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Sample records for accelerated radiotherapy rt

  1. Comparison of the dosimetries of 3-dimensions Radiotherapy (3D-RT) with linear accelerator and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in children irradiated for neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensity modulated radiotherapy is an efficient radiotherapy technique to increase dose in target volumes and decrease irradiation dose in organs at risk. This last objective is mainly relevant in children. However, previous results suggested that IMRT could increase low dose, factor of risk for secondary radiation induced cancer. This study was performed to compare dose distributions with 3D-radiotherapy (3D-RT) and IMRT with tomotherapy (HT) in children with neuroblastoma. Seven children with neuroblastoma were irradiated. Treatment plans were calculated for 3D-RT, and for HT. For the volume of interest, the PTV-V95% and conformity index were calculated. Dose constraints of all the organs at risk and integral dose were compared. Results The conformity index was statistically better for HT than for 3D-RT. PTV-V95% constraint was reached in 6 cases with HT compared to 2 cases with 3D-RT. For the ipsilateral kidney of the tumor, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for 3 patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in two cases and higher in one case. The threshold was not reached for one patient with either technique, but the value was lower with HT than with 3D-RT. For the contralateral kidney of the tumors, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for all patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in 5 of 7 children, equal in one patient and higher in one patient. The organ-at-risk volumes receiving low doses were significantly lower with 3D-RT but larger for the highest doses, compared to those irradiated with HT. The integral doses were not different. Conclusions IMRT with HT allows a better conformity treatment, a more frequently acceptable PTV-V95% than 3D-RT and, concomitantly, a better shielding of the kidneys. The integral doses are comparable between both techniques but consideration of differences in dose distribution between the two techniques, for the organs at risk, has to be taken in

  2. [Electronic dataflow management in radiotherapy: routine use of the DICOM-RT protocol].

    PubMed

    Germond, J F; Haefliger, J M

    2001-11-01

    The DICOM standard protocol of medical image exchange and its extensions to radiotherapy data has been implemented in order to enable electronic communication between all modalities within our radiology and radiotherapy departments. The network architecture used for radiotherapy includes as basic elements one CT simulator, several treatment planning systems, one linear accelerator fitted with multileaf collimator, one electronic portal imaging system and several laser imagers. As customary in radiotherapy departments, our equipments are heterogeneous with respect to manufacturers and computer operating systems. Choosing to resort to the DICOM-RT protocol spared us the acquisition of a proprietary information system because its elementary inter-connectivity characteristics can effectively be used for dataflow management. It has the advantage to minimally change the user's way of working since the electronic data transfer is taking place sequentially from one workstation to the other in a manner analogous to what is done with the paper document. Quality assurance management of treatments is simplified by the electronic nature of the transfers from the CT-simulation down to the accelerator since modalities interfaces, instead of users, are performing consistency checks. This process results in substantial time saving, but the DICOM computer interface is requiring a better skill that the one needed for operating standard office software. The DICOM-RT protocol is presently missing some functionality necessary for its integration into our hospital information system. Our experience is however showing that it represents a viable and promising solution for a small radiotherapy department. PMID:11797279

  3. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  4. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  5. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  6. Monte Carlo radiotherapy simulations of accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harriss-Phillips, W M; Bezak, E; Yeoh, E K

    2011-01-01

    Objective A temporal Monte Carlo tumour growth and radiotherapy effect model (HYP-RT) simulating hypoxia in head and neck cancer has been developed and used to analyse parameters influencing cell kill during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The model was designed to simulate individual cell division up to 108 cells, while incorporating radiobiological effects, including accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Method Reoxygenation of hypoxic tumours has been modelled using randomised increments of oxygen to tumour cells after each treatment fraction. The process of accelerated repopulation has been modelled by increasing the symmetrical stem cell division probability. Both phenomena were onset immediately or after a number of weeks of simulated treatment. Results The extra dose required to control (total cell kill) hypoxic vs oxic tumours was 15–25% (8–20 Gy for 5×2 Gy per week) depending on the timing of accelerated repopulation onset. Reoxygenation of hypoxic tumours resulted in resensitisation and reduction in total dose required by approximately 10%, depending on the time of onset. When modelled simultaneously, accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation affected cell kill in hypoxic tumours in a similar manner to when the phenomena were modelled individually; however, the degree was altered, with non-additive results. Simulation results were in good agreement with standard linear quadratic theory; however, differed for more complex comparisons where hypoxia, reoxygenation as well as accelerated repopulation effects were considered. Conclusion Simulations have quantitatively confirmed the need for patient individualisation in radiotherapy for hypoxic head and neck tumours, and have shown the benefits of modelling complex and dynamic processes using Monte Carlo methods. PMID:21933980

  7. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity.

  8. Combined treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with surgery, chemotherapy, and hyperfractionated accelerated external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Crevoisier, Renaud . E-mail: rdecrevo@mdanderson.org; Baudin, Eric; Bachelot, Anne; Leboulleux, Sophie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Caillou, Bernard; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze a prospective protocol combining surgery, chemotherapy (CT), and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Methods and materials: Thirty anaplastic thyroid carcinoma patients (mean age, 59 years) were treated during 1990-2000. Tumor extended beyond the capsule gland in 26 patients, with tracheal extension in 8. Lymph node metastases were present in 18 patients and lung metastases in 6. Surgery was performed before RT-CT in 20 patients and afterwards in 4. Two cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (120 mg/m{sup 2}) were delivered before RT and four cycles after RT. RT consisted of two daily fractions of 1.25 Gy, 5 days per week to a total dose of 40 Gy to the cervical lymph node areas and the superior mediastinum. Results: Acute toxicity (World Health Organization criteria) was Grade 3 or 4 pharyngoesophagitis in 10 patients; Grade 4 neutropenia in 21, with infection in 13; and Grade 3 or 4 anemia and thrombopenia in 8 and 4, respectively. At the end of the treatment, a complete local response was observed in 19 patients. With a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 12-78 months), 7 patients were alive in complete remission, of whom 6 had initially received a complete tumor resection. Overall survival rate at 3 years was 27% (95% confidence interval 10-44%) and median survival 10 months. In multivariate analysis, tracheal extension and macroscopic complete tumor resection were significant factors in overall survival. Death was related to local progression in 5% of patients, to distant metastases in 68%, and to both in 27%. Conclusions: Main toxicity was hematologic. High long-term survival was obtained when RT-CT was given after complete surgery. This protocol avoided local tumor progression, and death was mainly caused by distant metastases.

  9. Stress Response Leading to Resistance in Glioblastoma—The Need for Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT) Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Vaupel, Peter; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. In spite of multimodal therapy concepts, consisting of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival, merely 15–18 months, is still poor. Mechanisms for resistance of GBM to radio(chemo)therapy are not fully understood yet and due to the genetic heterogeneity within the tumor including radiation-resistant tumor stem cells, there are several factors leading to therapy failure. Recent research revealed that, hypoxia during radiation and miRNAs may adversely affect the therapeutic response to radiotherapy. Further molecular alterations and prognostic markers like the DNA-repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), anti-apoptotic molecular chaperones, and/or the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) have also been identified to play a role in the sensitivity to cytostatic agents. Latest approaches in the field of radiotherapy to use particle irradiation or dose escalation strategies including modern molecular imaging, however, need further evaluation with regard to long-term outcome. In this review we focus on current information about the mechanisms and markers that mediate resistance to radio(chemo)therapy, and discuss the opportunities of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT) concepts to improve treatment options for GBM patients. PMID:26771644

  10. The use of particle acceleration machines in radiotherapy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, C.; Pelliccioni, M.

    1982-10-01

    The effects of the dosage and the oxygen enhancement ratio when using particle accelerators in radiotherapy are discussed. The advantages derived from the Bragg peak effect and pion mass to energy conversion are commented on. Machines to produce electrons, X rays, protons, neutrons, heavy ions and negative pions are described. The good results observed in the case of negative pions can be attributed either to the favorable dose distribution or to the specific biological properties of the particles produced in the process of pion capture. The cost factors of the generating machines are also discussed.

  11. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  12. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  13. A phase II trial of accelerated radiotherapy using weekly stereotactic conformal boost for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG 0023

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Robert; Choucair, Ali; Gillin, Michael; Chakravarti, Arnab; Schultz, Christopher; Souhami, Luis; Chen, Allan; Pham, Huong; Mehta, Minesh

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This phase II trial was performed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of dose-intense accelerated radiation therapy using weekly fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) boost for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed GBM with postoperative enhancing tumor plus tumor cavity diameter <60 mm were enrolled. A 50-Gy dose of standard radiation therapy (RT) was given in daily 2-Gy fractions. In addition, patients received four FSRT treatments, once weekly, during Weeks 3 to 6. FSRT dosing of either 5 Gy or 7 Gy per fraction was given for a cumulative dose of 70 or 78 Gy in 29 (25 standard RT + 4 FSRT) treatments over 6 weeks. After the RT course, carmustine (BCNU) at 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given for 3 days, every 8 weeks, for 6 cycles. Results: A total of 76 patients were analyzed. Toxicity included: 3 Grade 4 chemotherapy, 3 acute Grade 4 radiotherapy, and 1 Grade 3 late. The median survival time was 12.5 months. No survival difference is seen when compared with the RTOG historical database. Patients with gross total resection (41%) had a median survival time of 16.6 months vs. 12.0 months for historic controls with gross total resection (p = 0.14). Conclusion: This first, multi-institutional FSRT boost trial for GBM was feasible and well tolerated. There is no significant survival benefit using this dose-intense RT regimen. Subset analysis revealed a trend toward improved outcome for GTR patients suggesting that patients with minimal disease burden may benefit from this form of accelerated RT.

  14. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Touloupidis, Stavros; Manavis, Ioannis

    2007-01-15

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific {alpha}/{beta} ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues.

  15. Prospective Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles . E-mail: charles.leonard@usoncology.com; Carter, Dennis; Kercher, Jane; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Cornish, Patricia C.; Hunter, Kari C.; Kondrat, Janis

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and acute toxicities of an accelerated, partial breast, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and August 2005, 55 patients with Stage I breast cancer and initial follow-up were enrolled at four facilities on a HealthONE and Western institutional review board-approved accelerated partial breast IMRT protocol. All patients were treated in 10 equal fractions delivered twice daily within 5 consecutive days. The first 7 patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 48 patients were treated to 38.5 Gy. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 10 months (range, <1-19) and after diagnosis was 11.5 months (range, 2-21). No local or distant recurrences developed. The T stage distribution was as follows: T1a in 11 patients, T1b in 24, and T1c in 20. The median tumor size was 9 mm (range, 1-20 mm). Breast cosmesis was judged by the patient as poor by 2, good by 12, and excellent by 40 (1 patient was legally blind) and by the physician as poor for 1, good for 10, and excellent for 44 patients. Breast pain, as judged by patient, was none in 34, mild in 19, moderate in 2, and severe in 0 patients. There was a single report of telangiectasia but no incidents of significant edema. Compared with historic controls for whom three-dimensional treatment planning techniques were used, IMRT provided similar dose delivery to the target while reducing the volume of normal breast included in the 100%, 75%, and 50% isodose lines. Conclusion: This initial report prospectively explored the feasibility of accelerated partial breast IMRT. After short-term follow-up, the dose delivery and clinical outcomes were very acceptable. We believe this regimen deserves additional investigation under institutional review board guidance.

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  17. Commissioning of a novel microCT/RT system for small animal conformal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul; Graves, Edward

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to commission a 120 kVp photon beam produced by a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner for use in irradiating mice to therapeutic doses. A variable-aperture collimator has been integrated with a microCT scanner to allow the delivery of beams with pseudocircular profiles of arbitrary width between 0.1 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate at the isocenter of the system was measured using ion chamber and gafchromic EBT film as 1.56-2.13 Gy min-1 at the water surface for field diameters between 0.2 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate decreases approximately 10% per every 5 mm depth in water for field diameters between 0.5 and 1.0 cm. The flatness, symmetry and penumbra of the beam are 3.6%, 1.0% and 0.5 mm, respectively. These parameters are sufficient to accurately conform the radiation dose delivered to target organs on mice. The irradiated field size is affected principally by the divergence of the beam. In general, the beam has appropriate dosimetric characteristics to accurately deliver the dose to organs inside the mice's bodies. Using multiple beams delivered from a variety of angular directions, targets as small as 2 mm may be irradiated while sparing surrounding tissue. This microCT/RT system is a feasible tool to irradiate mice using treatment planning and delivery methods analogous to those applied to humans.

  18. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  19. Glucose metabolic rate monitored with PET 18-F-FDG for tumor response to radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RT+CT) in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, N.C.; Hamberg, L.M.; Hunter, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Changes in tumor glucose utilization as a result of RT or RT+CT may have prognostic implication. Therefore, the goals of this study were (1) to determine the correlation between tumor control probability (TCP) and the gradient of residual glucose metabolic rate (MRGlc) in response to RT or RT+CT and (2) to define the level of residual MRGlc that corresponds with 80% of TCP (FDG-TCP>80). Quantitative and dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analog, 2-(18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was performed before treatment in 28 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer, and this was repeated 2-3 weeks after full dose RT or RT+CT in 22 patients. Thirteen patients who had adequate follow up for the status of local tumor are the subject of this report. Fifteen, 6 mm, axial slices were acquired over a region that included the tumor. Scanning was performed continuously for two hours. From these data, decay corrected tumor and blood pool time-activity curves were obtained. The glucose metabolic rate was calculated for tissue using the Sokoloff model. The baseline value (mean) of tumor MRGlc was 0.4414 {plus_minus}0.896 {mu}mol/min/gm, and it was reduced to 0.0671 {plus_minus}0.034 {mu}mol/min/gm with treatment, p+0.011. Local tumor control was obtained in 5/5 with residual MRGlc of < 0.0412 {mu}mol/min/gm, 1/2 with MRGlc 0.0532 - 0.0542, 1/4 with 0.0763-0.0888 and 0/2 with 0.160.

  20. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  1. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Richetti, Antonella; Bignardi, Mario; Corvo, Renzo; Gabriele, Pietro; Sormani, Maria Pia; Antognoni, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% {+-} 4% for CF and 78% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% {+-} 5% for CF and 64% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% {+-} 4% and 27% {+-} 6% for CF

  2. Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Multi-Institutional Prospective Study of Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia Among Eight Asian Countries

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Tatsuya Nakano, Takashi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional prospective single-arm study was conducted among eight Asian countries. Between 1999 and 2002, 120 patients (64 with Stage IIB and 56 with Stage IIIB) with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated RT. External beam RT consisted of 30 Gy to the whole pelvis, 1.5 Gy/fraction twice daily, followed by 20 Gy of pelvic RT with central shielding at a dose of 2-Gy fractions daily. A small bowel displacement device was used with the patient in the prone position. In addition to central shielding RT, intracavitary brachytherapy was started. Acute and late morbidities were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: The median overall treatment time was 35 days. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 4.7 years. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate for all patients was 84% and 70%, respectively. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate was 78% and 69% for tumors {>=}6 cm in diameter, respectively. No treatment-related death occurred. Grade 3-4 late toxicities of the small intestine, large intestine, and bladder were observed in 1, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rate of Grade 3-4 late toxicity at any site was 5%. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that accelerated hyperfractionated RT achieved sufficient pelvic control and survival without increasing severe toxicity. This treatment could be feasible in those Asian countries where chemoradiotherapy is not available.

  3. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  4. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyts, Sandra Dirix, Piet; Clement, Paul M.J.; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Schoenaers, Joseph; Hermans, Robert; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  5. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  6. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  7. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) for Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Toxicity and Survival Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dandekar, Prasad; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Kate

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the current protocol of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy was initiated to improve survival while limiting toxicities. Methods and Materials: All patients with ATC from 1991 to 2002 were accrued and received megavoltage radiotherapy from the mastoid processes to the carina up to 60 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.8 and 2 Gy, 6 hours apart. Results: Thirty-one patients were accrued with a median age of 69 years, and 55% were women. Debulking was performed in 26%, and total thyroidectomy, in 6%, whereas 68% received radical radiotherapy alone. Local control data were available for 27 patients: 22% had a complete response, 26% had a partial response, 15% showed progressive disease, and 37% showed static disease. Median overall survival for all 31 patients was 70 days (95% confidence interval, 40-99). There was no significant difference in median survival between patients younger (70 days) and older than 70 years (42 days), between men (70 days) and women (49days), and between patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (77 days) and radical radiotherapy alone (35 days). Grade III or higher skin erythema was seen in 56% patients; desquamation in 21%; dysphagia in 74%; and esophagitis in 79%. Conclusion: The current protocol failed to offer a significant survival benefit, was associated with severe toxicities, and thus was discontinued. There is a suggestion that younger patients with operable disease have longer survival, but this would require a larger study to confirm it.

  8. A survey of the practice and management of radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A; Kearton, J; Hayman, O

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine current radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control (QC) practice in the UK, as a comparative benchmark and indicator of development needs, and to raise awareness of QC as a key performance indicator. Methods All UK radiotherapy centres were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their local QC processes, and submit their QC schedules. The range of QC tests, frequency of measurements and acceptable tolerances in use across the UK were analysed, and consensus and range statistics determined. Results 72% of the UK's 62 radiotherapy centres completed the questionnaire and 40% provided their QC schedules. 60 separate QC tests were identified from the returned schedules. There was a large variation in the total time devoted to QC between centres: interquartile range from 13 to 26 h per linear accelerator per month. There has been a move from weekly to monthly testing of output calibration in the last decade, with reliance on daily constancy testing equipment. 33% of centres thought their schedules were in need of an update and only 30% used risk-assessment approaches to determine local QC schedule content. Less than 30% of centres regularly complete all planned QC tests each month, although 96% achieve over 80% of tests. Conclusions A comprehensive “snapshot” of linear accelerator QC testing practice in the UK has been collated, which demonstrates reasonable agreement between centres in their stated QC test frequencies. However, intelligent design of QC schedules and management is necessary to ensure efficiency and appropriateness. PMID:22674707

  9. Hyperfractionated or Accelerated Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mauguen, Audrey; Le Péchoux, Cécile; Saunders, Michele I.; Schild, Steven E.; Turrisi, Andrew T.; Baumann, Michael; Sause, William T.; Ball, David; Belani, Chandra P.; Bonner, James A.; Zajusz, Aleksander; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Nankivell, Matthew; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Paulus, Rebecca; Behrendt, Katarzyna; Koch, Rainer; Bishop, James F.; Dische, Stanley; Arriagada, Rodrigo; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Pignon, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In lung cancer, randomized trials assessing hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy seem to yield conflicting results regarding the effects on overall (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS). The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer Collaborative Group decided to address the role of modified radiotherapy fractionation. Material and Methods We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis in patients with nonmetastatic lung cancer, which included trials comparing modified radiotherapy with conventional radiotherapy. Results In non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 10 trials, 2,000 patients), modified fractionation improved OS as compared with conventional schedules (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88, 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.97; P = .009), resulting in an absolute benefit of 2.5% (8.3% to 10.8%) at 5 years. No evidence of heterogeneity between trials was found. There was no evidence of a benefit on PFS (HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.03; P = .19). Modified radiotherapy reduced deaths resulting from lung cancer (HR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.98; P = .02), and there was a nonsignificant reduction of non–lung cancer deaths (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.15; P = .33). In small-cell lung cancer (SCLC; two trials, 685 patients), similar results were found: OS, HR = 0.87, 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.02, P = .08; PFS, HR = 0.88, 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.03, P = .11. In both NSCLC and SCLC, the use of modified radiotherapy increased the risk of acute esophageal toxicity (odds ratio [OR] = 2.44 in NSCLC and OR = 2.41 in SCLC; P < .001) but did not have an impact on the risk of other acute toxicities. Conclusion Patients with nonmetastatic NSCLC derived a significant OS benefit from accelerated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy; a similar but nonsignificant trend was observed for SCLC. As expected, there was increased acute esophageal toxicity. PMID:22753901

  10. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  11. Routine Use of Continuous, Hyperfractionated, Accelerated Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Five-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Omar S. Lester, Jason; Cameron, Alison; Ironside, Janet; Gee, Amanda; Falk, Stephen; Morgan, Sally A.; Worvill, Jackie; Hatton, Matthew Q.F.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the results from continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) used as the standard fractionation for radical RT in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in five United Kingdom centers. Methods and Materials: In 2005, the CHART consortium identified six U.K. centers that had continued to use CHART after the publication of the CHART study in 1997. All centers had been using CHART for >5 years and agreed to use a common database to audit their results. Patients treated with CHART between 1998 and December 2003 were identified to allow a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment details, and survival were recorded retrospectively. Five centers completed the data collection. Results: A total of 583 patients who had received CHART were identified. Of these patients, 69% were male, with a median age of 68 years (range, 31-89); 83% had performance status 0 or 1; and 43% had Stage I or II disease. Of the 583 patients, 99% received the prescribed dose. In only 4 patients was any Grade 4-5 toxicity documented. The median survival from the start of RT was 16.2 months, and the 2-year survival rate of 34% was comparable to that reported in the original study. Conclusion: The results of this unselected series have confirmed that CHART is deliverable in routine clinical practice, with low levels of toxicity. Importantly, this series has demonstrated that the results of CHART reported from the randomized trial can be reproduced in routine clinical practice.

  12. A neutron track etch detector for electron linear accelerators in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Branko; Faj, Dario; Poje, Marina; Varga, Maja; Radolic, Vanja; Miklavcic, Igor; Ivkovic, Ana; Planinic, Josip

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron linear accelerators in medical radiotherapy have replaced cobalt and caesium sources of radiation. However, medical accelerators with photon energies over 10 MeV generate undesired fast neutron contamination in a therapeutic X-ray photon beam. Photons with energies above 10 MeV can interact with the atomic nucleus of a high-Z material, of which the target and the head of an accelerator consist, and lead to the neutron ejection. Results and conclusions. Our neutron dosimeter, composed of the LR-115 track etch detector and boron foil BN-1 converter, was calibrated on thermal neutrons generated in the nuclear reactor of the Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), and applied to dosimetry of undesirable neutrons in photon radiotherapy by the linear accelerator 15 MV Siemens Mevatron. Having considered a high dependence of a cross-section between neutron and boron on neutron energy, and broad neutron spectrum in a photon beam, as well as outside the entrance door to maze of the Mevatron, we developed a method for determining the effective neutron detector response. A neutron dose rate in the photon beam was measured to be 1.96 Sv/h. Outside the Mevatron room the neutron dose rate was 0.62 μSv/h. PACS: 87.52. Ga; 87.53.St; 29.40.Wk. PMID:22933893

  13. Dose characteristics of in-house-built collimators for stereotactic radiotherapy with a linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrgård, F. Stefan E.; Sipilä, Petri M.; Kulmala, Jarmo A. J.; Minn, Heikki R. I.

    1998-06-01

    Dose characteristics of a stereotactic radiotherapy unit based on a standard Varian Clinac 4/100 4 MV linear accelerator, in-house-built Lipowitz collimators and the SMART stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning software have been determined. Beam collimation is constituted from the standard collimators of the linear accelerator and a tertiary collimation consisting of a replaceable divergent Lipowitz collimator. Four collimators with isocentre diameters of 15, 25, 35 and 45 mm, respectively, were constructed. Beam characteristics were measured in air, acrylic or water with ionization chamber, photon diode, electron diode, diamond detector and film. Monte Carlo simulation was also applied. The radiation leakage under the collimators was less than 1% at 50 mm depth in water. Specific beam characteristics for each collimator were imported to SMART and dose planning with five non-coplanar converging arcs separated by angles was performed for treatment of a RANDO phantom. Dose verification was made with TLD and radiochromic film. The in-house-built collimators were found to be suitable for stereotactic radiotherapy and patient treatments with this system are in progress.

  14. Late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: A phase III randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Kuaile; Shi Xuehui; Jiang Guoliang . E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com; Yao Weiqiang; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Gendi; Zhu Longxiang

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Late course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy (RT) is as effective as standard chemoradiotherapy for nonsurgical management of locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We have evaluated further the efficacy of concurrent LCAF RT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: In all, 111 eligible patients with esophageal SCC were randomized to receive LCAF alone (LCAF) or concurrent LCAF and chemotherapy (LCAT+CT) between March 1998 and July 2000. All patients received conventional fractionation irradiation of 1.8 Gy per day, to a dose of 41.4 Gy/23 fractions in 4-5 weeks, followed by accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation using reduced fields, 1.5 Gy/fractions twice a day, to a dose of 27 Gy in 18 days. Thus, the total dose was 68.4 Gy/41 fractions in 44 days. Fifty-four patients in the LCAF+CT arm had an additional four cycles of chemotherapy using cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} daily and fluorouracil (5-FU) 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily on Days 1-3 every 4 weeks starting on the same day that LCAF was delivered. Results: The median survival was 23.9 months (95% confidence [CI], 20.1-27.7) for the LCAF arm and 30.8 months (95% CI, 17.6-44.1) for the LCAF+CT arm, respectively. Survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years of the LCAF arm were 77%, 39%, and 28%, respectively, while those of the LCAF+CT arm were 67%, 44%, and 40%, respectively (p = 0.310). Grades 3 and 4 acute toxicities occurred in 46% and 25% of the patients in the LCAF arm and the LCAF+CT arm, respectively; 6% of the patients in the combined arm had Grade 5 acute toxicities, whereas none was noted in the LCAF alone arm. Conclusions: Late course accelerated hyperfractionation was effective for locally advanced esophageal SCC. There was a trend toward better survival among patients who received intensified treatment with concurrent chemotherapy. Further randomized studies with a larger number of patients should be carried out, but additional measures must be taken to reduce the higher

  15. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  16. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in Patients With Prior Pelvic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Bedi, Manpreet; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine rates of toxicity, freedom from local progression, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and February 2005, 50 patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for primary (n = 2 patients) or recurrent (n = 48 patients) rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients were treated with 150-cGy fractions twice daily, with a total dose of 39 Gy (n = 47 patients) if the retreatment interval was >=1 year or 30 Gy (n = 3) if the retreatment interval was <1 year. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 48 (96%) patients. Eighteen (36%) patients underwent surgical resection following radiotherapy. Results: Two patients had grade 3 acute toxicity and 13 patients had grade 3 to 4 late toxicity. The 3-year rate of grade 3 to 4 late toxicity was 35%. The 3-year rate of freedom from local progression was 33%. The 3-year freedom from local progression rate was 47% in patients undergoing surgery and 21% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.057). The 3-year overall survival rate was 39%. The 3-year overall survival rate was 66% in patients undergoing surgery and 27% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.003). The 3-year overall survival rate was 53% in patients with a retreatment interval of >2 years and 21% in those with a retreatment interval of <=2 years (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated, accelerated reirradiation was well tolerated, with low rates of acute toxicity and moderate rates of late toxicity. Reirradiation may help improve pelvic control in rectal cancer patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy.

  17. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  18. Neutron dosimetry in linear electron accelerator during radiotherapy treatment: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio; Nastasi, U.; Ongaro, C.; Stasi, E.; Zanini, Alessandro

    1995-03-01

    In the electron linear accelerators used for radiotherapy by high energy electrons or gamma rays, there is a non negligible production of neutrons by photodisintegration or electrodisintegration reactions on the high Z components of the head machine (target, flattening filter, collimators). At the Experimental Physics Department of Torino University, Torino, Italy an experimental and theoretical evaluation has been performed on the undesired neutron production in the MD Class Mevatron Siemens accelerator used at the Radiotherapy Department of S. Giovanni Battista A.S. Hospital for cancer therapy by a 15 MV gamma ray beam. A simulation of the total process has been carried out, using EGS4 MonteCarlo computer code for the evaluation of photoneutron spectra and MCNP code for the neutron transport in the patient's body. The geometrical description both of the accelerator head in EGS4 and of the anthropomorphous phantom in MCNP have been highly optimized. Experimental measurements have been carried out by bubble detectors BD 100R appropriately allocated inside a new phantom in polyetylene and plexiglass, especially designed for this purpose.

  19. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30<=80%, V40<=65%, V50<=55%, V60<=40%, V65<=30%, V70<=15%, and V75<=3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  20. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    SciTech Connect

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  1. An improved method to accurately calibrate the gantry angle indicators of the radiotherapy linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Du, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, Tainsong

    2007-06-01

    The calibration of the gantry angle indicator is an important and basic quality assurance (QA) item for the radiotherapy linear accelerator. In this study, we propose a new and practical method, which uses only the digital level, V-film, and general solid phantoms. By taking the star shot only, we can accurately calculate the true gantry angle according to the geometry of the film setup. The results on our machine showed that the gantry angle was shifted by -0.11° compared with the digital indicator, and the standard deviation was within 0.05°. This method can also be used for the simulator. In conclusion, this proposed method could be adopted as an annual QA item for mechanical QA of the accelerator.

  2. A phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan in combination with concurrent pelvic radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, F; Horisberger, K; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U; Wenz, F; Leitner, A; Hochhaus, A; Grobholz, R; Willer, A; Kähler, G; Post, S; Hofheinz, R-D

    2007-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety data of a combination regimen using weekly irinotecan in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer in a phase-II trial. Patients with rectal cancer clinical stages T3/4 Nx or N+ were recruited to receive irinotecan (50 mg m−2 weekly) and capecitabine (500 mg m−2 bid days 1–38) with a concurrent RT dose of 50.4 Gy. Surgery was scheduled 4–6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. A total of 36 patients (median age 62 years; m/f: 27:9) including three patients with local recurrence were enclosed onto the trial. The median distance of the tumour from the anal verge was 5 cm. The main toxicity observed was (NCI-CTC grades 1/2/3/4 (n)): Anaemia 23/9/−/−; leucocytopenia 12/7/7/2, diarrhoea 13/15/4/−, nausea/vomiting 9/10/2/−, and increased activity of transaminases 3/3/1/−. One patient had a reversible episode of ventricular fibrillation during chemoradiation, most probably caused by capecitabine. The relative dose intensity was (median/mean (%)): irinotecan 95/91, capecitabine 100/92). Thirty-four patients underwent surgery (anterior resection n=25; abdomino-perineal resection n=6; Hartmann's procedure n=3). R0-resection was accomplished in all patients. Two patients died in the postoperative course from septic complications. Pathological complete remission was observed in five out of 34 resected patients (15%), and nine patients showed microfoci of residual tumour (26%). After a median follow-up of 28 months one patient had developed a local recurrence, and five patients distant metastases. Three-year overall survival for all patients with surgery (excluding three patients treated for local relapse or with primary metastatic disease) was 80%. In summary, preoperative chemoradiation with CapIri-RT exhibits promising efficacy whereas showing managable toxicity. The local recurrence and distant failure rates observed after

  3. Toxicity of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Tokita, Mari; MacAusland, Stephanie G.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Price, Lori Lyn; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence and severity of late normal tissue toxicity using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Treatment planning and delivery were in strict accordance with the technique and specified dose-volume constraints of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 protocol. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading schema. The cosmetic outcome was scored using the Harvard criteria. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the correlation of dosimetric variables with outcome. Results: At a median follow-up of 15 months, moderate-to-severe late toxicity developed in 10% of patients. The most pronounced late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis: 25% Grade 2-4 and 8.3% Grade 3-4. The modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, and 80% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and maximal dose within the breast correlated with the development of fibrosis (p = .10, p = .03, p = .04, p = .06, p = .09, and p = .046, respectively). The overall cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in 81.7%, fair in 11.7%, and poor in 6.7%. The presence of subcutaneous fibrosis, modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5% and 20% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and pathologic specimen volume correlated with the risk of a fair/poor cosmetic outcome (p < .001, p = .02, p = .05, p = .04, p = .01, respectively). Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation as specified in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project

  4. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob; Turesson, Ingela; Folin, Annika; Trovik, Clement S.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  5. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0-1 hour for 24 patients, 1-2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas. PMID:26663937

  6. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0–1 hour for 24 patients, 1–2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas. PMID:26663937

  7. Outcomes of Postoperative Simultaneous Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jung, Yuh-Seog; Ryu, Jun Sun; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment efficacy and toxicity of postoperative simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) for patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2008, 51 patients with histologically confirmed HNSCC received postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (N = 33) or helical tomotherapy (N = 18) using SMART after curative surgical resection. The sites included were the oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), larynx, and hypopharynx in 23, 20, 5, and 3 patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up duration of all patients and surviving patients were 32 (range, 5-78 months) and 39 months (range, 9-77 months), respectively. The 3-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in all patients were 71%, 77%, 75%, 85%, and 82%, respectively. Although no significant difference in 3-year LRRFS were found between OC (82%) and OP (82%) carcinomas, the 3-year DMFS was worse in cases of OC (66%) carcinoma compared with OP carcinoma (95%; p = 0.0414). Acute Grade 3 dermatitis, mucositis, and esophagitis occurred in 10%, 10%, and 2% of patients, respectively. At the last follow-up, Grade 3 xerostomia was documented in 10% of the patients. Young age ({<=}40 years) (p < 0.001) and OC carcinoma primary (p = 0.0142) were poor risk factors on univariate analysis for DMFS. Conclusion: Postoperative SMART was observed to be effective and safe in patients with HNSCC.

  8. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Hauptman, Jason S.; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael; De Salles, Antonio A.F.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  9. Comprehensive analysis of electron beam central axis dose for a radiotherapy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Shiu, A S; Tung, S S; Nyerick, C E; Ochran, T G; Otte, V A; Boyer, A L; Hogstrom, K R

    1994-04-01

    This work evaluates the application of AAPM task group 25 (TG25) methodology for determination of central axis depth dose for a radiotherapy linear accelerator, whose dual scattering foil system and applicators were recently modified. The percent depth dose (%DD) and the dose output factor have been measured for square and rectangular fields at 100- and 110-cm source-to-surface distance (SSDs). At 100-cm SSD, results showed that %DD for a specific energy and field size can vary with applicator, the largest variation being for the 20-MeV, 10 x 10-cm field where a spread of +/- 2.5% or +/- 3 mm about the mean %DD is observed. The square-root method determines rectangular field %DD within 1%. Output factors for rectangular fields are calculated from square field values more accurately using a square-root method than the equivalent-square method recommended by TG25. At 110-cm SSD, the %DD calculated from that at 100-cm SSD using an inverse square factor does not agree with measured values for all fields. The maximum difference observed for the 20-MeV, 6 x 6-cm field was 5.5% or 10 mm. Output data at the 110-cm SSD show that the square-root method is suitable for determination of the air-gap correction factors of rectangular fields. In summary, the recommendations of TG25 work reasonably well for central axis electron beam dosimetry for this version of a radiotherapy linear accelerator, except in limited cases where applicator-scattered electrons apparently cause minor but clinically significant discrepancies. PMID:8058023

  10. Clinical results of hypoxic cell radiosensitisation from hyperbaric oxygen to accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, M.; Dische, S.

    1996-01-01

    The 40-year history of hypoxic cell sensitisation can be traced from hyperbaric oxygen to the present clinical studies with carbogen, nicotinamide and accelerated radiotherapy. A meta-analysis by Overgaard (1995) included 10703 cases entered into 83 randomised controlled trials and showed an overall improvement in local tumour control of 4.6% (P = 0.00001) and in survival of 2.8% (P = 0.005). Hyperbaric oxygen gave a 6.6% (P = 0.003) improvement in local control and hypoxic cell sensitisers 3.9% (P = 0.04). Despite this, the only hypoxic cell-sensitising method in routine clinical use is the giving of nimorazole in supraglottic and pharyngeal carcinomas. Acute, as well as chronic hypoxia has been recognised and nicotinamide, the amide derivative of B3 is believed to prevent the former. Thus ARCON (accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide) has been introduced in the clinic in an effort to overcome tumour proliferation, chronic and acute hypoxia, respectively. The success of future randomised controlled trials would be improved greatly if methods were available to measure the concentration of hypoxic cells in tumours before treatment and thus select those where benefit may be gained. The use of ARCON recognises that tumour cell proliferation is an important cause of failure in addition to hypoxia. However, intrinsic radiosensitivity may also need to be taken into account in the future. Clinical trials aim to improve the therapeutic ratio and thus the study of morbidity is as important as local tumour control. International collaboration is essential if randomised controlled trials are to be carried out within reasonable periods of time. PMID:8763896

  11. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

  12. Why to start the concomitant boost in accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer in week 3

    SciTech Connect

    Terhaard, Chris H.J. . E-mail: C.H.J.Terhaard@AZU.nl; Kal, Henk B.; Hordijk, Gerrit-Jan

    2005-05-01

    analysis, besides the fractionation schedule (relative risk [RR], 2.6 for HAS vs. ASO), pretreatment tracheotomy/stridor (RR 4.3, yes vs. no), and local tumor response 3-6 weeks after radiotherapy (RR 5.1, no vs. yes) were independent factors for local control. Tumor control probability analysis indicated that the onset of repopulation may be about 4-6 days earlier for the HAS regimen. The onset of repopulation in the HAS regimen is probably at the end of the second week or at the beginning of the third week. Severe late toxicity was observed in the HAS group and ASO group in, respectively, 11% and 16%. In multivariate analysis this toxicity related significantly to the field size and pretreatment tracheotomy/stridor. Conclusions: In our study the timing of the boost in accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer was an independent factor for local control, favoring the use of a concomitant boost in Week 3. This finding may indicate that accelerated repopulation of tumor cells starts early in the treatment phase.

