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Sample records for accelerated sequence evolution

  1. Isolation of Hox Cluster Genes from Insects Reveals an Accelerated Sequence Evolution Rate

    PubMed Central

    Hadrys, Heike; Simon, Sabrina; Kaune, Barbara; Schmitt, Oliver; Schöner, Anja; Jakob, Wolfgang; Schierwater, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Among gene families it is the Hox genes and among metazoan animals it is the insects (Hexapoda) that have attracted particular attention for studying the evolution of development. Surprisingly though, no Hox genes have been isolated from 26 out of 35 insect orders yet, and the existing sequences derive mainly from only two orders (61% from Hymenoptera and 22% from Diptera). We have designed insect specific primers and isolated 37 new partial homeobox sequences of Hox cluster genes (lab, pb, Hox3, ftz, Antp, Scr, abd-a, Abd-B, Dfd, and Ubx) from six insect orders, which are crucial to insect phylogenetics. These new gene sequences provide a first step towards comparative Hox gene studies in insects. Furthermore, comparative distance analyses of homeobox sequences reveal a correlation between gene divergence rate and species radiation success with insects showing the highest rate of homeobox sequence evolution. PMID:22685537

  2. Cytonuclear interactions and relaxed selection accelerate sequence evolution in organelle ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Triant, Deborah A; Wu, Martin; Taylor, Douglas R

    2014-03-01

    Many mitochondrial and plastid protein complexes contain subunits that are encoded in different genomes. In animals, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins often exhibit rapid sequence evolution, which has been hypothesized to result from selection for mutations that compensate for changes in interacting subunits encoded in mutation-prone animal mitochondrial DNA. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed nuclear genes encoding cytosolic and organelle ribosomal proteins in flowering plants. The model angiosperm genus Arabidopsis exhibits low organelle mutation rates, typical of most plants. Nevertheless, we found that (nuclear-encoded) subunits of organelle ribosomes in Arabidopsis have higher amino acid sequence polymorphism and divergence than their counterparts in cytosolic ribosomes, suggesting that organelle ribosomes experience relaxed functional constraint. However, the observed difference between organelle and cytosolic ribosomes was smaller than in animals and could be partially attributed to rapid evolution in N-terminal organelle-targeting peptides that are not involved in ribosome function. To test the role of organelle mutation more directly, we used transcriptomic data from an angiosperm genus (Silene) with highly variable rates of organelle genome evolution. We found that Silene species with unusually fast-evolving mitochondrial and plastid DNA exhibited increased amino acid sequence divergence in ribosomal proteins targeted to the organelles but not in those that function in cytosolic ribosomes. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that rapid organelle genome evolution has selected for compensatory mutations in nuclear-encoded proteins. We conclude that coevolution between interacting subunits encoded in different genomic compartments within the eukaryotic cell is an important determinant of variation in rates of protein sequence evolution.

  3. Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

    2006-07-06

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  4. A simple method of accelerating monotonic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B.; Bhattacharyya, K.

    1993-03-01

    A converse of the well known Cesaro method has been demonstrated to accelerate successfully various monotonic sequences of practical concern. The method is simple, regular and particular apt for low-order data. Pilot calculations highlighting the workability in varying practical contexts involve atomic lattice constants (cubic), typical nuclear attraction integrals in molecular calculations and critical parameters in phase transitions.

  5. Antagonistic coevolution accelerates molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Steve; Vogwill, Tom; Buckling, Angus; Benmayor, Rebecca; Spiers, Andrew J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Quail, Mike; Smith, Frances; Walker, Danielle; Libberton, Ben; Fenton, Andrew; Hall, Neil; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that coevolution of interacting species (such as hosts and parasites) should drive molecular evolution through continual natural selection for adaptation and counter-adaptation1–3. Although the divergence observed at some host-resistance4–6 and parasite-infectivity7–9 genes is consistent with this, the long time periods typically required to study coevolution have so far prevented any direct empirical test. Here we show, using experimental populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and its viral parasite, phage Φ2 (refs 10, 11), that the rate of molecular evolution in the phage was far higher when both bacterium and phage coevolved with each other than when phage evolved against a constant host genotype. Coevolution also resulted in far greater genetic divergence between replicate populations, which was correlated with the range of hosts that coevolved phage were able to infect. Consistent with this, the most rapidly evolving phage genes under coevolution were those involved in host infection. These results demonstrate, at both the genomic and phenotypic level, that antagonistic coevolution is a cause of rapid and divergent evolution, and is likely to be a major driver of evolutionary change within species. PMID:20182425

  6. Distributed Representations Accelerate Evolution of Adaptive Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Stone, James V

    2007-01-01

    Animals with rudimentary innate abilities require substantial learning to transform those abilities into useful skills, where a skill can be considered as a set of sensory–motor associations. Using linear neural network models, it is proved that if skills are stored as distributed representations, then within-lifetime learning of part of a skill can induce automatic learning of the remaining parts of that skill. More importantly, it is shown that this “free-lunch” learning (FLL) is responsible for accelerated evolution of skills, when compared with networks which either 1) cannot benefit from FLL or 2) cannot learn. Specifically, it is shown that FLL accelerates the appearance of adaptive behaviour, both in its innate form and as FLL-induced behaviour, and that FLL can accelerate the rate at which learned behaviours become innate. PMID:17676948

  7. Comparative analysis of syntenic genes in grass genomes reveals accelerated rates of gene structure and coding sequence evolution in polyploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cycles of whole genome duplication (WGD) and diploidization are hallmarks of eukaryotic genome evolution and speciation. Polyploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) has had a massive increase in genome size largely due to recent WGDs. How these processes may impact the dynamics of gene evolution was studied...

  8. Accelerated Evolution in the Death Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert; Tung, Chih-Kuan; Gong, Xiu-Quing; Lambert, Guillaume; Liao, David

    2010-03-01

    We recall 4 main guiding principles of evolution: 1) instability of defections, 2) stress induced non-random mutations, 3) genetic heterogeneity, and 4) fragmented populations. Our previous preliminary experiments have been relatively simple 1-D stress experiments. We are proceeding with 2-D experiments whose design is guided by these principles. Our new experiment we have dubbed the Death Galaxy because of it's use of these design principles. The ``galaxy'' name comes from the fact that the structure is designed as an interconnected array of micro-ecologies, these micro-ecologies are similar to the stars that comprise an astronomical galaxy, and provide the fragmented small populations. A gradient of the antibiotic Cipro is introduced across the galaxy, and we will present results which show how bacterial evolution resulting in resistance to Cipro is accelerated by the physics principles underlying the device.

  9. Model of evolution of molecular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liaofu; Tsai, Lu; Lee, Weijiang

    1990-05-01

    A simplified model of the evolution of molecular sequences is proposed. An ensemble of strings is considered that consists of two letters and undergoes random point mutations and natural selections. A set of evolution equations is deduced. From the solution it is found that the first-order (second-order) informational parameters (redundancies) D1 decrease (D2 increase) in the course of evolution. Furthermore, the statistical correlations of the letters (bases) in the sequences are investigated in detail and the short-distance correlation is demonstrated. These results give a preliminary explanation of some physical aspects in the evolution of nucleic acid sequences.

  10. The evolution of nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Qiuping; Wang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The “$1000 Genome” project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the “$1000 Genome” while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards. PMID:25610451

  11. Insights into hominid evolution from the gorilla genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Scally, Aylwyn; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Jordan, Greg E.; Goodhead, Ian; Herrero, Javier; Hobolth, Asger; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Mailund, Thomas; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; McCarthy, Shane; Montgomery, Stephen H.; Schwalie, Petra C.; Tang, Y. Amy; Ward, Michelle C.; Xue, Yali; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Alkan, Can; Andersen, Lars N.; Ayub, Qasim; Ball, Edward V.; Beal, Kathryn; Bradley, Brenda J.; Chen, Yuan; Clee, Chris M.; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Graves, Tina A.; Gu, Yong; Heath, Paul; Heger, Andreas; Karakoc, Emre; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Laird, Gavin K.; Lunter, Gerton; Meader, Stephen; Mort, Matthew; Mullikin, James C.; Munch, Kasper; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Phillips, Andrew D.; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Rogers, Anthony S.; Sajjadian, Saba; Schmidt, Dominic; Shaw, Katy; Simpson, Jared T.; Stenson, Peter D.; Turner, Daniel J.; Vigilant, Linda; Vilella, Albert J.; Whitener, Weldon; Zhu, Baoli; Cooper, David N.; de Jong, Pieter; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eichler, Evan E.; Flicek, Paul; Goldman, Nick; Mundy, Nicholas I.; Ning, Zemin; Odom, Duncan T.; Ponting, Chris P.; Quail, Michael A.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Searle, Stephen M.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Rogers, Jane; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Durbin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Summary Gorillas are humans’ closest living relatives after chimpanzees, and are of comparable importance for the study of human origins and evolution. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a genome sequence for the western lowland gorilla, and compare the whole genomes of all extant great ape genera. We propose a synthesis of genetic and fossil evidence consistent with placing the human-chimpanzee and human-chimpanzee-gorilla speciation events at approximately 6 and 10 million years ago (Mya). In 30% of the genome, gorilla is closer to human or chimpanzee than the latter are to each other; this is rarer around coding genes, indicating pervasive selection throughout great ape evolution, and has functional consequences in gene expression. A comparison of protein coding genes reveals approximately 500 genes showing accelerated evolution on each of the gorilla, human and chimpanzee lineages, and evidence for parallel acceleration, particularly of genes involved in hearing. We also compare the western and eastern gorilla species, estimating an average sequence divergence time 1.75 million years ago, but with evidence for more recent genetic exchange and a population bottleneck in the eastern species. The use of the genome sequence in these and future analyses will promote a deeper understanding of great ape biology and evolution. PMID:22398555

  12. DNA and RNA editing of retrotransposons accelerate mammalian genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Levanon, Erez Y

    2015-04-01

    Genome evolution is commonly viewed as a gradual process that is driven by random mutations that accumulate over time. However, DNA- and RNA-editing enzymes have been identified that can accelerate evolution by actively modifying the genomically encoded information. The apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzymes, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBECs) are potent restriction factors that can inhibit retroelements by cytosine-to-uridine editing of retroelement DNA after reverse transcription. In some cases, a retroelement may successfully integrate into the genome despite being hypermutated. Such events introduce unique sequences into the genome and are thus a source of genomic innovation. adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine-to-inosine editing in double-stranded RNA, commonly formed by oppositely oriented retroelements. The RNA editing confers plasticity to the transcriptome by generating many transcript variants from a single genomic locus. If the editing produces a beneficial variant, the genome may maintain the locus that produces the RNA-edited transcript for its novel function. Here, we discuss how these two powerful editing mechanisms, which both target inserted retroelements, facilitate expedited genome evolution.

  13. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  14. Accelerated Evolution of Enhancer Hotspots in the Mammal Ancestor.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Alisha K; Bruneau, Benoit G; Sukonnik, Tatyana; Rubenstein, John L; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-04-01

    Mammals have evolved remarkably different sensory, reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal systems. To explore the genetic basis for these differences, we developed a comparative genomics approach to scan whole-genome multiple sequence alignments to identify regions that evolved rapidly in an ancestral lineage but are conserved within extant species. This pattern suggests that ancestral changes in function were maintained in descendants. After applying this test to therian mammals, we identified 4,797 accelerated regions, many of which are noncoding and located near developmental transcription factors. We then used mouse transgenic reporter assays to test if noncoding accelerated regions are enhancers and to determine how therian-specific substitutions affect their activity in vivo. We discovered enhancers with expression specific to the therian version in brain regions involved in the hormonal control of milk ejection, uterine contractions, blood pressure, temperature, and visual processing. This work underscores the idea that changes in developmental gene expression are important for mammalian evolution, and it pinpoints candidate genes for unique aspects of mammalian biology.

  15. Accelerated Evolution of Enhancer Hotspots in the Mammal Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Alisha K.; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Sukonnik, Tatyana; Rubenstein, John L.; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Mammals have evolved remarkably different sensory, reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal systems. To explore the genetic basis for these differences, we developed a comparative genomics approach to scan whole-genome multiple sequence alignments to identify regions that evolved rapidly in an ancestral lineage but are conserved within extant species. This pattern suggests that ancestral changes in function were maintained in descendants. After applying this test to therian mammals, we identified 4,797 accelerated regions, many of which are noncoding and located near developmental transcription factors. We then used mouse transgenic reporter assays to test if noncoding accelerated regions are enhancers and to determine how therian-specific substitutions affect their activity in vivo. We discovered enhancers with expression specific to the therian version in brain regions involved in the hormonal control of milk ejection, uterine contractions, blood pressure, temperature, and visual processing. This work underscores the idea that changes in developmental gene expression are important for mammalian evolution, and it pinpoints candidate genes for unique aspects of mammalian biology. PMID:26715627

  16. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  17. Accelerating Genome Sequencing 100X with FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Strenski, Dave

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two Cray XD1 systems with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs was evaluated using the FASTA computational biology program for human genome (DNA and protein) sequence comparisons. FPGA speedups of 50X (Virtex-II Pro 50) and 100X (Virtex-4 LX160) over a 2.2 GHz Opteron were obtained. FPGA coding issues for human genome data are described.

