philosophy. The study, completed in 1997, sought to identify factors making a positive contribution to learning within mental health care settings, and, having done this, to develop a means of auditing. Phase One drew on published work; however, it was necessary to determine the contextual validity of factors shown by colleagues to be conductive to learning, since the focus of this earlier work was, in the main, within general adult nursing. Information on the relevance of these factors was obtained from a sample (n = 146) of mental health nursing students, qualified staff, and teachers who responded to a self-completion postal survey, using a questionnaire as the research instrument. Phase Two drew upon the work completed in Phase One. A Likert-type scale audit instrument was developed and administered to a sample (n = 51) of mental health nursing students. In order to test the reliability of this instrument, students'verbal ratings of the quality of their learning experience were compared to numerical ratings provided by the audit instrument resultant from this study. Findings suggest that the instrument provides an effective, efficient means of evaluating learning environments from an individual student's perspective, and as a cumulative profile of student, practice setting and supervisors operating within it. This enables educationalists to identify standards which may be incorporated into future education/service provider contracting arrangements.

  9. Determination of smoking habits and personality traits among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Aylin; Ustün, Besti

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the smoking habits of students who receive nursing education in universities and their personality traits. We found that 29.2% of the students were habitual smokers, and the average score on the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test was 3.4 +/- 2.3. A significant difference in statistical terms was marked between the participants' smoking habits and the self-control factor. Because we found that the level of smoking among individuals with high self-control is rather low, providing information to students on quitting smoking and periodically assessing smoking status are recommended. In addition, individual improvement programs focused on the development of self-control can be added to nursing curricula.

  10. Group clinical supervision in pre-registration nurse training: the views of mental health nursing students.

    PubMed

    Carver, Neil; Ashmore, Russell; Clibbens, Nicola

    2007-10-01

    In 1994 the Department of Health recommended that nurses be introduced to the process of clinical supervision during pre-registration training. In response to this recommendation, the now defunct English National Board (ENB) stated that: "It will be a requirement that all students of pre-registration nursing programmes receive preparation in what to expect from clinical supervision" (ENB, 1995, p. 4). Despite the fact that no further guidance was issued there is an emerging body of literature exploring this area. This paper reports findings from the initial phase of a three-year prospective longitudinal study examining students' experiences of group clinical supervision undertaken as part of their pre-registration training. In this part of the study 32 mental health nursing students participated in focus groups in which they discussed their expectations of clinical supervision. Content analysis of the data produced five major categories: 'the nature of clinical supervision'; 'roles and responsibilities'; 'staying safe and doing no harm'; 'being in a group'; and 'being a student'. The findings suggest that the idea of supervision is attractive to students, although there are significant anxieties both about supervision in general and of group supervision in particular.

  11. Effectiveness of a Simulated Hospital Day with Undergraduate Student Nurses: A Comparative Descriptive Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholeben, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, outside forces create blocks that affect the quality and quantity of clinical experiences for pre-licensure nursing students. These limitations create an environment in which entry-level nursing students enter the workforce without a solid foundation in nursing concepts or in exposure to situations that they might encounter. To counter…

  12. Electronic Assessment and Feedback Tool in Supervision of Nursing Students during Clinical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettiäinen, Sari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine nursing teachers' and students' attitudes to and experiences of using an electronic assessment and feedback tool in supervision of clinical training. The tool was called eTaitava, and it was developed in Finland. During the pilot project, the software was used by 12 nursing teachers and 430 nursing students.…

  13. Bridging Community Generational Gaps through Experiential Learning: A College Nursing Student Practicum for Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Jane D.

    2013-01-01

    At the study site, an elder care practicum was adopted after nursing students demonstrated a lack of interest in the well-being of elderly patients. The purpose of the study was to determine if there was a change in college nursing students' attitudes toward nursing home residents as a result of increased intergenerational exposure following an…

  14. Student Contributions to Clinical Agencies: A Comparison of Adult Health and Psychiatric Staff Nurses' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindel, Cecelia Gatson; Bateman, Anne L.; Patsdaughter, Carol A.; Babington, Lynn M.; Medici, Geraldine

    2001-01-01

    Adult health/medical-surgical nurses (n=54) and mental health/psychiatric nurses (n=54) were surveyed about contributions of nursing students in clinical placements. Students provided clinical staff with opportunities for mentoring, reciprocal learning, and professional development and made direct contributions to patient care. (SK)

  15. The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Who Study Abroad: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Michelle Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Nurse Researchers need to explore study abroad programs and identify their impact on the development of cultural competence and global perspectives in nursing students. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of nursing students who study abroad and to identify benefits and impediments that may be used to spawn future…

  16. Teaching Psychology to Student Nurses: The Use of "Talking Head" Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Tait, Desiree J. R.; Tait, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a central part of undergraduate nursing curricula in the UK. However, student nurses report difficulties recognising the relevance and value of psychology. We sought to strengthen first-year student nurses' application of psychology by developing a set of digital stories based around "Talking Head" video clips where…

  17. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions

    PubMed Central

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Nurses play a major role in Thailand’s health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1) compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2) explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level. Methods A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents’ background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. Results A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being “confident” or “very confident” in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of “public health competency” than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in “clinical competency” between the two groups. Conclusion Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than those from public institutions, particularly with regard to public health. This phenomenon might have arisen because private nursing students had greater experience of diverse working environments during their training. One of the key limitations of this study was that the results were based on the subjective self-assessment of the respondents, which might risk respondent bias. Further studies that evaluate current nursing curricula in both

  18. Exploratory factor analysis of the pediatric nursing student clinical comfort and worry assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Al-Qaaydeh, Sharifa; Lassche, Madeline; Macintosh, Christopher I

    2012-10-01

    Pediatric nursing clinical often causes feelings of fear, thus hindering students' performance. This sparked the creation of the "pediatric nursing student clinical comfort and worry assessment tool," which can be utilized to identify worry-provoking elements before and after pediatric clinical rotations. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and psychometric testing of this tool. Psychometric tests used to assess data quality, reliability, and construct validity demonstrated that the pediatric nursing student clinical comfort and worry assessment tool can be used to evaluate nursing students' comfort and worry in pediatric nursing clinical rotations.

  19. Experiences of Success by Minority Students Attending a Predominantly Caucasian Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boruff, Staci M.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing educators have struggled for many years with the problem of student attrition in the minority population. Because there are so few minority students who choose nursing as a profession, educators strive to retain these students to graduation. Unfortunately, attrition rates of minority students continue to rise despite years of research into…

  20. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…