  13. Determining optimization of the initial parameters in Monte Carlo simulation for linear accelerator radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Shiau, An-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is a well known calculation algorithm which can accurately assess the dose distribution for radiotherapy. The present study investigated all the possible regions of the depth-dose or lateral profiles which may affect the fitting of the initial parameters (mean energy and the radial intensity (full width at half maximum, FWHM) of the incident electron). EGSnrc-based BEAMnrc codes were used to generate the phase space files (SSD=100 cm, FS=40×40 cm2) for the linac (linear accelerator, Varian 21EX, 6 MV photon mode) and EGSnrc-based DOSXYZnrc code was used to calculate the dose in the region of interest. Interpolation of depth dose curves of pre-set energies was proposed as a preliminary step for optimal energy fit. A good approach for determination of the optimal mean energy is the difference comparison of the PDD curves excluding buildup region, and using D(10) as a normalization method. For FWHM fitting, due to electron disequilibrium and the larger statistical uncertainty, using horn or/and penumbra regions will give inconsistent outcomes at various depths. Difference comparisons should be performed in the flat regions of the off-axis dose profiles at various depths to optimize the FWHM parameter.

  14. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy For Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghera, Paul; McConkey, Chris; Ho, Kean-Fatt; Glaholm, John; Hartley, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.hartley@uhb.nhs.uk

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tumor control rates in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from patients with squamous cell cancer of the larynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx (International Union Against Cancer Stage II-IV), who received accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy between January 1, 1998, and April 1, 2005, were retrospectively analyzed. Two different chemotherapy schedules were used, carboplatin and methotrexate, both single agents administered on an outpatient basis. The endpoints were overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 81 patients were analyzed. The 2-year overall survival rate was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.5-81.8%). The 2-year disease-free survival rate was 68.6% (95% CI, 58.4-78.8%). The 2-year local control rate was 75.4% (95% CI, 65.6-85.1%). When excluding patients with Stage II oral cavity, larynx, and hypopharynx tumors, 68 patients remained. For these patients, the 2-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rate was 67.6% (95% CI, 56.0-79.2%), 72.0% (95% CI, 61.0-83.0%), and 64.1% (95% CI, 52.6-75.7%), respectively. Conclusion: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy and synchronous chemotherapy can achieve high tumor control rates while being resource sparing and should be the subject of prospective evaluation.

  15. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  16. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  17. Assessment of contralateral mammary gland dose in the treatment of breast cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Foteineas, Andreas; Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Caimi, Mariangela; Margari, Niki; Dilvoi, Maria; Pantelakos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To measure the dose distribution, related to the treatment planning calculations, in the contralateral mammary gland of breast cancer patients treated with accelerated hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. METHODS: Thirty-four prospectively selected female patients with right breast cancer (pN0, negative surgical margins) were treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy/fraction) was prescribed; it was requested that planning target volumes be covered by the 95% isodose line. The contralateral mammary gland was defined on CT simulation. The dose received was evaluated by dose volume histograms. RESULTS: The measured contralateral breast doses were: (1) Dose maximum: 290-448 cGy [Equivalent (Eq) 337-522 cGy]; (2) Mean dose: 45-70 cGy (Eq 524-815 cGy); and (3) Median dose: 29-47 cGy (337-547 cGy) for total primary breast dose of 42.5 Gy in 16 equal fractions. The spearman rho correlation showed statistical significance between the contralateral breast volume and maximum dose (P = 0.0292), as well as mean dose (P = 0.0025) and median dose (P = 0.046) to the breast. CONCLUSION: Minimizing the dose to the contralateral breast has to be one of the priorities of the radiation oncologist when using short schedules because of the radiosensitivity of this organ at risk. Further study is necessary to assess the long-term clinical impact of this schedule. PMID:22013502

  18. Development and Dosimetric Characterization of a Tissue Substitute (Bolus) For Use in Linear Accelerator Electron Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada Trujillo, Jorge; Villaseñor Navarro, Luis Felipe; Mitsoura, Eleni

    2003-09-01

    We propose the design of a new custom made material, to be used as a tissue substitute in external beam electron radiotherapy, based on cotton fabric and beeswax. Due to its inexpensive, easy preparation, constant thickness, flexibility, uniform density and physical properties similar to those of soft tissue, this bolus will insure personalized optimal dose build up and dose distribution in irregular treatment regions. Materials and Methods: We used commercial Campeche beeswax and 100% cotton fabric to prepare the bolus. Beeswax's physical characteristics were determined by thermal and density analysis. Its chemical properties are to be determined by electronic microcopy. We performed quality control tests and calibration of the Varian 2100C linear accelerator. The tissue equivalence of the material is established for a range of electron energies (6, 9, 12, 16, 20 MeV) using a water equivalent solid phantom (PTW; Freiburg, Germany) and a plane parallel ionization chamber (PTW) associated to a PTW electrometer. Results: Beeswax's absolute density was found to be 0.9181g/ml at 21°C, with a melting point of 45°C. For the bolus elaboration, the cotton fabric was soaked in liquid beeswax and thin sheets of approximately 1 mm were obtained. These presented high flexibility, physical stability (color, texture, thickness) and homogeneity. Determination of this dosimetric characteristics and equivalent thickness are still in process. Discussion and conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that the tissue substitute is easily made, inexpensive to produce, molds well to the treatment area and its positioning is easy and reproducible over the course of the treatment. So we consider that it's a good alternative to the commercial bolus.

  19. Output trends, characteristics, and measurements of three megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Murshed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and understand the long-term behavior of the output from megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators. Output trends of nine beams from three linear accelerators over a period of more than three years are reported and analyzed. Output, taken during daily warm-up, forms the basis of this study. The output is measured using devices having ion chambers. These are not calibrated by accredited dosimetry laboratory, but are baseline-compared against monthly output which is measured using calibrated ion chambers. We consider the output from the daily check devices as it is, and sometimes normalized it by the actual output measured during the monthly calibration of the linacs. The data show noisy quasi-periodic behavior. The output variation, if normalized by monthly measured "real' output, is bounded between ± 3%. Beams of different energies from the same linac are correlated with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.97, for one particular linac, and as low as 0.44 for another. These maximum and minimum correlations drop to 0.78 and 0.25 when daily output is normalized by the monthly measurements. These results suggest that the origin of these correlations is both the linacs and the daily output check devices. Beams from different linacs, independent of their energies, have lower correlation coefficient, with a maximum of about 0.50 and a minimum of almost zero. The maximum correlation drops to almost zero if the output is normalized by the monthly measured output. Some scatter plots of pairs of beam output from the same linac show band-like structures. These structures are blurred when the output is normalized by the monthly calibrated output. Fourier decomposition of the quasi-periodic output is consistent with a 1/f power law. The output variation appears to come from a distorted normal distribution with a mean of slightly greater than unity. The quasi-periodic behavior is manifested in the seasonally averaged output

  20. Output trends, characteristics, and measurements of three mega-voltage radiotherapy linear accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murshed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and understand the long term behavior of the output from megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators. Output trends of nine beams from three linear accelerators over a period of more than three years are reported and analyzed. Output taken during daily warm-up forms the basis of this study. The output is measured using devices having ion-chambers. These are not calibrated by accredited dosimetry laboratory but are baseline compared against monthly output which are measured using calibrated ion-chambers. We consider the output from the daily check devices as it is and sometimes normalized them by the actual output measured during the monthly calibration of the Linacs. The data shows noisy quasi-periodic behavior. The output variation if normalized by monthly measured “real’ output, is bounded between ±3%. Beams of different energies from the same Linac are correlated with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.97 for one particular Linac and as low as 0.44 for another. These maximum and minimum correlations drop to 0.78 and 0.25 when daily output is normalized by the monthly measurements. These results suggest that the origin of these correlations are both the Linacs and the daily output check devices. Beams from different Linacs, independent of their energies, have lower correlation coefficient with a maximum of about 0.50 and a minimum of almost zero. The maximum correlation drops to almost zero if the output is normalized by the monthly measured output. Some scatter plots of pairs of beam-output from the same Linac show band-like structures. These structures are blurred when the output is normalized by the monthly calibrated output. Fourier decomposition of the quasi periodic output is consistent with a 1/f power law. The output variation appears to come from a distorted normal distribution with a mean of slightly greater than unity. The quasi-periodic behavior is manifested in the seasonally averaged output

  1. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series. PMID:24825407

  2. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  3. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  4. Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, Amifostine, and Preoperative Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HypoArc) for Rectal Cancer: A Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Tsoutsou, Pelagia; Chloropoulou, Pelagia A.; Manolas, Kostantinos; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Bevacizumab has established therapeutic activity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy enhances the activity of radiotherapy in experimental models. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiochemotherapy combined with bevacizumab in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with radiologic T3 and/or N+ rectal carcinoma were treated with preoperative conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (3.4 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions) supported with amifostine (500-1,000 mg daily), capecitabine (600 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily, 5 days per week), and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 2 cycles). Surgery followed 6 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. A cohort of 14 sequential patients treated with the same regimen without bevacizumab was available for comparison. Results: Grade 2 or 3 diarrhea was noted in 7 of 19 patients (36.8%), which was statistically worse than patients receiving the same regimen without bevacizumab (p = 0.01). A higher incidence of Grade 2 or 3 proctalgia was also noted (21.1%) (p = 0.03). Bladder and skin toxicity was negligible. All toxicities regressed completely within 2 weeks after the end of therapy. Pathologic complete and partial response was noted in 7 of 19 cases (36.8%) and 8 of 19 cases (42.1%). Within a median follow-up of 21 months, none of the patients has had late complications develop and only 1 of 18 evaluable cases (5.5%) has had locoregional relapse. Conclusions: Bevacizumab can be safely combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy and capecitabine as a preoperative radiochemotherapy regimen for patients with rectal cancer. The high pathologic complete response rates urges the testing of bevacizumab in randomized studies.

  5. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  6. Accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with contralateral central or mediastinal lung cancer relapse after pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Abu Jawad, Jehad; Gkika, Eleni; Freitag, Lutz; Lübcke, Wolfgang; Welter, Stefan; Gauler, Thomas; Schuler, Martin; Eberhardt, Wilfried Ernst Erich; Stamatis, Georgios; Stuschke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment options are very limited for patients with lung cancer who experience contralateral central or mediastinal relapse following pneumonectomy. We present results of an accelerated salvage chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods Patients with localized contralateral central intrapulmonary or mediastinal relapse after pneumonectomy were offered combined chemoradiotherapy including concurrent weekly cisplatin (25 mg/m2) and accelerated radiotherapy [accelerated fractionated (AF), 60 Gy, 8×2 Gy per week] to reduce time for repopulation. Based on 4D-CT-planning, patients were irradiated using multifield intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or helical tomotherapy. Results Between 10/2011 and 12/2012, seven patients were treated. Initial stages were IIB/IIIA/IIIB: 3/1/3; histopathological subtypes scc/adeno/large cell: 4/1/2. Tumour relapses were located in mediastinal nodal stations in five patients with endobronchial tumour in three patients. The remaining patients had contralateral central tumour relapses. All patients received 60 Gy (AF), six patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Median dose to the remaining contralateral lung, esophagus, and spinal cord was 6.8 (3.3-11.4), 8.0 (5.1-15.5), and 7.6 (2.8-31.2) Gy, respectively. With a median follow-up of 29 [17-32] months, no esophageal or pulmonary toxicity exceeding grade 2 [Common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTC-AE) v. 3] was observed. Median survival was 17.2 months, local in-field control at 12 months 80%. Only two local recurrences were observed, both in combination with out-field metastases. Conclusions This intensified accelerated chemoradiotherapy schedule was safely applicable and offers a curative chance in these pretreated frail lung cancer patients. PMID:25922702

  7. Effect of external shielding for neutrons during radiotherapy for prostate cancer, considering the 2300 CD linear accelerator and voxel phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Roque, H. S.; Rebello, W. F.; Correa, S. A.; Silva, A. X.; Souza, E. M.; Batita, D. V. S.; Sandrini, E. S.

    2014-02-01

    Photoneutron production occurs when high energy photons, greater than 6.7 MeV, interact with linear accelerator head structures. In Brazil, the National Cancer Institute, one of the centers of reference in cancer treatment, uses radiation at 4 angles (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°) as treatment protocol for prostate cancer. With the objective of minimizing the dose deposited in the patient due to photoneutrons, this study simulated radiotherapy treatment using MCNPX, considering the most realistic environment; simulating the radiotherapy room, the Linac 2300 head, the MAX phantom and the treatment protocol with the accelerator operating at 18 MV. In an attempt to reduce the dose deposited by photoneutrons, an external shielding was added to the Linac 2300. Results show that the equivalent dose due to photoneutrons deposited in the patient diminished. The biggest reduction was seen in bone structures, such as the tibia and fibula, and mandible, at approximately 75%. Besides that, organs such as the brain, pancreas, small intestine, lungs and thyroid revealed a reduction of approximately 60%. It can be concluded that the shielding developed by our research group is efficient in neutron shielding, reducing the dose for the patient, and thus, the risk of secondary cancer, and increasing patient survival rates.

  8. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  9. The Nano-X Linear Accelerator: A Compact and Economical Cancer Radiotherapy System Incorporating Patient Rotation.

    PubMed

    Eslick, Enid M; Keall, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Rapid technological improvements in radiotherapy delivery results in improved outcomes to patients, yet current commercial systems with these technologies on board are costly. The aim of this study was to develop a state-of-the-art cancer radiotherapy system that is economical and space efficient fitting with current world demands. The Nano-X system is a compact design that is light weight combining a patient rotation system with a vertical 6 MV fixed beam. In this paper, we present the Nano-X system design configuration, an estimate of the system dimensions and its potential impact on shielding cost reductions. We provide an assessment of implementing such a radiotherapy system clinically, its advantages and disadvantages compared to a compact conventional gantry rotating linac. The Nano-X system has several differentiating features from current radiotherapy systems, it is [1] compact and therefore can fit into small vaults, [2] light weight, and [3] engineering efficient, i.e., it rotates a relatively light component and the main treatment delivery components are not under rotation (e.g., DMLCs). All these features can have an impact on reducing the costs of the system. In terms of shielding requirements, leakage radiation was found to be the dominant contributor to the Nano-X vault and as such no primary shielding was necessary. For a low leakage design, the Nano-X vault footprint and concrete volume required is 17 m2 and 35 m3 respectively, compared to 54 m2 and 102 m3 for a conventional compact linac vault, resulting in decreased costs in shielding. Key issues to be investigated in future work are the possible patient comfort concerns associated with the patient rotation system, as well as the magnitude of deformation and subsequent adaptation requirements. PMID:24949649

  10. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  11. Image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer by CT-linear accelerator combination: Prostate movements and dosimetric considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R.; Grimm, Lisa; Oren, Reva

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have indicated that the prostate is not stationary and can move as much as 2 cm. Such prostate movements are problematic for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with its associated tight margins and dose escalation. Because of these intrinsic daily uncertainties, a relative generous 'margin' is necessary to avoid marginal misses. Using the CT-linear accelerator combination in the treatment suite (Primatom, Siemens), we found that the daily intrinsic prostate movements can be easily corrected before each radiotherapy session. Dosimetric calculations were performed to evaluate the amount of discrepancy of dose to the target if no correction was done for prostate movement. Methods and materials: The Primatom consists of a Siemens Somatom CT scanner and a Siemens Primus linear accelerator installed in the same treatment suite and sharing a common table/couch. The patient is scanned by the CT scanner, which is movable on a pair of horizontal rails. During scanning, the couch does not move. The exact location of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and rectum are identified and localized. These positions are then compared with the planned positions. The daily movement of the prostate and rectum were corrected for and a new isocenter derived. The patient was treated immediately using the new isocenter. Results: Of the 108 patients with primary prostate cancer studied, 540 consecutive daily CT scans were performed during the last part of the cone down treatment. Of the 540 scans, 46% required no isocenter adjustments for the AP-PA direction, 54% required a shift of {>=}3 mm, 44% required a shift of >5 mm, and 15% required a shift of >10 mm. In the superoinferior direction, 27% required a shift of >3 mm, 25% required a shift of >5 mm, and 4% required a shift of >10 mm. In the right-left direction, 34% required a shift of >3 mm, 24% required a shift of >5 mm, and 5% required a shift of >10 mm. Dosimetric calculations for a typical case of prostate cancer

  12. Treatment Outcomes of Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Comparison Between Combined Modality Radio-Chemotherapy and Two Variants of Single Modality Altered Fractionation Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kader, Hosam A.; Mydin, Aminudin R.; Wilson, Matthew; Alexander, Cheryl; Shahi, Jeevin; Pathak, Irvin; Wu, Jonn S.; Truong, Pauline T.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To compare outcomes in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated with radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT), accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AccRT), or hypofractionated radiotherapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Subjects were 321 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal cancer, Stage III or IVA/B, treated between January 2001 and December 2005 at the BC Cancer Agency with RT-CT (n = 157), AccRT (n = 57), or HypoRT (n = 107). Outcomes examined were disease-specific survival (DSS), locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), rate of G-tube use, and rate of hospitalization for acute complications. Results: Median follow-up was 3.4 years. Three-year Kaplan-Meier DSS with RT-CT, AccRT, and HypoRT were 80%, 81%, and 74%, respectively (p = 0.219). Cox regression analysis identified treatment modality as a significant factor affecting DSS (p = 0.038). Compared with RT-CT, the hazard ratio (HR) for DSS was 1.0 with AccRT and 2.0 with HypoRT (p = 0.021). Kaplan-Meier pairwise comparisons found no significant difference in LRC and OS between RT-CT and AccRT. HypoRT was associated with significantly lower LRC (p = 0.005) and OS (p = 0.008) compared with RT-CT. There were significant differences in the rates of G-tube use (p < 0.001) and of hospitalization (p = 0.036) among the three treatment groups, with the most frequent rates observed in the RT-CT group. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, AccRT conferred DSS, LRC, and OS comparable to that of RT-CT. Patients treated with RT-CT experienced higher rates of treatment-related acute toxicities. HypoRT was associated with the least favorable outcomes.

  13. Mature Results of a Randomized Trial of Accelerated Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Michele I.; Rojas, Ana M.; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Dische, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term late adverse events and treatment outcome of a randomized, multicenter Phase III trial of continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in 918 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Survival estimates were obtained for locoregional relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival and for late adverse events. Results: The 10-year estimates (+-1 standard error) for locoregional relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival were 43% +- 2% for CHART and 50% +- 3% with CRT (log-rank p = 0.2); 26% +- 2% and 29% +- 3% (p = 0.4), respectively; 41% +- 2% and 46% +- 3% (p = 0.3), respectively; and 56% +- 3% and 58% +- 3% (p = 0.5), respectively. There was a small but significant reduction in the incidence of slight or worse and moderate or worse epidermal adverse events with CHART (p = 0.002 to 0.05). Severe xerostomia, laryngeal edema, and mucosal necrosis were also significantly lower with CHART (p = 0.02 to 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the reduction in total dose from 66 Gy to 54 Gy, control of locoregional disease and survival with CHART were similar to those with CRT. These findings, together with the low incidence of long-term severe adverse events, suggest that CHART is a treatment option for patients with low-risk disease and for those unable to withstand the toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  14. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  15. Beam Quality Requirements of Dosage Control in Laser Ion Acceleration for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jao-Jang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Liu, Chuan; Chen, C. D.; Wilks, Scott

    2010-11-01

    Ion beam accelerated by laser solid target interaction has vested interested in medical applications. Particle therapy for cancer treatment is one of the most promising prospects. Typical proton beam energy spread for cancer treatment is Delta E / E ˜ 0.2% for synchrotron accelerator and Delta E / E ˜1% for cyclotron after energy selection system. Passive scattering irradiation mechanism is a common practice to induce SOBP (spread out Bragg peak) for cancer treatment. We examine depth and lateral dose distribution of hardons energized by radiation pressure via various energy selection criteria. Monte Carol codes use PIC simulation results as the input of particle beams. Dose uniformity, distal falloff and lateral penumbra are discussed in related to beam energy spread, emittance and entrance spot size will be presented.

  16. [Analysis and comparison of various quality protocols for radiotherapy linear accelerators].

    PubMed

    Ceruti, M; D'Ercole, L; Lisciandro, F; Nicelli, L; Rovera, G

    1997-03-01

    The main parameters determining the quality of an electron beam produced by a linear accelerator for medical use were considered in this study, particularly: flatness, symmetry and uniformity. We analyzed and compared several protocols issued by national and international associations (such as the AAPM, IPSM, ICRU, NACP), the software protocol developed for the measurement system we used (Multidata) and the measurement instructions recommended by the accelerator manufacturer (Siemens). The above associations issue quality protocols to ensure system performances suitable for medical use, to increase patient safety and to improve the treatment outcome. Radiation therapy safety and improvement depend on correct dose measurements and dose distribution in the treated volume. Once the dose value per monitor unit ratio (Gy/M.U.) is determined, controls are necessary to be sure that the value does not change in time and that the dose distribution has the same effect in the whole treated volume. Our goal is to point out the differences and the affinities in the definition of the parameters, which change slightly in the different protocols, and to study the origin of the differences found when the experimental results were compared. Another important issue is represented by the frequency of quality controls, which are definitely different from the fast checks which are often performed. In conclusion, some suggestions are provided for the choice of the quality protocol to follow. PMID:9221422

  17. Estimation of photoneutron intensities around radiotherapy linear accelerator 23-MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Shweikani, R; Anjak, O

    2015-05-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were used to study the variations of fast neutron relative intensities around a high-energy (23MV) linear accelerator (Varian 21EX) photon beam. The variations were determined on the patient plane at 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200cm from the isocenter of the photon beam. In addition, photoneutron intensities and distributions at isocenter level with field size of 40×40cm(2) at Source Axis Distance (SAD)=100cm around 23MV photon beam were also determined. The results showed that the photoneutron intensities decreased rapidly by increasing the distance from the center of the x-ray beam towards the periphery, for the open fields. PMID:25770858

  18. Impact of Schedule Duration on Head and Neck Radiotherapy: Accelerated Tumor Repopulation Versus Compensatory Mucosal Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, John D.; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Nahum, Alan E.; Malik, Zafar I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine how modelled maximum tumor control rates, achievable without exceeding mucositis tolerance (tcp{sub max-early}) vary with schedule duration for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and materials: Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we have fitted a range of tcp models to two HNSCC datasets (Withers' and British Institute of Radiology [BIR]), characterizing the dependence of tcp on duration and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Models likely to best describe future data have been selected using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and its quasi-AIC extension to overdispersed data. Setting EQD{sub 2}s in the selected tcp models to levels just tolerable for mucositis, we have plotted tcp{sub max-early} against schedule duration. Results: While BIR dataset tcp fits describe dose levels isoeffective for tumor control as rising significantly with schedule protraction, indicative of accelerated tumor repopulation, repopulation terms in fits to Withers' dataset do not reach significance after accounting for overdispersion of the data. The tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated from tcp fits to the overall Withers' and BIR datasets rise by 8% and 0-4%, respectively, between 20 and 50 days duration; likewise, tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated for stage-specific cohorts also generally rise slowly with increasing duration. However none of the increases in tcp{sub max-early} calculated from the overall or stage-specific fits reach significance. Conclusions: Local control rates modeled for treatments which lie just within mucosal tolerance rise slowly but insignificantly with increasing schedule length. This finding suggests that whereas useful gains may be made by accelerating unnecessarily slow schedules until they approach early reaction tolerance, little is achieved by shortening schedules further while reducing doses to remain within mucosal tolerance, an approach that may slightly worsen outcomes.

  19. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (<1/cm2) limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%). Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer

  20. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a 'bi-directional' force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software. PMID:25767898

  1. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a ‘bi-directional’ force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software.

  2. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Beppu, Naohito; Odawara, Soichi; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasue; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kimura, Fumihiko; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. PMID:23658415

  3. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  4. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  5. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-15

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mmx0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-I{sub b} (mA)x0.00808 (MeV/mA), where I{sub b} is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  6. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1. PMID:17555261

  7. Synergism between radiotherapy and vascular risk factors in the accelerated development of atherosclerosis: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Pherwani, Arun D; Reid, Julie A; Keane, Patrick F; Hannon, Raymond J; Soong, Chee Voon; Lee, Bernard

    2002-09-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used in the management of testicular tumors. However, to date the risk of radiation-induced vascular occlusive disease in men following radiotherapy for testicular cancer has not been regarded as a major factor in their long-term care. Several animal studies have shown the importance of established vascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced atherosclerosis. This report presents three cases of premature chronic iliofemoral arterial disease presenting 5,13, and 16 years following exposure to therapeutic irradiation for the treatment of testicular cancer. The patients were in the age group of 40-45 years and all demonstrated associated known atherosclerotic risk factors. The patients had received radiotherapy in the dose of 3,500-4,000 rads in a standard "dog-leg" fashion to the ipsilateral aortoiliac lymphatic chain. Our results showed that young men treated with radiotherapy for testicular cancer may be targeted from the outset for atherosclerotic risk factor reduction to minimize the risk of development of late chronic occlusive arterial disease. It may be that a cohort of men so treated with historical regimes of radiotherapy and now entering middle age should be screened for arterial disease and risk factor reduction. PMID:12183769

  8. RT_Image: an open-source tool for investigating PET in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Graves, Edward E; Quon, Andrew; Loo, Billy W

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a valuable imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of cancer. However, despite evidence that PET may be useful for defining target volumes for radiation therapy, no standardized methodology for accomplishing this task exists. To facilitate the investigation of the utility of PET imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning and accelerate its integration into clinical radiation oncology, we have developed software for exploratory analysis and segmentation of functional imaging datasets. The application, RT_Image, allows display of multiple imaging datasets and associated three-dimensional regions-of-interest (ROIs) at arbitrary view angles and fields of view. It also includes semi-automated image segmentation tools for defining metabolically active tumor volumes that may aid creation of target volumes for treatment planning. RT_Image is DICOM compliant, permitting the transfer of imaging data and DICOM-RT structure sets between the application and treatment planning software. RT_Image has been used by radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and radiation physicists to analyze over 200 PET datasets. Novel segmentation techniques have been implemented within this programming framework for therapy planning and for evaluation of molecular imaging-derived parameters as prognostic indicators. RT_Image represents a freely-available software base on which further investigations of the utlity of PET and molecular imaging in radiation oncology may be built. The development of tools such as this is critical in order to realize the potential of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy. PMID:17375973

  9. [Status report of Hungarian radiotherapy based on treatment data, available infrastucture, and human resources].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Király, Réka; Fodor, János; Kásler, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to report the status of Hungarian radiotherapy (RT) based on the assessment of treatment data in years 2012 to 2014, available infrastructure, and RT staffing. Between December 2014 and January 2015, a RT questionnaire including 3 parts (1. treatment data; 2. infrastructure; 3. staffing) was sent out to all Hungarian RT centers (n=12). All RT centers responded to all questions of the survey. 1. Treatment data: In 2014, 33,162 patients were treated with RT: 31,678 (95.5%) with teletherapy, and 1484 (4.5%) with brachytherapy (BT). Between 2012 and 2014, the number of patients treated with radiotherapy increased with 6.6%, but the number of BT patients decreased by 11%. Forty-two percent of all patients were treated in the two centers of the capital: 9235 patients (28%) at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO), and 4812 (14%) at the Municipial Oncoradiology Center (MOC). Out of the patients treated on megavoltage RT units (n=22,239), only 901 (4%) were treated with intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and 2018 (9%) with image-guided RT (IGRT). In 2014, 52% of all BT treatments were performed in Budapest: NIO - 539 patients (36%); MOC - 239 patients (16%); and BT was not available in 3 RT centers. Prostate I-125 seed implants and interstitial breast BT was utilized in one, prostate HDR BT in two, and head&neck implants in three centers. 2. Infrastructure: Including ongoing development projects funded by the European Union, by the end of year 2015, 39 megavoltage teletherapy units, and 12 HDR BT units will be in use in 13 available Hungarian RT centers. 3. Staffing: Actually, 92 radiation oncologists (RO), 29 RT residents, 61 medical physicists, and 229 radiation therapy technologists are working in 12 RT centers. There are 23 vacant positions (including 11 RO positions) available at the Hungarian RT centers. According to the professional minimal requirements and WHO guidelines, the implementation of 11 new linear accelerators, and 1 BT units

  10. Accelerated Radiotherapy, Carbogen, and Nicotinamide (ARCON) in the Treatment of Advanced Bladder Cancer: Mature Results of a Phase II Nonrandomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana Ph.D. Saunders, Michele

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that accelerated radiotherapy combined with carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) was an effective approach to use in the radical treatment of patients with advanced bladder carcinoma. Interim analysis from this Phase II study showed that it achieved a high level of locoregional control and overall survival (OS) and an acceptable level of adverse events. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2000, a total of 105 consecutive patients with high-grade superficial or muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma were given accelerated radiotherapy (50-55 Gy in 4 weeks) with carbogen alone or ARCON. End points of the study were OS, disease-specific, and local regional relapse-free survival, and for late adverse events, urinary (altered urination frequency, incontinence, hematuria, and urgency) and bowel dysfunction (stool frequency and blood loss). Results: At 5 and 10 years, local regional relapse-free survival rates were 44% after ARCON excluding the effect of salvage treatment and 62% after ARCON including the effect of salvage treatment (p = 0.04). Five- and 10-year rates were 35% and 27% for OS and 47% and 46% for disease-specific survival. The highest actuarial rate for Grade 3 or worse late urinary or bowel dysfunction was observed for altered urinary frequency (44% of patients had urinary events every 1 hour or less) and stool frequency of four or more events (26% at 5 years). Conclusions: Historic comparisons with other studies indicate no evidence of an increase in severe or worse adverse events and good permanent control of bladder disease after ARCON radiotherapy.

  11. Hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plataniotis, George

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after tumorectomy in early breast cancer patients is an established treatment modality which conventionally takes 6-7 wk to complete. Shorter RT schedules have been tested in large multicentre randomized trials and have shown equivalent results to that of standard RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) in terms of local tumor control, patient survival and late post-radiation effects. Some of those trials have now completed 10 years of follow-up with encouraging results for treatments of 3-4 wk and a total RT dose to the breast of 40-42.5 Gy with or without boost. A reduction of 50% in treatment time makes those RT schedules attractive for both patients and health care providers and would have a significant impact on daily RT practice around the world, as it would accelerate patient turnover and save health care resources. However, in hypofractionated RT, a higher (than the conventional 1.8-2 Gy) dose per fraction is given and should be managed with caution as it could result in a higher rate of late post-radiation effects in breast, heart, lungs and the brachial plexus. It is therefore advisable that both possible dose inhomogeneity and normal tissue protection should be taken into account and the appropriate technology such as three-dimensional/intensity modulated radiation therapy employed in clinical practice, when hypofractionation is used. PMID:21160631

  12. Dosimetric Characteristics of Circular 6-MeV X-Ray Beams for Stereotactic Radiotherapy with a Linear Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, A.; Rostkowska, J.; Kania, M.; Bulski, W.; Fijuth, J.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of 6 MeV circular X-ray beams of diameters ranging from 7.5 to 35.0 mm are reported. The 6-MeV X-ray beam from Clinac 2300CD was formed using additional cylindrical BrainLAB's collimators. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. Specific quantities measured include tissue maximum ratios (TMR), beam profiles (off-axis ratios OAR) and relative output factors. Measurements of these parameters were performed in a water phantom using small cylindrical ionization chambers and a diamond detector. Comparison of TMR values measured with the ionization chamber and the diamond detector showed no significant differences. It was shown that the latter yields more accurate results for beam profiles than ionization chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of this radiotherapy unit are found to be suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy.

  13. Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Safety and Efficacy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Souhami, Luis; Roberge, David; Kavan, Petr; Shakibnia, Lily; Muanza, Thierry; Lambert, Christine; Leblanc, Richard; Del Maestro, Rolando; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Shenouda, George

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Despite multimodality treatments, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. In an attempt to improve results, we have begun a program of accelerated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and June 2006, 35 unselected patients with glioblastoma multiforme were treated with hypo-IMRT. During a 4-week period, using a concomitant boost technique, a dose of 60 Gy and 40 Gy were delivered in 20 fractions prescribed to the periphery of the gross tumor volume and planning target volume, respectively. TMZ was administered according to the regimen of Stupp et al. Results: The median follow-up was 12.6 months. Of the 35 patients, 29 (82.8%) completed the combined modality treatment, and 25 (71.4%) received a median of four cycles of adjuvant TMZ. The median overall survival was 14.4 months, and the median disease-free survival was 7.7 months. The median survival time differed significantly between patients who underwent biopsy and those who underwent partial or total resection (7.1 vs. 16.1 months, p = 0.035). The median survival was also significantly different between patients with methylated vs. unmethylated 0-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoters (14.4 vs. 8.7 months, p = 0.049). The pattern of failure was predominantly central, within 2 cm of the initial gross tumor volume. Grade 3-4 toxicity was limited to 1 patient with nausea and emesis during adjuvant TMZ administration. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypo-IMRT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated with a useful 2-week shortening of radiotherapy. Despite a high number of patients with poor prognostic features (74.3% recursive partitioning analysis class V or VI), the median survival was comparable to that after standard radiotherapy fractionation schedules plus TMZ.

  14. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  15. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  16. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  17. A dosimetry technique for measuring kilovoltage cone-beam CT dose on a linear accelerator using radiotherapy equipment.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Daniel; Lawford, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    This work develops a technique for kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) dosimetry that incorporates both point dose and integral dose in the form of dose length product, and uses readily available radiotherapy equipment. The dose from imaging protocols for a range of imaging parameters and treatment sites was evaluated. Conventional CT dosimetry using 100 mm long pencil chambers has been shown to be inadequate for the large fields in CBCT and has been replaced in this work by a combination of point dose and integral dose. Absolute dose measurements were made with a small volume ion chamber at the central slice of a radiotherapy phantom. Beam profiles were measured using a linear diode array large enough to capture the entire imaging field. These profiles were normalized to absolute dose to form dose line integrals, which were then weighted with radial depth to form the DLPCBCT. This metric is analogous to the standard dose length product (DLP), but derived differently to suit the unique properties of CBCT. Imaging protocols for head and neck, chest, and prostate sites delivered absolute doses of 0.9, 2.2, and 2.9 cGy to the center of the phantom, and DLPCBCT of 28.2, 665.1, and 565.3mGy.cm, respectively. Results are displayed as dose per 100 mAs and as a function of key imaging parameters such as kVp, mAs, and collimator selection in a summary table. DLPCBCT was found to correlate closely with the dimension of the imaging region and provided a good indication of integral dose. It is important to assess integral dose when determining radiation doses to patients using CBCT. By incorporating measured beam profiles and DLP, this technique provides a CBCT dosimetry in radiotherapy phantoms and allows the prediction of imaging dose for new CBCT protocols. PMID:25207398

  18. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen. PMID:24403270

  19. Poster — Thur Eve — 28: Enabling trajectory-based radiotherapy on a TrueBeam accelerator with the Eclipse treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, J; Asiev, K; DeBlois, F; Morcos, M; Seuntjens, J; Syme, A

    2014-08-15

    The TrueBeam linear accelerator platform has a developer's mode which permits the user dynamic control over many of the machine's mechanical and radiation systems. Using this research tool, synchronous couch and gantry motion can be programmed to simulate isocentric treatment with a shortened SAD, with benefits such as smaller projected MLC leaf widths and an increased dose rate. In this work, water tank measurements were used to commission a virtual linear accelerator with an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, from which several arc-based radiotherapy treatments were generated, including an inverse optimized VMAT delivery. For each plan, the pertinent treatment delivery information was extracted from control points specified in the Eclipse-exported DICOM files using the pydicom package in Python, allowing construction of an XML control file. The dimensions of the jaws and MLC positions, defined for an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, were scaled for delivery on a conventional SAD linear accelerator, and translational couch motion was added as a function of gantry angle to simulate delivery at 85 cm SAD. Ionization chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were used to compare the radiation delivery to dose calculations in Eclipse. With the exception of the VMAT delivery, ionization chamber measurements agreed within 3.3% of the Eclipse calculations. For the VMAT delivery, the ionization chamber was located in an inhomogeneous region, but gamma evaluation of the Gafchromic film plane resulted in a 94.5% passing rate using criteria of 3 mm/3%. The results indicate that Eclipse calculation infrastructure can be used.