  18. Early Milestones in the Evolution of Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    About 80 years ago Rutherford [1] expressed the hope that particles could be accelerated to energies exceeding those occurring in radioactivity, enabling the study of nuclei and their constituents. Physicists and engineers have more than met this challenge, and today the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, Geneva is about to accelerate protons to 7 trillion (7 × 1012) eV. Here we describe some of the crucial steps that have gotten us there.

  19. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  20. Accelerated FoxP2 Evolution in Echolocating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wang, Jinhong; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Jones, Gareth; Zhang, Shuyi

    2007-01-01

    FOXP2 is a transcription factor implicated in the development and neural control of orofacial coordination, particularly with respect to vocalisation. Observations that orthologues show almost no variation across vertebrates yet differ by two amino acids between humans and chimpanzees have led to speculation that recent evolutionary changes might relate to the emergence of language. Echolocating bats face especially challenging sensorimotor demands, using vocal signals for orientation and often for prey capture. To determine whether mutations in the FoxP2 gene could be associated with echolocation, we sequenced FoxP2 from echolocating and non-echolocating bats as well as a range of other mammal species. We found that contrary to previous reports, FoxP2 is not highly conserved across all nonhuman mammals but is extremely diverse in echolocating bats. We detected divergent selection (a change in selective pressure) at FoxP2 between bats with contrasting sonar systems, suggesting the intriguing possibility of a role for FoxP2 in the evolution and development of echolocation. We speculate that observed accelerated evolution of FoxP2 in bats supports a previously proposed function in sensorimotor coordination. PMID:17878935

  1. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  2. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  3. The status and evolution of plasma Wakefield particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2006-03-15

    The status and evolution of the electron beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme is described. In particular, the effects of the radial electric field of the wake on the drive beam such as multiple envelope oscillations, hosing instability and emission of betatron radiation are described. Using ultra-short electron bunches, high-density plasmas can be produced by field ionization by the electric field of the bunch itself. Wakes excited in such plasmas have accelerated electrons in the back of the drive beam to greater that 4 G eV in just 10 cm in experiments carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre.

  4. Beyond reasonable doubt: evolution from DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    White, W Timothy J; Zhong, Bojian; Penny, David

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitatively that, as predicted by evolutionary theory, sequences of homologous proteins from different species converge as we go further and further back in time. The converse, a non-evolutionary model can be expressed as probabilities, and the test works for chloroplast, nuclear and mitochondrial sequences, as well as for sequences that diverged at different time depths. Even on our conservative test, the probability that chance could produce the observed levels of ancestral convergence for just one of the eight datasets of 51 proteins is ≈1×10⁻¹⁹ and combined over 8 datasets is ≈1×10⁻¹³². By comparison, there are about 10⁸⁰ protons in the universe, hence the probability that the sequences could have been produced by a process involving unrelated ancestral sequences is about 10⁵⁰ lower than picking, among all protons, the same proton at random twice in a row. A non-evolutionary control model shows no convergence, and only a small number of parameters are required to account for the observations. It is time that that researchers insisted that doubters put up testable alternatives to evolution.

  5. Adaptive radiation of venomous marine snail lineages and the accelerated evolution of venom peptide genes

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Baldomero M.; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip; Imperial, Julita S.; de la Cotera, Edgar P. Heimer; Aguilar, Manuel B.; Vera, Estuardo López; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Lluisma, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    An impressive biodiversity (>10,000 species) of marine snails (suborder Toxoglossa or superfamily Conoidea) have complex venoms, containing ca. 100 biologically active, disulfide-rich peptides. In the genus Conus, the most intensively investigated toxoglossan lineage (~500 species), a small set of venom gene superfamilies undergo rapid sequence hyperdiversification within their mature toxin regions. Each major lineage of Toxoglossa has its own distinct set of venom gene superfamilies. Two recently identified venom gene superfamilies are expressed in the large Turridae clade, but not in Conus. Thus, as major venomous molluscan clades expand, a small set of lineage specific venom gene superfamilies undergo accelerated evolution. The juxtaposition of extremely conserved signal sequences with hypervariable mature peptide regions is unprecedented and raises the possibility that in these gene superfamilies, the signal sequences are conserved as a result of an essential role they play in enabling rapid sequence evolution of the region of the gene that encodes the active toxin. PMID:22954218

  6. Refuting the hypothesis that the acquisition of germ plasm accelerates animal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Carrie A.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) give rise to the germ line in animals. PGCs are specified during embryogenesis either by an ancestral mechanism of cell–cell signalling (induction) or by a derived mechanism of maternally provided germ plasm (preformation). Recently, a hypothesis was set forth purporting that germ plasm liberates selective constraint and accelerates an organism's protein sequence evolution, especially for genes from early developmental stages, thereby leading to animal species radiations; empirical validation has been claimed in vertebrates. Here we present findings from global rates of protein evolution in vertebrates and invertebrates refuting this hypothesis. Contrary to assertions of the hypothesis, we find no effect of preformation on protein sequence evolution, the evolutionary rates of early-stage developmental genes, or on species diversification. We conclude that the hypothesis is mechanistically implausible, and our multi-faceted analysis shows no empirical support for any of its predictions. PMID:27577604

  7. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Diana V; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J M; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E; Jansen, Robert K; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T; Hajrah, Nahid H; Alharbi, Njud S; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Sabir, Jamal S M; Bailey, C Donovan

    2015-11-23

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms.

  8. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Diana V.; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J.M.; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E.; Jansen, Robert K.; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T.; Hajrah, Nahid H.; Alharbi, Njud S.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2015-01-01

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms. PMID:26592928

  9. A taste of pineapple evolution through genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The genome sequence assembly of the highly heterozygous Ananas comosus and its varieties is an impressive technical achievement. The sequence opens the door to a greater understanding of pineapple morphology and evolution.

  10. Non-Markovian time evolution of an accelerated qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustos, Dimitris; Anastopoulos, Charis

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method for evaluating the response of a moving qubit detector interacting with a scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. We treat the detector as an open quantum system, but we do not invoke the Markov approximation. The evolution equations for the qubit density matrix are valid at all times, for all qubit trajectories, and they incorporate non-Markovian effects. We analyze in detail the case of uniform acceleration, providing a detailed characterization of all regimes where non-Markovian effects are significant. We argue that the most stable characterization of acceleration temperature refers to the late time behavior of the detector because interaction with the field vacuum brings the qubit to a thermal state at the Unruh temperature. In contrast, the early-time transition rate, that is invoked in most discussions of acceleration temperature, does not exhibit a thermal behavior when non-Markovian effects are taken into account. Finally, we note that the non-Markovian evolution derived here also applies to the mathematically equivalent problem of a static qubit interacting with a thermal field bath.

  11. Evolution of a complex minisatellite DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Barros, Paula; Blanco, Miguel G; Boán, Francisco; Gómez-Márquez, Jaime

    2008-11-01

    Minisatellites are tandem repeats of short DNA units widely distributed in genomes. However, the information on their dynamics in a phylogenetic context is very limited. Here we have studied the organization of the MsH43 locus in several species of primates and from these data we have reconstructed the evolutionary history of this complex minisatellite. Overall, with the exception of gibbon, MsH43 has an organization that is asymmetric, since the distribution of repeats is distinct between the 5' and 3' halves, and heterogeneous since there are many different repeats, some of them characteristic of each species. Inspection of the MsH43 arrays showed the existence of many duplications and deletions, suggesting the implication of slippage processes in the generation of polymorphism. Concerning the evolutionary history of this minisatellite, we propose that the birth of MsH43 may be situated before the divergence of Old World Monkeys since we found the existence of some MsH43 repeat motifs in prosimians and New World Monkeys. The analysis of MsH43 in apes revealed the existence of an evolutionary breakpoint in the pathway that originated African great apes and humans. Remarkably, human MsH43 is more homologous to orang-utan than to the corresponding sequence in gorilla and chimpanzee. This finding does not comply with the evolutionary paradigm that continuous alterations occur during the course of genome evolution. To adjust our results to the standard phylogeny of primates, we propose the existence of a wandering allele that was maintained almost unaltered during the period that extends between orang-utan and humans.

  12. Advances in silkworm studies accelerated by the genome sequencing of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingyou; Li, Sheng; Feng, Qili

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in silkworm (Bombyx mori) research since the last review on this insect was published in this journal in 2005. In this article, we review the new and exciting progress and discoveries that have been made in B. mori during the past 10 years, which include the construction of a fine genome sequence and a genetic variation map, the evolution of genomes, the advent of functional genomics, the genetic basis of silk production, metamorphic development, immune response, and the advances in genetic manipulation. These advances, which were accelerated by the genome sequencing project, have promoted B. mori as a model organism not only for lepidopterans but also for general biology.

  13. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    PubMed

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  14. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  15. Crossover accelerates evolution in GAs with a Babel-like fitness landscape: mathematical analyses.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Iwasa, Y

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of crossover in accelerating evolution in genetic algorithms (GAs) is studied with a haploid finite population of bit sequences. A Babel-like fitness landscape is assumed. There is a single bit sequence (schema) that is significantly more advantageous than all the others. We study the time until domination of the advantageous schema (Τ&subd;). Evolution proceeds with appearance, spread, and domination of the advantageous schema. The most important process determining Τ&subd; is the appearance (creation) of the advantageous schema. Crossover helps this creation process and enhances the rate of evolution. To study this effect, we first establish an analytical method to estimate Τ&subd; with or without crossover. Then, we conduct a numerical analysis using the frequency vector representation of the population with the recurrence relations formulated after GA operations. Finally, we carry out direct computer simulations with simple GAs operating on a population of binary strings directly prepared in the computer memory to examine the performance of the two analytical methods. It is shown that Τ&subd; is reduced greatly by crossover with a mildly high rate when the mutation rate is adjusted to a moderate value and that an advantageous schema has a fairly larger order (the number of bits). From these observations, we can determine implementation criteria for GAs, which are useful when we are applying GAs to engineering problems having a conspicuously discontinuous fitness landscape.

  16. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  17. Sedimentary sequence evolution in a Foredeep basin: Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Bejarano, C.; Funes, D.; Sarzalho, S.; Audemard, F.; Flores, G.

    1996-08-01

    Well log-seismic sequence stratigraphy analysis in the Eastern Venezuela Foreland Basin leads to study of the evolution of sedimentary sequences onto the Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin. This basin comprises two different foredeep sub-basins: The Guarico subbasin to the west, older, and the Maturin sub-basin to the east, younger. A foredeep switching between these two sub-basins is observed at 12.5 m.y. Seismic interpretation and well log sections across the study area show sedimentary sequences with transgressive sands and coastal onlaps to the east-southeast for the Guarico sub-basin, as well as truncations below the switching sequence (12.5 m.y.), and the Maturin sub-basin shows apparent coastal onlaps to the west-northwest, as well as a marine onlap (deeper water) in the west, where it starts to establish. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of these sequences with well logs allowed the study of the evolution of stratigraphic section from Paleocene to middle Miocene (68.0-12.0 m.y.). On the basis of well log patterns, the sequences were divided in regressive-transgressive-regressive sedimentary cycles caused by changes in relative sea level. Facies distributions were analyzed and the sequences were divided into simple sequences or sub- sequences of a greater frequencies than third order depositional sequences.

  18. Accelerated protein evolution and origins of human-specific features: Foxp2 as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Webb, David M; Podlaha, Ondrej

    2002-12-01

    Genes responsible for human-specific phenotypes may have been under altered selective pressures in human evolution and thus exhibit changes in substitution rate and pattern at the protein sequence level. Using comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee, and mouse protein sequences, we identified two genes (PRM2 and FOXP2) with significantly enhanced evolutionary rates in the hominid lineage. PRM2 is a histone-like protein essential to spermatogenesis and was previously reported to be a likely target of sexual selection in humans and chimpanzees. FOXP2 is a transcription factor involved in speech and language development. Human FOXP2 experienced a >60-fold increase in substitution rate and incorporated two fixed amino acid changes in a broadly defined transcription suppression domain. A survey of a diverse group of placental mammals reveals the uniqueness of the human FOXP2 sequence and a population genetic analysis indicates possible adaptive selection behind the accelerated evolution. Taken together, our results suggest an important role that FOXP2 may have played in the origin of human speech and demonstrate a strategy for identifying candidate genes underlying the emergences of human-specific features.

  19. Temporal evolution of earthquake sequences (swarms) in the Central Volcanic Region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. M.; Smith, E. G.; Savage, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the temporal evolution of earthquake sequences in the Central Volcanic Region of New Zealand as a step towards probabilistic modelling. We characterize 257 sequences with at least four events selected from the GeoNet earthquake catalog between 1987 and 2009 with an inferred completeness magnitude of 2.5. We categorize 14 as mainshock-aftershock (MS-AS), including four of the ten largest sequences. We analyze sequences by size (4 to 831 events), maximum magnitude (2.53 to 6.14), duration (minutes to 35 days), and other parameters including moment release with time, magnitude histories, inter-event time differences, and spatial relationships. In particular we closely examine the position and size of the maximum magnitude event and its relation to the size and development of each sequence. Sequences with mainshock magnitudes of M=5.0 or greater all have 100 or more earthquakes (5 sequences, including 3 MS-AS). Sequences with a mainshock magnitude below 3.0 have less than 20 earthquakes (60 sequences). We use average inter-event time differences to look at development of sequences in time. While there is variability between sequences they generally fit three basic patterns (Fig.). We have also searched for possible triggering of the sequences by large global (M=7.0+) and moderate New Zealand (M=6.0+) earthquakes. While some sequences follow large earthquakes closely in time, we cannot rule out the possibility that this timing is random. Average inter-event times are plotted against time normalized to sequence duration for three sequences A) classic MS-AS sequence with decaying rate (increasing inter-event time); B) swarm whose rate accelerates towards the end of the sequence (decreasing inter-event time); C) sharp increase in rate (decrease in inter-event time) followed by steady decrease (seen for both swarm type and some foreshock-MS-AS sequences).

  20. Post-main-sequence planetary system evolution

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The fates of planetary systems provide unassailable insights into their formation and represent rich cross-disciplinary dynamical laboratories. Mounting observations of post-main-sequence planetary systems necessitate a complementary level of theoretical scrutiny. Here, I review the diverse dynamical processes which affect planets, asteroids, comets and pebbles as their parent stars evolve into giant branch, white dwarf and neutron stars. This reference provides a foundation for the interpretation and modelling of currently known systems and upcoming discoveries. PMID:26998326

  1. Post-main-sequence planetary system evolution.

    PubMed

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-02-01

    The fates of planetary systems provide unassailable insights into their formation and represent rich cross-disciplinary dynamical laboratories. Mounting observations of post-main-sequence planetary systems necessitate a complementary level of theoretical scrutiny. Here, I review the diverse dynamical processes which affect planets, asteroids, comets and pebbles as their parent stars evolve into giant branch, white dwarf and neutron stars. This reference provides a foundation for the interpretation and modelling of currently known systems and upcoming discoveries.

  2. Sequence-level mechanisms of human epigenome evolution.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, James G D; Chambers, Emily V; Semple, Colin A M

    2014-06-24

    DNA methylation and chromatin states play key roles in development and disease. However, the extent of recent evolutionary divergence in the human epigenome and the influential factors that have shaped it are poorly understood. To determine the links between genome sequence and human epigenome evolution, we examined the divergence of DNA methylation and chromatin states following segmental duplication events in the human lineage. Chromatin and DNA methylation states were found to have been generally well conserved following a duplication event, with the evolution of the epigenome largely uncoupled from the total number of genetic changes in the surrounding DNA sequence. However, the epigenome at tissue-specific, distal regulatory regions was observed to be unusually prone to diverge following duplication, with particular sequence differences, altering known sequence motifs, found to be associated with divergence in patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin. Alu elements were found to have played a particularly prominent role in shaping human epigenome evolution, and we show that human-specific AluY insertion events are strongly linked to the evolution of the DNA methylation landscape and gene expression levels, including at key neurological genes in the human brain. Studying paralogous regions within the same sample enables the study of the links between genome and epigenome evolution while controlling for biological and technical variation. We show DNA methylation and chromatin divergence between duplicated regions are linked to the divergence of particular genetic motifs, with Alu elements having played a disproportionate role in the evolution of the epigenome in the human lineage.

  3. Sequence dependent hole evolution in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2004-06-01

    The paper examines thedynamical behavior of a radical cation(G(+*)) generated in adouble stranded DNA for differentoligonucleotide sequences. The resonancehole tunneling through an oligonucleotidesequence is studied by the method ofnumerical integration of self-consistentquantum-mechanical equations. The holemotion is considered quantum mechanicallyand nucleotide base oscillations aretreated classically. The results obtaineddemonstrate a strong dependence of chargetransfer on the type of nucleotidesequence. The rates of the hole transferare calculated for different nucleotidesequences and compared with experimentaldata on the transfer from (G(+*))to a GGG unit.

  4. Integrating Sequence Evolution into Probabilistic Orthology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Sjöstrand, Joel; Andersson, Peter; Sennblad, Bengt; Lagergren, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Orthology analysis, that is, finding out whether a pair of homologous genes are orthologs - stemming from a speciation - or paralogs - stemming from a gene duplication - is of central importance in computational biology, genome annotation, and phylogenetic inference. In particular, an orthologous relationship makes functional equivalence of the two genes highly likely. A major approach to orthology analysis is to reconcile a gene tree to the corresponding species tree, (most commonly performed using the most parsimonious reconciliation, MPR). However, most such phylogenetic orthology methods infer the gene tree without considering the constraints implied by the species tree and, perhaps even more importantly, only allow the gene sequences to influence the orthology analysis through the a priori reconstructed gene tree. We propose a sound, comprehensive Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, DLRSOrthology, to compute orthology probabilities. It efficiently sums over the possible gene trees and jointly takes into account the current gene tree, all possible reconciliations to the species tree, and the, typically strong, signal conveyed by the sequences. We compare our method with PrIME-GEM, a probabilistic orthology approach built on a probabilistic duplication-loss model, and MrBayesMPR, a probabilistic orthology approach that is based on conventional Bayesian inference coupled with MPR. We find that DLRSOrthology outperforms these competing approaches on synthetic data as well as on biological data sets and is robust to incomplete taxon sampling artifacts.

  5. MODELING THE RED SEQUENCE: HIERARCHICAL GROWTH YET SLOW LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the effects of mergers on the evolution of massive early-type galaxies by modeling the evolution of their stellar populations in a hierarchical context. We investigate how a realistic red sequence population set up by z {approx} 1 evolves under different assumptions for the merger and star formation histories, comparing changes in color, luminosity, and mass. The purely passive fading of existing red sequence galaxies, with no further mergers or star formation, results in dramatic changes at the bright end of the luminosity function and color-magnitude relation. Without mergers there is too much evolution in luminosity at a fixed space density compared to observations. The change in color and magnitude at a fixed mass resembles that of a passively evolving population that formed relatively recently, at z {approx} 2. Mergers among the red sequence population ('dry mergers') occurring after z = 1 build up mass, counteracting the fading of the existing stellar populations to give smaller changes in both color and luminosity for massive galaxies. By allowing some galaxies to migrate from the blue cloud onto the red sequence after z = 1 through gas-rich mergers, younger stellar populations are added to the red sequence. This manifestation of the progenitor bias increases the scatter in age and results in even smaller changes in color and luminosity between z = 1 and z = 0 at a fixed mass. The resultant evolution appears much slower, resembling the passive evolution of a population that formed at high redshift (z {approx} 3-5), and is in closer agreement with observations. We conclude that measurements of the luminosity and color evolution alone are not sufficient to distinguish between the purely passive evolution of an old population and cosmologically motivated hierarchical growth, although these scenarios have very different implications for the mass growth of early-type galaxies over the last half of cosmic history.

  6. Marsupial Genome Sequences: Providing Insight into Evolution and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Janine E.

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials (metatherians), with their position in vertebrate phylogeny and their unique biological features, have been studied for many years by a dedicated group of researchers, but it has only been since the sequencing of the first marsupial genome that their value has been more widely recognised. We now have genome sequences for three distantly related marsupial species (the grey short-tailed opossum, the tammar wallaby, and Tasmanian devil), with the promise of many more genomes to be sequenced in the near future, making this a particularly exciting time in marsupial genomics. The emergence of a transmissible cancer, which is obliterating the Tasmanian devil population, has increased the importance of obtaining and analysing marsupial genome sequence for understanding such diseases as well as for conservation efforts. In addition, these genome sequences have facilitated studies aimed at answering questions regarding gene and genome evolution and provided insight into the evolution of epigenetic mechanisms. Here I highlight the major advances in our understanding of evolution and disease, facilitated by marsupial genome projects, and speculate on the future contributions to be made by such sequences. PMID:24278712

  7. TALENs-Assisted Multiplex Editing for Accelerated Genome Evolution To Improve Yeast Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Lin, Yuping; Qi, Xianni; Li, Lin; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-10-16

    Genome editing is an important tool for building novel genotypes with a desired phenotype. However, the fundamental challenge is to rapidly generate desired alterations on a genome-wide scale. Here, we report TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases)-assisted multiplex editing (TAME), based on the interaction of designed TALENs with the DNA sequences between the critical TATA and GC boxes, for generating multiple targeted genomic modifications. Through iterative cycles of TAME to induce abundant semirational indels coupled with efficient screening using a reporter, the targeted fluorescent trait can be continuously and rapidly improved by accumulating multiplex beneficial genetic modifications in the evolving yeast genome. To further evaluate its efficiency, we also demonstrate the application of TAME for significantly improving ethanol tolerance of yeast in a short amount of time. Therefore, TAME is a broadly generalizable platform for accelerated genome evolution to rapidly improve yeast phenotypes.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-01-01

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived. PMID:8415740

  9. Identification of the Imprinted KLF14 Transcription Factor Undergoing Human-Specific Accelerated Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Carson, Andrew R; Yamada, Takahiro; Arnaud, Philippe; Feil, Robert; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Kaneda, Masahiro; Perry, George H; Stone, Anne C; Lee, Charles; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage. PMID:17480121

  10. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Carson, Andrew R; Yamada, Takahiro; Arnaud, Philippe; Feil, Robert; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Kaneda, Masahiro; Perry, George H; Stone, Anne C; Lee, Charles; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W

    2007-05-04

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage.

  11. The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Elsik, Christine G; Tellam, Ross L; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Muzny, Donna M; Weinstock, George M; Adelson, David L; Eichler, Evan E; Elnitski, Laura; Guigó, Roderic; Hamernik, Debora L; Kappes, Steve M; Lewin, Harris A; Lynn, David J; Nicholas, Frank W; Reymond, Alexandre; Rijnkels, Monique; Skow, Loren C; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Schook, Lawrence; Womack, James; Alioto, Tyler; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Astashyn, Alex; Chapple, Charles E; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Chrast, Jacqueline; Câmara, Francisco; Ermolaeva, Olga; Henrichsen, Charlotte N; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Kiryutin, Boris; Kitts, Paul; Kokocinski, Felix; Landrum, Melissa; Maglott, Donna; Pruitt, Kim; Sapojnikov, Victor; Searle, Stephen M; Solovyev, Victor; Souvorov, Alexandre; Ucla, Catherine; Wyss, Carine; Anzola, Juan M; Gerlach, Daniel; Elhaik, Eran; Graur, Dan; Reese, Justin T; Edgar, Robert C; McEwan, John C; Payne, Gemma M; Raison, Joy M; Junier, Thomas; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Eyras, Eduardo; Plass, Mireya; Donthu, Ravikiran; Larkin, Denis M; Reecy, James; Yang, Mary Q; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Chitko-McKown, Carol G; Liu, George E; Matukumalli, Lakshmi K; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhu, Bin; Bradley, Daniel G; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Lau, Lilian P L; Whiteside, Matthew D; Walker, Angela; Wheeler, Thomas T; Casey, Theresa; German, J Bruce; Lemay, Danielle G; Maqbool, Nauman J; Molenaar, Adrian J; Seo, Seongwon; Stothard, Paul; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Baxter, Rebecca; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Brown, Wendy C; Childers, Christopher P; Connelley, Timothy; Ellis, Shirley A; Fritz, Krista; Glass, Elizabeth J; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Iivanainen, Antti; Lahmers, Kevin K; Bennett, Anna K; Dickens, C Michael; Gilbert, James G R; Hagen, Darren E; Salih, Hanni; Aerts, Jan; Caetano, Alexandre R; Dalrymple, Brian; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Gill, Clare A; Hiendleder, Stefan G; Memili, Erdogan; Spurlock, Diane; Williams, John L; Alexander, Lee; Brownstein, Michael J; Guan, Leluo; Holt, Robert A; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Moore, Richard; Moore, Stephen S; Roberts, Andy; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Waterman, Richard C; Chacko, Joseph; Chandrabose, Mimi M; Cree, Andy; Dao, Marvin Diep; Dinh, Huyen H; Gabisi, Ramatu Ayiesha; Hines, Sandra; Hume, Jennifer; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Joshi, Vandita; Kovar, Christie L; Lewis, Lora R; Liu, Yih-Shin; Lopez, John; Morgan, Margaret B; Nguyen, Ngoc Bich; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Ruiz, San Juana; Santibanez, Jireh; Wright, Rita A; Buhay, Christian; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Herdandez, Judith; Holder, Michael; Sabo, Aniko; Egan, Amy; Goodell, Jason; Wilczek-Boney, Katarzyna; Fowler, Gerald R; Hitchens, Matthew Edward; Lozado, Ryan J; Moen, Charles; Steffen, David; Warren, James T; Zhang, Jingkun; Chiu, Readman; Schein, Jacqueline E; Durbin, K James; Havlak, Paul; Jiang, Huaiyang; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Ren, Yanru; Shen, Yufeng; Song, Henry; Bell, Stephanie Nicole; Davis, Clay; Johnson, Angela Jolivet; Lee, Sandra; Nazareth, Lynne V; Patel, Bella Mayurkumar; Pu, Ling-Ling; Vattathil, Selina; Williams, Rex Lee; Curry, Stacey; Hamilton, Cerissa; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Barris, Wes; Bennett, Gary L; Eggen, André; Green, Ronnie D; Harhay, Gregory P; Hobbs, Matthew; Jann, Oliver; Keele, John W; Kent, Matthew P; Lien, Sigbjørn; McKay, Stephanie D; McWilliam, Sean; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Schnabel, Robert D; Smith, Timothy; Snelling, Warren M; Sonstegard, Tad S; Stone, Roger T; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Takasuga, Akiko; Taylor, Jeremy F; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Macneil, Michael D; Abatepaulo, Antonio R R; Abbey, Colette A; Ahola, Virpi; Almeida, Iassudara G; Amadio, Ariel F; Anatriello, Elen; Bahadue, Suria M; Biase, Fernando H; Boldt, Clayton R; Carroll, Jeffery A; Carvalho, Wanessa A; Cervelatti, Eliane P; Chacko, Elsa; Chapin, Jennifer E; Cheng, Ye; Choi, Jungwoo; Colley, Adam J; de Campos, Tatiana A; De Donato, Marcos; Santos, Isabel K F de Miranda; de Oliveira, Carlo J F; Deobald, Heather; Devinoy, Eve; Donohue, Kaitlin E; Dovc, Peter; Eberlein, Annett; Fitzsimmons, Carolyn J; Franzin, Alessandra M; Garcia, Gustavo R; Genini, Sem; Gladney, Cody J; Grant, Jason R; Greaser, Marion L; Green, Jonathan A; Hadsell, Darryl L; Hakimov, Hatam A; Halgren, Rob; Harrow, Jennifer L; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hastings, Nicola; Hernandez, Marta; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Ingham, Aaron; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Jamis, Catherine; Jensen, Kirsty; Kapetis, Dimos; Kerr, Tovah; Khalil, Sari S; Khatib, Hasan; Kolbehdari, Davood; Kumar, Charu G; Kumar, Dinesh; Leach, Richard; Lee, Justin C-M; Li, Changxi; Logan, Krystin M; Malinverni, Roberto; Marques, Elisa; Martin, William F; Martins, Natalia F; Maruyama, Sandra R; Mazza, Raffaele; McLean, Kim L; Medrano, Juan F; Moreno, Barbara T; Moré, Daniela D; Muntean, Carl T; Nandakumar, Hari P; Nogueira, Marcelo F G; Olsaker, Ingrid; Pant, Sameer D; Panzitta, Francesca; Pastor, Rosemeire C P; Poli, Mario A; Poslusny, Nathan; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ranganathan, Shoba; Razpet, Andrej; Riggs, Penny K; Rincon, Gonzalo; Rodriguez-Osorio, Nelida; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Romero, Natasha E; Rosenwald, Anne; Sando, Lillian; Schmutz, Sheila M; Shen, Libing; Sherman, Laura; Southey, Bruce R; Lutzow, Ylva Strandberg; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Tammen, Imke; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Urbanski, Jennifer M; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Verschoor, Chris P; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Wang, Zhiquan; Ward, Robert; Weikard, Rosemarie; Welsh, Thomas H; White, Stephen N; Wilming, Laurens G; Wunderlich, Kris R; Yang, Jianqi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2009-04-24