  20. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  1. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  2. A feasibility study of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy, cisplatin + 5-FU chemo-adjuvant and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. Univ. of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY ); Bowen, M.G.; Van Nagell, J.R.; Gallion, H.H.; DePriest, P. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy combined with hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy for Stage III and IV cervical cancers. Eleven patients with advanced Stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancers were treated with [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy in an up-front schedule followed by cisplatin (CDDP; 50 mg/m[sup 2]) chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated (1.2 Gy bid) radiotherapy given concurrently with intravenous infusion of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) (1000 mg/m[sup 2]/day [times] 4 days) in weeks 1 and 4 with conventional radiation (weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6). Total dose at a paracervical point A isodose surface was 80-85 Gy-eq by external and intracavitary therapy and 60 Gy at the pelvic sidewalls. Patients tolerated the protocol well. There was 91% compliance with the chemotherapy and full compliance with the [sup 252]Cf brachytherapy and the external beam radiotherapy. There were no problems with acute chemo or radiation toxicity. One patient developed a rectovaginal fistula (Grade 3-4 RTOG criteria) but no other patients developed significant late cystitis, proctitis or enteritis. There was complete response (CR) observed in all cases. With mean follow-up to 26 months, local control has been achieved with 90% actuarial 3-year survival with no evidence of disease (NED). [sup 252]Cf neutrons can be combined with cisplatin and 5-FU infusion chemotherapy plus hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy without unusual side effects or toxicity and with a high local response and tumor control rate. Further study of [sup 252]Cf neutron-chemoradiotherapy for advanced and bulky cervical cancer are indicated. The authors found chemotherapy was more effective with the improved local tumor control. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  4. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  5. Towards magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Teodor Marius

    The goal of this work is to address key aspects of the magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) process of cancer sites. MRIgRT is implemented by using a system comprised of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner coupled with a radiation source, in our case a radiotherapy accelerator (Linac). The potential benefits of MRIgRT are the real-time tracking of the tumor and neighbouring healthy anatomy during treatment irradiation leading to on-line treatment plan optimization. Ultimately, this results in an increased accuracy and efficiency of the overall treatment process. A large research effort is conducted at Cross Cancer Institute to develop a hybrid MRI-Linac system consisting of a bi-planar 0.2 T permanent magnet coupled with a 6 MV Linac. The present work is part of this project and aims to address the following key components: (a) magnetic shielding and dosimetric effects of the MRI-Linac system, (b) measure and correction of scanner-related MR image distortions, and (c) MRI-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The first two components are essential for the optimal construction and operation of the MRI-Linac system while the third one represents a direct application of the system. The linac passive shielding was achieved by (a) adding two 10 cm thick steel (1020) plates placed at a distance of 10 cm from the structure on opposite sides of the magnet; and (b) a box lined with a 1 mm MuMetal(TM) wall surrounding the Linac. For our proposed MRI-Linac configuration (i.e. 0.2 T field and rotating bi-planar geometry) the maximum dose difference from zero magnetic field case was found to be within 6% and 12% in a water and water-lung-water phantom, respectively. We developed an image system distortion correction method for MRI that relies on adaptive thresholding and an iterative algorithm to determine the 3D distortion field. Applying this technique the residual image distortions were reduced to within the voxel

  6. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  7. Be aware of neutrons outside short mazes from 10-MV linear accelerators X-rays in radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Brockstedt, S; Holstein, H; Jakobsson, L; Tomaszewicz, A; Knöös, T

    2015-07-01

    During the radiation survey of a reinstalled 10-MV linear accelerator in an old radiation treatment facility, high dose rates of neutrons were observed. The area outside the maze entrance is used as a waiting room where patients, their relatives and staff other than those involved in the actual treatment can freely pass. High fluence rates of neutrons would cause an unnecessary high effective dose to the staff working in the vicinity of such a system, and it can be several orders higher than the doses received due to X-rays at the same location. However, the common knowledge appears to have been that the effect of neutrons at 10-MV X-ray linear accelerator facilities is negligible and shielding calculations models seldom mention neutrons for this operating energy level. Although data are scarce, reports regarding this phenomenon are now emerging. For the future, it is advocated that contributions from neutrons are considered already during the planning stage of new or modified facilities aimed for 10 MV and that estimated dose levels are verified. PMID:25802465

  8. Pilot Quality Control Program for Audit RT External Beams at Mexican Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V. M.

    2008-08-01

    A pilot quality control program for audit 18 radiotherapy RT external beams at 13 Mexican hospitals is described—for eleven 60 Co beams and seven photon beams of 6, 10 and 15 MV from accelerators. This program contains five parts: a) Preparation of the TLD-100 powder: washing, drying and annealing (one hour 400 °C plus 24 hrs 80 °C). b) Sending two IAEA type capsules to the hospitals for irradiation at the hospital to a nominal DW = 2 Gy ṡ c ) Preparation at the SSDL of ten calibration curves CC in the range of 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy in terms of absorbed dose to water DW for 60 Co with traceability to primary laboratory NRC (Canada), according to a window irradiation: 26/10/2007-7/12/2007. d) Reading all capsules that match their hospital time irradiation and the SSDL window irradiation. f) Evaluation of the Dw imparted by the hospitals.

  9. Effects of Treatment Intensification on Acute Local Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Prospective Observational Study Validating CTCAE, Version 3.0, Scoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro Tomatis, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Guzzo, Marco; Sangalli, Claudia; Potepan, Paolo; Fantini, Simona; Bergamini, Cristiana; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Licitra, Lisa; Scaramellini, Gabriele; Cantu', Giulio; Olmi, Patrizia

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence and severity of acute local toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy (CHT), using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0), scoring system. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2006, 149 patients with head and neck cancer treated with RT at our center were prospectively evaluated for local toxicity during treatment. On a weekly basis, patients were monitored and eight toxicity items were recorded according to the CTCAE v3.0 scoring system. Of the 149 patients, 48 (32%) were treated with RT alone (conventional fractionation), 82 (55%) with concomitant CHT and conventional fractionation RT, and 20 (13%) with accelerated-fractionation RT and CHT. Results: Severe (Grade 3-4) adverse events were recorded in 28% (mucositis), 33% (dysphagia), 40% (pain), and 12% (skin) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed CHT to be the most relevant factor independently predicting for worse toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia, weight loss, salivary changes). In contrast, previous surgery, RT acceleration and older age, female gender, and younger age, respectively, predicted for a worse outcome of mucositis, weight loss, pain, and dermatitis. The T-score method confirmed that conventional RT alone is in the 'low-burden' class (T-score = 0.6) and suggests that concurrent CHT and conventional fractionation RT is in the 'high-burden' class (T-score = 1.15). Combined CHT and accelerated-fractionation RT had the highest T-score at 1.9. Conclusions: The CTCAE v3.0 proved to be a reliable tool to quantify acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with various treatment intensities. The effect of CHT and RT acceleration on the acute toxicity burden was clinically relevant.

  10. Predictors of Long-Term Toxicity Using Three-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Grills, Inga S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Ye Hong; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We analyzed variables associated with long-term toxicity using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients treated with 3D-CRT accelerated partial breast irradiation were evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scale. Cosmesis was scored using Harvard criteria. Multiple dosimetric and volumetric parameters were analyzed for their association with worst and last (W/L) toxicity outcomes. Results: Sixty-two patients had a minimum of 36 months of toxicity follow-up (median follow-up, 4.8 years). The W/L incidence of poor-fair cosmesis, any telangiectasia, and grade {>=}2 induration, volume reduction, and pain were 16.4%/11.5%, 24.2%/14.5%, 16.1%/9.7%, 17.7%/12.9%, and 11.3%/3.2%, respectively. Only the incidence of any telangiectasia was found to be predicted by any dosimetric parameter, with the absolute breast volume receiving 5% to 50% of the prescription dose (192.5 cGy-1925 cGy) being significant. No associations with maximum dose, volumes of lumpectomy cavity, breast, modified planning target volume, and PTV, dose homogeneity index, number of fields, and photon energy used were identified with any of the aforementioned toxicities. Non-upper outer quadrant location was associated with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.02 W/p = 0.04 L). A small cavity-to-skin distance was associated with a grade {>=}2 induration (p = 0.03 W/p = 0.01 L), a borderline significant association with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.06 W/p = 0.06 L) and poor-fair cosmesis (p = 0.08 W/p = 0.09 L), with threshold distances ranging from 5 to 8 mm. Conclusions: No dose--volume relationships associated with long-term toxicity were identified in this large patient cohort with extended follow-up. Cosmetic results were good-to-excellent in 88% of patients at 5 years.

  11. SU-E-T-190: First Integration of Steriotactic Radiotherapy Planning System Iplan with Elekta Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab, S; Soumya, R; Paul, S; Jassal, K; Munshi, A; Giri, U; Kumar, V; Roy, S; Ganesh, T; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For the first time in the world, BrainLAB has integrated its iPlan treatment planning system for clinical use with Elekta linear accelerator (Axesse with a Beam Modulator). The purpose of this study was to compare the calculated and measured doses with different chambers to establish the calculation accuracy of iPlan system. Methods: The iPlan has both Pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms. Beam data include depth doses, profiles and output measurements for different field sizes. Collected data was verified by vendor and beam modelling was done. Further QA tests were carried out in our clinic. Dose calculation accuracy verified point, volumetric dose measurement using ion chambers of different volumes (0.01cc and 0.125cc). Planner dose verification was done using diode array. Plans were generated in iPlan and irradiated in Elekta Axesse linear accelerator. Results: Dose calculation accuracies verified using ion chamber for 6 and 10 MV beam were 3.5+/-0.33(PB), 1.7%+/-0.7(MC) and 3.9%+/-0.6(PB), 3.4%+/-0.6(MC) respectively. Using a pin point chamber, dose calculation accuracy for 6MV and 10MV was 3.8%+/-0.06(PB), 1.21%+/-0.2(MC) and 4.2%+/-0.6(PB), 3.1%+/-0.7(MC) respectively. The calculated planar dose distribution for 10.4×10.4 cm2 was verified using a diode array and the gamma analysis for 2%-2mm criteria yielded pass rates of 88 %(PB) and 98.8%(MC) respectively. 3mm-3% yields 100% passing for both MC and PB algorithm. Conclusion: Dose calculation accuracy was found to be within acceptable limits for MC for 6MV beam. PB for both beams and MC for 10 MV beam were found to be outside acceptable limits. The output measurements were done twice for conformation. The lower gamma matching was attributed to meager number of measured profiles (only two profiles for PB) and coarse measurement resolution for diagonal profile measurement (5mm). Based on these measurements we concluded that 6 MV MC algorithm is suitable for patient treatment.

  12. Estimation of absorbed dose in clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator beams: Effect of ion chamber calibration and long-term stability

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, Johnson Pichy; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2013-01-01

    The measured dose in water at reference point in phantom is a primary parameter for planning the treatment monitor units (MU); both in conventional and intensity modulated/image guided treatments. Traceability of dose accuracy therefore still depends mainly on the calibration factor of the ion chamber/dosimeter provided by the accredited Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) network of laboratories. The data related to Nd,water calibrations, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) postal dose validation, inter-comparison of different dosimeter/electrometers, and validity of Nd,water calibrations obtained from different calibration laboratories were analyzed to find out the extent of accuracy achievable. Nd,w factors in Gray/Coulomb calibrated at IBA, GmBH, Germany showed a mean variation of about 0.2% increase per year in three Farmer chambers, in three subsequent calibrations. Another ion chamber calibrated in different accredited laboratory (PTW, Germany) showed consistent Nd,w for 9 years period. The Strontium-90 beta check source response indicated long-term stability of the ion chambers within 1% for three chambers. Results of IAEA postal TL “dose intercomparison” for three photon beams, 6 MV (two) and 15 MV (one), agreed well within our reported doses, with mean deviation of 0.03% (SD 0.87%) (n = 9). All the chamber/electrometer calibrated by a single SSDL realized absorbed doses in water within 0.13% standard deviations. However, about 1-2% differences in absorbed dose estimates observed when dosimeters calibrated from different calibration laboratories are compared in solid phantoms. Our data therefore imply that the dosimetry level maintained for clinical use of linear accelerator photon beams are within recommended levels of accuracy, and uncertainties are within reported values. PMID:24672156

  13. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  14. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Matthew; Nankivell, Matthew; Lyn, Ethan; Falk, Stephen; Pugh, Cheryl; Navani, Neal; Stephens, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  15. Planning for RtI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Jennifer; Antrim, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In 2004 the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act authorized funding for Response to Intervention (RtI) instruction in the United States. By 2011, 71 percent of school districts had adopted RtI (Institute of Education Sciences 2011). The goal of RtI is to provide personalized, just-in-time intervention in reading and math for students who…

  16. Next generation radiotherapy biomaterials loaded with high-Z nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifter, Gizem

    This research investigates the dosimetric feasibility of using high-Z nanoparticles as localized radiosensitizers to boost the dose to the residual tumor cells during accelerated partial breast irradiation while minimizing the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Analytical microdosimetry calculations were carried out to calculate dose enhancement (DEF) in the presence of high-Z nanoparticles. It has been proposed that routinely used inert radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) can be upgraded to smarter ones by coating/loading them with radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs), for sustained in-situ release after implantation to enhance RT. Prototype smart biomaterials were produced by incorporating the GNPs in poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymer millirods during the gel phase of production. In vitro release of GNPs was monitored over time by optical/spectroscopy methods as a function of various design parameters. The prototype smart biomaterials displayed sustained customizable release of NPs in-vitro, reaching a burst release profile approximately after 25 days. The results also show that customizable release profiles can be achievable by varying GNP concentrations that are embedded within smart biomaterials, as well as other design parameters. This would potentially allow customizable local dose boost resulting in diverse treatment planning opportunities for individual cases. Considered together, the results provide preliminary data for development of next generation of RT biomaterials, which can be employed at no additional inconvenience to RT patients.

  17. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E; Sinha, N; Bellon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  18. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  19. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  20. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI) delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT) are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT. PMID:25180098

  2. Review of hematological indices of cancer patients receiving combined chemotherapy & radiotherapy or receiving radiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman

    2016-09-01

    We observed the outcomes of chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CR) or radiotherapy (RT) alone for cancer patients of larynx, breast, blood and brain origins through complete blood count (CBC). Following were more depressed in CR patients: mean corpuscular hemoglobin-MCH & lymphocytes-LYM, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-MCHC, hemoglobin-HB and red blood cells-RBC. In RT patients, following were more depressed: LYM, MCH and MCHC. Overall, in all cancer patients, the lymphocytes were depressed 52%. There existed a significant difference between white blood cells and RBC in both CR and RT patients. A significant moderate negative correlation is found in HB with the dose range 30-78 (Gray) given to the CR cancer patients. More number of CBC parameters affected in patients treated with CR and RT; but in less percentage as compared to patients who treated with RT alone. The cancer patients suffered from anemia along with immune modulations from the treatments. PMID:27423975

  3. Radiotherapy for Graves' disease. The possible role of low-dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Jiménez, Pedro Lara; Rovirosa, Àngels; Biete, Albert; Linares, Victoria; Belles, Montse; Panés, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) have been used for the treatment of several benign diseases, including arthrodegenerative and inflammatory pathologies. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease and radiotherapy (RT) is a therapeutic option for ocular complications. The dose recommended in the clinical practice is 20 Gy (2 Gy/day). We hypothesized that lower doses (<10 Gy total dose, <1 Gy/day) could results in higher efficacy if we achieved anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of LD-RT. We review current evidence on the effects of RT in the treatment of Graves' disease and the possible use of LD-RT treatment strategy. PMID:27601953

  4. Evaluation of a combined respiratory-gating system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Kawamura, Shinji; Uehara, Takuya; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Koike, Masahiro; Sera, Tatsuhiro; Emoto, Yuki; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time, tumor-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed in our institution. The goals of this study were to assess the capability of SyncTraX in measuring the position of a fiducial marker using color fluoroscopic images, and to evaluate the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using this combined system for the simple geometry. For the fundamental evaluation of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using SyncTraX, the following were performed:1) determination of dosimetric and positional characteristics of sinusoidal patterns using a motor-driven base for several gating windows; 2) measurement of time delay using an oscilloscope; 3) positional verification of sinusoidal patterns and the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient; 4) measurement of the half-value layer (HVL in mm AL), effective kVp, and air kerma, using a solid-state detector for each fluoroscopic condition, to determine the patient dose. The dose profile in a moving phantom with gated radiotherapy having a gating window ≤ 4 mm was in good agreement with that under static conditions for each photon beam. The total time delay between TrueBeam and SyncTraX was < 227 ms for each photon beam. The mean of the positional tracking error was < 0.4 mm for sinusoidal patterns and for the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient. The air-kerma rates from one fluoroscopy direction were 1.93 ± 0.01, 2.86 ± 0.01, 3.92 ± 0.04, 5.28 ± 0.03, and 6.60 ± 0.05 mGy/min for 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV X-ray beams at 80 mA, respectively. The combined system comprising TrueBeam and SyncTraX could track the motion of the fiducial marker and control radiation delivery with reasonable accuracy; therefore, this system provides significant dosimetric improvement. However, patient exposure dose from fluoroscopy was not clinically negligible. PMID:27455483

  5. Relations among Manual RT, Visual RT and IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Thomas M.; Haith, Marshall M.

    As part of a study to determine whether visual and manual response systems are correlated, 26 children between 40 and 51 months of age took part in visual and manual reaction time (RT) tasks. Subjects, whose RTs had previously been tested at 3 months of age, were tested in 1 of 2 conditions. In the first condition, subjects viewed pictures only…

  6. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Alessia; Moeckli, Raphael; Balmer, Aubin; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine; Do, Huu-Phuoc; Weber, Damien C.; Munier, Francis L.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  7. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients: Rise in Interleukin 6 (IL-6) but not IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Lopes, Carlos; Callera, Fernando

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), macrophage inflammatory protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-{alpha}) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty eight patients with prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal blocking radiation therapy with a linear accelerator. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were measured by the related immunoassay kit 1 day before the beginning of RT and during RT at days 15 and 30. Results: The mean IL-2 values were elevated before and during the RT in contrast with those of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, which were within the normal range under the same conditions. Regarding markers IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, comparisons among the three groups (before treatment and 15 and 30 days during RT) did not show significant differences. Although values were within the normal range, there was a significant rise in IL-6 levels at day 15 of RT (p = 0.0049) and a decline at day 30 to levels that were similar to those observed before RT. Conclusions: IL-6 appeared to peak after 15 days of RT before returning to pre-RT levels. In contrast, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were not sensitive to irradiation. The increased levels of IL-6 following RT without the concurrent elevation of other cytokines involved in the acute phase reaction did not suggest a classical inflammatory response to radiation exposure. Further studies should be designed to elucidate the role of IL-6 levels in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT.

  8. Pilot Quality Control Program for Audit RT External Beams at Mexican Hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez R, J T; Tovar M, V M

    2008-08-11

    A pilot quality control program for audit 18 radiotherapy RT external beams at 13 Mexican hospitals is described--for eleven {sup 60}Co beams and seven photon beams of 6, 10 and 15 MV from accelerators. This program contains five parts: a) Preparation of the TLD-100 powder: washing, drying and annealing (one hour 400 deg. C plus 24 hrs 80 deg. C). b) Sending two IAEA type capsules to the hospitals for irradiation at the hospital to a nominal D{sub W} = 2 Gy{center_dot}c) Preparation at the SSDL of ten calibration curves CC in the range of 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub W} for {sup 60}Co with traceability to primary laboratory NRC (Canada), according to a window irradiation: 26/10/2007-7/12/2007. d) Reading all capsules that match their hospital time irradiation and the SSDL window irradiation. f) Evaluation of the Dw imparted by the hospitals.

  9. How Do the ASTRO Consensus Statement Guidelines for the Application of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Fit Intraoperative Radiotherapy? A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Treated at the European Institute of Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Mastropasqua, Mauro Giuseppe; Morra, Anna; Lazzari, Roberta; Rotmensz, Nicole; Sangalli, Claudia; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To verify how the classification according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement (CS) for the application of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) fits patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The study included 1,822 patients treated with ELIOT as the sole radiation modality outside of a clinical trial at the European Institute of Oncology after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer, who were classified into CS groups of suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable. The outcome in terms of ipsilateral breast recurrence, regional node relapse, distant metastases, progression free-survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were assessed. Results: All the 1,822 cases except for 25 could be classified according to ASTRO CS: 294 patients met the criteria for inclusion into the suitable group, 691 patients into the cautionary group, and 812 patients into the unsuitable group. The 5-year rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence for suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups were 1.5%, 4.4%, and 8.8%, respectively (p = 0.0003). Whereas the regional node relapse showed no difference, the rate of distant metastases was significantly different in the unsuitable group compared with the suitable and cautionary groups, having a significant impact on survival. Conclusion: In the context of patients treated with ELIOT, the ASTRO guidelines identify well the groups for whom APBI might be considered as an effective alternative to whole breast radiotherapy and also identify groups for whom APBI is not indicated.

  10. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  11. Cosmetic Outcomes for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgical Excision of Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using Single-Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimple, Randall J.; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Pavic, Dag; Lian, Jun; Livasy, Chad A.; Esler, Laura; Moore, Dominic T.; Sartor, Carolyn I.; Ollila, David W.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Determine cosmetic outcome and toxicity profile of intraoperative radiation delivered before tumor excision for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients age 48 or older with ultrasound-visible invasive ductal cancers <3 cm and clinically negative lymph nodes were eligible for treatment on this institutional review board-approved Phase II clinical trial. Treatment planning ultrasound was used to select an electron energy and cone size sufficient to cover the tumor plus a 1.5- to 2.0-cm circumferential margin laterally and a 1-cm-deep margin with the 90% isodose line. The dose was prescribed to a nominal 15 Gy and delivered using a Mobetron electron irradiator before tumor excision by segmental mastectomy. Physician- and patient-assessed cosmetic outcome and patient satisfaction were determined by questionnaire. Results: From March 2003 to July 2007, 71 patients were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy. Of those, 56 patients were evaluable, with a median follow-up of 3.1 years (minimum 1 year). Physician and patient assessment of cosmesis was 'good or excellent' (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group cosmesis scale) in 45/56 (80%) and 32/42 (76%) of all patients, respectively. Eleven patients who received additional whole breast radiation had similar rates of good or excellent cosmesis: 40/48 (83%) and 29/36 (81%), respectively). Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities were seen in 4/71 (6%) patients. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities or serious adverse events have been seen. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy delivered to an in situ tumor is feasible with acceptable acute tolerance. Patient and physician assessment of the cosmetic outcome is good to excellent.

  12. [Exchange of medical imaging and data information in radiotherapy: needs, methods and current limits].

    PubMed

    Manens, J P

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the image network within radiotherapy departments provides the technical infrastructure which is made necessary by the rapid evolution of techniques in the field of diagnosis and treatment in radiotherapy. The system is aimed at managing the whole set of data (textual data and images) that are needed for planning and control of treatments. The radiotherapy network addresses two objectives: managing both the information necessary for treatment planning (target volumes definition, planning dosimetry) and the control of all parameters involved during the patient's treatment under the treatment unit. The major challenge is to improve the quality of treatment. Multimodal imaging is a major advance as it allows the use of new dosimetry and simulation techniques. The need for standards to exchange medical imaging information is now recognized by all the institutions and a majority of users and manufacturers. It is widely accepted that the lack of standard has been one of the fundamental obstacles in the deployment of operational "Picture Archiving Communication Systems". The International Standard Organisation Open System Interconnection model is the standard reference mode used to describe network protocols. The network is based on the Ethernet and TCP/IP protocol that provides the means to interconnect imaging devices and workstations dedicated to specific image processing or machines used in radiotherapy. The network uses Ethernet cabled on twisted-pair (10 BaseT) or optical fibres in a star-shaped physical layout. Dicom V3.0 supports fundamental network interactions: transfer of images (computerized tomography magnetic resonance imaging query and retrieve of images), printing on network attached cameras, support of HIS/RIS related interfacing and image management. The supplement to the Dicom standard, Dicom RT, specifies five data objects known in Dicom as Information Object Definition for relevant radiotherapy. Dicom RT objects can provide a mean for

  13. The impact of flattening-filter-free beam technology on 3D conformal RT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The removal of the flattening filter (FF) leads to non-uniform fluence distribution with a considerable increase in dose rate. It is possible to adapt FFF beams (flattening-filter-free) in 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) by using field in field techniques (FiF). The aim of this retrospective study is to clarify whether the quality of 3D CRT plans is influenced by the use of FFF beams. Method This study includes a total of 52 CT studies of RT locations that occur frequently in clinical practice. Dose volume targets were provided for the PTV of breast (n=13), neurocranium (n=11), lung (n=7), bone metastasis (n=10) and prostate (n=11) in line with ICRU report 50/62. 3D CRT planning was carried out using FiF methods. Two clinically utilized photon energies are used for a Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerator in FFF mode at 7MVFFF and 11MVFFF as well as in FF mode at 6MVFF and 10MVFF. The plan quality in relation to the PTV coverage, OAR (organs at risk) and low dose burden as well as the 2D dosimetric verification is compared with FF plans. Results No significant differences were found between FFF and FF plans in the mean dose for the PTV of breast, lung, spine metastasis and prostate. The low dose parameters V5Gy and V10Gy display significant differences for FFF and FF plans in some subgroups. The DVH analysis of the OAR revealed some significant differences. Significantly more fields (1.9 – 4.5) were necessary in the use of FFF beams for each location (p<0.0001) in order to achieve PTV coverage. All the tested groups displayed significant increases (1.3 – 2.2 times) in the average number of necessary MU with the use of FFF beams (p<0.001). Conclusions This study has shown that the exclusive use of a linear accelerator in FFF mode is feasible in 3D CRT. It was possible to realize RT plans in comparable quality in typical cases of clinical radiotherapy. The 2D dosimetric validation of the modulated fields verified the dose calculation and thus the

  14. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Mignogna, Samantha; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Calista, Franco; Serafini, Giovanni; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Caravatta, Luciana; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Sallustio, Giuseppina; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m{sup 2} plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  15. Continuous accelerated 7-days-a-week radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Long-term results of Phase III clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof . E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Golen, Maria; Tarnawski, Rafal; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Suwinski, Rafal; Sygula, Mariusz; Wygoda, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To update 5-year results of a previously published study on special 7-days-a-week fractionation continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in Stage T{sub 2-4}N{sub 0-1}M were randomized between two definitive radiation treatments: accelerated fractionation 7 days a week including weekends (CAIR) and conventional 5 days a week (control). Hence the overall treatment time was 2 weeks shorter in CAIR. Results: Five-year local tumor control was 75% in the CAIR group and 33% in the control arm (p < 0.00004). Tumor-cure benefit corresponded with significant improvement in disease-free survival and overall survival rates. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with the incidence significantly higher in CAIR patients than in control (respectively, 94% vs. 53%). When 2.0-Gy fractions were used, radiation necrosis developed in 5 patients (22%) in the CAIR group as a consequential late effect (CLE), but when fraction size was reduced to 1.8 Gy no more CLE occurred. Actuarial 5-year morbidity-free survival rate was similar for both treatments. Conclusions: Selected head-and-neck cancer patients could be treated very effectively with 7-days-a-week radiation schedule with no compromise of total dose and with slight 10% reduction of fraction dose (2 Gy-1.8 Gy), which article gives 1 week reduction of overall treatment time compared with standard 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 47-49 days. Although this report is based on the relatively small group of patients, its results have encouraged us to use CAIR fractionation in a standard radiation treatment for moderately advanced head-and-neck cancer patients.

  16. Pattern of radiotherapy care in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The paper reveals the changing pattern of Bulgarian Radiotherapy (RT) care after the successful implementation of 15 projects for 100 million euro under the European Regional Development Fund in Operational Programme for Regional Development 2007-2013. The project enables a total one-step modernization of 14 Bulgarian RT Centres and creation of a new one. At the end of the Programme (mid 2015), 16 new Linacs and 2 modern cobalt machines will be available together with 11 virtual CT simulators, 5 CT simulators, 1 MRI and 1 PET CT for RT planning and all dosimetry facilities needed. Such a modernization has moved Bulgarian RT forward, with 2.7 MV units per one million of population (MV/mln.inh) in comparison with 0.9 MV/mln.inh in 2012. Guild of Bulgarian Radiotherapists includes 70 doctors, 46 physicists and 10 engineers, together with 118 RTTs and 114 nurses and they all have treated 16,447 patients in 2013. Major problems are inadequate reimbursement from the monopolistic Health Insurance Fund (900 euro for 3D conformal RT and 1500 euro for IMRT); fragmentation of RT care with 1-2 MV units per Centre; no payment for patient travel expenses; need for quick and profound education of 26% of doctors and 46% of physicists without RT license, along with continuous education for all others; and resource for 5000-9000 more patients to be treated yearly by RT in order to reach 45-50% from current service of 32%. After 15 years of struggle of RT experts, finally the pattern of Bulgarian RT care at 2014-2015 is approaching the level of modern European RT. PMID:26549991

  17. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  18. Analysis of serial CT images for studying the RT effects in head-neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dell'Oca, Italo; Logghe, Gerlinde; Moriconi, Stefano; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fiorino, Claudio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Images taken during and after RT for head and neck cancer have the potential to quantitatively assess xerostomia. Image information may be used as biomarkers of RT effects on parotid glands with significant potential to support adaptive treatment strategies. We investigated the possibility to extract information based on in-room CT images (kVCT, MVCT), acquired for daily image-guided radiotherapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer patients, in order to predict individual response in terms of toxicity. Follow-up MRI images were also used in order to investigate long term parotid gland deformation. PMID:26737472

  19. Clinical and endocrine responses to pituitary radiotherapy in pediatric Cushing's disease: an effective second-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Storr, Helen L; Plowman, P Nicholas; Carroll, Paul V; François, Inge; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Afshar, Farhad; Besser, G Michael; Grossman, Ashley B; Savage, Martin O

    2003-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is considered first-line treatment for Cushing's disease (CD). Options for treatment of postoperative persisting hypercortisolemia are pituitary radiotherapy (RT), repeat TSS, or bilateral adrenalectomy. From 1983 to 2001, we treated 18 pediatric patients (age, 6.4-17.8 yr) with CD. All underwent TSS, and 11 were cured (postoperative serum cortisol, <50 nM). Seven (39%) had 0900-h serum cortisol of 269-900 nM during the immediate postoperative period (2-20 d), indicating lack of cure. These patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 12.8 yr; range, 6.4-17.8 yr; 4 prepubertal; 3 pubertal) received external beam RT to the pituitary gland, using a 6-MV linear accelerator, with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 35 d. Until the RT became effective, hypercortisolemia was controlled with ketoconazole (dose, 200-600 mg/d) (n = 4) and metyrapone (750 mg-3 g/d) +/- aminoglutethimide (1 g/d) or o'p'DDD (mitotane, 3 mg/d) (n = 3). All patients were cured after pituitary RT. The mean interval from RT to cure (mean serum cortisol on 5-point day curve, <150 nM) was 0.94 yr (0.25-2.86 yr). Recovery of pituitary-adrenal function (mean cortisol, 150-300 nM) occurred at mean 1.16 yr (0.40-2.86 yr) post RT. At 2 yr post RT, puberty occurred early in one male patient (age, 9.8 yr) but was normal in the others. GH secretion was assessed at 0.6-2.5 yr post RT in all patients: six had GH deficiency (peak on glucagon/insulin provocation, <1.0-17.9 mU/liter) and received human GH replacement. Follow-up of pituitary function 7.6 and 9.5 yr post RT in two patients showed normal gonadotropin secretion and recovery of GH peak to 29.7 and 19.2 mU/liter. The seven patients were followed for mean 6.9 yr (1.4-12.0 yr), with no evidence of recurrence of CD. In conclusion, pituitary RT is an effective and relatively rapid-onset treatment for pediatric CD after failure of TSS. GH deficiency occurred in 86% patients. Long-term follow-up suggests some recovery of GH

  20. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Stalpers, Lukas J.A. . E-mail: l.stalpers@amc.uva.nl; Costa, Hanna C. da; Merbis, Merijn A.E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; Dam, Frits van

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p < 0.05) and overall (p < 0.05) well-being. Conclusion: Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect.

  1. Outcomes of Kimura's disease after radiotherapy or nonradiotherapeutic treatment modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ah Ram; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han . E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr; Park, Charn Il; Jun, Yoon Kyung

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of Kimura's disease and to identify the optimal treatment regimen for Kimura's disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 14 patients with Kimura's disease were treated with radiotherapy (RT) and 9 patients were treated with local excision or systemic steroids. The radiation doses ranged from 20 to 45 Gy. Immunohistochemical studies were performed in 13 cases. Results: At RT completion, a marked response in terms of tumor size was noted in most cases. The median follow-up was 65 months. Local control was obtained in 9 (64.3%) of the 14 in the RT group and in 2 (22.2%) of the 9 in the non-RT group. No secondary malignancies were observed in the RT group. Conclusion: These results supports the finding that RT is more effective against Kimura's disease. Simple or immunohistochemical features did not influence the treatment outcome.

  2. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  3. Outcome of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in chemotherapy-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Chandra; Hodgson, David C.; Wells, Woodrow A.; Sun, Alex; Bezjak, Andrea; Pintilie, Melania; Crump, Michael; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Tsang, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Tsang@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Patients with chemotherapy-resistant lymphoma have rapidly progressive disease and a poor prognosis. Local symptoms are treated with radiotherapy (RT) for local control. We have reviewed local control and toxicity in patients treated with hyperfractionated accelerated RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients received hyperfractionated RT between 1997 and 2003. The radiation dose was 39.9-40.5 Gy in 30 fractions. The median treatment time was 22 days with twice-daily involved-field RT. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Response was assessed <3 months after RT and was classified as a complete response, a complete response-unconfirmed, a partial response, or no response. Local control was defined as maintenance of local complete response, complete response-unconfirmed, or lack of local progression with a partial response. Recurrence or progression outside the RT volume was regarded as distant disease. Results: The median age was 53 years; 20 patients were men and 14 were women. The initial diagnosis was Stage I-II in 56% and Stage III-IV in 44%. The disease bulk was {>=}10 cm in 35% (n 12). The histologic features at diagnosis were follicular in 11 (Grade 1 in 4, Grade 2 in 3, and Grade 3 in 4), diffuse large B-cell in 14, peripheral T-cell lymphoma in 2, Burkitt-like in 1, mantle cell in 2, natural killer cell in 2, plasmacytoma/lymphoma in 1, and T-cell lymphoblastic in 1. The initial treatment was chemotherapy in 32 patients (94%); 71% were refractory to initial chemotherapy and 29% developed a relapse after an initial response. The RT response was complete in 24% (n = 8), complete, unconfirmed in 26% (n = 9), partial in 47% (n = 16), and none in 3% (n = 1). The local control rate was 73% at 1, 2, and 3 years. Grade 1 dermatitis was the most common side effect. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated RT provided good local control and was well tolerated. This encouraging result requires additional study with comparison to conventional fractionation

  4. Nonresected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Stages I Through IIIB: Accelerated, Twice-Daily, High-Dose Radiotherapy-A Prospective Phase I/II Trial With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Kranzinger, Manfred; Merz, Florian; Nairz, Olaf; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to investigate the tolerability of accelerated, twice-daily, high-dose radiotherapy. The secondary endpoints were survival and locoregional tumor control. Methods and Materials: Thirty consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven non-small-cell lung cancer were enrolled. Tumor Stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was found in 7, 3, 12, and 8 patients, respectively. We applied a median of 84.6 Gy (range, 75.6-90.0 Gy) to the primary tumors, 63.0 Gy (range, 59.4-72.0 Gy) to lymph nodes, and 45 Gy to nodes electively (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved sites). Fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily, with an interval of 11 hours, were given, resulting in a median treatment time of 35 days. In the majority of patients the conformal target-splitting technique was used. In 19 patients (63%) two cycles of induction chemotherapy were given. The median follow-up time of survivors is 72 months (range, 62-74 months). Results: We found Grade 1, 2 and 3 acute esophageal toxicity in 11 patients (37%), 2 patients (7%), and 2 patients (7%), respectively. Grade 2 acute pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients (7%). No late toxicity greater than Grade 1 was observed. The actual overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years are 63% and 23%, respectively; the median overall survival, 27.7 months. In 9 patients a local failure occurred, 7 of them presenting initially with an atelectasis without availability of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging at that time. In 4 patients recurrence occurred regionally. Conclusions: This Phase I/II trial with long-term follow-up shows low toxicity with promising results for survival and locoregional tumor control.

  5. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  6. Single fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases: are all questions answered?

    PubMed

    Chander, S S; Sarin, R

    1999-08-01

    All randomized trials show comparable pain relief rates with single or fractionated radiotherapy (RT) in selected patients. Further studies are required to determine the optimal single dose (our analysis suggests 6-8 Gy), its efficacy in preventing fractures/cord compression and defining criteria for recommending fractionated RT for a select few. Besides this, a 'lingua franca' for pain assessment tools is urgently required. PMID:10577706

  7. Current State Of Proton And Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy At The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center (HIBMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Niwa, Yasue; Fujii, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuki; Mima, Masayuki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2011-06-01

    HIBMC is the world's first facility to be able to use both proton (PRT) and carbon-ion radiotherapy (CiRT). The medically dedicated synchrotron can accelerate protons up to 230 MeV and carbon ions up to 320 MeV. From April 2001 to March 2010, the facility treated 3275 patients, with 2487 patients treated using PRT and 788 using CiRT. Particle radiotherapy was delivered to patients suffering from malignant tumors originating in the head and neck (502 patients), lungs (330), liver (539), prostate (1283), and the bone & soft tissue (130). The clinical results are as follows: (1) H & N tumors: The 2-year overall survival (OS) rates of patients with olfactory neuroblastoma, mucoepidermoid cancer, adenoid cystic cancer, adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma was 100%, 86%, 78%, 78%, 66%, and 62%, respectively. (2) Lung cancer: For all 80 patients, the 3-year OS rate was 75% (Stage IA: 74%; Stage IB: 76%) and local control (LC) rate was 82% (IA: 87%; IB: 77%). Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity was observed in only 1 patient. These results are comparable to those obtained by surgery, and indicate proton therapy and carbon-ion therapy are safe and effective for stage I lung cancer. (3) Liver cancer: The 5-year LC rate for 429 tumor patient was 90%, and the 5-year OS rate for 364 patients was 38%. These results seem equivalent to those obtained by surgery or radio-frequency ablation. (4) Prostate cancer: In 290 patients treated by proton radiotherapy, five patients died from other disease in the median follow-up period of 62 months. Biochemical disease-free survival and OS rate at 5 years was 88.2% and 96.5%, respectively. Our proton radiotherapy showed excellent OS and biochemical disease-free survival rates with minimum late morbidities. PRT VS CiRT: From our retrospective analysis, it seems that there is no significant difference in the LC and OS rate in H&N, lung and liver cancer between PRT and CiRT.