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.

  12. The Genome Sequence of Taurine Cattle: A window to ruminant biology and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tellam, Ross L.; Worley, Kim C.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to ∼7× coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1,217 are absent or undetected in non-eutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides an enabling resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production. PMID:19390049

  13. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  14. Whole-genome duplication and molecular evolution in Cornus L. (Cornaceae) – Insights from transcriptome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Xiang, Qiuyun; Manos, Paul S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Song, Bao-Hua; Cheng, Shifeng; Liu, Xin; Wong, Gane

    2017-01-01

    The pattern and rate of genome evolution have profound consequences in organismal evolution. Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, has been recognized as an important evolutionary mechanism of plant diversification. However, in non-model plants the molecular signals of genome duplications have remained largely unexplored. High-throughput transcriptome data from next-generation sequencing have set the stage for novel investigations of genome evolution using new bioinformatic and methodological tools in a phylogenetic framework. Here we compare ten de novo-assembled transcriptomes representing the major lineages of the angiosperm genus Cornus (dogwood) and relevant outgroups using a customized pipeline for analyses. Using three distinct approaches, molecular dating of orthologous genes, analyses of the distribution of synonymous substitutions between paralogous genes, and examination of substitution rates through time, we detected a shared WGD event in the late Cretaceous across all taxa sampled. The inferred doubling event coincides temporally with the paleoclimatic changes associated with the initial divergence of the genus into three major lineages. Analyses also showed an acceleration of rates of molecular evolution after WGD. The highest rates of molecular evolution were observed in the transcriptome of the herbaceous lineage, C. canadensis, a species commonly found at higher latitudes, including the Arctic. Our study demonstrates the value of transcriptome data for understanding genome evolution in closely related species. The results suggest dramatic increase in sea surface temperature in the late Cretaceous may have contributed to the evolution and diversification of flowering plants. PMID:28225773

  15. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  16. Accelerating Computation of DNA Sequence Alignment in Distributed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tao; Li, Guiyang; Deaton, Russel

    Sequence similarity and alignment are most important operations in computational biology. However, analyzing large sets of DNA sequence seems to be impractical on a regular PC. Using multiple threads with JavaParty mechanism, this project has successfully implemented in extending the capabilities of regular Java to a distributed environment for simulation of DNA computation. With the aid of JavaParty and the design of multiple threads, the results of this study demonstrated that the modified regular Java program could perform parallel computing without using RMI or socket communication. In this paper, an efficient method for modeling and comparing DNA sequences with dynamic programming and JavaParty was firstly proposed. Additionally, results of this method in distributed environment have been discussed.

  17. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis reveals accelerated genic evolution in a Tibet fish, Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liandong; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2014-12-26

    Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of organismal adaptation to the Tibetan Plateau at a genomic scale can provide insights into the process of adaptive evolution. Many highland species have been investigated and various candidate genes that may be responsible for highland adaptation have been identified. However, we know little about the genomic basis of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of a schizothoracine fish (Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus) and used it to identify potential genetic mechanisms of highland adaptation. We obtained totally 66,105 assembled unigenes, of which 7,232 were assigned as putative one-to-one orthologs in zebrafish. Comparative gene annotations from several species indicated that at least 350 genes lost and 41 gained since the divergence between G. pachycheilus and zebrafish. An analysis of 6,324 orthologs among zebrafish, fugu, medaka, and spotted gar identified consistent evidence for genome-wide accelerated evolution in G. pachycheilus and only the terminal branch of G. pachycheilus had an elevated Ka/Ks ratio than the ancestral branch. Many functional categories related to hypoxia and energy metabolism exhibited rapid evolution in G. pachycheilus relative to zebrafish. Genes showing signature of rapid evolution and positive selection in the G. pachycheilus lineage were also enriched in functions associated with energy metabolism and hypoxia. The first genomic resources for fish in the Tibetan Plateau and evolutionary analyses provided some novel insights into highland adaptation in fishes and served as a foundation for future studies aiming to identify candidate genes underlying the genetic bases of adaptation to Tibet in fishes.

  18. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Accelerated Genic Evolution in a Tibet Fish, Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liandong; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of organismal adaptation to the Tibetan Plateau at a genomic scale can provide insights into the process of adaptive evolution. Many highland species have been investigated and various candidate genes that may be responsible for highland adaptation have been identified. However, we know little about the genomic basis of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of a schizothoracine fish (Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus) and used it to identify potential genetic mechanisms of highland adaptation. We obtained totally 66,105 assembled unigenes, of which 7,232 were assigned as putative one-to-one orthologs in zebrafish. Comparative gene annotations from several species indicated that at least 350 genes lost and 41 gained since the divergence between G. pachycheilus and zebrafish. An analysis of 6,324 orthologs among zebrafish, fugu, medaka, and spotted gar identified consistent evidence for genome-wide accelerated evolution in G. pachycheilus and only the terminal branch of G. pachycheilus had an elevated Ka/Ks ratio than the ancestral branch. Many functional categories related to hypoxia and energy metabolism exhibited rapid evolution in G. pachycheilus relative to zebrafish. Genes showing signature of rapid evolution and positive selection in the G. pachycheilus lineage were also enriched in functions associated with energy metabolism and hypoxia. The first genomic resources for fish in the Tibetan Plateau and evolutionary analyses provided some novel insights into highland adaptation in fishes and served as a foundation for future studies aiming to identify candidate genes underlying the genetic bases of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. PMID:25543049

  19. Structure and sequence based analysis of alpha-amylase evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    α-Amylases hydrolyze α- 1,4-glycosidic bonds during assimilation of biological macromolecules. The amino acid sequences of these enzymes in thousands of diverse organisms are known and the 3D structures of several proteins have been solved. The 3D structure analysis of these universal enzymes from diverse organisms has been studied by the generation of phylogenetic trees and structure based sequence analysis to generate a metric for the degree of conservation that is responsible for individual speciation. Greater similarities are observed between reference NCBI tree and structure based phylogenetic tree compared to sequence based phylogenetic tree indicating that structures truly represent the functional aspects of proteins than from the sequence information alone. We report differences in the profile specific conserved and insertion/deletion regions, factors responsible for the Ca(2+) and Cl(-) ion binding and the disulfide connectivity pattern that discriminate the enzymes over evolution.

  20. Transient Hypermutagenesis Accelerates the Evolution of Legume Endosymbionts following Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Remigi, Philippe; Capela, Delphine; Clerissi, Camille; Tasse, Léna; Torchet, Rachel; Bouchez, Olivier; Batut, Jacques; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important mode of adaptation and diversification of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and a major event underlying the emergence of bacterial pathogens and mutualists. Yet it remains unclear how complex phenotypic traits such as the ability to fix nitrogen with legumes have successfully spread over large phylogenetic distances. Here we show, using experimental evolution coupled with whole genome sequencing, that co-transfer of imuABC error-prone DNA polymerase genes with key symbiotic genes accelerates the evolution of a soil bacterium into a legume symbiont. Following introduction of the symbiotic plasmid of Cupriavidus taiwanensis, the Mimosa symbiont, into pathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum we challenged transconjugants to become Mimosa symbionts through serial plant-bacteria co-cultures. We demonstrate that a mutagenesis imuABC cassette encoded on the C. taiwanensis symbiotic plasmid triggered a transient hypermutability stage in R. solanacearum transconjugants that occurred before the cells entered the plant. The generated burst in genetic diversity accelerated symbiotic adaptation of the recipient genome under plant selection pressure, presumably by improving the exploration of the fitness landscape. Finally, we show that plasmid imuABC cassettes are over-represented in rhizobial lineages harboring symbiotic plasmids. Our findings shed light on a mechanism that may have facilitated the dissemination of symbiotic competency among α- and β-proteobacteria in natura and provide evidence for the positive role of environment-induced mutagenesis in the acquisition of a complex lifestyle trait. We speculate that co-transfer of complex phenotypic traits with mutagenesis determinants might frequently enhance the ecological success of HGT. PMID:25181317

  1. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  2. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  3. Accelerating Genome Sequencing 100-1000X with FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O

    2008-01-01

    The performance of FPGAs on Cray XD1 and SGI/RASC systems (with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs) was evaluated for human genome sequencing using FASTA1 and BLAST2, respectively. Scalable speedups of 100X for a Virtex-4 FPGA (and exceeding 1000X for multiple FPGAs) over a 2.2 GHz Opteron were achieved. Similar FPGA speedups were achieved using BLAST on a SGI/RASC system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  5. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Benjamin M.; Sargent, Carole A.; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E.; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J.I.; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M.D.; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes—both single copy and amplified—on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  6. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution.

  7. Accelerated GPU simulation of compressible flow by the discontinuous evolution Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, B. J.; Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Virnau, P.; Yelash, L.

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present paper is to report on our recent results for GPU accelerated simulations of compressible flows. For numerical simulation the adaptive discontinuous Galerkin method with the multidimensional bicharacteristic based evolution Galerkin operator has been used. For time discretization we have applied the explicit third order Runge-Kutta method. Evaluation of the genuinely multidimensional evolution operator has been accelerated using the GPU implementation. We have obtained a speedup up to 30 (in comparison to a single CPU core) for the calculation of the evolution Galerkin operator on a typical discretization mesh consisting of 16384 mesh cells.

  8. Sequence Heterogeneity Accelerates Protein Search for Targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey; Kolomeisky, Anatoly

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry and heterogeneity of a genome. The work was supported by the Welch Foundation (Grant C-1559), by the NSF (Grant CHE-1360979), and by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  9. The Evolution of Insertion Sequences within Enteric Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. G.; Ochman, H.; Hartl, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    To identify mechanisms that influence the evolution of bacterial transposons, DNA sequence variation was evaluated among homologs of insertion sequences IS1, IS3 and IS30 from natural strains of Escherichia coli and related enteric bacteria. The nucleotide sequences within each class of IS were highly conserved among E. coli strains, over 99.7% similar to a consensus sequence. When compared to the range of nucleotide divergence among chromosomal genes, these data indicate high turnover and rapid movement of the transposons among clonal lineages of E. coli. In addition, length polymorphism among IS appears to be far less frequent than in eukaryotic transposons, indicating that nonfunctional elements comprise a smaller fraction of bacterial transposon populations than found in eukaryotes. IS present in other species of enteric bacteria are substantially divergent from E. coli elements, indicating that IS are mobilized among bacterial species at a reduced rate. However, homologs of IS1 and IS3 from diverse species provide evidence that recombination events and horizontal transfer of IS among species have both played major roles in the evolution of these elements. IS3 elements from E. coli and Shigella show multiple, nested, intragenic recombinations with a distantly related transposon, and IS1 homologs from diverse taxa reveal a mosaic structure indicative of multiple recombination and horizontal transfer events. PMID:1317318

  10. Sequence polymorphism and evolution of three cetacean MHC genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi Xia; Ren, Wen Hua; Li, Shu Zhen; Wei, Fu Wen; Zhou, Kai Ya; Yang, Guang

    2009-09-01

    Sequence variability at three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes (DQB, DRA, and MHC-I) of cetaceans was investigated in order to get an overall understanding of cetacean MHC evolution. Little sequence variation was detected at the DRA locus, while extensive and considerable variability were found at the MHC-I and DQB loci. Phylogenetic reconstruction and sequence comparison revealed extensive sharing of identical MHC alleles among different species at the three MHC loci examined. Comparisons of phylogenetic trees for these MHC loci with the trees reconstructed only based on non-PBR sites revealed that allelic similarity/identity possibly reflected common ancestry and were not due to adaptive convergence. At the same time, trans-species evolution was also evidenced that the allelic diversity of the three MHC loci clearly pre-dated species divergence events according to the relaxed molecular clock. It may be the forces of balancing selection acting to maintain the high sequence variability and identical alleles in trans-specific manner at the MHC-I and DQB loci.