  8. Current State Of Proton And Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy At The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center (HIBMC)

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masao; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Demizu, Yusuke; Niwa, Yasue; Fujii, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuki; Mima, Masayuki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2011-06-01

    HIBMC is the world's first facility to be able to use both proton (PRT) and carbon-ion radiotherapy (CiRT). The medically dedicated synchrotron can accelerate protons up to 230 MeV and carbon ions up to 320 MeV. From April 2001 to March 2010, the facility treated 3275 patients, with 2487 patients treated using PRT and 788 using CiRT. Particle radiotherapy was delivered to patients suffering from malignant tumors originating in the head and neck (502 patients), lungs (330), liver (539), prostate (1283), and the bone and soft tissue (130). The clinical results are as follows: (1) H and N tumors: The 2-year overall survival (OS) rates of patients with olfactory neuroblastoma, mucoepidermoid cancer, adenoid cystic cancer, adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma was 100%, 86%, 78%, 78%, 66%, and 62%, respectively. (2) Lung cancer: For all 80 patients, the 3-year OS rate was 75%(Stage IA: 74%; Stage IB: 76%) and local control (LC) rate was 82%(IA: 87%; IB: 77%). Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity was observed in only 1 patient. These results are comparable to those obtained by surgery, and indicate proton therapy and carbon-ion therapy are safe and effective for stage I lung cancer. (3) Liver cancer: The 5-year LC rate for 429 tumor patient was 90%, and the 5-year OS rate for 364 patients was 38%. These results seem equivalent to those obtained by surgery or radio-frequency ablation. (4) Prostate cancer: In 290 patients treated by proton radiotherapy, five patients died from other disease in the median follow-up period of 62 months. Biochemical disease-free survival and OS rate at 5 years was 88.2% and 96.5%, respectively. Our proton radiotherapy showed excellent OS and biochemical disease-free survival rates with minimum late morbidities. PRT VS CiRT: From our retrospective analysis, it seems that there is no significant difference in the LC and OS rate in H and N, lung and liver cancer between PRT and CiRT.

  9. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-02-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  10. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  11. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  12. Interinstrument Reliability of the RT3 Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the interinstrument reliability of six RT3 accelerometers for measuring physical activities. Each of the six healthy participants, mean age 36.1 years (SD 9.4), carried six RT3 accelerometers (same type and same producer) simultaneously placed ventrally at the waist belt. The participants performed three…

  13. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  14. Using CoRT Thinking in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchior, Timothy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of Edward de Bono's CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) program in English classes during the past five years at Memorial Junior High School in Valley Stream, New York. CoRT tools were used to analyze literary characters and plot development and to generate and organize ideas for writing assignments. (TE)

  15. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0–III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8–2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26986158

  16. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26986158

  17. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy - induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-07-01

    Efforts to reduce the severity of postradiotherapy xerostomia include the use of salivary substitutes to gain symptomatic relief, salivary gland stimulants, agents delivered to protect the glands during radiotherapy (RT), and physical means to partially spare the major salivary glands from RT while adequately irradiating tumor targets. These means include advanced RT treatment planning and salivary tissue transfer to nonirradiated areas. The relative potential gain from each of these strategies is discussed in this article. The combination of partial salivary gland sparing and radiation protectors/stimulants may provide additive or synergistic gains in reducing the severity of xerostomia. PMID:12903018

  18. Respiration gated radiotherapy treatment: a technical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Hideo D.; Hill, Bruce C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to optimize external-beam conformal radiotherapy, patient movement during treatment must be minimized. For treatment on the upper torso, the target organs are known to move substantially due to patient respiration. This paper deals with the technical aspects of gating the radiotherapy beam synchronously with respiration: the optimal respiration monitoring system, measurements of organ displacement and linear accelerator gating. Several respiration sensors including a thermistor, a thermocouple, a strain gauge and a pneumotachograph were examined to find the optimal sensor. The magnitude of breast, chest wall and lung motion were determined using playback of fluoroscopic x-ray images recorded on a VCR during routine radiotherapy simulation. Total dose, beam symmetry and beam uniformity were examined to determine any effects on the Varian 2100C linear accelerator due to gating.

  19. Pictorial review. Magnetic resonance for radiotherapy management and treatment planning in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Christopher; Malone, Shawn C; Avruch, Leonard; Breau, Rodney H; Flood, Trevor A; Lim, Megan; Morash, Christopher; Quon, Jeff S; Walsh, Cynthia; Schieda, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    MRI has an important role for radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning in prostate cancer (PCa) providing accurate visualization of the dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL) and locoregional anatomy, assessment of local staging and depiction of implanted devices. MRI enables the radiation oncologist to optimize RT planning by better defining target tumour volumes (thereby increasing local tumour control), as well as decreasing morbidity (by minimizing the dose to adjacent normal structures). Using MRI, radiation oncologists can define the DIL for delivery of boost doses of RT using a variety of techniques including: stereotactic body radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, proton RT or brachytherapy to improve tumour control. Radiologists require a familiarity with the different RT methods used to treat PCa, as well as an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of the various MR pulse sequences available for RT planning in order to provide an optimal multidisciplinary RT treatment approach to PCa. Understanding the expected post-RT appearance of the prostate and typical characteristics of local tumour recurrence is also important because MRI is rapidly becoming an integral component for diagnosis, image-guided histological sampling and treatment planning in the setting of biochemical failure after RT or surgery. PMID:26279086

  20. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0–3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose−10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  1. Temozolomide and Radiotherapy versus Radiotherapy Alone in High Grade Gliomas: A Very Long Term Comparative Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Salvatore; Corsa, Pietro; Raguso, Arcangela; Perrone, Antonio; Cossa, Sabrina; Munafò, Tindara; Sanpaolo, Gerardo; Donno, Elisa; Clemente, Maria Antonietta; Piombino, Michele; Parisi, Federico; Valle, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is the first line drug in the care of high grade gliomas. The combined treatment of TMZ plus radiotherapy is more effective in the care of brain gliomas then radiotherapy alone. Aim of this report is a survival comparison, on a long time (>10 years) span, of glioma patients treated with radiotherapy alone and with radiotherapy + TMZ. Materials and Methods. In this report we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 128 consecutive pts with diagnosis of high grade gliomas referred to our institutions from April 1994 to November 2001. The first 64 pts were treated with RT alone and the other 64 with a combination of RT and adjuvant or concomitant TMZ. Results. Grade 3 (G3) haematological toxicity was recorded in 6 (9%) of 64 pts treated with RT and TMZ. No G4 haematological toxicity was observed. Age, histology, and administration of TMZ were statistically significant prognostic factors associated with 2 years overall survival (OS). PFS was for GBM 9 months, for AA 11. Conclusions. The combination of RT and TMZ improves long term survival in glioma patients. Our results confirm the superiority of the combination on a long time basis. PMID:25815327

  2. Could Radiotherapy Effectiveness Be Enhanced by Electromagnetic Field Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Artacho-Cordón; del Mar, Salinas-Asensio María; Irene, Calvente; Sandra, Ríos-Arrabal; Josefa, León; Elisa, Román-Marinetto; Nicolás, Olea; Isabel, Núñez María

    2013-01-01

    One of the main goals in radiobiology research is to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness without provoking any increase in toxicity. In this context, it has been proposed that electromagnetic fields (EMFs), known to be modulators of proliferation rate, enhancers of apoptosis and inductors of genotoxicity, might control tumor recruitment and, thus, provide therapeutic benefits. Scientific evidence shows that the effects of ionizing radiation on cellular compartments and functions are strengthened by EMF. Although little is known about the potential role of EMFs in radiotherapy (RT), the radiosensitizing effect of EMFs described in the literature could support their use to improve radiation effectiveness. Thus, we hypothesized that EMF exposure might enhance the ionizing radiation effect on tumor cells, improving the effects of RT. The aim of this paper is to review reports of the effects of EMFs in biological systems and their potential therapeutic benefits in radiotherapy. PMID:23867611

  3. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  4. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Shera, David M.; Lustig, Robert A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  5. An integrated Monte Carlo dosimetric verification system for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Mizowaki, T.; Miyabe, Y.; Takegawa, H.; Narita, Y.; Yano, S.; Nagata, Y.; Teshima, T.; Hiraoka, M.

    2007-04-01

    An integrated Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, MCRTV (Monte Carlo for radiotherapy treatment plan verification), has been developed for clinical treatment plan verification, especially for routine quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The MCRTV system consists of the EGS4/PRESTA MC codes originally written for particle transport through the accelerator, the multileaf collimator (MLC), and the patient/phantom, which run on a 28-CPU Linux cluster, and the associated software developed for the clinical implementation. MCRTV has an interface with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and reads the information needed for MC computation transferred in DICOM-RT format. The key features of MCRTV have been presented in detail in this paper. The phase-space data of our 15 MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 2300C/D have been developed and several benchmarks have been performed under homogeneous and several inhomogeneous conditions (including water, aluminium, lung and bone media). The MC results agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 1% and 2% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions, respectively. The MC calculation for a clinical prostate IMRT treatment plan validated the implementation of the beams and the patient/phantom configuration in MCRTV.

  6. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  7. Chemically enhanced radiotherapy: visions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of cancer management, with more than a third of all cancer cures being attributable to RT. Despite the advances in RT over the past century, the overall outcomes in a majority of malignancies are still unsatisfactory. There has been a constant endeavor to enhance the outcome of RT, and this has been in the form of altered fractionation, oxymimetic radiosensitizers, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and anti-growth factor receptor targeted therapies. This article presents a vision for the future, with emphasis upon emerging prospects which could enhance RT outcomes. Positive speculations regarding the use of immunological aspects, the use of nanoscale technology and the adoption of metronomic concurrent chemotherapy have been presented. Also, the potential with the use of low dose hyperradiosensitivity in enhancing chemotherapy outcomes too has been discussed. In this era of evidence based clinical practise, there exists a strong obsession towards the ‘present’ with ‘contempt towards the future’. Accepting the shortcomings of the existing modalities, there must be a strong zeal towards discovering better methodologies to enhance radiotherapeutic outcomes for the sake of a better future. PMID:26904574

  8. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Luke; Gorayski, Peter; Harvey, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT). Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU) requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN. PMID:26351442

  9. How to Improve Therapeutic Ratio in Radiotherapy of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past two decades, external-beam radiation technology has substantially changed from traditional two-dimensional to conformal three-dimensional to intensity-modulated planning and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Summary Modern techniques of radiotherapy (RT) are highly focused and capable of delivering an ablative dose to targeted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors. SBRT is an option for selected patients with limited tumor volume and non-eligibility for other invasive treatments. Moreover, RT combined with a radiation sensitizer (RS) to increase the therapeutic ratio has shown promising results in select studies, prompting further investigation of this combination. With the undetermined role of RT in treatment guidelines and variation in patterns of treatment failure after RT in patient with HCC, useful biomarkers to guide RT decision-making and selection of patients are needed and emerging. Key Message The objective of this review is to summarize the current RS with SBRT schemes and biomarkers for patient selection used to maximize the effect of RT on HCC. PMID:27493896

  10. Factors That Improve RT-QuIC Detection of Prion Seeding Activity.

    PubMed

    Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Groveman, Bradley R; Campbell, Katrina J; Anson, Kelsie J; Manca, Matteo; Kraus, Allison; Caughey, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of prions is important in managing prion diseases. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay for prion seeding activity has been applied to many prion diseases and provides for specific antemortem diagnostic testing. We evaluated RT-QuIC's long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. Repeated assays of a single scrapie sample using multiple plate readers and recombinant prion protein (rPrP(Sen)) substrates gave comparable results. N-terminal truncated hamster rPrP(Sen) (residues 90-231) hastened both prion-seeded and prion-independent reactions but maintained a clear kinetic distinction between the two. Raising temperatures or shaking speeds accelerated RT-QuIC reactions without compromising specificity. When applied to nasal brushings from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, higher temperatures accelerated RT-QuIC kinetics, and the use of hamster rPrP(Sen) (90-231) strengthened RT-QuIC responses. Elongation of shaking periods reduced scrapie-seeded reaction times, but continuous shaking promoted false-positive reactions. Furthermore, pH 7.4 provided for more rapid RT-QuIC reactions than more acidic pHs. Additionally, we show that small variations in the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) significantly impacted the assay. Finally, RT-QuIC performed in multiplate thermoshakers followed by fluorescence readings in separate plate readers enhanced assay throughput economically. Collectively, these results demonstrate improved speed, efficacy and practicality of RT-QuIC assays and highlight variables to be optimized for future applications. PMID:27223300

  11. Factors That Improve RT-QuIC Detection of Prion Seeding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; Groveman, Bradley R.; Campbell, Katrina J.; Anson, Kelsie J.; Manca, Matteo; Kraus, Allison; Caughey, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of prions is important in managing prion diseases. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay for prion seeding activity has been applied to many prion diseases and provides for specific antemortem diagnostic testing. We evaluated RT-QuIC’s long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. Repeated assays of a single scrapie sample using multiple plate readers and recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) substrates gave comparable results. N-terminal truncated hamster rPrPSen (residues 90–231) hastened both prion-seeded and prion-independent reactions but maintained a clear kinetic distinction between the two. Raising temperatures or shaking speeds accelerated RT-QuIC reactions without compromising specificity. When applied to nasal brushings from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, higher temperatures accelerated RT-QuIC kinetics, and the use of hamster rPrPSen (90–231) strengthened RT-QuIC responses. Elongation of shaking periods reduced scrapie-seeded reaction times, but continuous shaking promoted false-positive reactions. Furthermore, pH 7.4 provided for more rapid RT-QuIC reactions than more acidic pHs. Additionally, we show that small variations in the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) significantly impacted the assay. Finally, RT-QuIC performed in multiplate thermoshakers followed by fluorescence readings in separate plate readers enhanced assay throughput economically. Collectively, these results demonstrate improved speed, efficacy and practicality of RT-QuIC assays and highlight variables to be optimized for future applications. PMID:27223300

  12. Roles of adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy for desmoplastic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Daniel E; Patel, Kirtesh R; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Parker, Douglas; Lawson, David H; Delman, Keith A; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Khan, Mohammad K

    2016-02-01

    Current guidelines are unclear as to the precise role of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with desmoplastic melanoma (DM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institutional outcomes in patients with DM, and to explore the roles of both adjuvant and salvage RT in these patients. We identified 100 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of DM who received treatment at our institution from 2000 to 2014. Local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in the 95 patients managed surgically with or without adjuvant and/or salvage RT. The overall rate of local recurrence (LR) was 10%. There was no LR in either adjuvant or salvage RT cohort. Adjuvant RT did not significantly improve LR-free survival at 5 years (100 vs. 81%, P=0.59), despite the RT patients having worse pathological features. Four of seven (57%) salvage patients developed distant metastases, despite 100% local control. Adjuvant RT did not significantly impact 5-year overall survival (86 vs. 82%, P=0.43). RT shows a trend towards improved local control in both the adjuvant and salvage settings for patients with DM, and likely overcomes adverse risk factors after surgery in appropriately selected patients. Future prospective studies are needed to better address the optimal management for these patients. PMID:26397051

  13. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  14. Radiotherapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation for Bone Oligometastases After Primary Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Xin; Lin, Li-Mei; He, Jun-Yan; Hong, Liang; Li, Jin-Luan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects and toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with androgen deprivation (AD) for bone oligometastases after primary curative RT for prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutively treated PCa patients with bone oligometastases from April 2005 to July 2014. All patients underwent RT combined with AD for oligometastatic bones after curative RT for PCa. Measured outcomes included overall survival (OS) rate, local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), pain relief, and toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS17.0. The median follow-up was 32.5 months (range, 0.6–50.3). The 3-year PFS and OS rates were 22.8% (95% CI, 13.4–37.5%) and 69% (95% CI, 51.7–81.1%), respectively. The number of bone oligometastases and RT schedule were found to be significantly associated with OS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). The 3-year OS for patients with 1 and >1 metastases was 78.8% versus 42.2%, respectively (P = 0.037). The long-course RT was associated with better 3-year OS compared with short-course (76.4% vs 44.1%, P = 0.03). A total of 15 (83.3%, 15/18) patients achieved pain relief. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. Long-course RT combined with ADT was effective and well-tolerated in PCa patients with bone oligometastases after curative RT for PCa. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate the findings. PMID:26871838

  15. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  16. Data mining DICOM RT objects for quality control in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi R.; DeMarco, John; Low, Daniel; Le, Anh H.; Liu, Brent J.

    2012-02-01

    Our goal in this paper is to data mine the wealth of information contained in the dose-volume objects used in external beam radiotherapy treatment planning. In addition, by performing computational pattern recognition on these mined objects, the results may help identify predictors for unsafe dose delivery. This will ultimately enhance current clinical registries by the inclusion of detailed dose-volume data employed in treatments. The most efficient way of including dose-volume information in a registry is through DICOM RT objects. With this in mind, we have built a DICOM RT specific infrastructure, capable of integrating with larger, more general clinical registries, and we will present the results of data mining these sets.

  17. RtI Models for Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Karen; Mursky, Chrystyna V.; Shah-Coltrane, Sneha; Johnsen, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) has promise for helping students, particularly ones with disabilities, achieve higher levels of academic and behavioral success in the general education classroom. What does it mean for gifted students or for those who are gifted and have a learning disability, such as twice-exceptional students? How might current…

  18. Which elderly newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients can benefit from radiotherapy and temozolomide? A PERNO prospective study.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Enrico; Depenni, Roberta; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Ermani, Mario; Faedi, Marina; Sturiale, Carmelo; Michiara, Maria; Servadei, Franco; Pavesi, Giacomo; Urbini, Benedetta; Pisanello, Anna; Crisi, Girolamo; Cavallo, Michele A; Dazzi, Claudio; Biasini, Claudia; Bertolini, Federica; Mucciarini, Claudia; Pasini, Giuseppe; Baruzzi, Agostino; Brandes, Alba A

    2016-05-01

    The role of temozolomide concurrent with and adjuvant to radiotherapy (RT/TMZ) in elderly patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. We evaluated the outcome of patients >70 years in the context of the Project of Emilia-Romagna Region in Neuro-Oncology (PERNO), the first Italian prospective observational population-based study in neuro-oncology. For this analysis the criteria for selecting patients enrolled in the PERNO study were: age >70 years; PS 0-3; histologically confirmed GBM; postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after surgery with or without concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) or postsurgical TMZ alone. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 76 GBM elderly patients were identified in the prospective PERNO study. Twenty-three patients did not receive any treatment after surgery, and 53 patients received postsurgical treatments (25 patients received RT alone and 28 patients RT/TMZ). Median survival was 11.1 months (95 % CI 8.8-13.5), adding temozolomide concomitant and adjuvant to radiotherapy it was 11.6 months (95 % CI 8.6-14.6), and 9.3 months (95 % CI 8.1-10.6) in patients treated with RT alone (P = 0.164). However, patients with MGMT methylated treated with RT/TMZ obtained a better survival (17.2 months, 95 % CI 11.5-22.9) (P = 0.042). No difference in terms of survival were observed if patients with MGMT unmethylated tumor received RT alone, or RT/TMZ or, in MGMT methylated tumor, if patients received radiotherapy alone. In elderly patients RT/TMZ represent a widely used approach but it is effective with methylated MGMT tumors only. PMID:26943851

  19. MicroRT - Small animal conformal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Stojadinovic, S.; Low, D. A.; Hope, A. J.; Vicic, M.; Deasy, J. O.; Cui, J.; Khullar, D.; Parikh, P. J.; Malinowski, K. T.; Izaguirre, E. W.; Mutic, S.; Grigsby, P. W.

    2007-12-15

    A novel small animal conformal radiation therapy system has been designed and prototyped: MicroRT. The microRT system integrates multimodality imaging, radiation treatment planning, and conformal radiation therapy that utilizes a clinical {sup 192}Ir isotope high dose rate source as the radiation source (teletherapy). A multiparameter dose calculation algorithm based on Monte Carlo dose distribution simulations is used to efficiently and accurately calculate doses for treatment planning purposes. A series of precisely machined tungsten collimators mounted onto a cylindrical collimator assembly is used to provide the radiation beam portals. The current design allows a source-to-target distance range of 1-8 cm at four beam angles: 0 deg. (beam oriented down), 90 deg., 180 deg., and 270 deg. The animal is anesthetized and placed in an immobilization device with built-in fiducial markers and scanned using a computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or positron emission tomography scanner prior to irradiation. Treatment plans using up to four beam orientations are created utilizing a custom treatment planning system--microRTP. A three-axis computer-controlled stage that supports and accurately positions the animals is programmed to place the animal relative to the radiation beams according to the microRTP plan. The microRT system positioning accuracy was found to be submillimeter. The radiation source is guided through one of four catheter channels and placed in line with the tungsten collimators to deliver the conformal radiation treatment. The microRT hardware specifications, the accuracy of the treatment planning and positioning systems, and some typical procedures for radiobiological experiments that can be performed with the microRT device are presented.

  20. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  1. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  2. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.

  3. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  4. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  5. The Influence of Pretreatment Characteristics and Radiotherapy Parameters on Time Interval to Development of Radiation-Associated Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Ahmed, Irfan M.; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment characteristics and radiotherapy parameters which may influence time interval to development of radiation-associated meningioma (RAM). Methods and Materials: A Medline/PUBMED search of articles dealing with RAM yielded 66 studies between 1981 and 2006. Factors analyzed included patient age and gender, type of initial tumor treated, radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume, and time interval from RT to development of RAM. Results: A total of 143 patients with a median age at RT of 12 years form the basis of this report. The most common initial tumors or conditions treated with RT were medulloblastoma (n = 27), pituitary adenoma (n = 20), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 20), low-grade astrocytoma (n = 19), and tinea capitis (n = 14). In the 116 patients whose RT fields were known, 55 (47.4%) had a portion of the brain treated, whereas 32 (27.6%) and 29 (25.0%) had craniospinal and whole-brain fields. The median time from RT to develop a RAM or latent time (LT) was 19 years (range, 1-63 years). Male gender (p = 0.001), initial diagnosis of leukemia (p = 0.001), and use of whole brain or craniospinal field (p <= 0.0001) were associated with a shorter LT, whereas patients who received lower doses of RT had a longer LT (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The latent time to develop a RAM was related to gender, initial tumor type, radiotherapy volume, and radiotherapy dose.

  6. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  7. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  8. Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Transitioning Satellite Data to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center located at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting testbed activities aimed at transitioning satellite products to National Weather Service operational end users for the last 10 years. SPoRT is a NASA/NOAA funded project that has set the bar for transition of products to operational end users through a paradigm of understanding forecast challenges and forecaster needs, displaying products in end users decision support systems, actively assessing the operational impact of these products, and improving products based on forecaster feedback. Aiming for quality partnerships rather than a large quantity of data users, SPoRT has become a community leader in training operational forecasters on the use of up-and-coming satellite data through the use of legacy instruments and proxy data. Traditionally, SPoRT has supplied satellite imagery and products from NASA instruments such as the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). However, recently, SPoRT has been funded by the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Grounds to accelerate the transition of selected imagery and products to help improve forecaster awareness of upcoming operational data from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). This presentation provides background on the SPoRT Center, the SPoRT paradigm, and some example products that SPoRT is excited to work with forecasters to evaluate.

  9. Late toxicities and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy combined with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with triple-negative non-metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pernin, V; Belin, L; Cottu, P; Bontemps, P; Lemanski, C; De La Lande, B; Baumann, P; Missohou, F; Levy, C; Peignaux, K; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Denis, F; Gobillion, A; Bollet, M; Vago, N A; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Fourquet, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of the concurrent combination of bevacizumab with adjuvant radiotherapy (B-RT) in breast cancer (BC). Methods: Multicentre, prospective study, of the toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone or B-RT in patients with non-metastatic BC enrolled in randomized Phase 3 BEATRICE trial. Early and late toxicities were assessed by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3.0 during and 12 months after the completion of RT. Results: From 2007 to 2012, 39 females received adjuvant B-RT and 45 received adjuvant RT alone. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. All patients had triple-negative non-metastatic BC and received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT. 90% of the 39 females treated by concurrent B-RT received whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost and 4 (10%) received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 49% of the females with internal mammary chain irradiation. The mean duration of bevacizumab was 11.7 months. 38 (84%) females treated by RT alone received WBI with a boost and 16% of the females received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 47% of the females with internal mammary chain RT in 31%. Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed in 9% of patients receiving B-RT and 5% of patients receiving RT alone with no significant difference. 1 year after the completion of RT, the most common late grade 1–2 toxicities in the B-RT group were pain (18%), fibrosis (8%) and telangiectasia (5%). Conclusion: The concurrent bevacizumab with locoregional RT is associated with acceptable early and late 1-year toxicities in patients with BC. Advances in knowledge: The largest series of this association. PMID:25645108

  10. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  11. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  12. Roles of adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy for desmoplastic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Daniel E.; Patel, Kirtesh R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Parker, Douglas; Lawson, David H.; Delman, Keith A.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines are unclear as to the precise role of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with desmoplastic melanoma (DM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institutional outcomes in patients with DM, and to explore the roles of both adjuvant and salvage RT in these patients. We identified 100 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of DM who received treatment at our institution from 2000 to 2014. Local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in the 95 patients managed surgically with or without adjuvant and/or salvage RT. The overall rate of local recurrence (LR) was 10%. There was no LR in either adjuvant or salvage RT cohort. Adjuvant RT did not significantly improve LR-free survival at 5 years (100 vs. 81%, P = 0.59), despite the RTpatients having worse pathological features. Four of seven (57%) salvage patients developed distant metastases, despite 100% local control. Adjuvant RT did not significantly impact 5-year overall survival (86 vs. 82%, P = 0.43). RT shows a trend towards improved local control in both the adjuvant and salvage settings for patients with DM, and likely overcomes adverse risk factors after surgery in appropriately selected patients. Future prospective studies are needed to better address the optimal management for these patients. PMID:26397051

  13. The power of integration: radiotherapy and global palliative care.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Danielle; Grover, Surbhi; Elmore, Shekinah N; Knaul, Felicia M; Atun, Rifat; Caulley, Lisa; Herrera, Cristian A; Jones, Joshua A; Price, Aryeh J; Munshi, Anusheel; Gandhi, Ajeet K; Shah, Chiman; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a powerful tool for the palliation of the symptoms of advanced cancer, although access to it is limited or absent in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). There are multiple factors contributing to this, including assumptions about the economic feasibility of RT in LMICs, the logical challenges of building capacity to deliver it in those regions, and the lack of political support to drive change of this kind. It is encouraging that the problem of RT access has begun to be included in the global discourse on cancer control and that palliative care and RT have been incorporated into national cancer control plans in some LMICs. Further, RT twinning programs involving high- and low-resource settings have been established to improve knowledge transfer and exchange. However, without large-scale action, the consequences of limited access to RT in LMICs will become dire. The number of new cancer cases around the world is expected to double by 2030, with twice as many deaths occurring in LMICs as in high-income countries (HICs). A sustained and coordinated effort involving research, education, and advocacy is required to engage global institutions, universities, health care providers, policymakers, and private industry in the urgent need to build RT capacity and delivery in LMICs. PMID:27481320

  14. Preparation of purified tuberculin RT 23

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Mogens; Bentzon, M. Weis

    1958-01-01

    The technical procedure used in the preparation of a batch of more than 500 g of purified tuberculin (PPD) is described. This batch is designated RT 23, and it is estimated that the quantity now prepared will cover the global demand for purified tuberculin for human use for several years. RT 23 has been prepared by mixing 77 smaller lots of tuberculin selected from a total of 95 lots. The method of preparing the individual lots is described and the experimental data, i.e., the yield and the biological activity ascertained by skin tests in BCG-vaccinated guinea-pigs, are given for all lots. The possible causes of variations in the yield and biological activity of the individual lots are discussed. PMID:13618721

  15. Getting SMaRT in California

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-02-01

    With the year 2000 fast approaching, Waste Management`s Davis Street SMaRT Station in the San Francisco Bay Area is ramping up its yard and wood waste components to reach the magic 50% recycling figure required of california jurisdictions. Waste Management`s Davis Street Station in San Leandro, Calif., is in a growth spurt. Late last year the SMaRT facility--which stands for station for materials recycling and transfer--added 50 tph of yard and wood waste capacity, making it one of the largest facilities in the country that deal with organic wastes, and bringing the multimaterial facility to a total of more than 3,000 tpd of overall capacity.

  16. The School Psychologist's Role in Response to Intervention (RtI): Factors That Influence RtI Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yenni, Amanda; Hartman, Amie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the actual implementation of Response to Intervention (RtI) was related to school psychologists' knowledge, district opportunities for RtI training within the school district, and school psychologists' attitudes toward RtI. The implementation and use of RtI was predicted to be dependent upon those…

  17. Efficacy of Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy for Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunmi; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Yun-Han; Oh, Won Yong; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Ki Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy (RT) on progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Methods We reviewed the records of 22 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer treated with RT between 2008 and 2014. The median radiation dose for recurrent disease was 57.6 Gy (range, 45–75.6 Gy). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the type of RT: patients underwent RT without previous history of irradiation (n = 14) and those treated with secondary RT (reirradiation: n = 8) at the time of recurrence. Results The median follow-up period was 24.9 months (range, 4.5–66.6 months). Progression was observed in 14 patients (including 8 with loco-regional failure and 9 with distant metastases). Distant metastases were related to the RT dose (<70 Gy, P = 0.031). The 2-year loco-regional control (LRC), PFS, and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.6%, 45.1%, and 82.0%, respectively. The LRC rate was not different between the patients treated with RT for the first time and those treated with reirradiation (P = 0.101, 2-year LRC 79.5% vs. 41.7%). However, reirradiation was related to poor PFS (P = 0.022) and OS (P = 0.002). An escalated RT dose (≥70 Gy) was associated with a higher PFS (P = 0.014, 2-year PFS 63.5% vs. 20.8%). Conclusion Salvage RT for locally recurrent colorectal cancer can be offered when surgery is impossible. Dose-escalated RT shows a possible benefit in reducing the risk of progression. PMID:27218097

  18. Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: New Indications and Directions for Future Study.

    PubMed

    Ohri, Nitin; Dawson, Laura A; Krishnan, Sunil; Seong, Jinsil; Cheng, Jason C; Sarin, Shiv K; Kinkhabwala, Milan; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Coleman, C Norman; Guha, Chandan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide; its incidence is increasing in the United States. Depending on disease extent and underlying liver status, patients may be treated with local, locoregional, and/or systemic therapy. Recent data indicates that radiotherapy (RT) can play a meaningful role in the management of HCC. Here, we review published experiences using RT for HCC, including the use of radiosensitizers and stereotactic RT. We discuss methods for performing preclinical studies of RT for HCC and biomarkers of response. As a part of the HCC Working Group, an informal committee of the National Cancer Institute's Radiation Research Program, we suggest how RT should be implemented in the management of HCC and identify future directions for the study of RT in HCC. PMID:27377923

  19. Elderly Patients With Painful Bone Metastases Should be Offered Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Sarah; Presutti, Roseanna; Zhang Liying; Salvo, Nadia; Hird, Amanda; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Mitera, Gunita; Sinclair, Emily; DeAngelis, Carlo; Nguyen, Janet; Napolskikh, Julie; Chow, Edward

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in relieving metastatic bone pain in elderly patients. Methods and Materials: The response to RT for palliation of metastatic bone pain was evaluated from a prospective database of 558 patients between 1999 and 2008. The pain scores and analgesic intake were used to calculate the response according to the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party palliative RT endpoints. Subgroup analyses for age and other demographic information were performed. Results: No significant difference was found in the response rate in patients aged >=65, >=70, and >=75 years compared with younger patients at 1, 2, or 3 months after RT. The response was found to be significantly related to the performance status. Conclusion: Age alone did not affect the response to palliative RT for bone metastases. Elderly patients should be referred for palliative RT for their painful bone metastases, regardless of age, because they receive equal benefit from the treatment.

  20. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  1. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Qin, Qin; Sun, Jinglong; Han, Dan; Wang, Zhongtang; Teng, Junjie; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM). Methods Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events. Results Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005) compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232). However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage. PMID:26930609

  2. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  3. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  6. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  7. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  8. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  9. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    PubMed Central

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin® couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90° and 270° microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0° microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head immobilizer added ±0.1 mm to

  10. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  11. Immunological interactions in radiotherapy-opening a new window of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tapesh; Purushothaman, Kiran; Puthiyottil, Sanudev Sadanandan Vadakke; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Muttah, Geetha

    2016-02-01

    After a span of significant developments & advances we have reached a plateau in all the oncological disciplines in last decade. Escalation of dose of radiotherapy (RT) became possible with emergence of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Different radiosensitizing agents starting from conventional cytotoxic drugs to hypoxic radiosensitizers have been tried to increase the effect of RT. However technological advancement hasn't been translated into significant clinical benefits. Exploiting the immune system to enhance the effect of RT is a relatively new concept and a fast growing area in the field of oncology. RT cannot longer be considered as a localized treatment, but rather as a systemic weapon for solid tumors. The phenomenon of abscopal effect, meaning the action of RT upon distant 'out-of-field' foci of malignancies has been a major focus of recent research, and holds great promise for the future. In this review article we are going to discuss the immunological interactions in RT and its promising clinical implications. PMID:26904573

  12. Radiotherapy Timing in 4,820 Patients With Breast Cancer: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Detti, Beatrice; Bruni, Alessio; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between a delay in radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery and ipsilateral breast recurrence (BR). Methods and Materials: We included in our analysis 4,820 breast cancer patients who had undergone postoperative RT at University of Florence. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the interval between surgery and RT (T1, <60 days; T2, 61-120 days; T3, 121-180 days; and T4, >180 days). Results: On multivariate analysis, the timing of RT did not reach statistical significance in patients who received only postoperative RT (n = 1,935) or RT and hormonal therapy (HT) (n = 1,684) or RT, chemotherapy (CHT), and HT (n = 529). In the postoperative RT-only group, age at presentation, surgical margin status, and a boost to the tumor bed were independent prognostic factors for BR. In the RT plus HT group, age at presentation and boost emerged as independent prognostic factors for BR (p = 0.006 and p = 0.049, respectively). Finally, in the RT, CHT, and HT group, only multifocality was an independent BR predictor (p = 0.01). Only in the group of patients treated with RT and CHT (n = 672) did multivariate analysis with stepwise selection show RT timing as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; p = 0.045). Analyzing this group of patients, we found that most patients included had worse prognostic factors and had received CHT consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil before undergoing RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the timing of RT itself does not affect local recurrence, which is mainly related to prognostic factors. Thus, the 'waiting list' should be thought of as a 'programming list,' with patients scheduled for RT according to their prognostic factors.