  11. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in sequences of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Carl D.; Cherry, John A.

    1984-12-01

    A geochemical mass-transfer model (WATEGM-SE) is used to illustrate the effect of several major processes on the chemical evolution of groundwater flowing through hypothetical sequences of sedimentary rocks. Using chemical reactions prevalent in these rock types, the simulations demonstrate the influence of the initial soil PCO 2, temperature, pressure and the sequence of encounter of the mineral phases along the flow path of the groundwater. The evolution of groundwater in different sequences of limestone and dolostone is simulated with a range of initial PCO 2 -values typical of natural soils. Temperatures of 10° and 25°C are used. The simulations indicate that appreciable differences in the chemical composition of the groundwater and the spring-discharge water will occur, depending on whether a limestone or dolostone unit is first encountered. The cases of more complex stratigraphy are represented by three hypothetical sequences in which each stratum has only one reactive mineral phase. The reactions used in these simulations include calcite dissolution and precipitation, gypsum dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange, and the weathering of albite to kaolinite. Sulfate reduction occurs in the last stratum in each of these sequences. The strata in the three sequences are indentical except for the order in which they are encountered by the groundwater. Considerably different hydrochemistries are calculated for each of these sequences even within the same types of rock units. The effect of increasing total pressure is demonstrated with a water initially saturated with both gypsum and calcite under a pressure of 1 bar. The system is then closed and the pressure is increased to 1 kbar while the temperature remains constant at 25°C. The results indicate that pressure has a significant effect above 50 bar or 500 m hydrostatic head. It is commonly expected that groundwater in sedimentary rocks will exhibit trends in chemistry that are the result of the length

  12. Accelerated evolution of morph-biased genes in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Purandare, Swapna R; Bickel, Ryan D; Jaquiery, Julie; Rispe, Claude; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2014-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, the production of alternative phenotypes (or morphs) from the same genotype due to environmental factors, results in some genes being expressed in a morph-biased manner. Theoretically, these morph-biased genes experience relaxed selection, the consequence of which is the buildup of slightly deleterious mutations at these genes. Over time, this is expected to result in increased protein divergence at these genes between species and a signature of relaxed purifying selection within species. Here we test these theoretical expectations using morph-biased genes in the pea aphid, a species that produces multiple morphs via polyphenism. We find that morph-biased genes exhibit faster rates of evolution (in terms of dN/dS) relative to unbiased genes and that divergence generally increases with increasing morph bias. Further, genes with expression biased toward rarer morphs (sexual females and males) show faster rates of evolution than genes expressed in the more common morph (asexual females), demonstrating that the amount of time a gene spends being expressed in a morph is associated with its rate of evolution. And finally, we show that genes expressed in the rarer morphs experience decreased purifying selection relative to unbiased genes, suggesting that it is a relaxation of purifying selection that contributes to their faster rates of evolution. Our results provide an important empirical look at the impact of phenotypic plasticity on gene evolution.

  13. Accelerated Evolution of Morph-Biased Genes in Pea Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Purandare, Swapna R.; Bickel, Ryan D.; Jaquiery, Julie; Rispe, Claude; Brisson, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, the production of alternative phenotypes (or morphs) from the same genotype due to environmental factors, results in some genes being expressed in a morph-biased manner. Theoretically, these morph-biased genes experience relaxed selection, the consequence of which is the buildup of slightly deleterious mutations at these genes. Over time, this is expected to result in increased protein divergence at these genes between species and a signature of relaxed purifying selection within species. Here we test these theoretical expectations using morph-biased genes in the pea aphid, a species that produces multiple morphs via polyphenism. We find that morph-biased genes exhibit faster rates of evolution (in terms of dN/dS) relative to unbiased genes and that divergence generally increases with increasing morph bias. Further, genes with expression biased toward rarer morphs (sexual females and males) show faster rates of evolution than genes expressed in the more common morph (asexual females), demonstrating that the amount of time a gene spends being expressed in a morph is associated with its rate of evolution. And finally, we show that genes expressed in the rarer morphs experience decreased purifying selection relative to unbiased genes, suggesting that it is a relaxation of purifying selection that contributes to their faster rates of evolution. Our results provide an important empirical look at the impact of phenotypic plasticity on gene evolution. PMID:24770714

  14. Niche divergence accelerates evolution in Asian endemic Procapra gazelles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junhua; Jiang, Zhigang; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Huijie

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche divergence and adaptation to new environments are thought to play important roles in driving speciation. Whether recently evolved species show evidence for niche divergence or conservation is vital towards understanding the role of ecology in the process of speciation. The genus Procapra is an ancient, monophyletic lineage endemic to Asia that contains three extant species (P. gutturosa, P. przewalskii and P. picticaudata). These species mainly inhabit the Qinghai-Tibetan and Mongolian Plateaus, and today have primarily allopatric distributions. We applied a series of geographic information system–based analyses to test for environmental variation and niche divergence among these three species. We found substantial evidence for niche divergence in species’ bioclimatic preferences, which supports the hypothesis that niche divergence accelerates diversification in Procapra. Our results provide important insight into the evolutionary history of ungulates in Asia and help to elucidate how environmental changes accelerate lineage diversification. PMID:25951051

  15. Programming cells by multiplex genome engineering and accelerated evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter A.; Sun, Zachary Z.; Xu, George; Forest, Craig R.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The breadth of genomic diversity found among organisms in nature allows populations to adapt to diverse environments1,2. However, genomic diversity is difficult to generate in the laboratory and new phenotypes do not easily arise on practical timescales3. Although in vitro and directed evolution methods4–9 have created genetic variants with usefully altered phenotypes, these methods are limited to laborious and serial manipulation of single genes and are not used for parallel and continuous directed evolution of gene networks or genomes. Here, we describe multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) for large-scale programming and evolution of cells. MAGE simultaneously targets many locations on the chromosome for modification in a single cell or across a population of cells, thus producing combinatorial genomic diversity. Because the process is cyclical and scalable, we constructed prototype devices that automate the MAGE technology to facilitate rapid and continuous generation of a diverse set of genetic changes (mismatches, insertions, deletions). We applied MAGE to optimize the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli to overproduce the industrially important isoprenoid lycopene. Twenty-four genetic components in the DXP pathway were modified simultaneously using a complex pool of synthetic DNA, creating over 4.3 billion combinatorial genomic variants per day. We isolated variants with more than fivefold increase in lycopene production within 3 days, a significant improvement over existing metabolic engineering techniques. Our multiplex approach embraces engineering in the context of evolution by expediting the design and evolution of organisms with new and improved properties. PMID:19633652

  16. Rotational evolution of pre-main sequence stars in Lupus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, R.; Bouvier, J.; Allain, S.; Krautter, J.

    1998-02-01

    We present results of a study of the rotational periods of Post-TTauri stars (PTTSs) in the Lupus star forming region. These stars have been discovered by spectroscopic follow-up observations of ROSAT x-ray sources. Photometric observations have allowed to determine their luminosity, and by comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks they were found to be significantly older on average than typical TTauri stars. 46 stars have been monitored photometrically, and for 34 of them photometric variations were found that are consistent with rotational brightness modulations caused by starspots. The large number of data on rotational periods of pre-main-sequence (PMS) / zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) stars available by now allows us to study the impact of stellar mass on the evolution of angular momentum. For several different mass bins, we compare the available data on rotational periods with theoretical models, and find good agreement between theory and observations for the mass-dependency of the pre-main-sequence evolution of angular momentum. We also study the relation between activity, rotation, mass, and age of low mass stars, and demonstrate that activity is driven by rotation mainly, while it seems to be rather independent of mass and age. Based on observations collected at European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (observing proposals ESO No. 55.E-0575, 57.E-0250).

  17. DNA Sequence Evolution and Rare Homoeologous Conversion in Tetraploid Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Page, Justin T.; Liechty, Zach S.; Clemons, Kimberly; Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M.; Van Deynze, Allen; Stelly, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Allotetraploid cotton species are a vital source of spinnable fiber for textiles. The polyploid nature of the cotton genome raises many evolutionary questions as to the relationships between duplicated genomes. We describe the evolution of the cotton genome (SNPs and structural variants) with the greatly improved resolution of 34 deeply re-sequenced genomes. We also explore the evolution of homoeologous regions in the AT- and DT-genomes and especially the phenomenon of conversion between genomes. We did not find any compelling evidence for homoeologous conversion between genomes. These findings are very different from other recent reports of frequent conversion events between genomes. We also identified several distinct regions of the genome that have been introgressed between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, which presumably resulted from breeding efforts targeting associated beneficial alleles. Finally, the genotypic data resulting from this study provides access to a wealth of diversity sorely needed in the narrow germplasm of cotton cultivars. PMID:27168520

  18. Transcriptomic insights into human brain evolution: acceleration, neutrality, heterochrony.

    PubMed

    Somel, Mehmet; Rohlfs, Rori; Liu, Xiling

    2014-12-01

    Primate brain transcriptome comparisons within the last 12 years have yielded interesting but contradictory observations on how the transcriptome evolves, and its adaptive role in human cognitive evolution. Since the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, the human prefrontal cortex transcriptome seems to have evolved more than that of the chimpanzee. But at the same time, most expression differences among species, especially those observed in adults, appear as consequences of neutral evolution at cis-regulatory sites. Adaptive expression changes in the human brain may be rare events involving timing shifts, or heterochrony, in specific neurodevelopmental processes. Disentangling adaptive and neutral expression changes, and associating these with human-specific features of the brain require improved methods, comparisons across more species, and further work on comparative development.

  19. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, premain sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we developed much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; measured disk accretion rates in these systems; and constructed detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions such as grain growth in protoplanetary disks.

  20. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, pre-main sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we are developing much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; measuring disk accretion rates in these systems; and constructing detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions such as grain growth in protoplanetary disks.

  1. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, pre-main sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we are developing much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; measuring disk accretion rates in these systems; and constructing detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions such as grain growth in protoplanetary disks.

  2. Sequence diversity and evolution of antimicrobial peptides in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Amparyup, Piti

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are evolutionarily ancient molecules that act as the key components in the invertebrate innate immunity against invading pathogens. Several AMPs have been identified and characterized in invertebrates, and found to display considerable diversity in their amino acid sequence, structure and biological activity. AMP genes appear to have rapidly evolved, which might have arisen from the co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogens, and enabled organisms to survive in different microbial environments. Here, the sequence diversity of invertebrate AMPs (defensins, cecropins, crustins and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors) are presented to provide a better understanding of the evolution pattern of these peptides that play a major role in host defense mechanisms.

  3. Evolution of dispersal and life history interact to drive accelerating spread of an invasive species.

    PubMed

    Perkins, T Alex; Phillips, Benjamin L; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Populations on the edge of an expanding range are subject to unique evolutionary pressures acting on their life-history and dispersal traits. Empirical evidence and theory suggest that traits there can evolve rapidly enough to interact with ecological dynamics, potentially giving rise to accelerating spread. Nevertheless, which of several evolutionary mechanisms drive this interaction between evolution and spread remains an open question. We propose an integrated theoretical framework for partitioning the contributions of different evolutionary mechanisms to accelerating spread, and we apply this model to invasive cane toads in northern Australia. In doing so, we identify a previously unrecognised evolutionary process that involves an interaction between life-history and dispersal evolution during range shift. In roughly equal parts, life-history evolution, dispersal evolution and their interaction led to a doubling of distance spread by cane toads in our model, highlighting the potential importance of multiple evolutionary processes in the dynamics of range expansion.

  4. An Evolution Based Biosensor Receptor DNA Sequence Generation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements. PMID:22315543

  5. Stellar evolution from the zero-age main sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, J. G.; Demarque, P.; Sweigart, A. V.; Gross, P. G.

    1979-01-01

    A consistent set of 247 evolutionary sequences extending from the ZAMS to the red-giant branch is presented for Y from 0.10 to 0.40, Z from 0.00001 to 0.10, and masses of 0.55 to 6.90 solar masses. Each sequence is started from a homogeneous ZAMS model, and almost all are evolved to the base of the red-giant branch. It is shown that: (1) the relative position of the main sequence can be determined as a function of composition; (2) theoretical luminosity functions can be derived from the relative evolutionary time scales; (3) a dip in luminosity sometimes occurs at the base of the red-giant branch and is most pronounced at larger Z values; (4) metal-poor stars evolve farther up along the main sequence before turning off toward the red-giant branch; and (5) the onset of helium burning halts the evolution across the Hertzsprung gap for the most massive and most metal-poor models, so that the star remains blue during its phase of core-helium burning.