  13. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Shibuya, Keiko; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nishino, Shigeo; Ogo, Etsuyo; Uchida, Nobue; Karasawa, Kumiko; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

  14. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head. PMID:27081582

  15. Radiotherapy infrastructure and human resources in Europe - present status and its implications for 2020.

    PubMed

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Samiei, Massoud; Bodis, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is required for nearly half of the newly diagnosed cancer patients. To optimise the quality and availability of RT, guidelines have been proposed by European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology-QUAntification of Radiation Therapy Infrastructure And Staffing Needs (ESTRO-QUARTS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study evaluates the present status of RT capacity in Europe and the projected needs by 2020 as per these recommendations. Thirty-nine of the 53 countries, listed in Europe by the UN Statistical Division, whose cancer incidences, teletherapy and human resources were available in the Global Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence (GLOBOCAN), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and DIrectory of RAdiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) (IAEA) databases were evaluated. A total of 3550 teletherapy units (TRT), 7017 radiation oncologists (RO), 3685 medical physicists (MP) and 12,788 radiotherapy technologists (RTT) are presently available for the 3.44 million new cancer cases reported annually in these countries. The present infrastructure and human resources in RT are estimated to provide RT access to 74.3% of the patients requiring RT. The current capacity in TRT, RO, MP and RTT when compared with recommended guidelines has a deficit of 25.6%, 18.3%, 22.7% and 10.6%, respectively. Thus, to respond to requirements by 2020, the existing capacity needs to be augmented by an additional 1698 TRTs, 2429 ROs, 1563 MPs and 2956 RTTs. With an imminent rise in cancer incidence, multifaceted strategic planning at national and international levels within a coordinated comprehensive cancer control programme is highly desirable to give adequate access to all patients who require radiotherapy across Europe. Specific steps to address this issue at national and continental levels involving all major stakeholders are proposed. PMID:25085229

  16. Cytokine and Growth Factor Responses After Radiotherapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Gaber, M. Waleed

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the time course and clinical significance of cytokines and peptide growth factors in pediatric patients with ependymoma treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We measured 15 cytokines and growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-{gamma}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-{alpha}) from 30 patients before RT and 2 and 24 h, weekly for 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the initiation of RT. Two longitudinal models for the trend of log-transformed measurements were fitted, one during treatment and one through 12 months. Results: During RT, log IL-8 declined at a rate of -0.10389/wk (p = 0.0068). The rate of decline was greater (p = 0.028) for patients with an infratentorial tumor location. The decline in IL-8 after RT was significant when stratified by infratentorial tumor location (p = 0.0345) and more than one surgical procedure (p = 0.0272). During RT, the decline in log VEGF was significant when stratified by the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After RT, the log VEGF declined significantly at a rate of -0.06207/mo. The decline was significant for males (p = 0.0222), supratentorial tumors (p = 0.0158), one surgical procedure (p = 0.0222), no ventriculoperitoneal shunt (p = 0.0005), and the absence of treatment failure (p = 0.0028). Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 declined significantly during RT and the decline differed according to tumor location. The angiogenesis factor VEGF declined significantly during the 12 months after RT. The decline was greater in males, those without a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and in those with favorable disease factors, including one surgical procedure, supratentorial tumor location, and

  17. Radiotherapy for Early Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma According to the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG): The Roles of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Involved-Node Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koeck, Julia; Abo-Madyan, Yasser; Lohr, Frank; Stieler, Florian; Kriz, Jan; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Wenz, Frederik; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Cure rates of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are high, and avoidance of late complications and second malignancies have become increasingly important. This comparative treatment planning study analyzes to what extent target volume reduction to involved-node (IN) and intensity-modulated (IM) radiotherapy (RT), compared with involved-field (IF) and three-dimensional (3D) RT, can reduce doses to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Based on 20 computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with early unfavorable mediastinal HL, we created treatment plans for 3D-RT and IMRT for both the IF and IN according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). As OAR, we defined heart, lung, breasts, and spinal cord. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were evaluated for planning target volumes (PTVs) and OAR. Results: Average IF-PTV and IN-PTV were 1705 cm{sup 3} and 1015 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean doses to the PTVs were almost identical for all plans. For IF-PTV/IN-PTV, conformity was better with IMRT and homogeneity was better with 3D-RT. Mean doses to the heart (17.94/9.19 Gy for 3D-RT and 13.76/7.42 Gy for IMRT) and spinal cord (23.93/13.78 Gy for 3D-RT and 19.16/11.55 Gy for IMRT) were reduced by IMRT, whereas mean doses to lung (10.62/8.57 Gy for 3D-RT and 12.77/9.64 Gy for IMRT) and breasts (left 4.37/3.42 Gy for 3D-RT and 6.04/4.59 Gy for IMRT, and right 2.30/1.63 Gy for 3D-RT and 5.37/3.53 Gy for IMRT) were increased. Volume exposed to high doses was smaller for IMRT, whereas volume exposed to low doses was smaller for 3D-RT. Pronounced benefits of IMRT were observed for patients with lymph nodes anterior to the heart. IN-RT achieved substantially better values than IF-RT for almost all OAR parameters, i.e., dose reduction of 20% to 50%, regardless of radiation technique. Conclusions: Reduction of target volume to IN most effectively improves OAR sparing, but is still considered investigational. For the time being, IMRT should be considered for

  18. Influence of parotid-sparing radiotherapy on xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J Gabriel; Aragon, Cecilia; Henson, Brad S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes permanent salivary gland dysfunction (SGD) and xerostomia. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of parotid-sparing RT on salivary function. The aim of this was to characterize the relationship between radiation dosages to parotid glands, SGD, xerostomia, and impaired quality of life (QOL). Ninety-three patients received unilateral (n=38) and bilateral (n=44) neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques, or standard three-field technique RT (n=11). Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected pre-RT and 1 year post-RT. Assessment of QOL and xerostomia was conducted with three questionnaires. The results demonstrated that reduced radiation dosages to parotid glands were strongly associated with percentage of baseline parotid flow rates measured at 1 year post-RT. Unilateral and bilateral neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques were successful in preserving salivary output, compared to standard three beam RT techniques. Lower radiation dose to contralateral parotid glands was associated with greater percentage of baseline salivary flow rates at 1 year post-RT, fewer xerostomic complaints, and an enhanced QOL. PMID:12893079

  19. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  20. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  1. Two-year longitudinal study of parotid salivary flow rates in head and neck cancer patients receiving unilateral neck parotid-sparing radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Eisbruch, A; D'Hondt, E; Ship, J A

    1999-05-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment for head and neck cancers, and frequently causes permanent salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. This 2-year longitudinal study evaluated unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates in 11 patients with head and neck cancers who received unilateral neck parotid-sparing RT. The results demonstrated that treated parotid glands had essentially no output up to 2 years post-RT. Alternatively, spared parotid flow rates were indistinguishable from pre-RT values at 1 and 2 years post-RT, and increased slightly over time. Total unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates 2 years after completion of RT were similar to pre-RT values, suggesting that spared parotid function may compensate for lost function from treated parotid glands. These results demonstrate that unilateral neck parotid-sparing techniques are effective in preserving contralateral parotid glands up to 2 years after the completion of RT. PMID:10621842

  2. Intelligence and RT: A Modified Hick Paradigm and a New RT Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between speed of information processing (SIP) and psychometric intelligence was investigated by giving 60 college students (22 males and 38 females) 2 choice reaction time (RT) tests (modified Hick paradigm) and Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices. Results support an association between intelligence and SIP. (SLD)

  3. ARCHER{sub RT} – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER{sub RT} is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER{sub RT}. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER{sub RT} and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER{sub RT} agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER{sub RT} are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to

  4. Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT) Arising From the Acoustic Nerve in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Xueyong; Lin, Zhixiong; Chen, Yupeng; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs) are rare, highly malignant central nervous system tumors that predominantly occur in young children. A 22-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of relapsing tinnitus and gradual hearing loss. Neuroimaging revealed an enhanced intrinsic left internal auditory canal mass. The patient underwent radiotherapy treatment. Three years later, the tumor size continued to increase, as observed by imaging, and ultimately evolved into the left cerebellopontine angle. As a consequence, a total tumor resection was performed, and a pathological diagnosis of AT/RT was made. Aggressive radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment continued; however, the tumor recurred within 11 months after the total tumor resection. The patient died within 4 months of the second operation. Histopathologically, the tumor contained characteristic rhabdoid cells with areas that resembled a classical primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Immunostaining showed loss of INI1 protein expression in tumor cells, and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed a hemizygous deletion of the hSNF5/INI1 gene region on 22q11.2. This is the first report of an AT/RT that arised from the acoustic nerve in a young adult. Despite manifold diagnostic and therapeutic advances, the prognosis of patients with AT/RT remains poor. PMID:25634176

  5. Improved survival with the addition of radiotherapy to androgen deprivation: questions answered and a review of current controversies in radiotherapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Kavanagh, Brian D; Rusthoven, Chad G

    2016-01-01

    The contemporary standard of care for locally advanced high-risk prostate cancer includes a combination of dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) plus androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). However, 20 years ago, at the inception of the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) led study (NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110), the survival impact of prostate RT for high-risk disease was uncertain. Recently, Mason, Warde and colleagues presented the final results of this NCIC/MRC study (PMID: 25691677) randomizing 1,205 high-risk prostate cancer patients to ADT + RT vs. ADT alone. These updated results confirm substantial improvements with the addition of RT to ADT for the endpoints of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and biochemical recurrence. Close examination of subtleties of this trial's design highlight some of the most salient controversies in the field of prostate RT, including the risk-stratified roles of ADT, optimal ADT duration, and RT field design in the dose-escalated and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) era. PMID:26855950

  6. ZD6474, an inhibitor of VEGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase activity in combination with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, Barbara; Gustafson, Dan; Bianco, Cataldo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Dimery, Isaiah; Raben, David . E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2006-01-01

    Radiation enhances both epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, which are a part of key pathways for tumor progression. Some tumors may not respond well to EGFR inhibitors alone or may develop resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Therefore, drug therapy targeted to VEGF receptors and EGFRs, when combined with radiotherapy (RT), may improve tumor control and provide wider applicability. This article focuses on ZD6474, an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling in combination with RT. We discuss preclinical and clinical studies with RT and inhibitors of VEGF or EGFR signaling first. We then address issues associated with ZD6474 pharmacokinetic dosing, and scheduling when combined with RT. We also discuss ZD6474 in the context of anti-EGFR therapy resistance. Dual inhibition of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling pathways shows promise in enhancing RT efficacy.

  7. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  8. Involved-field radiotherapy for patients in partial remission after chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, Berthe M.P. . E-mail: b.aleman@nki.nl; Raemaekers, John M.M.; Tomisic, Radka; Baaijens, Margreet H.A.; Bortolus, Roberto; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Maazen, Richard W.M. van der; Girinsky, Theodore; Demeestere, Geertrui; Lugtenburg, Pieternella; Lievens, Yolande; Jong, Daphne de; Pinna, Antonella; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The use of radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to describe the role of radiotherapy in patients with advanced HL who were in partial remission (PR) after chemotherapy. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial, patients <70 years old with previously untreated Stage III-IV HL were treated with six to eight cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone/doxorubicin, bleomycine, vinblastine hybrid chemotherapy. Patients in complete remission (CR) after chemotherapy were randomized between no further treatment and involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT). Those in PR after six cycles received IF-RT (30 Gy to originally involved nodal areas and 18-24 Gy to extranodal sites with or without a boost). Results: Of 739 enrolled patients, 57% were in CR and 33% in PR after chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 7.8 years. Patients in PR had bulky mediastinal involvement significantly more often than did those in CR after chemotherapy. The 8-year event-free survival and overall survival rate for the 227 patients in PR who received IF-RT was 76% and 84%, respectively. These rates were not significantly different from those for CR patients who received IF-RT (73% and 78%) or for those in CR who did not receive IF-RT (77% and 85%). The incidence of second malignancies in patients in PR who were treated with IF-RT was similar to that in nonirradiated patients. Conclusion: Patients in PR after six cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone/doxorubicine, bleomycine, vinblastine treated with IF-RT had 8-year event-free survival and overall survival rates similar to those of patients in CR, suggesting a definite role for RT in these patients.

  9. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  10. Radiotherapy Issues in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older ‘low-risk’ patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of ‘low risk’ are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for ‘high-risk’ patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1–3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational. PMID:24715826

  11. Methotrexate based chemotherapy and deferred radiotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL): single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Silvani, A; Salmaggi, A; Eoli, M; Lamperti, E; Broggi, G; Marras, C E; Fariselli, L; Milanesi, I; Fiumani, A; Gaviani, P; Erbetta, A; Giovagnoli, A R; Pollo, B; Botturi, A; Boiardi, A

    2007-05-01

    In the following study, we present our experience in the treatment of PCNSL patients using a multi-step schedule combining chemotherapy and deferred radiotherapy. Patients were treated with two modified M-BACOD cycles and then differently according to radiological response For PR, SD and PD patients, chemotherapy was interrupted and radiotherapy initiated immediately (45 Gy Whole-brain RT). With CR patients, chemotherapy was continued with a combination of HMTX, VCZ, PCB and HD Ara-C up to a total of nine cycles. In 36 patients suitable for evaluation (2 patients had undergone tumour resection): 69.4% (25 of 36) had a complete response (CR), 19.4% (7 of 36) had a partial response(PR), 8.3% (3 of 36) had stable disease(SD), and 2.7% (one of 36) had progressive disease (PD). The PR, SD and PD patients were immediately treated by radiotherapy. In this cohort of patients, we observed 6 CR, 4 PR and 2 PD, respectively, following radiotherapy. At first relapse, a total of 16 CR patients were treated by radiotherapy for a total dose of 45 Gy. The OS was 42.1 months for the entire group of patients. In CR patients treated at the moment of recurrence by salvage radiotherapy, the TTP (time lasting from histological diagnosis until recurrence of disease before RT) was 28.3 months, with a 43.4% of disease free patients observed at 2 years. The median disease-free time observed after complete response to radiotherapy was 10.5 months. In 16 patients (34%), further progression of disease was observed following radiotherapy. Two patients developed extra-CNS disease in the breast and testis. When taking into account the patients with radiotherapy delayed at recurrence, the OS was 48 months and the survival rates were 70% and 60% at 2 years and 5 years, respectively. PMID:17111190

  12. Modern Radiotherapy Concepts and the Impact of Radiation on Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deloch, Lisa; Derer, Anja; Hartmann, Josefin; Frey, Benjamin; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2016-01-01

    Even though there is extensive research carried out in radiation oncology, most of the clinical studies focus on the effects of radiation on the local tumor tissue and deal with normal tissue side effects. The influence of dose fractionation and timing particularly with regard to immune activation is not satisfactorily investigated so far. This review, therefore, summarizes current knowledge on concepts of modern radiotherapy (RT) and evaluates the potential of RT for immune activation. Focus is set on radiation-induced forms of tumor cell death and consecutively the immunogenicity of the tumor cells. The so-called non-targeted, abscopal effects can contribute to anti-tumor responses in a specific and systemic manner and possess the ability to target relapsing tumor cells as well as metastases. The impact of distinct RT concepts on immune activation is outlined and pre-clinical evidence and clinical observations on RT-induced immunity will be discussed. Knowledge on the radiosensitivity of immune cells as well as clinical evidence for enhanced immunity after RT will be considered. While stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy seem to have a beneficial outcome over classical RT fractionation in pre-clinical animal models, in vitro model systems suggest an advantage for classical fractionated RT for immune activation. Furthermore, the optimal approach may differ based on the tumor site and/or genetic signature. These facts highlight that clinical trials are urgently needed to identify whether high-dose RT is superior to induce anti-tumor immune responses compared to classical fractionated RT and in particular how the outcome is when RT is combined with immunotherapy in selected tumor entities. PMID:27379203

  13. The role of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jelercic, Stasa; Rajer, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Background PET-CT is becoming more and more important in various aspects of oncology. Until recently it was used mainly as part of diagnostic procedures and for evaluation of treatment results. With development of personalized radiotherapy, volumetric and radiobiological characteristics of individual tumour have become integrated in the multistep radiotherapy (RT) planning process. Standard anatomical imaging used to select and delineate RT target volumes can be enriched by the information on tumour biology gained by PET-CT. In this review we explore the current and possible future role of PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning. After general explanation, we assess its role in radiotherapy of those solid tumours for which PET-CT is being used most. Conclusions In the nearby future PET-CT will be an integral part of the most radiotherapy treatment planning procedures in an every-day clinical practice. Apart from a clear role in radiation planning of lung cancer, with forthcoming clinical trials, we will get more evidence of the optimal use of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of other solid tumours. PMID:25810695

  14. Beneficial effects of aminoguanidine on radiotherapy-induced kidney and testis injury.

    PubMed

    Ekici, K; Temelli, O; Parlakpinar, H; Samdanci, E; Polat, A; Beytur, A; Tanbek, K; Ekici, C; Dursun, I H

    2016-08-01

    This experimental study was designed to investigate both protective and therapeutic effects of aminoguanidine (AG), on radiotherapy (RT)-induced oxidative stress in kidney and testis. Forty rats were divided into five groups equally as follows: (i) control, (ii) RT, (iii) AG, (iv) AG+RT and (v) RT+AG group. Histopathological findings and biochemical evaluations, including tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress index (OSI), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr) and testosterone levels, were determined. MDA, TOS and OSI were significantly higher in RT-treated groups, whereas SOD, CAT, GPX and GSH were significantly lower in these groups when compared with the control rats in the kidney and testis tissue. AG treatment significantly decreased MDA, TOS and OSI levels and increased SOD, CAT, GPX and GSH levels, when compared to the RT-treated groups in both kidney and testis tissue. BUN and Cr levels did not change among the groups, whereas testosterone levels were found as reduced in the RT-treated rats. AG treatment significantly augmented these hazardous effects of RT on testis tissue. According to our results, AG has beneficial effects against RT-induced kidney and testis injury. PMID:26610736

  15. Rectal cancer delivery of radiotherapy in adequate time and with adequate dose is influenced by treatment center, treatment schedule, and gender and is prognostic parameter for local control: Results of study CAO/ARO/AIO-94

    SciTech Connect

    Fietkau, Rainer . E-mail: rainer.fietkau@med.uni-rostock.de; Roedel, Claus; Hohenberger, Werner; Raab, Rudolf; Hess, Clemens; Liersch, Torsten; Becker, Heinz; Wittekind, Christian; Hutter, Matthias; Hager, Eva; Karstens, Johann; Ewald, Hermann; Christen, Norbert; Jagoditsch, Michael; Martus, Peter; Sauer, Rolf

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The impact of the delivery of radiotherapy (RT) on treatment results in rectal cancer patients is unknown. Methods and Materials: The data from 788 patients with rectal cancer treated within the German CAO/AIO/ARO-94 phase III trial were analyzed concerning the impact of the delivery of RT (adequate RT: minimal radiation RT dose delivered, 4300 cGy for neoadjuvant RT or 4700 cGy for adjuvant RT; completion of RT in <44 days for neoadjuvant RT or <49 days for adjuvant RT) in different centers on the locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years. The LRR, DFS, and delivery of RT were analyzed as endpoints in multivariate analysis. Results: A significant difference was found between the centers and the delivery of RT. The overall delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for the LRR (no RT, 29.6% {+-} 7.8%; inadequate RT, 21.2% {+-} 5.6%; adequate RT, 6.8% {+-} 1.4%; p = 0.0001) and DFS (no RT, 55.1% {+-} 9.1%; inadequate RT, 57.4% {+-} 6.3%; adequate RT, 69.1% {+-} 2.3%; p = 0.02). Postoperatively, delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for LRR on multivariate analysis (together with pathologic stage) but not for DFS (independent parameters, pathologic stage and age). Preoperatively, on multivariate analysis, pathologic stage, but not delivery of RT, was an independent prognostic parameter for LRR and DFS (together with adequate chemotherapy). On multivariate analysis, the treatment center, treatment schedule (neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant RT), and gender were prognostic parameters for adequate RT. Conclusion: Delivery of RT should be regarded as a prognostic factor for LRR in rectal cancer and is influenced by the treatment center, treatment schedule, and patient gender.

  16. Consensus statement on palliative lung radiotherapy: third international consensus workshop on palliative radiotherapy and symptom control.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, George; Macbeth, Fergus; Burmeister, Bryan; Kelly, Karie-Lynn; Bezjak, Andrea; Langer, Corey; Hahn, Carol; Movsas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to disseminate a consensus statement on palliative radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer created in conjunction with the Third International Lung Cancer Consensus Workshop. The palliative lung RT workshop committee agreed on 5 questions relating to (1) patient selection, (2) thoracic external-beam radiation therapy (XRT) fractionation, (3) endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB), (4) concurrent chemotherapy (CC), and (5) palliative endpoint definitions. A PubMed search for primary/cross-referenced practice guidelines, consensus statements, meta-analyses, and/or systematic reviews was conducted. Final consensus statements were created after review and discussion of the available evidence. The following summary statements reflect the consensus of the international working group. 1. Key factors involved in the decision to deliver palliative RT include performance status, tumor stage, pulmonary function, XRT volume, symptomatology, weight loss, and patient preference. 2. Palliative thoracic XRT is generally indicated for patients with stage IV disease with current/impending symptoms and for patients with stage III disease treated for palliative intent. 3. There is no evidence to routinely recommend EBB alone or in conjunction with other palliative maneuvers in the initial palliative management of endobronchial obstruction resulting from lung cancer. 4. There is currently no evidence to routinely recommend CC with palliative-intent RT. 5. Standard assessment of symptoms and health-related quality of life (QOL) using validated questionnaires should be carried out in palliative RT lung cancer trials. Despite an expanding literature, continued prospective randomized investigations to better define the role of XRT, EBB, and CC in the context of thoracic palliation of patients with lung cancer is needed. PMID:21729656

  17. Preliminary results of a randomized study (NPC-9902 Trial) on therapeutic gain by concurrent chemotherapy and/or accelerated fractionation for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anne W.M. . E-mail: awmlee@ha.org.hk; Tung, Stewart Y.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Chappell, Rick; Fu, Y.-T.; Lu, Tai-Xiang; Tan, Terence; Chua, Daniel T.T.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Xu, Shirley L.; Pang, Ellie S.Y.; Sze, W.-M.; Leung, T.-W.; Kwan, W.-H.; Chan, Paddy; Liu, X.-F.; Tan, E.-H.; Sham, Jonathan; Siu, Lillian; Lau, W.-H.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the benefit achieved by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and/or accelerated fractionation (AF) vs. radiotherapy (RT) alone with conventional fractionation (CF) for patients with T3-4N0-1M0 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: All patients were irradiated with the same RT technique to {>=}66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction, conventional five fractions/week in the CF and CF+C (chemotherapy) arms, and accelerated six fractions/week in the AF and AF+C arms. The CF+C and AF+C patients were given the Intergroup 0099 regimen (concurrent cisplatin plus adjuvant cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil). Results: Between 1999 and April 2004, 189 patients were randomly assigned; the trial was terminated early because of slow accrual. The median follow-up was 2.9 years. When compared with the CF arm, significant improvement in failure-free survival (FFS) was achieved by the AF+C arm (94% vs. 70% at 3 years, p = 0.008), but both the AF arm and the CF+C arm were insignificant (p {>=} 0.38). Multivariate analyses showed that CRT was a significant factor: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.52 (0.28-0.97), AF per se was insignificant: HR = 0.68 (0.37-1.25); the interaction of CRT by AF was strongly significant (p = 0.006). Both CRT arms had significant increase in acute toxicities (p < 0.005), and the AF+C arm also incurred borderline increase in late toxicities (34% vs. 14% at 3 years, p = 0.05). Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with accelerated fractionation could significantly improve tumor control when compared with conventional RT alone; further confirmation of therapeutic ratio is warranted.

  18. Late Side Effects and Quality of Life After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Skovlund, Eva; Hjermstad, Marianne J.; Dahl, Olav; Frykholm, Gunilla; Carlsen, Erik; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is little knowledge on long-term morbidity after radiotherapy (50 Gy) and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. Therefore, late effects on bowel, anorectal, and urinary function, and health-related quality of life (QoL), were studied in a national cohort (n = 535). Methods and Materials: All Norwegian patients who received pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified. Patients treated with surgery alone served as controls. Patients were without recurrence or metastases. Bowel and urinary function was scored with the LENT SOMA scale and the St. Marks Score for fecal incontinence and QoL with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Results: Median time since surgery was 4.8 years. Radiation-treated (RT+) patients (n = 199) had increased bowel frequency compared with non-radiation-treated (RT-) patients (n = 336); 19% vs. 6% had more than eight daily bowel movements (p < 0.001). In patients without stoma, a higher proportion of RT+ (n = 69) compared with RT- patients (n = 240), were incontinent for liquid stools (49% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), needed a sanitary pad (52% vs. 13%, p < 0.001), and lacked the ability to defer defecation (44% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). Daily urinary incontinence occurred more frequently after radiotherapy (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.001). Radiation-treated patients had worse social function than RT- patients, and patients with fecal or urinary incontinence had impaired scores for global quality of life and social function (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with considerable long-term effects on anorectal function, especially in terms of bowel frequency and fecal incontinence. RT+ patients have worse social function, and fecal incontinence has a negative impact on QoL.

  19. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  20. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  1. Safety assessment of molecular targeted therapies in association with radiotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a real-life report.

    PubMed

    Langrand-Escure, Julien; Vallard, Alexis; Rivoirard, Romain; Méry, Benoîte; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Ben Mrad, Majed; Diao, Peng; Rancoule, Chloé; Suchaud, Jean-Philippe; Fournel, Pierre; Guillot, Aline; Chargari, Cyrus; Escudier, Bernard; Négrier, Sylvie; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Molecular targeted therapies (TT) are the cornerstone of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment. There is a paucity of data on the safety of the radiotherapy (RT)-TT association in a sequential or a concomitant setting. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively assess the safety of the RT-TT association. From 2006 to 2014, data from 84 consecutive patients treated with RT and TT for metastatic RCC were retrospectively collected. RT-TT sequential and concomitant associations were, respectively, defined by a time interval of more than five TT half-lives and less than or equal to five TT half-lives between the last TT administration and RT initiation. Toxicities in the fields of RT were assessed systematically. As many patients received several TT and RT courses, 136 RT-TT associations were analyzed, with 66 sequential and 70 concomitant schemes. RT was mainly delivered on bone (75%) and brain metastases (14.7%). TT were tyrosine kinase inhibitors (73.5%), mTOR inhibitors (19.8%), and monoclonal antibodies (6.7%). With a median follow-up of 9.5 months, whatever the sequence, no grade≥4 toxicity was reported. Two grade 3 toxicities were reported with sequential (3%) and concomitant (2.9%) RT-TT, respectively. Sequential or concomitant RT-TT associations in metastatic RCC do not seem to cause major toxicity. PMID:27045782

  2. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  3. Cardiac Exposures in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: 1950s-1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Carolyn W. Nisbet, Andrew; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the doses to the heart and coronary arteries from common breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) regimens used worldwide from the 1950s to the 1990s. Methods and Materials: Virtual simulation and computed tomography planning were used to reconstruct the megavoltage and electron regimens. Manual planning was used for the orthovoltage and brachytherapy regimens. Several sources of variability associated with the dose estimates were assessed. Results: Breast or chest wall RT resulted in whole heart doses of 0.9-14 Gy for left-sided and of 0.4-6 Gy for right-sided irradiation. Internal mammary chain RT delivered heart doses of 3-17 Gy and 2-10 Gy for left- and right-sided irradiation, respectively. For most regimens, the dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery was greater than the heart dose. Scar boost, supraclavicular fossa, and axillary RT delivered mean cardiac doses of {<=}3 Gy. The greatest source of variability in estimating dose from a given regimen was patient anatomy. Conclusion: For most techniques, the greatest radiation doses were received by the anterior part of the heart and the left anterior descending coronary artery, a common site of atherosclerosis causing myocardial infarction. Irradiation of these structures might have contributed to the excess risk of death from heart disease seen after some past breast cancer RT regimens.

  4. Salivary Gland. Photon beam and particle radiotherapy: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Ester; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Bonora, Maria; Cavallo, Anna; Fossati, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are rare diseases and their treatment depends upon histology, stage and site of origin. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment but radiotherapy (RT) plays a key role in both the postoperative and the inoperable setting, as well as in recurrent disease. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, a wide retrospective literature suggests postoperative RT (PORT) in patients with high risk pathological features. SGCs, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) in particular, are known to be radio-resistant tumors and should therefore respond well to particle beam therapy. Recently, excellent outcome has been reported with radical carbon ion RT (CIRT) in particular for ACC. Both modern photon- and hadron-based treatments are effective and are characterized by a favourable toxicity profile. But it is not clear whether one modality is superior to the other for disease control, due to the differences in patients' selection, techniques, fractionation schedules and outcome measurements among clinical experiences. In this paper, we review the role of photon and particle RT for malignant SGCs, discussing the difference between modalities in terms of biological and technical characteristics. RT dose and target volumes for different histologies (ACC versus non-ACC) have also been taken into consideration. PMID:27394087

  5. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  6. Improved 6-year overall survival in AT/RT - results of the registry study Rhabdoid 2007.

    PubMed

    Bartelheim, Kerstin; Nemes, Karolina; Seeringer, Angela; Kerl, Kornelius; Buechner, Jochen; Boos, Joachim; Graf, Norbert; Dürken, Matthias; Gerss, Joachim; Hasselblatt, Martin; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Teichert von Luettichau, Irene; Nagel, Inga; Nygaard, Randi; Oyen, Florian; Quiroga, Eduardo; Schlegel, Paul-Gerhardt; Schmid, Irene; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Siebert, Reiner; Solano-Paez, Palma; Timmermann, Beate; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Frühwald, Michael Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are characterized by mutations and subsequent inactivation of SMARCB1 (INI1, hSNF5), a predilection for very young children and an unfavorable outcome. The European Registry for rhabdoid tumors (EU-RHAB) was established to generate a common European database and to establish a standardized treatment regimen as the basis for phase I/II trials. Thus, genetic analyses, neuropathologic and radiologic diagnoses, and a consensus treatment regimen were prospectively evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, 31 patients with AT/RT from four countries were recruited into the registry study Rhabdoid 2007 and treated with systemic and intraventricular chemotherapy. Eight patients received high-dose chemotherapy, 23 radiotherapy, and 17 maintenance therapy. Reference evaluations were performed in 64% (genetic analyses, FISH, MLPA, sequencing) up to 97% (neuropathology, INI1 stain). Germ-line mutations (GLM) were detected in 6/21 patients. Prolonged overall survival was associated with age above 3 years, radiotherapy and achievement of a complete remission. 6-year overall and event-free survival rates were 46% (±0.10) and 45% (±0.09), respectively. Serious adverse events and one treatment-related death due to insufficiency of a ventriculo peritoneal shunt (VP-shunt) and consecutive herniation were noted. Acquisition of standardized data including reference diagnosis and a standard treatment schedule improved data quality along with a survival benefit. Treatment was feasible with significant but manageable toxicity. Although our analysis is biased due to heterogeneous adherence to therapy, EU-RHAB provides the best available basis for phase I/II clinical trials. PMID:27228363

  7. Quality of Radiotherapy Reporting in Randomized Controlled Trials of Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Yahalom, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Standards for the reporting of radiotherapy details in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are lacking. Although radiotherapy (RT) is an important component of curative therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), we postulated that RT reporting may be inadequate in Phase III HL and NHL trials. Methods and Materials: We searched PubMed and the Cochrane registry for reports of RCTs involving RT and either HL or NHL published between 1998 and 2007. We screened 133 titles and abstracts to identify relevant studies. We included a total of 61 reports. We assessed these reports for the presence of six quality measures: target volume, radiation dose, fractionation, radiation prescription, quality assurance (QA) process use, and adherence to QA (i.e., reporting of major or minor deviations). Results: Of 61 reports, 23 (38%) described the target volume. Of the 42 reports involving involved-field RT alone, only 8 (19%) adequately described the target volume. The radiation dose and fractionation was described in most reports (54 reports [89%] and 39 reports [64%], respectively). Thirteen reports specified the RT prescription point (21%). Only 12 reports (20%) described using a RT QA process, and 7 reports (11%) described adherence to the QA process. Conclusion: Reporting of RT in HL and NHL RCTs is deficient. Because the interpretation, replication, and application of RCT results depend on adequate description and QA of therapeutic interventions, consensus standards for RT reporting should be developed and integrated into the peer-review process.

  8. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  9. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  10. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lymphoma involving the mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Toner, Sean; Hunt, Margie; Wu, Elisa J.; Yahalom, Joachim . E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, potential advantage, and indications for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving excessively large mediastinal disease volumes or requiring repeat RT. Methods and materials: Sixteen patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 11) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 5) undergoing primary radiotherapy or repeat RT delivered via an IMRT plan were studied. The indications for using an IMRT plan were previous mediastinal RT (n = 5) or extremely large mediastinal treatment volumes (n 11). For each patient, IMRT, conventional parallel-opposed (AP-PA), and three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) plans were designed using 6-MV X-rays to deliver doses ranging from 18 to 45 Gy (median, 36 Gy). The plans were compared with regard to dose-volume parameters. The IMRT/AP-PA and IMRT/3D-CRT ratios were calculated for each parameter. Results: For all patients, the mean lung dose was reduced using IMRT, on average, by 12% compared with AP-PA and 14% compared with 3D-CRT. The planning target volume coverage was also improved using IMRT compared with AP-PA but was not different from the planning target volume coverage obtained with 3D-CRT. Conclusion: In selected patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the mediastinum, IMRT provides improved planning target volume coverage and reduces pulmonary toxicity parameters. It is feasible for RT of large treatment volumes and allows repeat RT of relapsed disease without exceeding cord tolerance. Additional follow-up is necessary to determine whether improvements in dose delivery affect long-term morbidity and disease control.

  11. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  12. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  13. Has the Pattern of Practice in the Prescription of Radiotherapy for the Palliation of Thoracic Symptoms Changed Between 1999 and 2006 at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Alysa; Goh, Philiz; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Ghosh, Sunita; Danjoux, Cyril; Barbera, Lisa; Tsao, May; Chow, Edward

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Eleven randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing various radiotherapy (RT) schedules for locally advanced lung cancer published since 1991 found no difference in palliation of intrathoracic symptoms. The most commonly prescribed schedule by Canadian Radiation Oncologists (RO) (20 Gy in five fractions [20 Gy/5]), when first evaluated versus 10 Gy/1 in a 2002 RCT, showed a significant survival benefit. A subsequent RCT assessing 20 Gy/5 found worse survival versus 16 Gy/2. This study examines whether the RT prescription for lung cancer palliation in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP) has changed over time. Methods and Materials: Chart review was conducted for patients treated with palliative thoracic RT across three periods (1999-2006). Patient demographics, tumor, treatment, and organizational factors were analyzed descriptively. Chi-square test was used to detect differences in proportions between unordered categorical variables. Continuous variables were tested using analysis of variance. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of RT schedule prescribed. Results: A total of 117 patients received 121 courses of palliative thoracic RT. The most common dose (20 Gy/5) comprised 65% of courses in 1999, 68% in 2003, and 60% in 2005-2006 (p = 0.76). The next most common dose was 30 Gy/10 (13%). Overall, the median survival was 14.9 months, independent of RT schedule (p = 0.68). Multivariate analysis indicated palliative chemotherapy and certification year of RO were significant predictors of prescription of 20 Gy/5. Conclusion: RT schedule for palliation of intrathoracic symptoms did not mirror the results of sequential, conflicting RCTs, suggesting that factors other than the literature influenced practice patterns in palliative thoracic RT.

  14. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  15. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D. Costin, M. Rattoni, B. Vienne, C. Vabre, A. Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  16. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  17. Enhancement of Glioma Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy Response With Targeted Antibody Therapy Against Death Receptor 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fiveash, John B. Gillespie, G. Yancey; Oliver, Patsy G.; Zhou Tong; Belenky, Michael L.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: TRA-8 is an agonistic mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells through a caspase-8-dependent mechanism. We investigated the ability of TRA-8 to augment the radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy response of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The in vitro cytotoxicity of TRA-8 and temozolomide (Tmz) or RT was examined using adenosine triphosphate-dependent viability and clonogenic survival assays with five glioma cell lines. Death receptor 5 expression was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo studies included subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models testing various combination treatments, including RT, Tmz, and TRA-8. Results: TRA-8, combined with Tmz or RT, produced enhanced cytotoxicity against five glioma cell lines compared with the use of the individual agents alone. Death receptor 5 upregulation occurred in response to RT. Complete tumor regression in the subcutaneous experiments was the most common in animals that received combination therapy with TRA-8/Tmz/RT. TRA-8 enhanced tumor growth delay in combination with RT or Tmz. TRA-8 alone had limited activity against intracranial tumors. In contrast, the median survival of mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-alone-treated mice. The median survival of the mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT or chemoradiotherapy only was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-treated mice. A trend toward improved survival was observed between TRA-8/Tmz/RT-treated and Tmz/RT-treated mice. Conclusions: These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that TRA-8 will augment the RT and chemotherapy response in gliomas. A humanized version of TRA-8 is being evaluated in a Phase II clinical trial.

  18. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  19. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. Methods and Materials: The data from 308 patients aged {>=}75 years who received short-course (treatment time 1-5 days) or long-course RT (2-4 weeks) for MSCC were retrospectively analyzed for functional outcome, local control, and survival. Furthermore, nine potential prognostic factors were investigated: gender, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone or visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and speed at which motor deficits developed. Results: Improvement of motor deficits occurred in 25% of patients, with no further progression of MSCC in an additional 59%. The 1-year local control and survival rate was 92% and 43%, respectively. Improved functional outcomes were associated with ambulatory status and slower developing motor deficits. Improved local control resulted from long-course RT. Improved survival was associated with a longer interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type (breast/prostate cancer, myeloma/lymphoma), lack of visceral or other bone metastases, ambulatory status, and a slower development of motor deficits. Conclusion: Short- and long-course RT are similarly effective in patients aged {>=}75 years regarding functional outcome and survival. Long-course RT provided better local control. Patients with better expected survival should receive long-course RT and others short-course RT. The criteria for selection of an appropriate regimen for MSCC in very elderly patients should be the same as for younger individuals.

  20. [Linear accelerator radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brandt, R A; Salvajoli, J V; Oliveira, V C; Carmignani, M; da Cruz, J C; Leal, H D; Ferraz, L

    1995-03-01

    Radiosurgery is the precise radiation of a known intracranial target with a high dose of energy, sparing the adjacent nervous tissue. Technological advances in the construction of linear accelerators, stereotactic instruments and in computer sciences made this technique easier to perform and affordable. The main indications for radiosurgery are inoperable cerebral vascular malformations, vestibular and other cranial schwannomas, skull base meningiomas, deep seated gliomas and cerebral metastases. More recently, the development of fraccionated stereotactic radiotherapy increased the spectrum of indications to bigger lesions and to those adjacent to critical nervous structures. We present our initial experience in the treatment of 31 patients. An adequate control of the neoplastic lesions was obtained and the adequate time of observation is still needed to evaluate the results in arteriovenous malformations. PMID:7575207

  1. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  2. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Pure Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Grills, Inga Siiner; Chen, Peter Y.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving therapy using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: From March 2001 to February 2009, 53 patients with Stage 0 breast cancer were treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI. Median age was 62 years. All patients underwent excision with margins negative by {>=}1 mm before adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). A total of 39 MammoSite brachytherapy (MS) patients and 14 three-dimensional conformal external beam RT (3DCRT) patients were treated to the lumpectomy bed alone with 34 Gy and 38.5 Gy, respectively. Of the DCIS cases, 94% were mammographically detected. All patients with calcifications had either specimen radiography or postsurgical mammography confirmation of clearance. Median tumor size was 6 mm, and median margin distance was 5 mm. There were no statistically significant differences according to APBI method for race/ethnicity, tumor detection method, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, or use of tamoxifen (p = NS). Recurrence and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cosmesis was scored by the Harvard criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.4-6.3 years), the overall and cause-specific survival rates were 98% and 100%, respectively. Three-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 2%. One failure was observed at the resection bed 11 months post-RT. No other elsewhere breast failures, regional recurrences, or distant metastases were noted. Cosmesis was excellent or good in 92.4% of cases, with no statistically significant differences according to the APBI method (92.3% with MammoSite and 92.8% with 3DCRT; p = 0.649). Conclusions: APBI as part of breast-conserving therapy for pure DCIS was associated with excellent local control and survival rates, with the vast majority of patients having good to excellent cosmesis. This finding supports the recent analysis by the

  3. Role of Radiotherapy and Newer Techniques in the Treatment of GI Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-06-01

    The role of radiotherapy in multidisciplinary treatment of GI malignancies is well established. Recent advances in imaging as well as radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques have made it possible to target tumors more accurately while sparing normal tissues. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an advanced method of delivering radiation using cutting-edge technology to manipulate beams of radiation. The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy is growing for many GI malignancies, such as cancers of the stomach, pancreas, esophagus, liver, and anus. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for some GI tumors such as locally advanced pancreatic cancer and primary or metastatic tumors of the liver. Stereotactic body radiotherapy requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location and subcentimeter accuracy of the delivered dose. New image-guided techniques have been developed to overcome setup uncertainties at the time of treatment, including real-time imaging on the linear accelerator. Modern imaging techniques have also allowed for more accurate pretreatment staging and delineation of the primary tumor and involved sites. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans can be particularly useful in radiotherapy planning and assessing treatment response. Molecular biomarkers are being investigated as predictors of response to radiotherapy with the intent of ultimately moving toward using genomic and proteomic determinants of therapeutic strategies. The role of all of these new approaches in the radiotherapeutic management of GI cancers and the evolving role of radiotherapy in these tumor sites will be highlighted in this review. PMID:25918298

  4. Treatment of stage IV(A-B) nasopharyngeal carcinoma by induction-concurrent chemoradiotherapy and accelerated fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anne W.M. . E-mail: awmlee@ha.org.hk; Yau, T.K.; Wong, Dominique H.M.; Chan, Elian W.K.; Yeung, Rebecca M.W.; Ng, W.T.; Tong, Macy; Soong, Inda S.; Sze, W.M.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To explore a more effective strategy for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma with extensive locoregional disease. Methods and Materials: Between October 1998 and January 2003, 49 patients with Stage IV(A-B) disease infiltrating or abutting neurologic structures were treated with induction-concurrent chemotherapy and accelerated radiotherapy (RT). A combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil was used in the induction phase and single-agent cisplatin in the concurrent phase. All patients were irradiated with conformal techniques at 2 Gy/fraction, six daily fractions weekly, to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: Although 92% of patients had one or more acute toxicities Grade 3 or worse, 96% completed the whole course of RT, and 92% had five or more cycles of chemotherapy. The great majority of toxicities were uneventful, but 1 patient died of neutropenic sepsis. With a median follow-up of 3.1 years, 20 patients had failure at one or more sites and 15 patients died. The 3-year locoregional and distant failure-free rate was 77% and 75%, respectively, and the overall survival rate was 71%. At last follow-up, 27% of patients had developed late Grade 3 or worse toxicity (24% were hearing impairments), but none had radiation-induced neurologic damage. Conclusion: The current strategy achieved encouraging results for this poor prognostic group, and confirmation of the therapeutic gain by a prospective randomized trial is warranted.