  6. Convergence acceleration for vector sequences and applications to computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram; Celestina, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    Some recent developments in acceleration of convergence methods for vector sequences are reviewed. The methods considered are the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the modified minimal polynomial extrapolation. The vector sequences to be accelerated are those that are obtained from the iterative solution of linear or nonlinear systems of equations. The convergence and stability properties of these methods as well as different ways of numerical implementation are discussed in detail. Based on the convergence and stability results, strategies that are useful in practical applications are suggested. Two applications to computational fluid mechanics involving the three dimensional Euler equations for ducted and external flows are considered. The numerical results demonstrate the usefulness of the methods in accelerating the convergence of the time marching techniques in the solution of steady state problems.

  7. Convergence acceleration for vector sequences and applications to computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram; Celestina, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    Some recent developments in acceleration of convergence methods for vector sequences are reviewed. The methods considered are the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the modified minimal polynomial extrapolation. The vector sequences to be accelerated are those that are obtained from the iterative solution of linear or nonlinear systems of equations. The convergence and stability properties of these methods as well as different ways of numerical implementation are discussed in detail. Based on the convergence and stability results, strategies that are useful in practical applications are suggested. Two applications to computational fluid mechanics involving the three dimensional Euler equations for ducted and external flows are considered. The numerical results demonstrate the usefulness of the methods in accelerating the convergence of the time marching techniques in the solution of steady state problems.

  8. Test Sequence for Superconducting XFEL Cavities in the Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffran, J.; Petersen, B.; Reschke, D.; Swierblewski, J.

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2016 onwards, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The main part of the superconducting European XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF) at DESY. This paper gives an overview of the test sequences for the superconducting cavities, applied in the preparation area and at the two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall, and describes the complete area. In addition it summarizes the tests and lessons learnt until the middle of 2014.

  9. Tropics accelerate the evolution of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yukilevich, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that facilitate speciation and explain global patterns of species diversity has remained a challenge for decades. The most general pattern of species biodiversity is the latitudinal gradient, whereby species richness increases toward the tropics. Although such a global pattern probably has a multitude of causes, recent attention has focused on the hypothesis that speciation and the evolution of reproductive isolation occur faster in the tropics. Here, I tested this prediction using a dataset on premating and postzygotic isolation between recently diverged Drosophila species. Results showed that while the evolution of premating isolation was not greater between tropical Drosophila relative to nontropical species, postzygotic isolation evolved faster in the tropics. In particular, hybrid male sterility was much greater among tropical Drosophila compared to nontropical species pairs of similar genetic age. Several testable explanations for the novel pattern are discussed, including greater role for sterility-inducing bacterial endosymbionts in the tropics and more intense sperm-sperm competition or sperm-egg sexual conflict in the tropics. The results imply that processes of speciation in the tropics may evolve at different rates or may even be somewhat different from those at higher latitudes.

  10. Impact of small repeat sequences on bacterial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Delihas, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Intergenic regions of prokaryotic genomes carry multiple copies of terminal inverted repeat (TIR) sequences, the nonautonomous miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE). In addition, there are the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences that fold into a small stem loop rich in G-C bonding. And the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) display similar small stem loops but are an integral part of a complex genetic element. Other classes of repeats such as the REP2 element do not have TIRs but show other signatures. With the current availability of a large number of whole-genome sequences, many new repeat elements have been discovered. These sequences display diverse properties. Some show an intimate linkage to integrons, and at least one encodes a small RNA. Many repeats are found fused with chromosomal open reading frames, and some are located within protein coding sequences. Small repeat units appear to work hand in hand with the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional apparatus of the cell. Functionally, they are multifaceted, and this can range from the control of gene expression, the facilitation of host/pathogen interactions, or stimulation of the mammalian immune system. The CRISPR complex displays dramatic functions such as an acquired immune system that defends against invading viruses and plasmids. Evolutionarily, mobile repeat elements may have influenced a cycle of active versus inactive genes in ancestral organisms, and some repeats are concentrated in regions of the chromosome where there is significant genomic plasticity. Changes in the abundance of genomic repeats during the evolution of an organism may have resulted in a benefit to the cell or posed a disadvantage, and some present day species may reflect a purification process. The diverse structure, eclectic functions, and evolutionary aspects of repeat elements are described.

  11. Origin of noncoding DNA sequences: molecular fossils of genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Naora, H; Miyahara, K; Curnow, R N

    1987-09-01

    The total amount of noncoding sequences on chromosomes of contemporary organisms varies significantly from species to species. We propose a hypothesis for the origin of these noncoding sequences that assumes that (i) an approximately equal to 0.55-kilobase (kb)-long reading frame composed the primordial gene and (ii) a 20-kb-long single-stranded polynucleotide is the longest molecule (as a genome) that was polymerized at random and without a specific template in the primordial soup/cell. The statistical distribution of stop codons allows examination of the probability of generating reading frames of approximately equal to 0.55 kb in this primordial polynucleotide. This analysis reveals that with three stop codons, a run of at least 0.55-kb equivalent length of nonstop codons would occur in 4.6% of 20-kb-long polynucleotide molecules. We attempt to estimate the total amount of noncoding sequences that would be present on the chromosomes of contemporary species assuming that present-day chromosomes retain the prototype primordial genome structure. Theoretical estimates thus obtained for most eukaryotes do not differ significantly from those reported for these specific organisms, with only a few exceptions. Furthermore, analysis of possible stop-codon distributions suggests that life on earth would not exist, at least in its present form, had two or four stop codons been selected early in evolution.

  12. Instability evolution in shock-accelerated inclined heavy gas cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Dell; Wayne, Patrick; Vorobieff, Peter; Davis, Daniel; Truman, C. Randall

    2014-11-01

    A heavy gas cylinder interacts with a normal or oblique shockwave at Mach numbers M ranging from 1.13 to 2.0. The angle between the shock front and cylinder axis is varied between 0 and 30°, while the Atwood numbers A range from 0.25 (SF6-N2 mix) to 0.67 (pure SF6). The evolution of the column is imaged in two perpendicular planes with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). For oblique shock interactions, the nature of the flow is fully three-dimensional, with several instabilities developing in separate directions. In the plane that captures a cross-section of the column, Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) leads to formation of a pair of counter-rotating vortex columns. A uniform scaling appears to govern the primary instability growth in this plane across the M and A ranges, when the length scale is normalized by a product of the minimum streamwise scale after shock compression and M0.5. In the vertical plane through the column, Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices form with regular spacing along the column. The dominant wavelength of the structures in the vertical plane also appears to scale with the minimum compressed streamwise length. This research is supported by the US DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Grant DE-NA0002220.

  13. Simplified models for the evolution of supernova remnants including particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Voelk, H. J.

    1989-11-01

    A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is presented which models the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of the Galactic cosmic rays. In contrast to earlier two-fluid models the closure parameters needed for a hydrodynamic approximation of the cosmic ray 'gas' are not taken as prescribed constants but are estimated dynamically within the model. Diffusive coupling between the outer shock and the remnant interior is introduced; this is shown to be an important moderator of the acceleration as is heating of the thermal plasma by Alfven wave dissipation. For reasonable estimates of the suprathermal particle injection rate into the acceleration process, of the diffusion coefficient appropriate to the accelerated particles, of the coupling between interior and shock, and of wave heating, solutions are found which appear consistent both with observations of young remnants and the idea that the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays are produced in supernova remnants.

  14. Spectroscopic evolution of massive stars on the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Palacios, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars depends on several parameters, and the relation between different morphological types is not fully constrained. Aims: We aim to provide an observational view of evolutionary models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, on the main sequence. This view should help compare observations and model predictions. Methods: We first computed evolutionary models with the code STAREVOL for initial masses between 15 and 100 M⊙. We subsequently calculated atmosphere models at specific points along the evolutionary tracks, using the code CMFGEN. Synthetic spectra obtained in this way were classified as if they were observational data: we assigned them a spectral type and a luminosity class. We tested our spectral classification by comparison to observed spectra of various stars with different spectral types. We also compared our results with empirical data of a large number of OB stars. Results: We obtain spectroscopic sequences along evolutionary tracks. In our computations, the earliest O stars (O2-3.5) appear only above 50 M⊙. For later spectral types, a similar mass limit exists, but is lower. A luminosity class V does not correspond to the entire main sequence. This only holds for the 15 M⊙ track. As mass increases, a larger portion of the main sequence is spent in luminosity class III. Above 50 M⊙, supergiants appear before the end of core-hydrogen burning. Dwarf stars (luminosity class V) do not occur on the zero-age main sequence above 80 M⊙. Consequently, the distribution of luminosity class V in the HR diagram is not a diagnostic of the length of the main sequence (above 15 M⊙) and cannot be used to constrain the size of the convective core. The distribution of dwarfs and giants in the HR diagram that results from our calculations agrees well with the location of stars analyzed by means of quantitative spectroscopy. For supergiants, there is a slight discrepancy in the sense that luminosity class I is observed slightly

  15. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  16. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, pre-main sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we plan to: (1) Develop much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; (2) Study the dusty emission and accretion rates in these systems, with ages closer to the expected epoch of (giant) planet formation at 3-10 Myr; and (3) Develop detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions in protoplanetary disks and to constrain possible grain growth as the first stage of planetesimal formation.

  17. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, pre-main sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we: (1) Developed detailed calculations of disk structure to study physical conditions and investigate the observational effects of grain growth in T Tauri disks; (2) Studied the dusty emission and accretion rates in older disk systems, with ages closer to the expected epoch of (giant) planet formation at 3-10 Myr, and (3) Began a project to develop much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution.

  18. Primordial stellar evolution - The pre-main-sequence phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, S. W.; Palla, F.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The quasi-static contraction of primordial stars composed of pure hydrogen and helium gas is studied by following numerically the evolution of a star of five solar masses from the end of protostellar accretion to the onset of hydrogen burning. Although the protostellar core of this mass is radiatively stable and undergoing nonhomologous contraction, its large surface area and luminosity force the star to a partially convective, homologously contracting state within only 100 yr. Deuterium later ignites at an off-center temperature maximum but fails to produce interior convection. The star follows a conventional premain sequence track in the HR diagram, reaching the ZAMS after 1.2 million yr, with a luminosity of 880 solar luminosities and a radius of 1.2 solar radii.

  19. Clinical sequencing uncovers origins and evolution of Lassa virus

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Matranga, Christian B.; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E.; Moses, Lina M.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M.; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M.; Gire, Stephen K.; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J.; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M.; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S.; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G.; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B.; Lander, Eric S.; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Akpede, George O.; Asogun, Danny A.; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z.; Happi, Christian T.; Garry, Robert F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us how little is known about biosafety level-4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:26276630

  20. Natural recombination in alphaherpesviruses: Insights into viral evolution through full genome sequencing and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Loncoman, Carlos A; Vaz, Paola K; Coppo, Mauricio Jc; Hartley, Carol A; Morera, Francisco J; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2017-04-01

    Recombination in alphaherpesviruses was first described more than sixty years ago. Since then, different techniques have been used to detect recombination in natural (field) and experimental settings. Over the last ten years, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and bioinformatic analyses have greatly increased the accuracy of recombination detection, particularly in field settings, thus contributing greatly to the study of natural alphaherpesvirus recombination in both human and veterinary medicine. Such studies have highlighted the important role that natural recombination plays in the evolution of many alphaherpesviruses. These studies have also shown that recombination can be a safety concern for attenuated alphaherpesvirus vaccines, particularly in veterinary medicine where such vaccines are used extensively, but also potentially in human medicine where attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccines are in use. This review focuses on the contributions that NGS and sequence analysis have made over the last ten years to our understanding of recombination in mammalian and avian alphaherpesviruses, with particular focus on attenuated live vaccine use.

  1. Tumour evolution inferred by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Kendall, Jude; Troge, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter; Rodgers, Linda; McIndoo, Jeanne; Cook, Kerry; Stepansky, Asya; Levy, Dan; Esposito, Diane; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Krasnitz, Alex; McCombie, W Richard; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2011-04-07

    Genomic analysis provides insights into the role of copy number variation in disease, but most methods are not designed to resolve mixed populations of cells. In tumours, where genetic heterogeneity is common, very important information may be lost that would be useful for reconstructing evolutionary history. Here we show that with flow-sorted nuclei, whole genome amplification and next generation sequencing we can accurately quantify genomic copy number within an individual nucleus. We apply single-nucleus sequencing to investigate tumour population structure and evolution in two human breast cancer cases. Analysis of 100 single cells from a polygenomic tumour revealed three distinct clonal subpopulations that probably represent sequential clonal expansions. Additional analysis of 100 single cells from a monogenomic primary tumour and its liver metastasis indicated that a single clonal expansion formed the primary tumour and seeded the metastasis. In both primary tumours, we also identified an unexpectedly abundant subpopulation of genetically diverse 'pseudodiploid' cells that do not travel to the metastatic site. In contrast to gradual models of tumour progression, our data indicate that tumours grow by punctuated clonal expansions with few persistent intermediates.

  2. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  3. Seventeen New Complete mtDNA Sequences Reveal Extensive Mitochondrial Genome Evolution within the Demospongiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2008-01-01

    Two major transitions in animal evolution–the origins of multicellularity and bilaterality–correlate with major changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. Demosponges, the largest class in the phylum Porifera, underwent only the first of these transitions and their mitochondrial genomes display a peculiar combination of ancestral and animal-specific features. To get an insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Demospongiae, we determined 17 new mtDNA sequences from this group and analyzing them with five previously published sequences. Our analysis revealed that all demosponge mtDNAs are 16- to 25-kbp circular molecules, containing 13–15 protein genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2–27 tRNA genes. All but four pairs of sampled genomes had unique gene orders, with the number of shared gene boundaries ranging from 1 to 41. Although most demosponge species displayed low rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, a significant acceleration in evolutionary rates occurred in the G1 group (orders Dendroceratida, Dictyoceratida, and Verticillitida). Large variation in mtDNA organization was also observed within the G0 group (order Homosclerophorida) including gene rearrangements, loss of tRNA genes, and the presence of two introns in Plakortis angulospiculatus. While introns are rare in modern-day demosponge mtDNA, we inferred that at least one intron was present in cox1 of the common ancestor of all demosponges. Our study uncovered an extensive mitochondrial genomic diversity within the Demospongiae. Although all sampled mitochondrial genomes retained some ancestral features, including a minimally modified genetic code, conserved structures of tRNA genes, and presence of multiple non-coding regions, they vary considerably in their size, gene content, gene order, and the rates of sequence evolution. Some of the changes in demosponge mtDNA, such as the loss of tRNA genes and the appearance of hairpin-containing repetitive elements, occurred in

  4. The accelerated build-up of the red sequence in high-redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerulo, P.; Couch, W. J.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Barrientos, L. F.; Muñoz, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.8 < z < 1.5 taken from the HAWK-I Cluster Survey (HCS). The comparison with the low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.08) sample of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and other literature results shows that the slope and intrinsic scatter of the cluster red sequence have undergone little evolution since z = 1.5. We find that the luminous-to-faint ratio and the slope of the faint end of the luminosity distribution of the HCS red sequence are consistent with those measured in WINGS, implying that there is no deficit of red galaxies at magnitudes fainter than M_V^{ast } at high redshifts. We find that the most massive HCS clusters host a population of bright red sequence galaxies at MV < -22.0 mag, which are not observed in low-mass clusters. Interestingly, we also note the presence of a population of very bright (MV < -23.0 mag) and massive (log (M*/M⊙) > 11.5) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than z = 0.8. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range 0.8 < zphot < 1.5 shows that the red sequence in clusters is more developed at the faint end, suggesting that halo mass plays an important role in setting the time-scales for the build-up of the red sequence.

  5. Assessing site-interdependent phylogenetic models of sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2006-09-01

    In recent works, methods have been proposed for applying phylogenetic models that allow for a general interdependence between the amino acid positions of a protein. As of yet, such models have focused on site interdependencies resulting from sequence-structure compatibility constraints, using simplified structural representations in combination with a set of statistical potentials. This structural compatibility criterion is meant as a proxy for sequence fitness, and the methods developed thus far can incorporate different site-interdependent fitness proxies based on other measurements. However, no methods have been proposed for comparing and evaluating the adequacy of alternative fitness proxies in this context, or for more general comparisons with canonical models of protein evolution. In the present work, we apply Bayesian methods of model selection-based on numerical calculations of marginal likelihoods and posterior predictive checks-to evaluate models encompassing the site-interdependent framework. Our application of these methods indicates that considering site-interdependencies, as done here, leads to an improved model fit for all data sets studied. Yet, we find that the use of pairwise contact potentials alone does not suitably account for across-site rate heterogeneity or amino acid exchange propensities; for such complexities, site-independent treatments are still called for. The most favored models combine the use of statistical potentials with a suitably rich site-independent model. Altogether, the methodology employed here should allow for a more rigorous and systematic exploration of different ways of modeling explicit structural constraints, or any other site-interdependent criterion, while best exploiting the richness of previously proposed models.

  6. Does vocal learning accelerate acoustic diversification? Evolution of contact calls in Neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Medina-García, A; Araya-Salas, M; Wright, T F

    2015-10-01

    Learning has been traditionally thought to accelerate the evolutionary change of behavioural traits. We evaluated the evolutionary rate of learned vocalizations and the interplay of morphology and ecology in the evolution of these signals. We examined contact calls of 51 species of Neotropical parrots from the tribe Arini. Parrots are ideal subjects due to their wide range of body sizes and habitats, and their open-ended vocal learning that allows them to modify their calls throughout life. We estimated the evolutionary rate of acoustic parameters of parrot contact calls and compared them to those of morphological traits and habitat. We also evaluated the effect of body mass, bill length, vegetation density and species interactions on acoustic parameters of contact calls while controlling for phylogeny. Evolutionary rates of acoustic parameters did not differ from those of our predictor variables except for spectral entropy, which had a significantly slower rate of evolution. We found support for correlated evolution of call duration, and fundamental and peak frequencies with body mass, and of fundamental frequency with bill length. The degree of sympatry between species did not have a significant effect on acoustic parameters. Our results suggest that parrot contact calls, which are learned acoustic signals, show evolutionary rates similar to those of morphological traits. This is the first study to our knowledge to provide evidence that change through cultural evolution does not necessarily accelerate the evolutionary rate of traits acquired through life-long vocal learning.

  7. Effects of different kinds of essentiality on sequence evolution of human testis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Julia; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2017-01-01

    We asked if essentiality for either fertility or viability differentially affects sequence evolution of human testis proteins. Based on murine knockout data, we classified a set of 965 proteins expressed in human seminiferous tubules into three categories: proteins essential for prepubertal survival (“lethality proteins”), associated with male sub- or infertility (“male sub-/infertility proteins”), and nonessential proteins. In our testis protein dataset, lethality genes evolved significantly slower than nonessential and male sub-/infertility genes, which is in line with other authors’ findings. Using tissue specificity, connectivity in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, and multifunctionality as proxies for evolutionary constraints, we found that of the three categories, proteins linked to male sub- or infertility are least constrained. Lethality proteins, on the other hand, are characterized by broad expression, many PPI partners, and high multifunctionality, all of which points to strong evolutionary constraints. We conclude that compared with lethality proteins, those linked to male sub- or infertility are nonetheless indispensable, but evolve under more relaxed constraints. Finally, adaptive evolution in response to postmating sexual selection could further accelerate evolutionary rates of male sub- or infertility proteins expressed in human testis. These findings may become useful for in silico detection of human sub-/infertility genes. PMID:28272493

  8. Prof. Hayashi's work on the pre-main sequence evolution and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takenori

    2012-09-01

    Prof. Hayashi's work on the evolution of stars in the pre-main sequence stage is reviewed. The historical background and the process of finding the Hayashi phase are mentioned. The work on the evolution of low-mass stars is also reviewed including the determination of the bottom of the main sequence and evolution of brown dwarfs, and comparison is made with the other works in the same period.

  9. Repetitive sequences in plant nuclear DNA: types, distribution, evolution and function.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2014-08-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences are a major component of eukaryotic genomes and may account for up to 90% of the genome size. They can be divided into minisatellite, microsatellite and satellite sequences. Satellite DNA sequences are considered to be a fast-evolving component of eukaryotic genomes, comprising tandemly-arrayed, highly-repetitive and highly-conserved monomer sequences. The monomer unit of satellite DNA is 150-400 base pairs (bp) in length. Repetitive sequences may be species- or genus-specific, and may be centromeric or subtelomeric in nature. They exhibit cohesive and concerted evolution caused by molecular drive, leading to high sequence homogeneity. Repetitive sequences accumulate variations in sequence and copy number during evolution, hence they are important tools for taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, and are known as "tuning knobs" in the evolution. Therefore, knowledge of repetitive sequences assists our understanding of the organization, evolution and behavior of eukaryotic genomes. Repetitive sequences have cytoplasmic, cellular and developmental effects and play a role in chromosomal recombination. In the post-genomics era, with the introduction of next-generation sequencing technology, it is possible to evaluate complex genomes for analyzing repetitive sequences and deciphering the yet unknown functional potential of repetitive sequences.

  10. Repetitive Sequences in Plant Nuclear DNA: Types, Distribution, Evolution and Function

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences are a major component of eukaryotic genomes and may account for up to 90% of the genome size. They can be divided into minisatellite, microsatellite and satellite sequences. Satellite DNA sequences are considered to be a fast-evolving component of eukaryotic genomes, comprising tandemly-arrayed, highly-repetitive and highly-conserved monomer sequences. The monomer unit of satellite DNA is 150–400 base pairs (bp) in length. Repetitive sequences may be species- or genus-specific, and may be centromeric or subtelomeric in nature. They exhibit cohesive and concerted evolution caused by molecular drive, leading to high sequence homogeneity. Repetitive sequences accumulate variations in sequence and copy number during evolution, hence they are important tools for taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, and are known as “tuning knobs” in the evolution. Therefore, knowledge of repetitive sequences assists our understanding of the organization, evolution and behavior of eukaryotic genomes. Repetitive sequences have cytoplasmic, cellular and developmental effects and play a role in chromosomal recombination. In the post-genomics era, with the introduction of next-generation sequencing technology, it is possible to evaluate complex genomes for analyzing repetitive sequences and deciphering the yet unknown functional potential of repetitive sequences. PMID:25132181

  11. STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Sargent, Anneila I.

    2009-08-10

    We present new subarcsecond ({approx}0.''7) Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of the 1.3 mm continuum emission from circumstellar disks around 11 low- and intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars. High-resolution observations for three additional sources were obtained from the literature. In all cases the disk emission is spatially resolved. We adopt a self-consistent accretion disk model based on the similarity solution for the disk surface density and constrain the dust radial density distribution on spatial scales of about 40 AU. Disk surface densities appear to be correlated with the stellar ages where the characteristic disk radius increases from {approx}20 AU to {approx}100 AU over about 5 Myr. This disk expansion is accompanied by a decrease in the mass accretion rate, suggesting that our sample disks form an evolutionary sequence. Interpreting our results in terms of the temporal evolution of a viscous {alpha}-disk, we estimate (1) that at the beginning of the disk evolution about 60% of the circumstellar material was located inside radii of 25-40 AU, (2) that disks formed with masses from 0.05 to 0.4 M {sub sun}, and (3) that the viscous timescale at the disk initial radius is about 0.1-0.3 Myr. Viscous disk models tightly link the surface density {sigma}(R) with the radial profile of the disk viscosity {nu}(R) {proportional_to} R {sup {gamma}}. We find values of {gamma} ranging from -0.8 to 0.8, suggesting that the viscosity dependence on the orbital radius can be very different in the observed disks. Adopting the {alpha} parameterization for the viscosity, we argue that {alpha} must decrease with the orbital radius and that it may vary between 0.5 and 10{sup -4}. From the inferred disk initial radii we derive specific angular momenta, j, for parent cores of (0.8 - 4) x 10{sup -4} km s{sup -1} pc. Comparison with the values of j in dense cores suggests that about 10% of core angular momentum and 30% of the core

  12. The Intervening Sequence of Coxiella burnetii: Characterization and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Indu; Walter, Mathias C.; Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Raghavan, Rahul; Hicks, Linda D.; Minnick, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The intervening sequence (IVS) of Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, is a 428-nt selfish genetic element located in helix 45 of the precursor 23S rRNA. The IVS element, in turn, contains an ORF that encodes a hypothetical ribosomal S23 protein (S23p). Although S23p can be synthesized in vitro in the presence of an engineered E. coli promoter and ribosome binding site, results suggest that the protein is not synthesized in vivo. In spite of a high degree of IVS conservation among different strains of C. burnetii, the region immediately upstream of the S23p start codon is prone to change, and the S23p-encoding ORF is evidently undergoing reductive evolution. We determined that IVS excision from 23S rRNA was mediated by RNase III, and IVS RNA was rapidly degraded, thereafter. Levels of the resulting 23S rRNA fragments that flank the IVS, F1 (~1.2 kb) and F2 (~1.7 kb), were quantified over C. burnetii's logarithmic growth phase (1–5 d). Results showed that 23S F1 quantities were consistently higher than those of F2 and 16S rRNA. The disparity between levels of the two 23S rRNA fragments following excision of IVS is an interesting phenomenon of unknown significance. Based upon phylogenetic analyses, IVS was acquired through horizontal transfer after C. burnetii's divergence from an ancestral bacterium and has been subsequently maintained by vertical transfer. The widespread occurrence, maintenance and conservation of the IVS in C. burnetii imply that it plays an adaptive role or has a neutral effect on fitness. PMID:27595093

  13. Cancer Genome Sequencing: Understanding Malignancy as a Disease of the Genome, its Conformation, and its Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Lalit R.; Nykter, Matti; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Advances in cancer genomics have been propelled by the steady evolution of molecular profiling technologies. Over the past decade, high-throughput sequencing technologies have matured to the point necessary to support disease-specific shotgun sequencing. This has compelled whole-genome sequencing studies across a broad panel of malignancies. The emergence of high-throughput sequencing technologies has inspired new chemical and computational techniques enabling interrogation of cancer-specific genomic and transcriptomic variants, previously unannotated genes, and chromatin structure. Finally, recent progress in single-cell sequencing holds great promise for studies interrogating the consequences of tumor evolution in cancers presenting with genomic heterogeneity. PMID:23111104

  14. Universal Sequence Replication, Reversible Polymerization and Early Functional Biopolymers: A Model for the Initiation of Prebiotic Sequence Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sara Imari; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2012-01-01

    Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles) that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for regularly varying monomer

  15. Temporal evolution of the electric field accelerating electrons away from the auroral ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Marklund, G T; Ivchenko, N; Karlsson, T; Fazakerley, A; Dunlop, M; Lindqvist, P A; Buchert, S; Owen, C; Taylor, M; Vaivalds, A; Carter, P; André, M; Balogh, A

    2001-12-13

    The bright night-time aurorae that are visible to the unaided eye are caused by electrons accelerated towards Earth by an upward-pointing electric field. On adjacent geomagnetic field lines the reverse process occurs: a downward-pointing electric field accelerates electrons away from Earth. Such magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in the collisionless plasma above the auroral ionosphere have been predicted, but how they could be maintained is still a matter for debate. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the electric fields-a knowledge of which is crucial to an understanding of their nature-cannot be resolved uniquely by single satellite measurements. Here we report on the first observations by a formation of identically instrumented satellites crossing a beam of upward-accelerated electrons. The structure of the electric potential accelerating the beam grew in magnitude and width for about 200 s, accompanied by a widening of the downward-current sheet, with the total current remaining constant. The 200-s timescale suggests that the evacuation of the electrons from the ionosphere contributes to the formation of the downward-pointing magnetic-field-aligned electric fields. This evolution implies a growing load in the downward leg of the current circuit, which may affect the visible discrete aurorae.