  5. Influence of Radiotherapy Treatment Concept on the Outcome of Patients With Localized Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. Kelter, Verena; Welzel, Thomas; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Bischof, Marc; Hof, Holger; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of 57 patients with localized ependymomas treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients with localized ependymomas were treated with RT. Histology was myxopapillary ependymoma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 23), and anaplastic ependymoma (n = 30). In 16 patients, irradiation of the craniospinal axis (CSI) was performed with a median dose of 20 Gy. Forty-one patients were treated with local RT, with a local dose of 45 Gy to the posterior fossa, including a boost to the tumor bed of 9 Gy. In 19 patients, the tumor bed was irradiated with a median dose of 54 Gy. Results: Overall survival after primary diagnosis was 83% and 71% at 3 and 5 years. Five-year overall survival was 80% in low-grade and 79% in high-grade tumors. Survival from RT was 79% at 3 and 64% at 5 years. We could not show a significant difference in overall survival between CSI and local RT only. Freedom of local failure was 67% at 5 years in patients treated with CSI and 60% at 5 years after local RT. A rate of 83% for distant failure-free survival could be observed in the CSI group as opposed to 93% in the group receiving local RT only. Conclusion: Local RT in patients with localized tumors is equieffective to CSI. The radiation oncologist must keep in mind that patients with localized ependymomas benefit from local doses {>=}45 Gy.

  6. Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yu, Chang-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do; Kim, Woo-Kun; Kim, Jin-Cheon; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

  7. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  8. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  9. Potential Of VIRAC* RT-32 And RT-16 Antennas To Serve As Satellite Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiders, M.; Trokss, J.; Elerts, M.

    2015-02-01

    The basic application of RT-32 and RT-16 parabolic antennas is radio astronomy observations, both the radio-telescopes have been upgraded with state-of-the art cryogenic receivers, and now a large-scale modernization of the infrastructure is underway. Since the radio-astronomical observations are not full-time activities, a research work has been done to clear up whether these antennas, besides the mentioned activities, can be used as a satellite ground station. The main goal of this added functionality is to make possible the use of the extremely high reception systems' figure-of-merit thus raising the satellite downlink data rates without increasing the on-board power consumption, which would be particularly important for developers of small satellites. In this paper, the progress in the research project is reported, which includes successful S-band satellite signal reception experiments and possible options as to integration of the related equipment into the system so that both functionalities could successfully coexist. Performance of the existing and the upgraded antenna positioning systems is estimated to determine if the latter are usable even for servicing low-Earth orbiting satellites. In addition, possible options are considered as to upgrading the system with automatic beam tracking capability, which would increase the antenna pointing accuracy even further.

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  11. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.

  12. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    PubMed Central

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eilsbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than ≈20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than ≈25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk. PMID:20171519

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Maverick W K

    2016-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  14. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pillsbury, H.C. III; Webster, W.P.; Rosenman, J.

    1986-05-01

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study.

  15. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Morgia, Marita; Atyeo, John; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  16. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Casella, Donato; Bernini, Marco; Sanchez, Luis; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Simoncini, Roberta; Nori, Jacopo; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible patients were women with early BC (maximum diameter 2.5 cm) suitable for breast conserving surgery. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02104895. A total of 117 patients aged 70 years or more were analyzed (58 in the WBI arm, 59 in the APBI arm). At a median follow-up of 5-years (range 3.4-7.0), the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate was 1.9 % in both groups. No significant difference between the two groups was identified (log-rank test p = 0.96). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates in the WBI group and APBI group were 6.1 and 1.9 %, respectively (p = 0.33). The APBI group presented significantly better results in terms of acute skin toxicity, considering both any grade (p = 0.0001) and grade 2 or higher (p = 0.0001). Our subgroup analyses showed a very low rate and no significant difference in terms of IBTR, using both WBI and APBI. A significant impact on patients compliance in terms of acute and early late toxicity was shown, which could translate in a consistent improvement of overall quality of life. PMID:26350524

  17. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  18. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  19. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with perineural invasion: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bur, Andrés M; Lin, Alexander; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2016-04-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is widely regarded as a negative prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment guidelines recommend adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with adverse pathologic features, including PNI. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine if patients with PNI as their only indication for adjuvant therapy benefit from adjuvant RT. In total, 339 abstracts were reviewed for relevance leaving 85 articles, which were evaluated in detail. Thirteen retrospective studies addressed the role of adjuvant RT for patients with PNI. Evidence is lacking to recommend adjuvant RT for all patients with HNSCC with PNI. However, the literature suggests that large nerve or multifocal PNI may predict worse outcome and may be a more appropriate indication for adjuvant therapy. We advocate that patients decide whether to undergo adjuvant therapy after a discussion of the limitations of current evidence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2350-E2357, 2016. PMID:26613965

  1. Prospective Study of Psychosocial Distress Among Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Jennelle, Richard; Grady, Victoria; Tovar, Adrienne; Bowen, Kris; Simonin, Patty; Tracy, Janice; McCrudden, Dale; Stella, Jonathan R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of psychosocial distress among patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer and to examine the association between depression and anxiety and demographic and medical variables. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients (25 men and 15 women) with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent RT administered with definitive (24 patients) or postoperative (16 patients) intent. Twenty patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument before RT, on the last day of RT, and at the first follow-up visit. The effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on psychosocial distress was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of mild to severe pre-RT depression was 58% and 45% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D and Beck Depression Inventory-II scale, respectively. The prevalence of severe pre-RT anxiety was 7%. The depression levels, as determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument increased significantly during RT and remained elevated at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.001 for both). The variables that were significantly associated with post-RT depression included a greater pre-RT depression level, employment status (working at enrollment), younger age (<55 years), single marital status, and living alone (p < 0.05, for all). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that an alarming number of patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer have symptoms suggestive of psychosocial distress even before beginning treatment. This proportion increases significantly during RT. Studies investigating the role of antidepressants and/or psychiatric counseling might be warranted in the future.

  2. The timing of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy influences tumor dissemination in a preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Natacha; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Van Overmeire, Eva; Blacher, Silvia; Marée, Raphael; Van Ginderachter, Jo; Lallemand, François; Lenaerts, Eric; Coucke, Philippe; Noel, Agnès; Martinive, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (neoRT) used in cancer treatments aims at improving local tumor control and patient overall survival. The neoRT schedule and the timing of the surgical treatment (ST) are empirically based and influenced by the clinician's experience. The current study examines how the sequencing of neoRT and ST affects metastatic dissemination. In a breast carcinoma model, tumors were exposed to different neoRT schedules (2x5Gy or 5x2Gy) followed by surgery at day 4 or 11 post-RT. The impact on the tumor microenvironment and lung metastases was evaluated through immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses. After 2x5Gy, early ST (at day 4 post-RT) led to increased size and number of lung metastases as compared to ST performed at day 11. Inversely, after 5x2Gy neoRT, early ST protected the mice against lung metastases. This intriguing relationship between tumor aggressiveness and ST timing could not be explained by differences in classical parameters studied such as hypoxia, vessel density and matrix remodeling. The study of tumor-related inflammation and immunity reveals an increased circulating NK cell percentage following neoRT as compared to non irradiated mice. Then, radiation treatment and surgery were applied to tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice. In the absence of NK cells, neoRT appears to increase lung metastatic dissemination as compared to non irradiated tumor-bearing mice. Altogether our data demonstrate that the neoRT schedule and the ST timing affect metastasis formation in a pre-clinical model and points out the potential role of NK cells. These findings highlight the importance to cautiously tailor the optimal window for ST following RT. PMID:26440148

  3. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  4. Preserved salivary output and xerostomia-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients receiving parotid-sparing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Inglehart, M R; Eisbruch, A; Ship, J A

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes salivary dysfunction and diminished xerostomia-related quality of life. We have demonstrated that three-dimensional treatment planning and conformational dose-delivery techniques can minimize RT doses to contralateral parotid glands while providing therapeutic doses to tumors. This study's purpose was to assess parotid salivary function up to 1 year post-RT in patients receiving bilateral neck parotid-sparing RT, and to determine if parotid preservation would significantly improve xerostomia-related quality of life. Unstimulated (UPFR) and stimulated (SPFR) parotid flow rates were collected from 20 head and neck cancer patients. All subjects completed a 15-item xerostomia-related quality of life scale (XeQoLS) prior to RT, at the completion of RT, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post-RT. Salivary flow rates from spared and treated glands were significantly decreased at the completion of RT. After RT completion, spared UPFR and SPFR function increased and was not significantly different from baseline values. Output from treated glands remained statistically indistinguishable from zero throughout the post-RT period. Subjects had a significantly worse xerostomia-related quality of life at the completion of RT compared to baseline, and XeQoLS responses improved significantly 1 month post-RT. Responses at 1 year were markedly better than at the completion of RT, but still significantly worse than baseline. These findings suggest that despite parotid-sparing RT, salivary flow rates from treated and spared glands and xerostomia-related quality of life decrease at the completion of RT. However, with the use of parotid-sparing RT, contralateral glands are preserved at 1 year post-RT with a concomitant improvement in xerostomia-related quality of life. PMID:11120488

  5. (Chemo)radiotherapy after laser microsurgery and selective neck dissection for pN2 head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Ihler, Friedrich; Zeller, Nina; Welz, Christian; Jung, Klaus; Canis, Martin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed the efficacy of transoral laser microsurgery and postoperative (chemo) radiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Between 1987 and 2007, 318 patients with pN2 neck disease were included. Seventy-three patients received laser resection and neck dissection alone, 154 postoperative radiotherapy, and 91 postoperative (C)RT. Mean follow-up was 58.2 ± 51.2 months, and locoregional control was significantly better after postoperative (C)RT (surgery alone: 42 %, radiotherapy: 57 %, CRT: 59 %; p < 0.01). Postoperative (C)RT did not have a significant impact on disease-specific survival (DSS) (surgery alone: 55 %, radiotherapy alone: 60 %, CRT: 64 %; p = 0.36). Fifty-seven patients (17.92 %) developed distant metastases, and 39 patients (12.26 %) presented with secondary malignancies, with no significant differences found between the treatment groups. Postoperative (C)RT significantly improved locoregional control, but had no significant effect on DSS because of high rates of secondary malignancies and distant metastases. Reduced radicality in combination with an effective screening might improve prognosis and quality of life of these patients. PMID:25864181

  6. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: A physician's decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and/or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3x10{sup -9} to 2.54x10{sup -5}%/MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39x10{sup -8} to 1.80x10{sup -5}%/MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60x10{sup -9} to 1.35x10{sup -5}%/MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the

  7. Accelerators for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanz, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    History has shown that energetic particles can be useful for medical applications. From the time, in 1895 when Roentgen discovered X-rays, and in 1913 when Coolidge developed the vacuum X-ray tube, energetic particles have been an important tool for medicine. Development of the appropriate tool for effective and safe radiotherapy requires an in-depth understanding of the application and constraints. Various solutions are possible and choices must be analyzed on the basis of the suitability for meeting the requirements. Some of the requirements of charged particle therapy are summarized and various accelerator options are described and discussed.

  8. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J.; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (µtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the µtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The µtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 µm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5%bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of µtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  9. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA -loaded echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K

    2016-06-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (μtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the μtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The μtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 μm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5 % bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of μtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  10. [Description of latest generation equipment in external radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pellejero, S; Lozares, S; Mañeru, F

    2009-01-01

    Both the planning systems and the form of administering radiotherapy have changed radically since the introduction of 3D planning. At present treatment planning based on computerised axial tomography (CAT) images is standard practice in radiotherapy services. In recent years lineal accelerators for medical use have incorporated technology capable of administering intensity modulated radiation beams (IMRT). With this mode distributions of conformed doses are generated that adjust to the three dimensional form of the white volume, providing appropriate coverage and a lower dose to nearby risk organs. The use of IMRT is rapidly spreading amongst radiotherapy centres throughout the world. This growing use of IMRT has focused attention on the need for greater control of the geometric uncertainties in positioning the patient and control of internal movements. To this end, both flat and volumetric image systems have been incorporated into the treatment equipment, making image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) possible. This article offers a brief description of the latest advances included in the planning and administration of radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19738655

  11. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayes, I; Rumble, R B; Bowen, J; Dixon, P; Warde, P

    2012-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiotherapy that uses beams with multiple intensity levels for any single beam, allowing concave dose distributions and tighter margins than those possible using conventional radiotherapy. IMRT is ideal for treating complex treatment volumes and avoiding close proximity organs at risk that may be dose limiting and provides increased tumour control through an escalated dose and reduces normal tissue complications through organ at risk sparing. Given the potential advantages of IMRT and the availability of IMRT-enabled treatment planning systems and linear accelerators, IMRT has been introduced in a number of disease sites. This systematic review examined the evidence for IMRT in the treatment of breast cancer to quantify the potential benefits of this new technology and to make recommendations for radiation treatment programmes considering adopting this technique. Providing that avoidance of acute adverse effects associated with radiation is an outcome of interest, then IMRT is recommended over tangential radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery, based on a review of six published reports including 2012 patients. There were insufficient data to recommend IMRT over standard tangential radiotherapy for reasons of oncological outcomes or late toxicity. Future research should focus on studies with longer follow-up and provide data on late toxicity and disease recurrence rates. PMID:22748561

  12. Truths and Myths About Radiotherapy for Verrucous Carcinoma of Larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Lockwood, Gina; Irish, Jonathan; Ringash, Jolie; Cummings, Bernard; Waldron, John; Kim, John; Dawson, Laura A.; Bayley, Andrew; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The role of primary radiotherapy (RT) for laryngeal verrucous carcinoma (LVC) is controversial because of concerns about anaplastic transformation, an increased incidence of metastases, and poorer local control after RT. To address these concerns, we report our experience. Methods and Materials: All patients with pathologically diagnosed LVC treated with primary RT at our institution between 1961 and 2004 were reviewed. The local control, overall survival, and disease-specific survival rate were established. The outcome after salvage treatment and the incidence of metastases and anaplastic transformation were determined. Results: Of 62 LVC patients with a minimal follow-up of 2 years, 20 local and 1 nodal recurrence were identified. Salvage surgery was undertaken in 18 of the 21 patients, and disease control was achieved in 17; the eighteenth patient died of a complication after surgery. Ultimate laryngeal preservation was achieved in 50 patients (81%), including 42 after initial RT and an additional 8 after salvage surgery. Distant failure and anaplastic transformation were not observed. Second cancers after RT were identified in 4 patients, only 1 of which was a head-and-neck cancer detected 11 years later. Of the 39 deceased patients, only 3 died of LVC. The local control, overall survival, and disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 66% (95% confidence interval, 52-77%), 87% (95% confidence interval, 75-93%), and 97% (95% confidence interval, 87-99%), respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the initial control of LVC with RT is less reliable compared with reports from surgical series; however, local recurrence was almost always salvaged successfully, resulting in disease-specific survival rates equivalent to those of surgical series. Neither anaplastic transformation nor unusual metastasis development was observed in this series.

  13. Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Desmoid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Griffith, Kent A.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Feng, Felix Y.; Lucas, David R.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To identify high-risk patients with desmoid tumors who could benefit from postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the efficacy of postoperative and definitive RT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of clinical data for all patients with desmoid tumors who underwent definitive local therapy at the University of Michigan from 1984 through 2008. Estimates for local control were calculated using the product-limit method of Kaplan and Meier, and associations with patient, tumor, and RT characteristics were explored using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Treatment for 95 patients who qualified for the study included surgery, RT, or both in 54, 13, and 28 cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 38 months, the actuarial 3-year local control (95% confidence interval [CI]) was not significantly different (p = 0.3) among the three treatment groups: 84.6% (70.2-92.4), 92.3% (56.6-98.9), and 69.0% (43.1-84.9), respectively. Tumor site in the head/neck (p = 0.03) and history of previous surgical therapy (p = 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.4, and HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.3-7.8), whereas gender, age, use of RT, and positive margins were not (p > 0.2). Conclusions: Our findings suggest equivalent local control rates after surgery, RT, or a combination of both. Although history of previous surgical therapy or site of origin in the head/neck region were found to be associated with increased risk of recurrence after local therapy, there was no clear association between surgical margin status and local control.

  14. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  15. Combining targeted agents with modern radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G; Finkelstein, Steven E; Monjazeb, Arta M; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A; Coleman, C Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J; Wang, Dian

    2014-11-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  16. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  17. Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Vertebral Hemangiomas: Results of a Multicenter Study and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Rades, Dirk; Winkler, Cornelia; Eich, Hans T.; Bruns, Frank; Gosheger, Georg; Willich, Normann; Micke, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The current study analyzes the potential role of radiotherapy (RT) in symptomatic vertebral hemangioma (SVH). Methods and Materials: Seven cooperating German institutions collected clinical information, treatment plans, and outcome data for all patients with SVH referred for local RT. Results: From 1969 to 2008, a total of 84 patients with 96 symptomatic lesions were irradiated for SVH. The primary indication for radiotherapy was pain (97.6%), and 28.6% of patients had additional neurological symptoms. RT was performed at a median total dose of 34 Gy, with a median single dose of 2.0 Gy. After receiving a median follow-up of 68 months, the overall patient response rate was 90.5%. Complete symptom remission occurred in 61.9% of patients, 28.6% of patients had partial pain relief, and 9.5% of patients had no pain relief. In 26.2% of patients, radiological signs of reossification were observed in long-term follow-up but not significantly correlated with pain relief. Most importantly, total doses of >=34 Gy resulted in significantly greater symptomatic relief and control rate than total doses of <34 Gy. Conclusions: This study consists of the largest database of cases reported so far using RT for SVH. RT is easy, safe, and effective for pain relief treatment for SVH. Total doses of at least 34 Gy give the best symptomatic response.

  18. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  19. A Review of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giardina, M; Cantone, M C; Tomarchio, E; Veronese, I

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a review of risk analyses in radiotherapy (RT) processes carried out by using Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) methodology, a qualitative method that proactively identifies risks to patients and corrects medical errors before they occur. This literature review was performed to provide an overview of how to approach the development of HFMEA applications in modern RT procedures, comparing recently published research conducted to support proactive programs to identify risks. On the basis of the reviewed literature, the paper suggests HFMEA shortcomings that need to be addressed. PMID:27575344

  20. Economic consequence of local control with radiotherapy: Cost analysis of internal mammary and medial supraclavicular lymph node radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lievens, Yolande . E-mail: yolande.lievens@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; Kesteloot, Katrien; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the financial implications of radiotherapy (RT) to the internal mammary and medial supraclavicular lymph node chain (IM-MS) in postoperative breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis were performed, using Markov models, comparing the early and delayed costs and effects of IM-MS during a 20-year time span from a societal viewpoint. The outcome estimates were based on Level I evidence from postoperative RT literature and the cost estimates on the standard practice of the Leuven University Hospitals, with the RT costs derived from an activity-based costing program developed in the department. Results: On the basis of the assumptions of the model and seen during a 20-year time span, primary treatment including IM-MS RT results in a cost savings (approximately EURO 10,000) compared with a strategy without RT. Because IM-MS RT also results in better clinical effectiveness and greater quality of life, the treatment with IM-MS dominates the approach without IM-MS. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results in all tested circumstances. Although threshold values were found for the cost of IM-MS, the cost at relapse, and the quality of life after treatment, these were substantially different from the baseline estimates, indicating that it is very unlikely that omitting IM-MS would become superior. Conclusion: This ex-ante cost evaluation of IM-MS RT showed that the upfront costs of locoregional RT are easily compensated for by avoiding the costs of treating locoregional and distant relapse at a later stage. The cost-sparing effect of RT should, however, be evaluated for a sufficiently long time span and is most specifically found in tumors with a rather slow natural history and a multitude of available systemic treatments at relapse, such as breast cancer.

  1. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  2. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  3. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  4. The long term follow-up of early stage follicular lymphoma treated with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or combined modality treatment.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; García, Olga; Mercadal, Santiago; Pomares, Helena; Fernández-Alvarez, Rubén; González-Barca, Eva; Tapia, Gustavo; González-García, Esther; Moreno, Miriam; Domingo-Domènech, Eva; Sorigué, Marc; Navarro, José-Tomás; Motlló, Cristina; Fernández-de-Sevilla, Alberto; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Local (involved-field or recently involved-site) radiotherapy is the standard therapy in limited-stage follicular lymphoma (FL). We retrospectively analyzed the value of chemotherapy in 130 patients with limited-stage FL (46 treated with radiotherapy alone [RT group], 30 with radiotherapy plus chemotherapy [COMBINED group] and 43 with chemotherapy alone [CHEMO group], 11 were managed with observation). Ninety-six percent of patients responded (RT 98%, COMBINED 100%, CHEMO 91%, p=0.179), and 37% (40/107) of patients in complete response relapsed (RT 42%, COMBINED 27%, CHEMO 41%, p=0.371). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) probabilities at 10 years were similar in RT, COMBINED and CHEMO patients (PFS 41%, 61% and 39% [p=0.167], and OS 77%, 81% and 72% [p=0.821], respectively), while the COMBINED group showed a trend to better time-to-progression (TTP 43%, 72% and 47% [p=0.055]). On multivariate analysis, only a FLIPI score ≥2 showed a trend to influence PFS (HR 2.1 [95% confidence interval 0.9-4.6], p=0.067), and OS (HR 2.4 [0.9-6.5], p=0.084), while patients treated with radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (COMBINED group) showed a significantly better TTP compared with those receiving only RT (HR 0.3 [0.1-0.8], p=0.024). In our study no benefit was observed in survival with the use of systemic therapy compared with local radiotherapy. PMID:26122511

  5. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  7. Does Quality of Radiotherapy Predict Outcomes of Multicentre Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Alysa; Straube, William; Laurie, Fran; Followill, David

    2013-01-01

    Central review of radiotherapy (RT) delivery within multicentre clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970’s in the USA. Early quality assurance (QA) publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. Medline search was performed to identify multicentre studies which described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicentre studies (1980–2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast and pancreas. Between 0% and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In seven trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. 5/9 and 2/5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation and two reported non-significant trends towards increased toxicity with non-compliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question. PMID:23683829

  8. Pelvic Radiotherapy versus Radical Prostatectomy with Limited Lymph Node Sampling for High-Grade Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Jacob, Rojymon; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Nix, Jeffrey W.; Fiveash, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare oncologic outcomes for patients with Gleason score (GS) ≥ 8 prostate adenocarcinoma treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) versus external beam radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation (RT + ADT). Methods. Between 2001 and 2014, 121 patients with GS ≥ 8 were treated at our institution via RT + ADT (n = 71) or RP (n = 50) with ≥ 1 year of biochemical follow-up. Endpoints included biochemical failure (BF), distant metastasis, and initiation of salvage ADT. Results. The RT + ADT group was older, had higher biopsy GS, and had greater risk of lymph node involvement. All other pretreatment characteristics were similar between groups. Mean number of lymph nodes (LNs) sampled for patients undergoing RP was 8.2 (±6.18). Mean biochemical follow-up for all patients was 61 months. Five-year estimates of BF for the RT + ADT and RP groups were 7.2% versus 42.3%, (p < 0.001). The RT + ADT group also had lower rates of distant metastasis (2% versus 7.8%) and salvage ADT (8% versus 33.8%). Conclusion. In this analysis, RT + ADT was associated with improved biochemical and metastatic control when compared to RP with limited LN sampling. How RT + ADT compares with more aggressive lymphadenectomy, as is currently our institutional standard, remains an important unanswered question. PMID:27051534

  9. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered "low risk," i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6-8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  10. The role of tumor volume in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The assumption that the larger tumor contains a higher number of clonogenic cells what may deteriorate prognosis of patients treated with RT has been confirmed in many clinical studies. Significant prognostic influence of tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome has been found for tumors of different localizations including patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Although TV usually is a stronger prognostic factor than T stage, commonly used TNM classification system dose not incorporate TV data. The aim of the paper is to refresh clinical data regarding the role of TV in RT of patients with HNC. At present somehow new meaning of TV could be employed in the aspect of modern RT techniques and combined treatment strategies. For larger TV more aggressive treatment options may be considered. In modern RT techniques escalated dose could be provided highly conformal or RT can be combined with systemic treatment increasing therapeutic ratio. In the study several reports estimating prognostic value of TV for patients with HNC treated with RT has been reviewed. Due to substantially various reported groups of patients as to tumor site, stage of disease or treatment strategies, precise cut-off value could not be establish in general, but the significant association between TV and treatment outcome had been found in almost all studies. There is a strong suggestion that TV should supplement clinical decision in the choice of optimal treatment strategy for patients with HNC. PMID:24423415

  11. A DICOM based radiotherapy plan database for research collaboration and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberg, J.; Krogh, S.; Brink, C.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To create a central radiotherapy (RT) plan database for dose analysis and reporting, capable of calculating and presenting statistics on user defined patient groups. The goal is to facilitate multi-center research studies with easy and secure access to RT plans and statistics on protocol compliance. Methods: RT institutions are able to send data to the central database using DICOM communications on a secure computer network. The central system is composed of a number of DICOM servers, an SQL database and in-house developed software services to process the incoming data. A web site within the secure network allows the user to manage their submitted data. Results: The RT plan database has been developed in Microsoft .NET and users are able to send DICOM data between RT centers in Denmark. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) calculations performed by the system are comparable to those of conventional RT software. A permission system was implemented to ensure access control and easy, yet secure, data sharing across centers. The reports contain DVH statistics for structures in user defined patient groups. The system currently contains over 2200 patients in 14 collaborations. Conclusions: A central RT plan repository for use in multi-center trials and quality assurance was created. The system provides an attractive alternative to dummy runs by enabling continuous monitoring of protocol conformity and plan metrics in a trial.

  12. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland <26 Gy). A DW sequence was performed once at rest and then repeated continuously during salivary stimulation. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for both parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

  13. Characteristic evaluation of photoneutron in radiotherapy room using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, E.-T.; Kim, J.-H.; Kim, C.-S.; Kang, S.-S.

    2015-08-01

    Linear accelerators are now playing a pivotal role in radiotherapy and high energy photon beams of a strength exceeding 8 MV have recently been mainly used. However, when using high energy photons, neutron contamination due to photonuclear reaction develops. This study focused on the dose distribution of photoneutrons emitted from a linear accelerator using Monte Carlo MCNPX code. MCNPX was used to simulate transportation of photoneutrons in the linear accelerator and the entire space of the radiotherapy room and is useful for calculating the flux, spectrum and absorbed dose. As result of the simulation, we could know that the neutron absorbed dose was as less as negligible when comparing to the photon absorbed dose in radiotherapy room. And it was found that the photoneutron flux increased substantially starting from 10 MV while the absorbed dose rose sharply between 10 MV and 12 MV. It was observed that although the ratio of thermal neutrons to fast neutrons was not altered as the energy increased, it was found that as the distance from the source increased the ratio of thermal neutrons rose markedly.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a time-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of time, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical regimes of self-similar RT mixing -acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with time-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. Support of National Science Foundation is warmy appreciated.

  15. Short-course radiotherapy is not optimal for spinal cord compression due to myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Hoskin, Peter J.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schulte, Rainer; Poortmans, Philip; Veninga, Theo; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Obralic, Nermina; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Bahrehmand, Roja; Engenhart-Cabilic, Rita; Schild, Steven E.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the suitability of short-course radiotherapy (RT) for spinal cord compression (SCC) in myeloma patients. Methods and Materials: Data for 172 myeloma patients irradiated between January 1994 and December 2004 for SCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy, 5 x 4 Gy, n = 61) and long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy, 15 x 2.5 Gy, 20 x 2 Gy, n = 111) were compared for functional outcome up to 24 months after RT. In addition, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 90 patients (52%). Forty-seven percent of nonambulatory patients regained the ability to walk. Functional outcome was significantly influenced by the time of developing motor deficits before RT. Improvement of motor function was more frequent after long-course RT than after short-course RT: 59% vs. 39% (p = 0.10) at 1 month, 67% vs. 43% (p 0.043) at 6 months, 76% vs. 40% (p = 0.003) at 12 months, 78% vs. 43% (p 0.07) at 18 months, and 83% v 54% (p = 0.33) at 24 months. A subgroup analysis of the long-course RT group demonstrated a similar functional outcome for 10 x 3 Gy when compared with 15 x 2.5 Gy and 20 x 2 Gy. Conclusions: Long-course RT is preferable for SCC in myeloma patients because it resulted in better functional outcome than short-course RT. Treatment with 10 x 3 Gy can be considered appropriate.

  16. Obesity and Risk of Biochemical Failure for Patients Receiving Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Spiotto, Michael T.; Kapp, Daniel S.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Obesity has been proposed as an independent risk factor for patients undergoing surgery or radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Using body mass index (BMI) as a measure of obesity, we tested its role as a risk factor for patients receiving salvage RT after prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Rates of subsequent biochemical relapse were examined in 90 patients who underwent salvage RT between 1984 and 2004 for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy. Median follow-up was 3.7 years. The BMI was tested as a continuous and categorical variable (stratified as <25, 25-<30, and {>=}30 kg/m{sup 2}). Univariate and multivariate proportional hazards regression analyses were performed for clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors associated with time to relapse after salvage RT. Results: There were 40 biochemical failures after salvage RT with a median time to failure of 1.2 years. The BMI was not associated with adverse clinical, pathologic, or treatment factors. On multivariate analysis, obesity was independently significant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2; p = 0.01), along with RT dose (HR, 0.7; p = 0.003) and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen level (HR, 1.2; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: This study is weakly suggestive that obesity may be a risk factor for salvage RT patients. Whether this results from greater biologic aggressiveness or technical inadequacies cannot be answered by this study. Given the very high failure rate observed for severely obese patients, we propose that technical difficulties with RT are at play. This hypothesis is supported by the RT literature and could be prospectively investigated. Techniques that optimize targeting, especially in obese patients, perhaps seem warranted at this time.

  17. Results of salvage radiotherapy after inadequate surgery in invasive cervical carcinoma patients: A retrospective analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. . E-mail: drsaibish@rediffmail.com; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kumar, Vinay; Karunanidhi, Gunaseelan; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of salvage radiotherapy (RT) after inadequate surgery in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 105 invasive cervical carcinoma patients were treated at our center with external beam RT with or without intracavitary RT after having undergone total/subtotal hysterectomy at outside institutions. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. The gap between surgery and RT was 23-198 days (median, 80). Clinically visible residual disease was present in 81 patients (77.1%). Total hysterectomy had been done in 82 patients (78%) and subtotal hysterectomy in 23 patients (22%). The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and pelvic control rates of all patients were 55.2%, 53.3%, and 72.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, older age, total hysterectomy, hemoglobin level >10 g% before RT, nonsquamous histologic type, use of intracavitary RT, a shorter gap between surgery and RT, and the absence of, or a small volume of, residual disease favorably affected the outcome. The 5-year actuarial rate of late toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Criteria) was 19% in the rectum, 4.8% in the bladder, 24.8% in the skin, and 14.3% in the small intestine. Conclusions: Inadequate and inappropriate surgery in invasive cervical cancer with resulting gross residual disease is common in India. Factors such as the use of intracavitary RT, the correction of anemia, and a shorter gap between surgery and RT will enable postoperative RT to achieve acceptable results with minimal morbidity.

  18. Preoperative Versus Postoperative Radiotherapy in Soft-Tissue Sarcoma: Multi-Institutional Analysis of 821 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Randall, R. Lor; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT) sequencing with surgery on overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), local failure, and distant failure in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the National Oncology Database, a proprietary database of aggregated tumor registries owned by IMPAC Medical Systems (Sunnyvale, CA). Patients with STS of all major anatomic sites who received definitive surgery and either preoperative (preop) or postoperative (postop) RT were included. Patients were also required to have known stage and grade. Prognostic factors for survival were identified using multivariate techniques. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and compared for statistical significance (p < 0.05) using the log-rank test. Results: A total of 821 patients met inclusion criteria. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Age, stage, histology, gender, tumor size, and RT sequence were independent predictors for OS (p < 0.05). Preop RT was associated with significantly improved OS and CSS compared with postop RT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.91, p < 0.01, and HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46-0.88, p < 0.01, respectively). The 5-year CSS was 79% and 74%, in favor of preop RT (log-rank, p < 0.05). Preop RT was also significantly associated with a reduced risk for local and distant relapse compared with postop RT. Conclusion: Preoperative RT is associated with a reduced cancer-specific mortality compared with postoperative RT in STS. The results of this study may serve as motivation to conduct future prospective studies with larger patient numbers.

  19. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  20. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  1. Global RT-PCR and RT-qPCR Analysis of the mRNA Expression of the Human PTPome.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive comparative gene expression analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase superfamily members (PTPome) under cell- or tissue-specific growth conditions may help to define their individual and specific role in physiology and disease. Semi-quantitative and quantitative PCR are commonly used methods to analyze and measure gene expression. Here, we describe technical aspects of PTPome mRNA expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). We provide a protocol for each method consisting in reverse transcription followed by PCR using a global platform of specific PTP primers. The chapter includes aspects from primer validation to the setup of the PTPome RT-qPCR platform. Examples are given of PTP-profiling gene expression analysis using a human breast cancer cell line upon long-term or short-term treatment with cell signaling-activation agents. PMID:27514798

  2. Detection of beet yellows virus by RT-PCR and immunocapture RT-PCR in Tetragonia expansa and Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kundu, K; Rysánek, P

    2004-01-01

    Two sensitive methods, RT-PCR with phenol-extracted RNA or Triton X-100-released RNA and immunocapture RT-PCR (IR-RT-PCR) were used for the detection of Beet yellows virus (BYV) in young and old leaves of Tetragonia expansa and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and in sugar beet roots. Four oligonucleotide primer pairs proved suitable for the detection of BYV. The release of BYV RNA with Triton X-100 was shown to be a very effective and easy as compared to isolation of total RNA by phenol extraction with the same or higher sensitivity of subsequent PCR. Using the Triton X-100 release of RNA and IC-RT-PCR the sensitivity of detection was so high that pg amounts of BYV RNA occurring in dilutions up to 10(-6) of saps from young Tetragonia and sugar beet leaves could be detected. PMID:15595212

  3. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  4. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  5. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to

  6. Evaluation of a broad range real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the diagnosis of septic synovitis in horses

    PubMed Central

    Elmas, Colette R.; Koenig, Judith B.; Bienzle, Dorothee; Cribb, Nicola C.; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Coté, Nathalie M.; Weese, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Septic synovitis is a potentially debilitating and life-threatening disorder in horses. We hypothesized that a universal bacterial real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay would have improved sensitivity and decreased turn-around time for detection of bacteria in synovial fluid (SF) samples. Forty-eight SF samples were collected from 36 horses that presented to two referral institutions with suspected septic synovitis. Universal RT-PCR, bacterial culture and SF analysis were performed on all samples, and an interpretation on the sample being septic or not was derived by three board certified specialists from the history, clinical assessment and SF characteristics. RT-PCR results were compared to a composite standard comprised of positive culture and interpretation by all three specialists of samples as “septic”. For 41 of 48 samples (85%), culture and RT-PCR results were concordant. Compared to the composite standard, 83% of samples were correctly classified by RT-PCR (turn-around time of approximately 4 hours). Relative sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR were 87% and 72% respectively, and 56% and 86% for culture. Hence, universal RT-PCR was a rapid and highly sensitive test, which may accelerate diagnosis and improve outcome for horses with septic synovitis. PMID:24101798

  7. Serial study of the effect of radiotherapy on semen parameters, hamster egg penetration rates, and lymphocyte chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Barnes, M.; Arthur, K.; Ringrose, T.; Douglas, G.

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the long-term effects of radiotherapy (RT) on male fertility and the induction of lymphocyte and sperm chromosome abnormalities. This preliminary report provides information on 11 cancer patients (mainly seminomas) treated by RT (testicular dose, 44 to 499 rads). All 11 men were studied pre-RT and at intervals post-RT. The pre-RT semen profile varied considerably, but, in general, the profile was poor with a mean sperm concentration of 19.4 x 10/sup 6/ ml and a mean hamster egg penetration rate of 5%. One month after RT, the sperm concentration decreased and hamster egg penetration was 0% in all men. At 3 and 12 months post-RT, all but two patients were azoospermic. By 24 months post-RT, 9 of 11 patients had regained sperm production and 5 had sperm capable of hamster egg penetration. The three men who have been studied 36 months post-RT had a mean sperm concentration of 45.3 x 10/sup 6/ ml, and all had positive hamster egg penetration tests, although two of the three men had very low penetration rates (2% and 4%). Lymphocyte chromosome analysis demonstrated a striking frequency of chromosome abnormalities post-RT which decreased with time (pre-RT, 0%; 1 month, 42.4%; 3 months, 24.7%; 12 months, 13.8%; 24 months, 11.2%; and 36 months, 10.0%). Thus, it appears that sperm production starts to recover 2 to 3 years after RT when the frequency of lymphocyte chromosome abnormalities has decreased, but the sperm may not be fully functional at this time, as evidenced by poor rates of hamster egg penetration. Future studies of sperm chromosome analysis in these men will determine whether this impairment of the sperm is associated with meiotic chromosome abnormalities.

  8. Long-Term Results and Predictive Factors of Three-Dimensional Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy for Biochemical Relapse After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhof, Dirk . E-mail: dirk.neuhof@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hentschel, Tina; Bischof, Marc; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Hohenfellner, Markus; Debus, Juergen

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (RT) is used to treat patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). Although retrospective series have demonstrated that salvage RT will result in biochemical response in approximately 75% of patients, long-term response is much lower (20-40%). The purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors related to the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcome after salvage RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 171 patients received salvage RT at University of Heidelberg. Patient age, margin status, Gleason score, tumor grading, pathologic tumor stage, pre-RP and pre-RT PSA levels, and time from RP to rise of PSA were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up time was 39 months. The 5-year overall and clinical relapse-free survival were 93.8% and 80.8%, respectively. After RT serum PSA decreased in 141 patients (82.5%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival was 35.1%. Univariate analysis showed following statistically significant predictors of PSA recurrence after RT: preoperative PSA level (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor classification (p 0.001), Gleason score (p < 0.001), tumor grading (p = 0.004), and pre-RT PSA level (p = 0.031). On multivariate analysis, only Gleason score (p = 0.047) and pre-RT PSA level (p = 0.049) were found to be independently predictive of PSA recurrence. Conclusions: This study represents one of the largest retrospective studies analyzing the outcome of patients treated with salvage RT at a single institution. Our findings suggest that patients with Gleason score <7 and low pre-RT PSA levels are the best candidates for salvage RT, whereas patients with high-grade lesions should be considered for additional treatment (e.g., hormonal therapy)

  9. High quality surface reconstruction in radiotherapy: Cross-sectional contours to 3D mesh using wavelets.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, S; Scalco, E; Broggi, S; Avuzzi, B; Valdagni, R; Rizzo, G

    2015-08-01

    A novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) surface reconstruction of anatomical structures in radiotherapy (RT) is presented. This is obtained from manual cross-sectional contours by combining both image voxel segmentation processing and implicit surface streaming methods using wavelets. 3D meshes reconstructed with the proposed approach are compared to those obtained from traditional triangulation algorithm. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations are performed in terms of mesh quality metrics. Differences in smoothness, detail and accuracy are observed in the comparison, considering three different anatomical districts and several organs at risk in radiotherapy. Overall best performances were recorded for the proposed approach, regardless the complexity of the anatomical structure. This demonstrates the efficacy of the proposed approach for the 3D surface reconstruction in radiotherapy and allows for further specific image analyses using real biomedical data. PMID:26737226

  10. Primary Cardiac Angiosarcoma Treated With Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Elsayad, Khaled; Lehrich, Philipp; Yppaerilae-Wolters, Heidi; Dieckmann, Chantal; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for inoperable patients with primary cardiac sarcomas or residual tumor is often limited by the sensitivity of the heart and lung to radiation injury. We describe a novel treatment modality with adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using tumor volume tracking in a 37-year-old woman who presented with unresectable primary cardiac angiosarcoma. The patient was treated using positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-guided ART with 55.8 Gy concomitant with paclitaxel chemotherapy. In conclusion, the treatment was well tolerated, and a significant tumor volume reduction of ∼ 57% was achieved during radiotherapy, suggesting the effectiveness and tolerability of ART in combination with paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. PMID:26514752

  11. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  12. Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Three-Dimensional or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy? A Single Institution’s Experience

    PubMed Central

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Riaz, Nadeem; Hu, Man; Morris, Luc; Sherman, Eric; McBride, Sean; Lee, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Compare outcomes of hypopharyngeal carcinoma that received conventional radiotherapy versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Study Design Retrospective single-institution trial. Methods Between April 1990 and May 2011, 100 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer underwent curative radiotherapy (RT) at our institution: 50 with IMRT and 50 with conventional RT. The median age was 63 years. There were 12 T1, 22 T2, 37 T3, and 28 T4 patients. The majority of patients (82%) had nodal disease: 54% N2 and 8% N3. The majority of patients (83%) received chemotherapy. Of the patients who received chemotherapy, 84% received a platinum-based regimen. The median RT dose was 7,000 cGy. The majority of patients (62%) had prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. Toxicities were reviewed. Local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FFM) rates, functional larynx preservation (LP), laryngectomy-free survival (LFS), and overall-survival (OS) curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to test prognostic variables. Results With a median follow up of 48.4 months, the 3/5-year LC, LRC, FFM, LP, LFS and OS rates were 74%/69%, 77%/74%, 70%/66%, 51%/29%, 49.6%/31.8%, and 49%/34%, respectively. The median OS was 2.9 years. The 3-year LC rate for IMRT was 77% versus 81% for conventional RT (P = .91); 3-year LRC for IMRT was 85% versus 76% for conventional RT (P = .32). There was no increased local failure with IMRT. There was no difference in the rate of stricture with IMRT (32%) versus conventional RT (25.3%) (P = .86). Conclusions IMRT achieved comparable LC and LRC rates to conventional RT. PMID:26597398

  13. Long-Term Outcomes of Radiotherapy for Pituitary Adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Felicia E. Amdur, Robert J. M.D.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term local control and toxicity for pituitary adenomas treated with fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The records of 100 patients with pituitary adenomas treated between 1983 and 2003 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-one patients had hormone-secreting tumors; 69 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative RT. Median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.6-20.2 years) for all patients and 6.2 years (range, 2-20.2 years) for living patients. The mean dose delivered was 45 Gy (range, 43-50.4 Gy). Results: The 10-year actuarial local control rates for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas were 98% and 73%, respectively (p 0.0015). Actuarial 10-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 95% and 88%, and overall survival rates were 66% and 79% for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas, respectively. Involvement of the sphenoid sinus was found to be significantly associated with decreased 10-year CSS (p = 0.0453). When compared with the two- or three-field techniques, stereotactic RT was associated with improved CSS (p = 0.0775). CSS was not significantly associated with hormone excretion, extent of surgery, or whether RT was administrated postoperatively or for salvage after a postsurgical recurrence. New cases of hypopituitarism occurred in 35 patients. One patient experienced vision loss, and one patient developed a post-treatment glioma. Conclusions: This is one of the most mature series in the literature that documents excellent results with fractionated RT for pituitary adenoma. We recommend 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction using stereotactic noncoplanar fields.

  14. Role of Radiotherapy as Curative Treatment of Extramammary Paget's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Wada, Hidefumi; Miyagi, Etsuko; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Minagawa, Yumiko; Ogino, Ichiro; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a relatively rare malignancy that usually arises in the genital areas. Wide surgical excision remains the standard and most reliable curative treatment of EMPD. However, surgery is sometimes not possible, because many patients are elderly, and complete excision can be difficult owing to the tumor location. We, therefore, performed a review to determine the role of radiotherapy (RT) for EMPD. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients with EMPD in their external genitalia (4 men and 18 women, age 52-94 years at RT) underwent RT with curative intent. Nine patients had regional lymph node metastases. A total dose of 45-70.2 Gy (median, 60) was delivered to the pelvis, including the tumors, in 25-39 fractions (median, 33). Results: In all but 3 patients, the irradiated tumors were controlled during a follow-up period of 8-133 months (median, 42). Of the 22 patients, 13 developed recurrences, including local progression within the radiation field in 3 and lymph node and/or distant metastases outside the radiation field in 10, at 3-43 months after treatment. The 2- and 5-year local progression-free rates were 91% and 84%, respectively. Of the 22 patients, 7 patients had died at 33-73 months after RT. The cause of death was tumor progression in 4, infectious pneumonia in 2, and renal failure in 1 patient. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were 100% for both at 2 years and 53% and 73% at 5 years, respectively. No therapy-related Grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT is safe and effective for patients with EMPD. It appears to contribute to prolonged survival as a result of good tumor control.

  15. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of {>=}33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided.

  16. [Antalgic radiotherapy in lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Gaeta, M; Pergolizzi, S; Settineri, N; Frosina, P; De Renzis, C

    1994-06-01

    Lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathy (LCN) may be caused by infiltration or compression of the lumbosacral plexi and nerves from intrapelvic or paraaortic neoplasms. The authors submitted 23 patients complaining of LCN with CT documented intrapelvic or paraaortic tumors to palliative radiotherapy. Megavoltage external beam irradiation was administered using a 6-MV linear accelerator. Treatment field sizes ranged from 56 cm2 to 235 cm2 (mean: 150.54 cm2) and encompassed only the site where the disease involved the lumbosacral plexus or its branches. > or = 3 Gy/day fractions were used. Twenty-one of 22 assessable patients (95.4%) obtained LCN pain relief; 19 (86.3%) obtained complete LCN pain relief. The median time to pain progression (TPP) was 150 days (range: 39-510 days). The median survival was 165 days. Seven patients were LCN pain-free at death. Two patients are alive and LCN pain-free. The remaining 12 patients had recurrent LCN pain: four of them were reirradiated at the site of previous neuropathy and only two had partial relief again. The authors conclude that it is advisable to submit to palliative radiotherapy the inoperable disseminated and/or recurrent cancer patients complaining of LCN, to use large fractions not to occupy the extant time of their already short life-expectancy, and to design small fields to avoid acute side-effects. PMID:7518934

  17. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Conti, V.; Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD).

  18. Carbon ion radiotherapy of skull base chondrosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela . E-mail: Daniela.Ertner@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Hof, Holger; Didinger, Bernd; Combs, Stephanie E.; Jaekel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of carbon ion radiotherapy in chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Patients and Methods: Between November 1998 and September 2005, 54 patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ion radiation therapy (RT) using the raster scan technique at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. All patients had gross residual tumors after surgery. Median total dose was 60 CGE (weekly fractionation 7 x 3.0 CGE). All patients were followed prospectively in regular intervals after treatment. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE v.3.0) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 3-84 months). Only 2 patients developed local recurrences. The actuarial local control rates were 96.2% and 89.8% at 3 and 4 years; overall survival was 98.2%at 5 years. Only 1 patient developed a mucositis CTCAE Grade 3; the remaining patients did not develop any acute toxicities >CTCAE Grade 2. Five patients developed minor late toxicities (RTOG/EORTC Grades 1-2), including bilateral cataract (n = 1), sensory hearing loss (n = 1), a reduction of growth hormone (n = 1), and asymptomatic radiation-induced white matter changes of the adjacent temporal lobe (n = 2). Grade 3 late toxicity occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) only. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT is an effective treatment for low- and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base offering high local control rates with low toxicity.

  19. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-07-21

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7-20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT. PMID:27353199

  20. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D.; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-07-01

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7–20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT.

  1. Predictive and Prognostic Significance of Glutathione Levels and DNA Damage in Cervix Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi Srinivasa; Kodali, Maheedhar; Prakash Saxena, Pu

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive significance of serum glutathione (GSH) and tumor tissue DNA damage in the treatment of cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included subjects undergoing hysterectomy (for normal cervix tissue) and cervical cancer patients who underwent conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin once per week for 5 weeks with concurrent external radiotherapy of 2 Gy per fraction for 5 weeks, followed by two applications of intracavitary brachytherapy once per week after 2 weeks' rest). Blood was collected after two fractions, whereas both blood and tissues were collected after five fractions of radiotherapy in separate groups of subjects. Serum for total GSH content and tissues were processed for single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay for DNA damage analysis. Clinical tumor radioresponse was assessed 2 months after the completion of treatment as complete responders (CR) (100% shrinkage), partial responders (PR) (>50%), and nonresponders (NR) (<50%). Results: Serum GSH content depleted significantly after a total dose of 4 Gy and 10 Gy of radiotherapy with a single dose of cisplatin, which was significantly lesser in NR than of CR patients. Similarly, Olive Tail Moment, the index of DNA damage, indicated significantly higher values in the fifth fraction of radiotherapy (5-RT) than in pretreatment. The DNA damage after 5-RT in the NR subgroup was significantly lower than that of CR. Conclusions: Serum GSH analysis and tumor tissue SCGE assay found to be useful parameters for predicting chemoradioresponse prior to and also at an early stage of treatment of cervical cancers.

  2. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  3. Single centre outcomes from definitive chemo-radiotherapy and single modality radiotherapy for locally advanced oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joanna; McDonald, Alexander; McIntosh, David; MacLaren, Vivienne; Hennessy, Aisling; Grose, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background Definitive chemo-radiotherapy (dCRT) has been advocated as an alternative to surgical resection for the treatment of locally advanced oesophageal cancer (OC). We have retrospectively reviewed 4 years’ experience of patients (pts) who underwent contemporary staging and were treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (dCRT) or single modality radical radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Methods Retrospective analysis permitted identification of consecutive patients who underwent contemporary staging prior to non-surgical treatment for locally advanced oesophageal carcinoma. The primary outcomes were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), adjusted for baseline differences in age, tumour staging and histological cell type. All patients were treated with either dCRT or single modality RT within a single centre between 2009 and 2012. Results We identified 235 patients in total [median age 69.8 years, male =130 pts, female =105 pts, adenocarcinoma (ACA) =85 pts, squamous =150 pts]. A total of 190 pts received dCRT and 45 patients were treated with RT. All patients were staged with CT of chest, abdomen and pelvis, 226 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and 183 patients had PET-CT. Patients treated with dCRT demonstrated longer OS (27 vs. 25 months respectively, P=0.02) and DFS (31 vs. 16 months respectively, P=0.01) compared to those treated with RT. More advanced tumour stage (stage 3 vs. stage 1/2) at presentation conferred poorer OS (32 vs. 38.2 months, P=0.02) and DFS (11 vs. 28 months, P=0.013). We demonstrated an acceptable toxicity profile with only 77 patients (32.8%) suffering grade 3 toxicity and 9 patients (4.2%) experiencing grade 4 toxicity by CTC criteria. The NG/PEG feeding rates were 4% across all treated patients. Conclusions This retrospective analysis is in keeping with current treatment paradigms emphasising the importance and safety of concurrent CRT in maximising curative potential for patients undergoing

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  6. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  7. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  8. Evaluation Of Damage And Deformation Of Rt-32 Radio Telescope / Radioteleeskopa Rt-32 Deformācijas Un Bojājumu Novērtējums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, R.; Jěkabsons, N.; Běrziņš, A.; Klapers, M.; Upnere, S.

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of the work was to analyze the operation of the large radio telescope RT-32 at the Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC). The analysis has been performed in order to evaluate dimensional changes in the RT- 32 structural base due to reorientation of the antenna mirror. Three different orientations of the dish were considered, and the dimensional changes in the load carrying substructure were measured. The measurements were made to estimate possible effect of the geometrical changes of the antenna due to gravitational loads on the overall performance of the radio telescope with respect to the obtained astronomical results, their accuracy and validity. Comprehensive mapping and classification of the corrosive damage of steel elements in the antenna have been done. A preliminary numerical analysis by the finite element method was carried out to demonstrate the overall effect of the damaged steel beams on the geometrical distortion of the antenna surface.

  9. Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, James A. Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu; Earle, Craig C.; Katz, Steven J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

  10. Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon H.; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Guenther

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {<=}20 weeks was found. The adjusted hazard ratio for RT within 77 days vs. after 77 days was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.87) for the interval to local recurrence, 1.05 (95% CI, 0.82-1.34) for disease-free survival, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.77-1.49) for overall survival. For the interval to local recurrence the adjusted hazard ratio for {<=}48, 49-77, and 78-112 days was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.34-2.37), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.33-2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33-2.41), respectively, relative to {>=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  11. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  12. Bridging the gap between the KERNEL and RT-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hendra, R.G.

    1981-06-01

    A software package is proposed to allow users of the PL-11 language, and the LSI-11 KERNEL in general, to use their PL-11 programs under RT-11. Further, some general purpose extensions to the KERNEL are proposed that facilitate some number conversions and strong manipulations. A Floating Point Package of procedures to allow full use of the hardware floating point capability of the LSI-11 computers is proposed. Extensions to the KERNEL that allow a user to read, write and delete disc files in the manner of RT-11 is also proposed. A device directory listing routine is also included.

  13. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    M Alabdoaburas, Mohamad; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Veres, Atilla; De Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects. PMID:26699572

  14. WE-G-17A-03: MRIgRT: Quantification of Organ Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanescu, T; Tadic, T; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an MRI-based methodology and tools required for the quantification of organ motion on a dedicated MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A three-room facility, consisting of a TrueBeam 6X linac vault, a 1.5T MR suite and a brachytherapy interventional room, is currently under commissioning at our institution. The MR scanner can move and image in either room for diagnostic and treatment guidance purposes. Methods: A multi-imaging modality (MR, kV) phantom, featuring programmable 3D simple and complex motion trajectories, was used for the validation of several image sorting algorithms. The testing was performed on MRI (e.g. TrueFISP, TurboFLASH), 4D CT and 4D CBCT. The image sorting techniques were based on a) direct image pixel manipulation into columns or rows, b) single and aggregated pixel data tracking and c) using computer vision techniques for global pixel analysis. Subsequently, the motion phantom and sorting algorithms were utilized for commissioning of MR fast imaging techniques for 2D-cine and 4D data rendering. MR imaging protocols were optimized (e.g. readout gradient strength vs. SNR) to minimize the presence of susceptibility-induced distortions, which were reported through phantom experiments and numerical simulations. The system-related distortions were also quantified (dedicated field phantom) and treated as systematic shifts where relevant. Results: Image sorting algorithms were validated for specific MR-based applications such as quantification of organ motion, local data sampling, and 4D MRI for pre-RT delivery with accuracy better than the raw image pixel size (e.g. 1 mm). MR fast imaging sequences were commissioning and imaging strategies were developed to mitigate spatial artifacts with minimal penalty on the image spatial and temporal sampling. Workflows (e.g. liver) were optimized to include the new motion quantification tools for RT planning and daily patient setup verification. Conclusion: Comprehensive methods were developed

  15. Is Response to Radiotherapy in Patients Related to the Severity of Pretreatment Pain?

    SciTech Connect

    Kirou-Mauro, Andrea; Hird, Amanda; Wong, Jennifer; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions. Results: During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.

  16. Population Accessibility to Radiotherapy Services in New South Wales Region of Australia: a methodological contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Nagesh; Wickramasuriya, Rohan; Miller, Andrew; Perez, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an integrated modelling process to assess the population accessibility to radiotherapy treatment services in future based on future cancer incidence and road network-based accessibility. Previous research efforts assessed travel distance/time barriers affecting access to cancer treatment services, as well as epidemiological studies that showed that cancer incidence rates vary with population demography. It is established that travel distances to treatment centres and demographic profiles of the accessible regions greatly influence the demand for cancer radiotherapy (RT) services. However, an integrated service planning approach that combines spatially-explicit cancer incidence projections, and the RT services accessibility based on patient road network have never been attempted. This research work presents this novel methodology for the accessibility assessment of RT services and demonstrates its viability by modelling New South Wales (NSW) cancer incidence rates for different age-sex groups based on observed cancer incidence trends; estimating the road network-based access to current NSW treatment centres; and, projecting the demand for RT services in New South Wales, Australia from year 2011 to 2026.

  17. Association of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 with Radiotherapy Resistance in Patients with T1N0M0 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kim, Min-Soo; Yu, Jong-Han; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lee, Hae Kyung; Suh, Young-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical studies have shown that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status is associated with resistance to radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we evaluated the overall survival of a T1N0M0 breast cancer cohort in Korea according to the use of RT and the HER2 status. Methods We analyzed data collected from 11,552 patients with invasive breast cancer who were enrolled in the Korean Breast Cancer Society Registration Program between 1999 and 2007. Data on the TNM stage, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, HER2 status, operation method, and the use of RT were analyzed. Results The median follow-up period was 51 months. A significant improvement in overall survival after RT was observed only in the HER2(-) group. In this group, the 10-year overall survival rate was 95.5% for patients who did not receive RT and 96.3% for patients who received RT (p=0.037). In contrast, in the HER2(+) group, RT was not associated with a survival benefit (p=0.887). Multivariate analysis showed that RT was significantly associated with a reduction in mortality in the HER2(-) group (hazard ratio, 0.738; 95% confidence interval, 0.549-0.993; p=0.045). Conclusion We found that postoperative RT was not associated with a survival benefit in HER2(+) breast cancer patients, suggesting that HER2(+) breast cancers could be RT resistant. PMID:24155755

  18. Survival benefit of radiotherapy to patients with small cell esophagus carcinoma - an analysis of Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xilei; Pan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare malignant tumor. So far, few studies are found to research the effect of radiotherapy (RT) to it. This study is designed to explore the prognostic factors, and analyze survival benefit of RT to patients with SCEC. Results Patients with SCEC were more likely to be in female, older, higher disease stage than those with non-small cell esophageal carcinoma. RT was used in more than 50% SCEC patients. RT tended be reduced as the disease stage raise in SCEC. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that age, year, disease stage, and RT were the prognostic factors of survival (P < 0.05). RT reduced nearly 75% risks of death in localized stage (P < 0.05), nearly 50% risks of death in regional stage (P > 0.05) and nearly 30% risks of death in distant stage (P > 0.05). Methods SCEC patients between 1973 and 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, year, sex, race, stage, surgery, and RT were summarized. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to explore the independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Cox regression survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of RT to SCEC based on different stages. Conclusions Stage, age, year, and RT are independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Survival benefit of RT exists in any disease stage, but is only statistically significant in localized stage of SCEC. PMID:26943276

  19. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1–2N0–1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10–131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions. PMID:24385471

  20. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-01-01

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT. PMID:27570422

  1. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  2. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p {<=} 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT.

  3. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E.; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W.; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  4. Recombinant human erythropoietin α modulates the effects of radiotherapy on colorectal cancer microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, W; Boterberg, T; Smeets, P; Van Damme, N; Demetter, P; Zwaenepoel, O; Cesteleyn, L; Houtmeyers, P; Peeters, M; Pattyn, P

    2007-01-01

    Recent data suggest that recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) modulates tumour growth and therapy response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the modulation of radiotherapy (RT) effects on tumour microvessels by rhEPO in a rat colorectal cancer model. Before and after 5 × 5 Gy of RT, dynamic contrast-enhanced -magnetic resonance imaging was performed and endothelial permeability surface product (PS), plasma flow (F), and blood volume (V) were modelled. Imaging was combined with pO2 measurements, analysis of microvessel density, microvessel diameter, microvessel fractal dimension, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α), Bax, and Bcl-2. We found that RT significantly reduced PS and V in control rats, but not in rhEPO-treated rats, whereas F was unaffected by RT. Oxygenation was significantly better in rhEPO-treated animals, and RT induced a heterogeneous reoxygenation in both groups. Microvessel diameter was significantly larger in rhEPO animals, whereas VEGF expression was significantly lower in the rhEPO group. No differences were observed in HIF-1α, Bax, or Bcl-2 expression. We conclude that rhEPO results in spatially heterogeneous modulation of RT effects on tumour microvessels. Direct effects of rhEPO on neoplastic endothelium are likely to explain these findings in addition to indirect effects induced by increased oxygenation. PMID:17299396

  5. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  6. Radiotherapy in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Søgaard, Mette; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with implantable cardiac rhythm devices undergo radiotherapy (RT) for cancer and are thereby exposed to the risk of device failure. Current safety recommendations seem to have limitations by not accounting for the risk of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators malfunctioning at low radiation doses. Besides scant knowledge about optimal safety measures, only little is known about the exact prevalence of patients with devices undergoing RT. In this review, we provide a short overview of the principles of RT and present the current evidence on the predictors and mechanisms of device malfunctions during RT. We also summarize practical recommendations from recent publications and from the industry. Strongly associated with beam energy of photon RT, device malfunctions occur at ∼3% of RT courses, posing a substantial issue in clinical practice. Malfunctions described in the literature typically consist of transient software disturbances and only seldom manifest as a permanent damage of the device. Through close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists, a tailored individualized approach might be necessary in this patient group in waiting time for updated international guidelines in the field. PMID:26041870

  7. Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: The Combined Michigan and Utrecht Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Houweling, Anette C.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze the combined and updated results from the University of Michigan and University Medical Center Utrecht on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the parotid gland 1 year after radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 222 prospectively analyzed patients with various HN malignancies were treated with conventional and intensity-modulated RT. Stimulated individual parotid gland flow rates were measured before RT and 1 year after RT using Lashley cups at both centers. A flow ratio <25% of pretreatment was defined as a complication. The data were fitted to the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Results: A total of 384 parotid glands (Michigan: 157; Utrecht: 227 glands) was available for analysis 1 year after RT. Combined NTCP analysis based on mean dose resulted in a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to 50% complication probability) of 39.9 Gy and m (steepness of the curve) of 0.40. The resulting NTCP curve had good qualitative agreement with the combined clinical data. Mean doses of 25-30 Gy were associated with 17-26% NTCP. Conclusions: A definite NTCP curve for parotid gland function 1 year after RT is presented, based on mean dose. No threshold dose was observed, and TD{sub 50} was equal to 40 Gy.

  8. External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Bernhard . E-mail: Bernhard.Berger@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Ganswindt, Ute; Bamberg, Michael; Hehr, Thomas

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare proliferative disorder of synovial membranes with invasive and expansive growth patterns. Radical synovectomy is regarded as the treatment of choice. However, because of the high recurrence rates, additive treatment might be useful. Radiotherapy (RT) has been evaluated with positive results, but the optimal treatment schedules are vague. We have reviewed our experience with postoperative RT in cases of suspected or proven residual disease. Methods and Materials: Between December 1996 and January 2006, 7 diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis patients underwent RT at our institution. The most common location was the knee joint (5 patients). All patients underwent radical surgery and were treated subsequently with 6-MV photon RT. The total doses applied were 30-50 Gy, depending on the resection status and estimated risk of relapse. For analysis, we retrospectively reviewed all patients in April 2006. Results: The mean follow-up time was 29 months (range, 3-112 months). RT had no acute adverse effects. At the assessment, no evidence was found of recurrent or persisting disease in any patient. Of the 7 patients, 6 reported asymptomatic limb function and excellent quality of life; 1 patient had persistent restriction of joint movement after repeated surgery. No radiotherapeutic late effects were seen. Conclusion: The results of our series have confirmed the efficacy and safety of postoperative RT for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. Hence, this treatment should be considered for patients with suspected or proven residual disease.

  9. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-08-14

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT. PMID:27570422

  10. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  11. Primary radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the pyriform sinus.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Amdur, Robert J; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Werning, John W

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to report the long-term outcomes of primary radiotherapy (RT) for patients with T1-T2 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the pyriform sinus. Between November 1964 and March 2008, 135 patients with T1-T2 pyriform sinus SCC were treated with primary RT at the University of Florida. Adjuvant chemotherapy was employed in 21 patients (16 %) and 62 patients (46 %) underwent a planned neck dissection. Median follow-up was 3.5 years (range 0.2-24.7 years); median follow-up on living patients was 8.3 years (range 3.8-24.0 years). The 5-year outcomes were as follows: local control, 85 %; regional control, 81 %; local-regional control, 71 %; distant metastasis-free survival, 76 %; cause-specific survival, 62 %; and overall survival, 38 %. The 5-year local control rate was 88 % for T1 cancers and 84 % for those with T2 SCCs (p = 0.5429). Sixteen patients (12 %) experienced severe late complications. Primary RT results in a high probability of cure with a relatively modest risk of severe late complications for patients with T1-T2 SCCs of the pyriform sinus. PMID:26071621

  12. Recent progress of HIMAC for sophisticated heavy-ion cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, K.; Furukawa, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Hara, Y.; Inaniwa, T.; Iwata, Y.; Katagiri, K.; Kanematsu, N.; Mizushima, K.; Miyoshi, T.; Mori, S.; Murakami, T.; Sano, Y.; Sato, S.; Shirai, T.; Takada, E.; Takei, Y.; Yonai, S.

    2014-07-01

    The NIRS has carried out carbon-ion radiotherapy (RT) with HIMAC since 1994. On the basis of their ten-year HIMAC experience, NIRS has developed a standard-type CIRT facility in order to boost availability of carbon-ion RT in Japan. Work has been carried out at its pilot facility at Gunma University since 2010. The current projects of the pilot facility include Saga-HIMAT and i-ROCK, promoted by the Kanagawa prefectural cancer center. Toward the further sophisticated conformal carbon-ion RT with HIMAC, the NIRS has since 2006 been developing new treatment technologies, such as a fast 3D rescanning with a pencil beam and a compact rotating gantry.

  13. Analysis of residual disease following preoperative radiotherapy versus initial surgery in endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.A.; Nahhas, W.A.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.

    1982-02-01

    A clinicopathologic study of residual disease following pre-operative radiotherapy (RT) in 67 patients and initial surgery in 40 patients with early invasive endometrial carcinoma is presented. In 10%, extrauterine spread was found at operation. In 10% of patients, the histologic type, and in 19% the grade of tumor, differed between the curettage and hysterectomy specimens. Pre-op RT altered the depth of myometrial invasion and frequency of vascular invasion, but there was no evidence that irradiation itself affected the histologic type or grade of tumor. The patients with residual tumor after pre-op RT had significantly more cancer-related deaths than those without residual disease. The high risk factors were deep myometrial invasion and residual disease outside the uterus. Vascular invasion did not affect the prognosis in this series. The importance of surgical-pathologic staging by initial surgery is discussed.

  14. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. Results The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Conclusion Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities. PMID:24501708

  15. Primary tumor regression speed after radiotherapy and its prognostic significance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To observe the primary tumor (PT) regression speed after radiotherapy (RT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and evaluate its prognostic significance. Methods One hundred and eighty-eight consecutive newly diagnosed NPC patients were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and fiberscope examination of the nasopharynx before RT, during RT when the accumulated dose was 46–50 Gy, at the end of RT, and 3–4 months after RT. Results Of 188 patients, 40.4% had complete response of PT (CRPT), 44.7% had partial response of PT (PRPT), and 14.9% had stable disease of PT (SDPT) at the end of RT. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for patients with CRPT, PRPT, and SDPT at the end of RT were 84.0%, 70.7%, and 44.3%, respectively (P < 0.001, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.177, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.480-3.202). The 5-year failure-free survival (FFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates also differed significantly (87.8% vs. 74.3% vs. 52.7%, P = 0.001, HR = 2.148, 95% CI, 1.384-3.333; 91.7% vs. 84.7% vs. 66.1%, P = 0.004, HR = 2.252, 95% CI = 1.296-3.912). The 5-year local relapse–free survival (LRFS) rates were not significantly different (95.8% vs. 86.0% vs. 81.8%, P = 0.137, HR = 1.975, 95% CI, 0.976-3.995). By multivariate analyses, the PT regression speed at the end of RT was the only independent prognostic factor of OS, FFS, and DMFS (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.004, respectively). The 5-year FFS rates for patients with CRPT during RT and CRPT only at the end of RT were 80.2% and 97.1%, respectively (P = 0.033). For patients with persistent PT at the end of RT, the 5-year LRFS rates of patients without and with boost irradiation were 87.1% and 84.6%, respectively (P = 0.812). Conclusions PT regression speed at the end of RT was an independent prognostic factor of OS, FFS, and DMFS in NPC patients. Immediate strengthening treatment may be provided to patients with poor

  16. Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P.; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

  17. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  18. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  19. Mechanisms of injury to normal tissue after radiotherapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hubenak, Justin R.; Zhang, Qixu; Branch, Cynthia D.; Kronowitz, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefits of radiotherapy (RT) for cancer have been well documented for many years. However, even with targeted radiation delivery, many patients treated with radiation develop adverse effects. The purpose of this review was to analyze the current research into the biological basis of RT-induced normal tissue damage. Methods The PubMed and EMBASE databases were reviewed for articles on adverse effects of RT on normal tissue published from January 2005 through May 2012. Subsequently, abstracts of these articles were reviewed to identify articles with information relevant to the biological basis of RT-induced DNA damage and DNA repair. In addition, reference lists of the articles identified by the database search were reviewed, and referenced articles that seemed relevant were reviewed with no limitations on publication date. Results The database searches yielded 1751 publications. Of these, 1729 were eliminated because they did not address fundamental biology or were duplicates. A total of 22 articles were included. These articles revealed that many adverse effects are driven by chronic oxidative stress that affects the nuclear function of DNA repair mechanisms. Among normal cells undergoing replication, cells in S phase are most radioresistant because of overexpression of DNA repair enzymes, while cells in M phase are especially radiosensitive. Cancer cells exhibit increased radiosensitivity due to a breakdown in cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms, and this increased radiosensitivity leads to accumulation of irreparable DNA lesions and cell death. Irradiated cells have an indirect effect on the cell cycle and survival of co-cultured non-irradiated cells. Method of irradiation and linear energy transfer to cancer cells versus bystander cells is shown to have an effect on cell survival, both cancerous and healthy. Conclusions RT-induced increases in reactive oxygen species in irradiated cells may signal healthy cells by increasing metabolic

  20. Gastrointestinal symptoms after pelvic radiotherapy: Role for the gastroenterologist?

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, H. Jervoise N. . E-mail: j.andreyev@ic.ac.uk; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Blake, Peter; Dearnaley, David; Norman, Andrew R.; Tait, Diana

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cause of GI symptoms after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in a consecutive series of patients with symptoms beginning after RT. A striking lack of evidence is available concerning the optimal treatment for the 50% of patients who develop permanent changes in bowel habits affecting their quality of life after pelvic RT. As a result, in the UK, most such patients are never referred to a gastroenterologist. Methods and Materials: All diagnoses were prospectively recorded from a consecutive series of patients with symptoms that started after RT and who were referred during a 32-month period to a gastroenterology clinic. Patients either underwent direct access flexible sigmoidoscopy or were investigated in a standard manner by one gastroenterologist after first being seen in the clinic. Results: A total of 265 patients referred from 15 institutions were investigated. They included 90 women (median age, 61.5 years; range, 22-84 years) and 175 men (median age, 70 years; range, 31-85 years). RT had been completed a median of 3 years (range, 0.1-34 years) before the study in the women and 2 years (range, 0-21 years) before in the men. Of the 265 patients, 171 had primary urologic, 78 gynecologic, and 16 GI tumors. The GI symptoms included rectal bleeding in 171, urgency in 82, frequency in 80, tenesmus, discomfort, or pain in 79, fecal incontinence in 79, change in bowel habit in 42, weight loss in 19, vomiting without other obstructive symptoms in 18, steatorrhea in 7, nocturnal defecation in 8, obstructive symptoms in 4, and other in 24. After investigation, significant neoplasia was found in 12%. One-third of all diagnoses were unrelated to the previous RT. More than one-half of the patients had at least two diagnoses. Many of the abnormalities diagnosed were readily treatable. The symptoms were generally unhelpful in predicting the diagnosis, with the exception of pain, which was associated with neoplasia (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results of our

  1. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  2. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  3. Choice reaction time to movement of eccentric visual targets during concurrent rotary acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamerman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of concurrent rotary acceleration on choice reaction time (RT) to a small, accelerating visual cursor on a cathode-ray tube. Subjects sat in an enclosed rotating device at the center of rotation and observed a 3-mm dot accelerating at different rates across a cathode-ray tube. The dot was viewed at various eccentricities under conditions of visual stimulation alone and with concurrent rotary acceleration. Subjects responded to both vertical and horizontal dot movements. There was a significant inverse relationship between choice RT and level of dot acceleration (p less than .001), and a significant direct relationship between choice RT and eccentricity (p less than .001). There was no significant difference between choice RT to vertical or horizontal dot motion (p greater than .25), and choice RT was not significantly affected by concurrent rotary acceleration (p greater than .10). The results are discussed in terms of the effects of vestibular stimulation on choice RT to visual motion.

  4. The Timing of Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy can potentially eradicate residual microscopic disease. Defining the optimal patient and treatment factors is essential and is particularly relevant within the context of adjuvant vs early vs delayed postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A systematic review of all published SRT studies was performed to identify the pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) after SRT. A total of 41 studies encompassing 5597 patients satisfied the study entry criteria. Radiobiologic interpretation of biochemical tumor control was used to provide the framework for the observed relationships. Results: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before SRT (P<.0001) and RT dose (P=.0052) had a significant and independent association with RFS. There was an average 2.6% loss of RFS for each incremental 0.1 ng/mL PSA at the time of SRT (95% CI, {approx}2.2-3.1). With a PSA level of 0.2 ng/mL or less before SRT, the RFS approached 64%. The dose for salvage RT in the range of 60-70 Gy seemed to be on the steep part of the sigmoidal dose-response curve, with a dose of 70 Gy achieving 54% RFS compared with only 34% for 60 Gy. There was a 2% improvement in RFS for each additional Gy (95% CI, {approx}0.9-3.2). The observed dose-response was less robust on sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: This study provides Level 2a evidence for initiating SRT at the lowest possible PSA. Dose escalation is also suggested by the data. Progressively better tumor control rates with SRT after radical prostatectomy are achieved with a lower PSA at initiation and with a higher RT dose. Early salvage RT may be an equivalent strategy to adjuvant RT.

  5. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  6. RtI and Comprehensive Assessment: Are They Opposed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin-Rohr, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) promotes a well-integrated system connecting general, compensatory, gifted, and special education in providing high quality, standards-based instruction and intervention that are matched to students' academic, social-emotional, and behavioral needs. There are three levels to this framework. Tier 1 (or Universal) is…

  7. Improved Plasma Properties in RT-1 with a Levitated Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Watanabe, Sho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Junko

    2007-11-01

    Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) is a novel device to confine plasmas in a magnetosphere-like configuration generated by a superconducting internal conductor. The ring coil is excited with a permanent current of Ic=250kAT that is magnetically levitated in the chamber to minimize disturbances to the plasmas. The main scientific objective of RT-1 is to realize self-organized states of flowing plasmas with a very high beta value, where the thermal pressure of plasmas is balanced by the hydrodynamic pressure of a fast flow (S. M. Mahajan & Z. Yoshida, PRL 81, 4863 (1998), Z. Yoshida & S. M. Mahajan, PRL 88, 095001 (2002)). We have started a series of initial plasma experiments since 2006, and in this study, we focused on the improvements of plasma properties by the coil levitation. Hydrogen plasmas were generated by an 8.2GHz ECH system. When the coil was levitated, a line integrated electron density increased to ne=4x10^17m-2 and the peak density was close to the O-mode cut off density of the microwave. The beta value of the plasma was ˜3% and the pressure was mainly sustained by a high energy component of electrons. The magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 is also suitable for the confinement of non-neutral plasmas. Experiments on electron plasmas were conducted in RT-1 expanding the previous work in a normal conducting device.

  8. Analysis of errors detected in external beam audit dosimetry program at Mexican radiotherapy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Romero, José T.; Tovar-Muñoz, Víctor M.

    2012-10-01

    Presented and analyzed are the causes of deviation observed in the pilot postal dosimetry audit program to verify the absorbed dose to water Dw in external beams of teletherapy 60Co and/or linear accelerators in Mexican radiotherapy centers, during the years 2007-2011.

  9. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, F.-M. Chien, C.-Y.; Tsai, W.-L.; Chen, H.-C.; Hsu, H.-C.; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, T.-L.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity.

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  11. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Xu Hongde; Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua; Liu Jianren

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  12. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect.

  13. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  14. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  15. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  16. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  17. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  18. Radiotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the latest research progress and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Yong; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy (RT) in the management of urinary bladder cancer has undergone several alterations along the last decades. Recently, many protocols have been developed supporting the use of multi-modality therapy, and the concept of organ preservation began to be reconsidered. Advances in radiotherapy planning, verification, and delivery provide a method to optimize radiotherapy for bladder cancer and overcome difficulties which have previously limited the success of this treatment. They offer the opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated and by increasing radiation dose or using more intensive fractionation and synchronous chemotherapy regimes. These techniques have a large potential to improve the therapeutic outcome of bladder cancer. In the near future, it should be possible to offer selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment. In this review, we aim to present the role of radiotherapy in the management of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Alternative methods of improving treatment accuracy such as helical tomotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are also discussed. PMID:25973322

  19. Radiotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the latest research progress and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Yong; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy (RT) in the management of urinary bladder cancer has undergone several alterations along the last decades. Recently, many protocols have been developed supporting the use of multi-modality therapy, and the concept of organ preservation began to be reconsidered. Advances in radiotherapy planning, verification, and delivery provide a method to optimize radiotherapy for bladder cancer and overcome difficulties which have previously limited the success of this treatment. They offer the opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated and by increasing radiation dose or using more intensive fractionation and synchronous chemotherapy regimes. These techniques have a large potential to improve the therapeutic outcome of bladder cancer. In the near future, it should be possible to offer selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment. In this review, we aim to present the role of radiotherapy in the management of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Alternative methods of improving treatment accuracy such as helical tomotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are also discussed. PMID:25973322

  20. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  1. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  2. Assessment of Extended-Field Radiotherapy for Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Jidong Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Pervez, Nadeem; Dundas, George; Urtasun, Raul; Pearcey, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) plans for pelvic and para-aortic RT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients; and to evaluate the integral dose (ID) received by critical structures within the radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We selected 10 patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. For each patient, three plans were created with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HT. The IMRT and HT plans were both optimized to keep the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) the same as that with 3D-CRT. The dosimetry and ID for the critical structures were compared. A paired two-tailed Student t test was used for data analysis. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plans, the IMRT plans resulted in lower IDs in the organs at risk (OARs), ranging from -3.49% to -17.59%. The HT plans showed a similar result except that the ID for the bowel increased 0.27%. The IMRT and HT plans both increased the IDs to normal tissue (see and text for definition), pelvic bone, and spine (range, 3.31-19.7%). The IMRT and HT dosimetry showed superior PTV coverage and better OAR sparing than the 3D-CRT dosimetry. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed similar PTV coverage, lower Ids, and a decreased dose to most OARs. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT and HT appear to achieve excellent PTV coverage and better sparing of OARs, but at the expense of increased IDs to normal tissue and skeleton. HT allows for additional improvement in dosimetry and sparing of most OARs.

  3. Effect of Radiotherapy Volume and Dose on Secondary Cancer Risk in Stage I Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Martin, Jarad M.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR) due to para-aortic (PA), dogleg field (DLF), or extensive field (EF) radiotherapy (RT) at different dose levels for Stage I testicular seminoma. Methods and Materials: The organ equivalent dose concept with a linear, plateau, and linear-exponential dose-response model was applied to the dose distributions to estimate the SCR. The dose distributions were calculated in a voxel-based anthropomorphic phantom. Three different three-dimensional plans were computed: PA, DLF, and EF. The plans were calculated with 6-MV photons and two opposed fields, using 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: The estimated cumulative SCR for a 75-year-old patient treated with PA-RT at age 35 was 23.3% (linear model), 20.9% (plateau model), and 20.8% (linear-exponential model) compared with 19.8% for the general population. Dependent on the model, PA-RT compared with DLF-RT reduced the SCR by 48-63% or 64-69% when normalized to EF-RT. For PA-RT, the linear dose-response model predicted a decrease of 45% in the SCR, using 20 Gy instead of 30 Gy; the linear-exponential dose-response model predicted no change in SCR. Conclusion: Our model suggested that the SCR after PA-RT for Stage I testicular seminoma is reduced by approximately one-half to two-thirds compared with DLF-RT, independent of the dose-response model. The SCR is expected to be equal or lower with 20 Gy than with 30 Gy. In the absence of mature patient data, the organ equivalent dose concept offers the best potential method of estimating the SCR when discussing treatment options with patients.

  4. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Damien; Mishra, Mark; Onn, Amir; Dicker, Adam P.; Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  5. Long-Term Results of Conformal Radiotherapy for Progressive Airway Amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Grillone, Gregory A.; Bohrs, Harry K.; Lee, Richard; Sakai, Osamu; Berk, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of conformal external beam radiotherapy (RT) for local control of progressive airway amyloidosis. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biopsy-proven progressive airway amyloidosis treated with conformal RT between 2000 and 2006 at Boston Medical Center. The patients were evaluated for performance status and pulmonary function, with computed tomography and endoscopy after RT compared with the pretreatment studies. Local control was defined as the lack of progression of airway wall thickening on computed tomography imaging and stable endobronchial deposits by endoscopy. Results: A total of 10 symptomatic airway amyloidosis patients (3 laryngeal and 7 tracheobronchial) received RT to a median total dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions within 2 weeks. At a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 1.5-10.3), 8 of the 10 patients had local control. The remaining 2 patients underwent repeat RT 6 and 8.4 months after initial RT, 1 for persistent bronchial obstruction and 1 for progression of subglottic amyloid disease with subsequent disease control. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved at a median of 18 months after RT compared with the baseline values, from a median score of 2 to a median of 1 (p = .035). Airflow (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) measurements increased compared with the baseline values at each follow-up evaluation, reaching a 10.7% increase (p = .087) at the last testing (median duration, 64.8 months). Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 esophagitis, occurring in 40% of patients. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT prevented progressive amyloid deposition in 8 of 10 patients, resulting in a marginally increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and improved functional capacity, without late morbidity.

  6. Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric E.; Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fowler, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

  7. Long term results of comparison of concurrent low-dose daily cisplatin versus the standard weekly cisplatin with six fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Lal, Punita; Bajpai, Ranjeet; Goel, Anshu; Yadav, Rajan; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Weekly administration of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) appears more feasible and substantially more popular than the 3 weekly schedules due to better compliance. Different concurrent cisplatin schedules have been attempted including a daily schedule. We did a comparison of two consecutive single arm studies, i.e., use of weekly cisplatin versus daily cisplatin when used with concurrently with a moderately accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule. Patients and Methods: Two prospective feasibility, safety and efficacy studies were carried out consecutively within the department. The weekly CDDP study was done from August 2003 to August 2005 and daily CDDP study was conducted from November 2005 to June 2007. Both studies included locally advanced stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region with RT dose of 70 Gy. Concurrent single-agent cisplatin was administered weekly (35 mg/m2) in the first and daily (6 mg/m2) in the second study. Results: Weekly cisplatin study had 68 and daily CDDP study had 52 patients. The median follow-up in the two studies was 93 and 63 months, respectively. Compliance in the two studies was comparable. Acute Grade III/IV mucositis and dysphagia were significantly higher in weekly cisplatin study. Late Grade II/III toxicities such as xerostomia, dysphagia, ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity were similar. The 5 years locoregional control was 18% and 25% and 5 years overall survival rate was 32% and 31% in weekly and daily cisplatin studies, respectively. Conclusions: Modest acceleration along with either weekly or daily cisplatin, whichever is possible in one's setup, is do-able, provided due attention is paid to patient selection and supportive care. PMID:27275456

  8. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious.

  10. Same strategy for pitfalls of radiotherapy in different anatomical districts.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, Margherita; Ottaviani, Giulia; Rupel, Katia; Ciriello, Francesca; Beorchia, Aulo; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Zacchigna, Serena; Biasotto, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) and radiodermatitis (RD) are serious side effects of radiotherapy (RT), often leading to its suspension, need for analgesics, and enteral/parenteral nutrition. Laser therapy is becoming a recommended treatment option. This prospective study aimed at demonstrating the beneficial effect of class IV laser therapy (HPLT) on RT-induced OM, an off-label use of HPLT to treat RD in breast cancer patients. Fifty-three cancer patients, during/after RT and/or chemotherapy (CT), affected by OM, were treated with HPLT during four consecutive days (970 ± 15 nm, 5 W (50 %), 35-6000 Hz, 240 s). Assessment of OM (Grading Objective Scale, WHO-SCALE), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), functional ability, subjective parameters, and site/severity of OM were recorded over time. Similarly, 27 breast cancer patients affected by RD were treated by HPLT and monitored over time for grade, discomfort, itching, and bleeding. Progressive improvement of WHO-SCALE from day 7 on, and of VAS from day 2 on (p < 0.000) was registered. All patients' functional capacity improved on day 4 (p < 0.05). All subjective parameters improved on day 14 (p < 0.001) except for voice, which improved on day 21 (p < 0.000). Ulcerations' dimension and erythema's severity significantly decreased in all sites examined (p < 0.05). Similarly, HPLT proved to be beneficial in managing RD for all the parameters considered (p < 0.002). Regardless of OM grade/site and of kind/site of tumor, HPLT proved to be effective in healing OM as well as RD. In both cases, effective treatment can improve life quality through a safe, easy, innovative approach. Therefore, HPLT may become an integral part of everyday practice in the management of RT adverse effects. PMID:26796710

  11. Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Yom, Sue S.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of regional recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 198 patients treated with definitive RT for cervical cancer between 1980 and 2000 who experienced a regional recurrence without a central or distal vaginal recurrence were reviewed. All patients received a combination of external-beam RT and intracavitary brachytherapy. In the 180 patients with a documented location of regional recurrence, the relationship between the recurrence and the radiation fields was determined. Results: The median time to regional recurrence was 13 months (range, 2-85 months). Of the 180 patients who had an evaluable regional recurrence, 119 (66%) had a component of marginal failure; 71 patients recurred above-the-field, 2 patients occurred in the inguinal nodes, and 2 patients recurred above-the-field and in the inguinal nodes. In addition, 105 patients (58%) had a component of in-field failure; 59 patients recurred in-field only, 39 patients recurred in-field and above-the-field, 2 patients recurred in-field, above-the-field, and in the inguinal nodes, and 5 patients recurred in-field and in the inguinal nodes. The median survival after regional recurrence was 8 months (range, 0-194 months). Conclusions: Most regional recurrences after definitive RT for cervical cancer include a component of marginal failure, usually immediately superior to the radiation field. These recurrences suggest a deficiency in target volume. Recurrences also occur in-field, suggesting a deficiency in dose. Developments in pretreatment staging, field delineation, dose escalation, and posttreatment surveillance may help to improve outcome in these patients.

  12. Radiotherapy to Improve Local Control Regardless of Surgical Margin and Malignancy Grade in Extremity and Trunk Wall Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L. Trovik, Clement S.; Bauer, Henrik C.F.; Rydholm, Anders; Monge, Odd R.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Alvegard, Thor; Bruland, Oyvind S.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy has during the past decades become increasingly used in the treatment of localized soft tissue sarcoma. We evaluated the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence rates (LRRs) in Scandinavia between 1986 and 2005. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,093 adult patients with extremity or trunk wall soft tissue sarcoma treated at four Scandinavian sarcoma centers were stratified according to the treatment period (1986-1991, 1992-1997, and 1998-2005). The use of adjuvant RT, quality of the surgical margin, interval between surgery and RT, and LRR were analyzed. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results: The use of RT (77% treated postoperatively) increased from 28% to 53%, and the 5-year LRR decreased from 27% to 15%. The rate of wide surgical margins did not increase. The risk factors for local recurrence were histologic high-grade malignancy (hazard ratio [HR], 5), an intralesional (HR, 6) or marginal (HR, 3) surgical margin, and no RT (HR, 3). The effect of RT on the LRR was also significant after a wide margin resection and in low-grade malignant tumors. The LRR was the same after preoperative and postoperative RT. The median interval from surgery to the start of RT was 7 weeks, and 98% started RT within 4 months. The LRR was the same in patients who started treatment before and after 7 weeks. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that adjuvant RT effectively prevents local recurrence in soft tissue sarcoma, irrespective of the tumor depth, malignancy grade, and surgical margin status. The effect was most pronounced in deep-seated, high-grade tumors, even when removed with a wide surgical margin.

  13. Comparison of long-term survival between temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for patients with low-grade gliomas after surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Xiu-juan; Wei, Yu-mei; Tao, Heng-min; An, Dian-zheng; Sun, Jia-teng; Li, Bao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the survival outcomes of temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy (TMZ + RT) vs radiotherapy alone (RT-alone) for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) after surgical resection. Patients and methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed postoperative records of 69 patients with LGGs treated with TMZ + RT (n=31) and RT-alone (n=38) at the Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University between June 2011 and December 2013. Patients in the TMZ + RT group were administered 50–100 mg oral TMZ every day until the radiotherapy regimen was completed. Results The median follow-up since surgery was 33 months and showed no significant intergroup differences (P=0.06). There were statistically significant intergroup differences in the progression-free survival rate (P=0.037), with 83.9% for TMZ-RT group and 60.5% for RT-alone group. The overall 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 89.86%. Age distribution (≥45 years and <45 years) and resection margin (complete resection or not) were significantly associated with OS (P=0.03 and P=0.004, respectively). Conclusion Although no differences were found in the 2-year OS between the TMZ + RT and RT-alone groups, there was a trend toward increased 2-year progression-free survival in the TMZ + RT group. With better tolerability, concurrent TMZ chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for postoperative patients with LGGs. Age distribution and surgical margin are likely potential indicators of disease prognosis. The possible differences in long-term survival between the two groups and the links between prognostic factors and long-term survival may be worthy of further investigation. PMID:27574452

  14. Online Adaptive Radiotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Foroudi, Farshad; Wong, Jacky; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Haworth, Annette; Roxby, Paul; Thomas, Jessica; Herschtal, A.; Pham, Daniel; Williams, Scott; Tai, Keen Hun; Duchesne, Gillian

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the advantages and disadvantages of daily online adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (RT) compared with conventional RT for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with T2-T4 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated with daily online adaptive image-guided RT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). From day 1 daily soft tissue-based isocenter positioning was performed using CBCT images acquired before treatment. Using a composite of the initial planning CT and the first five daily CBCT scans, small, medium, and large adaptive plans were created. Each of these adaptive plans used a 0.5-cm clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume expansion. For Fractions 8-32, treatment involved daily soft tissue-based isocenter positioning and selection of suitable adaptive plan of the day. Treating radiation therapists completed a credentialing program, and one radiation oncologist performed all the contouring. Comparisons were made between adaptive and conventional treatment on the basis of CTV coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: All 27 patients completed treatment per protocol. Bladder volume decreased with time or fraction number (p < 0.0001). For the adaptive component (Fractions 8-32) the small, medium, large, and conventional plans were used in 9.8%, 49.2%, 39.5%, and 1.5% of fractions, respectively. For the adaptive strategy, 2.7% of occasions resulted in a CTV V95 <99%, compared with 4.8% of occasions for the conventional approach (p = 0.42). Mean volume of normal tissue receiving a dose >45 Gy was 29% (95% confidence interval, 24-35%) less with adaptive RT compared with conventional RT. The mean volume of normal tissue receiving >5 Gy was 15% (95% confidence interval, 11-18%) less with adaptive RT compared with conventional RT. Conclusions: Online adaptive radiotherapy is feasible in an academic radiotherapy center. The volume of normal tissue irradiated can be significantly

  15. A Contribution to Solve the Problem of the Need for Consolidative Radiotherapy after Intensive Chemotherapy in Advanced Stages of Hodgkin's Lymphoma-Analysis of a Quality Control Program Initiated by the Radiotherapy Reference Center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    SciTech Connect

    Eich, Hans Theodor Gossmann, Axel; Engert, Andreas; Kriz, Jan; Bredenfeld, Henning; Hansemann, Katja; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Pfistner, Beate; Staar, Susanne; Diehl, Volker; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy (RT) after intensive chemotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is still unclear. The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) randomized HD12 trial was designed to test whether consolidative RT in the region of initial bulky disease and of residual disease is necessary after effective chemotherapy. A quality control program based on a multidisciplinary panel of radiation oncologists, radiologists, and medical oncologists who reviewed all patients' staging and restaging imaging was initiated. Methods and Materials: A total of 1661 patients aged 16 to 65 years with HL in Stage IIB (large mediastinal mass and/or E-lesions) or Stage III to IV were randomized from January 1999 to January 2003 according to a factorial design between: 8 esc.BEACOPP + RT (arm A), 8 esc.BEACOPP non-RT (arm B), 4+4BEACOPP + RT (arm C), 4+4BEACOPP non-RT (arm D). Results: In the fifth interim analysis, 1449 patients were eligible for the arm comparison with regard to RT. After a median observation time of 48 months the FFTF rate was 86% and the OS 92%. The FFTF was 95% in the RT arms A+C and 88% in the non-RT arms B+D: no sequential significant difference. One thousand and eighty four patients were evaluated by the panel. The panel defined initial bulky disease in 800 patients and residual disease in 600 patients. The panel recommended continuation of therapy according to the randomization for 934 of 1084 patients and additive RT independently from the randomization arm for 145 of 1084 patients. Conclusions: The study showed that RT can be reduced substantially after effective chemotherapy. However, because of the irradiation of 10% of patients in the non-RT arms, equivalent effectiveness of a non-RT strategy cannot be proved. A substantial limitation of consolidative RT according to expert panel recommendations appears to be possible without reducing effectiveness.

  16. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  17. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  18. Definitive radiotherapy with concurrent oncothermia for stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia enhances the susceptibility of tumors to radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Oncothermia, also known as electro-hyperthermia, is a new treatment modality developed to overcome the problems of traditional hyperthermia by selectively delivering energy to the malignant tissues. The present study reports the outcome of combined oncothermia and RT in a 75-year-old patient with stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to the advanced age and the performance status of the patient, the combination of systemic chemotherapy and RT was deemed infeasible; therefore, the patient instead decided to undergo oncothermia concurrently with definitive RT. The RT was administered at a dose of 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions using a three-dimensional conformal plan technique. Oncothermia was started concomitantly with RT and was performed for 60 min per session, two sessions per week, for a total of 12 sessions. No severe toxicities developed, with the exception of mild odynophagia, which resolved soon after the treatments. Follow-up computed tomography showed complete tumor response, and the patient was alive with no evidence of the disease 18 months after the completion of the treatment. In conclusion, the present case report suggests that oncothermia combined with RT, with the former possessing radiosensitizing potential and no additional toxicities, may be a promising alternative for advanced-age and/or frail patients with locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:26622391

  19. Evaluation of different fiducial markers for image-guided radiotherapy and particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Habermehl, Daniel; Henkner, Katrin; Ecker, Swantje; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-07-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques are widely used in the irradiation of moving organs. A crucial step in ensuring the correct position of a target structure directly before or during treatment is daily image guidance by computed tomography (CT) or X-ray radiography (image-guided radiotherapy, IGRT). Therefore, combinations of modern irradiation devices and imaging, such as on-board imaging (OBI) with X-rays, or in-room CT such as the tomotherapy system, have been developed. Moreover, combinations of linear accelerators and in-room CT-scanners have been designed. IGRT is of special interest in hypofractionated and radiosurgical treatments where high single doses are applied in the proximity of critical organs at risk. Radiographically visible markers in or in close proximity to the target structure may help to reproduce the position during RT and could therefore be used as external surrogates for motion monitoring. Criteria sought for fiducial markers are (i) visibility in the radiologic modalities involved in radiotherapeutic treatment planning and image guidance, such as CT and kilovoltage (kV) OBI), (ii) low production of imaging artifacts, and (iii) low perturbation of the therapeutic dose to the target volume. Photon interaction with interstitial markers has been shown to be not as important as in particle therapy, where interaction of the particle beam, especially with metal markers, can have a significant impact on treatment. This applies especially with a scanned ion beam. Recently we commenced patient recruitment at our institution within the PROMETHEUS trial, which evaluates a hypofractionation regime, starting with 4 x 10 Gy (RBE), for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this work is, therefore, to evaluate potential implantable fiducial markers for enabling precise patient and thus organ positioning in scanned ion beams. To transfer existing knowledge of marker application from photon to particle therapy, we used a range of commercially

  20. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  1. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  2. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  3. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized. PMID:27230835

  4. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes In The Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy To Dysphagia Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2,4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6–44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0–2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0–2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT. PMID:21669502

  5. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  6. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  7. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  8. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  9. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  10. Monitoring external beam radiotherapy using real-time beam visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of a novel radiation therapy monitoring technique that utilizes a flexible scintillating film, common optical detectors, and image processing algorithms for real-time beam visualization (RT-BV). Methods: Scintillating films were formed by mixing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb (GOS) with silicone and casting the mixture at room temperature. The films were placed in the path of therapeutic beams generated by medical linear accelerators (LINAC). The emitted light was subsequently captured using a CMOS digital camera. Image processing algorithms were used to extract the intensity, shape, and location of the radiation field at various beam energies, dose rates, and collimator locations. The measurement results were compared with known collimator settings to validate the performance of the imaging system. Results: The RT-BV system achieved a sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio to enable real-time monitoring of the LINAC beam at 20 fps with normal ambient lighting in the LINAC room. The RT-BV system successfully identified collimator movements with sub-millimeter resolution. Conclusions: The RT-BV system is capable of localizing radiation therapy beams with sub-millimeter precision and tracking beam movement at video-rate exposure.

  11. Monitoring external beam radiotherapy using real-time beam visualization

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of a novel radiation therapy monitoring technique that utilizes a flexible scintillating film, common optical detectors, and image processing algorithms for real-time beam visualization (RT-BV). Methods: Scintillating films were formed by mixing Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) with silicone and casting the mixture at room temperature. The films were placed in the path of therapeutic beams generated by medical linear accelerators (LINAC). The emitted light was subsequently captured using a CMOS digital camera. Image processing algorithms were used to extract the intensity, shape, and location of the radiation field at various beam energies, dose rates, and collimator locations. The measurement results were compared with known collimator settings to validate the performance of the imaging system. Results: The RT-BV system achieved a sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio to enable real-time monitoring of the LINAC beam at 20 fps with normal ambient lighting in the LINAC room. The RT-BV system successfully identified collimator movements with sub-millimeter resolution. Conclusions: The RT-BV system is capable of localizing radiation therapy beams with sub-millimeter precision and tracking beam movement at video-rate exposure. PMID:25563243

  12. Outcomes in Patients With Early-Stage Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Asai, Masao; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sumi, Minako; Itami, Jun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between February 1988 and February 2007, 77 patients with Stage I or Stage II HPC underwent definitive RT in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Eleven of the patients received local irradiation, and the other 66 patients received elective bilateral neck irradiation and booster irradiation to the primary lesion. The median follow-up period for all the patients was 33 months from the start of RT, ranging from 3 to 229 months. Results: The rates of overall survival, HPC-specific survival, HPC recurrence-free survival, and local control with laryngeal voice preservation for the 77 patients at 5 years were 47%, 74%, 57%, and 70%, respectively. The survival rates were not affected by the patient characteristics or treatment factors, but the RT field was significantly correlated with local control in a multivariate analysis. Seven of the patients had Grade 3 or greater complications, but these complications occurred after salvage surgery in 6 of the patients. Of the 77 patients, 83% had synchronous or metachronous malignancies, but these malignancies did not influence the survival of the patients if the malignancies were detected at an early stage. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate treatment method for early-stage HPC. However, because synchronous or metachronous malignancies occur at a relatively high frequency, careful follow-up and the early detection of such malignancies are critical.

  13. Orbital marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of Malt: Radiotherapy results and clinical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Chang-Ok . E-mail: cosuh317@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Shim, Su Jung; Lee, Sang-wook; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Sang Yeul; Hahn, Jee Sook

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the clinical behavior and treatment outcome of low-grade primary orbital lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (Malt). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with pathologically confirmed marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Thirty-eight patients (79.1%) received thorough staging workup studies including bone marrow biopsy. Radiation doses ranged from 5.4 to 30.6 Gy (median, 30.6 Gy). Median follow-up period was 70 months. Results: Only 2 patients revealed extraorbital lymphoma involvement (bone marrow, skin). Forty-six of 52 eye lesions showed complete response to RT. Six lesions demonstrated a partial response and showed gradual regression during the follow-up period of 39-72 months. Three patients experienced local recurrences at 34, 48, and 52 months after RT, which seemed to be related to improper use of the lens shield. Salvage re-RT was successful. The 10-year actuarial relapse-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 93.1%, 97.9%, and 86.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the MALT lymphoma of the orbit was localized at diagnosis and extraorbital relapse rarely occurred. Therefore, extensive staging workup at the time of diagnosis and follow-up studies to detect distant relapse may not be obligatory. Low-dose RT alone with proper lens shielding is the optimum treatment modality for orbital MALT lymphoma.

  14. Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) Design of a Small Animal Radiotherapy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, S.; Mackie, T. R.; Jeraj, R.

    2014-03-01

    Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) was initiated with the goal of facilitating medical research by developing medical technologies including both hardware and software on an open-source platform. Our first project was to develop an integrated imaging and radiotherapy device for small animals that includes computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and radiation therapy (RT) modalities for which technical specifications were defined in the first OSMD conference held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA in December 2011. This paper specifically focuses on the development of a small animal RT (micro-RT) system by designing a binary micro multileaf collimator (bmMLC) and a small animal treatment planning system (SATPS) to enable intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Both hardware and software projects are currently under development and their current progresses are described. After the development, both bmMLC and TPS will be validated and commissioned for a micro-RT system. Both hardware design and software development will be open-sourced after completion.

  15. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. PMID:18952706

  16. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  17. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  18. Palliative Radiotherapy with or without Additional Care by a Multidisciplinary Palliative Care Team: A Retrospective Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Dalhaug, Astrid; Pawinski, Adam; Aandahl, Gro; Haukland, Ellinor; Engljähringer, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze pattern of care and survival after palliative radiotherapy (RT) in patients managed exclusively by regular oncology staff or a multidisciplinary palliative care team (MPCT) in addition. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 522 RT courses. Comparison of Two Groups: MPCT versus none. Results. We analyzed 140 RT courses (27%) with MPCT care and 382 without it. The following statistically significant differences were observed: 33% of female patients had MPCT care versus only 23% of male patients and 37% of patients <65 years had MPCT care versus only 22% of older patients. MPCT patients were more likely to have poor performance status and liver metastases. In the MPCT group steroid and opioid use was significantly more common. Dose-fractionation regimens were similar. Median survival was significantly shorter in the MPCT group, 3.9 versus 6.9 months. In multivariate analysis, MPCT care was not associated with survival. Adjusted for confounders, MPCT care reduced the likelihood of incomplete RT by 33%, P > 0.05. Conclusions. Patterns of referral and care differed, for example, regarding age and medication use. It seems possible that MPCT care reduces likelihood of incomplete RT. Therefore, the impact of MPCT care on symptom control should be investigated and objective referral criteria should be developed. PMID:25006507

  19. The Role of Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Mottrie, Alexandre; Bossi, Alberto; Fossati, Nicola; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    A non-negligible proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) harbors aggressive disease. These individuals are at higher risk of experiencing recurrence after surgery. Results from prospective, randomized trials support the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy (aRT) on cancer control in selected patients with adverse disease features at RP. However, only one of these randomized trials found a significant benefit of aRT on survival. Although such a level of evidence is not currently available for salvage RT, retrospective studies demonstrated that this approach leads to excellent outcomes if administered at the earliest sign of PSA recurrence. Prognostic models might help clinicians in identifying patients who would benefit the most from adjuvant and/or salvage RT. This individualized approach would allow sparing the risk of short- and long-term toxicity in a substantial proportion of patients. Nonetheless, results from randomized trials are still awaited to compare the efficacy of (early) salvage and aRT. PMID:26449841

  20. Tomotherapy – a different way of dose delivery in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Skórska, Małgorzata; Jodda, Agata; Ryczkowski, Adam; Kaźmierska, Joanna; Adamska, Krystyna; Karczewska-Dzionk, Aldona; Żmijewska-Tomczak, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Helical tomotherapy is one of the methods of radiotherapy. This method enables treatment implementation for a wide spectrum of clinical cases. The vast array of therapeutic uses of helical tomotherapy results directly from the method of dose delivery, which is significantly different from the classic method developed for conventional linear accelerators. The paper discusses the method of dose delivery by a tomotherapy machine. Moreover, an analysis and presentation of treatment plans was performed in order to show the therapeutic possibilities of the applied technology. Dose distributions were obtained for anaplastic medulloblastoma, multifocal metastases to brain, vulva cancer, tongue cancer, metastases to bones, and advanced skin cancer. Tomotherapy treatment plans were compared with conventional linear accelerator plans. Results Following the comparative analysis of tomotherapy and conventional linear accelerator plans, in each case we obtained the increase in dose distribution conformity manifested in greater homogeneity of doses in the radiation target area for anaplastic medulloblastoma, multifocal metastases to brain, vulva cancer, metastases to bones, and advanced skin cancer, and the reduction of doses in organs at risk (OAR) for anaplastic medulloblastoma, vulva cancer, tongue cancer, and advanced skin cancer. The time of treatment delivery in the case of a tomotherapy machine is comparable to the implementation of the plan prepared in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for a conventional linear accelerator. In the case of tomotherapy the application of a fractional dose was carried out in each case during one working period of the machine. For a conventional linear accelerator the total value of the fractional dose in the case of anaplastic medulloblastoma and metastases to bones was delivered using several treatment plans, for which a change of set-up was necessary during a fraction. Conclusion The obtained results

  1. Fractionated beam radiotherapy is a special case of continuous beam radiotherapy when irradiation time is small.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Jayanta; Rajguru, Tapan K; Choudhury, Krishnangshu B; Dutta, Sumita; Sharma, Shyam; Sarkar, Aniruddha

    2013-01-01

    Fractionated beam radiotherapy, in other terms, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and continuous beam radiotherapy or Brachytherapy are two modes of radiotherapy techniques. Although in many ways, they appear to be different, radiobiologically, with the help of mathematics, it can be proved that the biological effective dose (BED) of EBRT is similar to BED of Brachytherapy, when irradiation time is small. Here an attempt is made to correlate these two predominant modes of radiotherapy techniques. PMID:24125964

  2. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James R.

    2002-04-30

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  3. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  4. Electron contamination modeling and skin dose in 6 MV longitudinal field MRIgRT: Impact of the MRI and MRI fringe field

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Keall, P. J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In recent times, longitudinal field MRI-linac systems have been proposed for 6 MV MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT). The magnetic field is parallel with the beam axis and so will alter the transport properties of any electron contamination particles. The purpose of this work is to provide a first investigation into the potential effects of the MR and fringe magnetic fields on the electron contamination as it is transported toward a phantom, in turn, providing an estimate of the expected patient skin dose changes in such a modality. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam were performed. Longitudinal magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T were applied to a 30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3} phantom. Surrounding the phantom there is a region where the magnetic field is at full MRI strength, consistent with clinical MRI systems. Beyond this the fringe magnetic field entering the collimation system is also modeled. The MRI-coil thickness, fringe field properties, and isocentric distance are varied and investigated. Beam field sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15 and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were simulated. Central axis dose, 2D virtual entry skin dose films, and 70 {mu}m skin depth doses were calculated using high resolution scoring voxels. Results: In the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field, electron contamination from the linear accelerator is encouraged to travel almost directly toward the patient surface with minimal lateral spread. This results in a concentration of electron contamination within the x-ray beam outline. This concentration is particularly encouraged if the fringe field encompasses the collimation system. Skin dose increases of up to 1000% were observed for certain configurations and increases above Dmax were common. In nonmagnetically shielded cases, electron contamination generated from the jaw faces and air column is trapped and propagated almost directly to the phantom entry region, giving rise to

  5. Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy by Individualized Isotoxic Dose Prescription.

    PubMed

    Zindler, Jaap D; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a favorable tradeoff between treatment benefits and morbidity ("therapeutic ratio"), radiotherapy (RT) dose is prescribed according to the tumor volume, with the goal of controlling the disease while respecting normal tissue tolerance levels. We propose a new paradigm for tumor dose prescription in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) based on organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerance levels called isotoxic dose prescription (IDP), which is derived from experiences and limitations of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. With IDP, the radiation dose is prescribed based on the predefined level of normal tissue complication probability of a nearby dose-limiting OAR at a prespecified dose-volume constraint. Simultaneously, the prescribed total tumor dose (TTD) is maximized to the technically highest achievable level in order to increase the local tumor control probability (TCP). IDP is especially relevant for tumors located at eloquent locations or for large tumors in which severe toxicity has been described. IDP will result in a lower RT dose or a treatment scheduled with more fractions if the OAR tolerance level is exceeded, and potential dose escalation occurs when the OAR tolerance level allows it and when it is expected to be beneficial (if TCP < 90%). For patients with small tumors at noneloquent sites, the current SABR dose prescription already results in high rates of local control at low toxicity rates. In this review, the concept of IDP is described in the context of SABR. PMID:26476075

  6. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the spine treated with RapidArc volumetric-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Khodri, Mustapha; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy for epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) using volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). A 48-year-old woman was referred for curative irradiation of a vertebral EHE after failure of surgery. A comparison between VMAT and conventional conformal tridimensional (3D) dosimetry was performed and potential advantage of VMAT for sparing critical organs from irradiation's side effects was discussed. The total delivered dose on the planning target volume was 54 Gy in 27 fractions. The patient was finally treated with VMAT. The tolerance was excellent. There was no acute toxicity, including no increase in pain. With a follow-up of 18 months, no delayed toxicity was reported. The clinical response consisted of a decrease in the dorsal pain. The D{sub max} for the spinal cord was reduced from 55 Gy (3D-radiotherapy [RT]) (which would be an unacceptable dose to the spine because of the risk of myelopathy) to 42.8 Gy (VMAT), which remains below the recommended dose threshold (45 Gy). The dose delivered to 20% of organ volume (D{sub 20}) was reduced from 47 Gy (3D-RT) to 3 Gy (VMAT) for the spinal cord. The study shows that VMAT allows the delivery of curative treatment for vertebral EHEs because of critical organ sparing.

  7. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  8. Single agent nanoparticle for radiotherapy and radio-photothermal therapy in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y; Li, Chun

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [(64)Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of (64)Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC. PMID:25913249

  9. Disturbed Colonic Motility Contributes to Anorectal Symptoms and Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric K.; Bartholomeusz, Dylan L.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fraser, Robert J.; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata; Moore, James W.; Schoeman, Mark N.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of colonic motility in the pathogenesis of anorectal symptoms and dysfunction after radiotherapy (RT) for carcinoma of the prostate. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients, median age 71 (range, 50-81) years with localized prostate carcinoma randomized to one of two radiation dose schedules underwent colonic transit scintigraphy and assessment of anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), anorectal function (manometry), and anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and at 1 month and 1 year after RT. Results: Whole and distal colonic transit increased 1 month after RT, with faster distal colonic transit only persisting at 1 year. Frequency and urgency of defecation, fecal incontinence, and rectal bleeding increased 1 month after RT and persisted at 1 year. Basal anal pressures remained unchanged, but progressive reductions occurred in anal squeeze pressures and responses to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Rectal compliance decreased progressively in the patients, although no changes in anorectal sensory function ensued. Radiotherapy had no effect on the morphology of the internal and external anal sphincters. Distal colonic retention was weakly related to rectal compliance at 1 month, but both faster colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance were more frequent with increased fecal urgency. At 1 year, a weak inverse relationship existed between colonic half-clearance time and frequency of defecation, although both faster whole-colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance occurred more often with increased stool frequency. Conclusion: Colonic dysmotility contributes to anorectal dysfunction after RT for carcinoma of the prostate. This has implications for improving the management of anorectal radiation sequelae.

  10. Phase I Study of Vandetanib With Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Wong, Eric T.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence has suggested that angiogenesis inhibition might potentiate the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition might be of therapeutic benefit, because the epidermal growth factor receptor is upregulated in GBM and contributes to radiation resistance. We conducted a Phase I study of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, in patients with newly diagnosed GBM combined with RT and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: A total of 13 GBM patients were treated with vandetanib, radiotherapy, and c