  16. Reconstructing the Dynamics of HIV Evolution within Hosts from Serial Deep Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Art F. Y.; Swenson, Luke C.; Bunnik, Evelien M.; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Harrigan, P. Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a ‘fitness valley’ separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant. PMID:23133358

  17. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  18. The evolution of the Voyager mission sequence software and trends for future mission sequence software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Robert N., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The historical background of the spacecraft sequence generation process as it is represented by the Voyager mission to the outer planets is discussed. Present plans for future sequencing methods are examined, including the emphasis on cutting costs and the contrast between the centralized and distributed systems for sequencing. The use of artificial intelligence in mission sequencing is addressed.

  19. On the origins of birds: the sequence of character acquisition in the evolution of avian flight

    PubMed Central

    Garner, J. P.; Taylor, G. K.; Thomas, A. L. R.

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of competing theories for the evolution of avian flight is problematic, and tends to rest too heavily on reconstruction of the mode of life of one or a few specimens representing still fewer species. A more powerful method is to compare the sequence of character acquisition predicted by the various theories with the empirical sequence provided by cladistic phylogeny. Arboreal and cursorial theories incorrectly predict the sequence of character acquisition for several key features of avian evolution. We propose an alternative 'pouncing proavis' model for the evolution of flight. As well as being both biologically and evolutionarily plausible, the pouncing proavis model correctly predicts the evolutionary sequence of all five key features marking the evolution of birds.

  20. Phylogenetic Relationships and the Evolution of Regulatory Gene Sequences in the Parrotfishes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lydia L.; Fessler, Jennifer L.; Alfaro, Michael E.; Streelman, J. Todd; Westneat, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory genes control the expression of other genes and are key components of developmental processes such as segmentation and embryonic construction of the skull in vertebrates. Here we examine the variability and evolution of three vertebrate regulatory genes, addressing issues of their utility for phylogenetics and comparing the rates of genetic change seen in regulatory loci to the rates seen in other genes in the parrotfishes. The parrotfishes are a diverse group of colorful fishes from coral reefs and seagrasses worldwide and have been placed phylogenetically within the family Labridae. We tested phylogenetic hypotheses among the parrotfishes, with a focus on the genera Chlorurus and Scarus, by analyzing eight gene fragments for 42 parrotfishes and eight outgroup species. We sequenced mitochondrial 12s rRNA (967 bp), 16s rRNA (577 bp), and cytochrome b (477 bp). From the nuclear genome, we sequenced part of the protein-coding genes rag2 (715 bp), tmo4c4 (485 bp), and the developmental regulatory genes otx1 (672 bp), bmp4 (488 bp), and dlx2 (522 bp). Bayesian, likelihood, and parsimony analyses on the resulting 4903 bp of DNA sequence produced similar topologies that confirm the monophyly of the scarines and provide a phylogeny at the species level for portions of the genera Scarus and Chlorurus. Four major clades of Scarus were recovered, with three distributed in the Indo-Pacific and one containing Caribbean/Atlantic taxa. Molecular rates suggest a Miocene origin of the parrotfishes (22 mya) and a recent divergence of species within Scarus and Chlorurus, within the past 5 million years. Developmentally important genes made a significant contribution to phylogenetic structure, and rates of genetic evolution were high in bmp4, similar to other coding nuclear genes, but low in otx1 and the dlx2 exons. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution patterns in developmental regulatory genes support the hypothesis of stabilizing selection during the history of

  1. Polynomial chaos expansion in structural dynamics: Accelerating the convergence of the first two statistical moment sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquelin, E.; Adhikari, S.; Sinou, J.-J.; Friswell, M. I.

    2015-11-01

    Polynomial chaos solution for the frequency response of linear non-proportionally damped dynamic systems has been considered. It has been observed that for lightly damped systems the convergence of the solution can be very poor in the vicinity of the deterministic resonance frequencies. To address this, Aitken's transformation and its generalizations are suggested. The proposed approach is successfully applied to the sequences defined by the first two moments of the responses, and this process significantly accelerates the polynomial chaos convergence. In particular, a 2-dof system with respectively 1 and 2 parameter uncertainties has been studied. The first two moments of the frequency response were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, polynomial chaos expansion and Aitken's transformation of the polynomial chaos expansion. Whereas 200 polynomials are required to have a good agreement with Monte Carlo results around the deterministic eigenfrequencies, less than 50 polynomials transformed by the Aitken's method are enough. This latter result is improved if a generalization of Aitken's method (recursive Aitken's transformation, Shank's transformation) is applied. With the proposed convergence acceleration, polynomial chaos may be reconsidered as an efficient method to estimate the first two moments of a random dynamic response.

  2. GPU-Acceleration of Sequence Homology Searches with Database Subsequence Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shuji; Kakuta, Masanori; Ishida, Takashi; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Sequence homology searches are used in various fields and require large amounts of computation time, especially for metagenomic analysis, owing to the large number of queries and the database size. To accelerate computing analyses, graphics processing units (GPUs) are widely used as a low-cost, high-performance computing platform. Therefore, we mapped the time-consuming steps involved in GHOSTZ, which is a state-of-the-art homology search algorithm for protein sequences, onto a GPU and implemented it as GHOSTZ-GPU. In addition, we optimized memory access for GPU calculations and for communication between the CPU and GPU. As per results of the evaluation test involving metagenomic data, GHOSTZ-GPU with 12 CPU threads and 1 GPU was approximately 3.0- to 4.1-fold faster than GHOSTZ with 12 CPU threads. Moreover, GHOSTZ-GPU with 12 CPU threads and 3 GPUs was approximately 5.8- to 7.7-fold faster than GHOSTZ with 12 CPU threads. PMID:27482905

  3. GPU-Acceleration of Sequence Homology Searches with Database Subsequence Clustering.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Kakuta, Masanori; Ishida, Takashi; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Sequence homology searches are used in various fields and require large amounts of computation time, especially for metagenomic analysis, owing to the large number of queries and the database size. To accelerate computing analyses, graphics processing units (GPUs) are widely used as a low-cost, high-performance computing platform. Therefore, we mapped the time-consuming steps involved in GHOSTZ, which is a state-of-the-art homology search algorithm for protein sequences, onto a GPU and implemented it as GHOSTZ-GPU. In addition, we optimized memory access for GPU calculations and for communication between the CPU and GPU. As per results of the evaluation test involving metagenomic data, GHOSTZ-GPU with 12 CPU threads and 1 GPU was approximately 3.0- to 4.1-fold faster than GHOSTZ with 12 CPU threads. Moreover, GHOSTZ-GPU with 12 CPU threads and 3 GPUs was approximately 5.8- to 7.7-fold faster than GHOSTZ with 12 CPU threads.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  5. Genome sequencing of the extinct Eurasian wild aurochs illuminates the phylogeography and evolution of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interrogation of modern and ancient bovine genome sequences provides a valuable model to study the evolution of cattle. Here, we analyse the first complete wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) genome sequence using DNA extracted from a ~ 6,750 year-old humerus bone retrieved from a cave site in Derbyshire...

  6. Skeletal ossification and sequence heterochrony in xenarthran evolution.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali; Knight, Frank; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Asher, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Previous analyses of how mammals vary in their ossification sequences have focused on monotremes, marsupials, and boreoeutherian placentals. Here, we focus on the sequence of cranial and postcranial ossification events during growth in the xenarthran skull and skeleton, including armadillos, anteaters, and sloths. We use two different methods to quantify sequence heterochrony: sequence analysis of variance (ANOVA) and event-paring/Parsimov. Our results indicate that Parsimov is conservative and does not detect clear heterochronic shifts between xenarthran and boreoeutherian placentals. Sequence-ANOVA performs better, but both methods exhibit sensitivity to the artifactual accumulation of ties. By controlling for ties and taking into account results that the methods have in common, our analysis suggests that xenarthrans significantly differ from other placentals by a late ossification of the sternum and an early ossification of the phalanges and pubis. We interpret these differences as showing that heterochrony plays a role in the skeletal development of xenarthrans, a change from previous studies that have emphasized the developmental homogeneity of the skeleton across placental mammals.

  7. Multiplex Chromosomal Exome Sequencing Accelerates Identification of ENU-Induced Mutations in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Mondal, Kajari; Patel, Viren; Horner, Vanessa L; Long, Alyssa B; Cutler, David J; Caspary, Tamara; Zwick, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Mus musculus have proved powerfully informative by revealing unsuspected mechanisms governing basic biological processes. This approach uses potent chemical mutagens, such as N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), to randomly induce mutations in mice, which are then bred and phenotypically screened to identify lines that disrupt a specific biological process of interest. Although identifying a mutation using the rich resources of mouse genetics is straightforward, it is unfortunately neither fast nor cheap. Here we show that detecting newly induced causal variants in a forward genetic screen can be accelerated dramatically using a methodology that combines multiplex chromosome-specific exome capture, next-generation sequencing, rapid mapping, sequence annotation, and variation filtering. The key innovation of our method is multiplex capture and sequence that allows the simultaneous survey of both mutant, parental, and background strains in a single experiment. By comparing variants identified in mutant offspring with those found in dbSNP, the unmutagenized background strains, and parental lines, induced causative mutations can be distinguished immediately from preexisting variation or experimental artifact. Here we demonstrate this approach to find the causative mutations induced in four novel ENU lines identified from a recent ENU screen. In all four cases, after applying our method, we found six or fewer putative mutations (and sometimes only a single one). Determining the causative variant was then easily achieved through standard segregation approaches. We have developed this process into a community resource that will speed up individual labs' ability to identify the genetic lesion in mutant mouse lines; all of our reagents and software tools are open source and available to the broader scientific community.

  8. Insights into vertebrate evolution from the chicken genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Rebecca F

    2005-01-01

    The chicken has recently joined the ever-growing list of fully sequenced animal genomes. Its unique features include expanded gene families involved in egg and feather production as well as more surprising large families, such as those for olfactory receptors. Comparisons with other vertebrate genomes move us closer to defining a set of essential vertebrate genes. PMID:15693954

  9. The tomato genome sequence provides insight into fleshy fruit evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the inbred tomato cultivar ‘Heinz 1706’ was sequenced and assembled using a combination of Sanger and “next generation” technologies. The predicted genome size is ~900 Mb, consistent with prior estimates, of which 760 Mb were assembled in 91 scaffolds aligned to the 12 tomato chromosom...

  10. Rapid evolution of cis-regulatory sequences via local point mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Wray, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the evolution of protein-coding sequences within genomes is well understood, the same cannot be said of the cis-regulatory regions that control transcription. Yet, changes in gene expression are likely to constitute an important component of phenotypic evolution. We simulated the evolution of new transcription factor binding sites via local point mutations. The results indicate that new binding sites appear and become fixed within populations on microevolutionary timescales under an assumption of neutral evolution. Even combinations of two new binding sites evolve very quickly. We predict that local point mutations continually generate considerable genetic variation that is capable of altering gene expression.

  11. Mid-Infrared Evidence for Accelerated Evolution in Compact Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hibbard, J. E.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Charlton, J. C.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2010-06-01

    We find evidence for accelerated evolution in compact group galaxies from the distribution in mid-infrared colorspace of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) compared to the distributions of several other samples including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are not uniformly distributed in colorspace, as well as quantitative evidence for a gap. Galaxies in the infall region of the Coma cluster also exhibit a non-uniform distribution and a less well defined gap, which may reflect a similarity with the compact group environment. Neither the Coma Center or interacting samples show evidence of a gap, leading us to speculate that the gap is unique to the environment of high galaxy density where gas has not been fully processed or stripped.

  12. Mid-Infrared Evidence for Accelerated Evolution in Compact Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, K. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hibbard, J. E.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Charlton, J. C.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We find evidence for accelerated evolution in compact group galaxies from the mid-infrared distribution in colorspace of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) and the distributions of several comparison samples including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are not uniformly distributed in colorspace, as well as quantitative evidence for a gap. Galaxies in the infall region of the Coma cluster also exhibit a non-uniform distribution and a less well defined gap, which may reflect a similarity with the compact group environment. None of the other samples we studied show evidence of a gap, leading us to speculate that it is unique to the environment present in compact groups and clusters; one of high density where gas has not been fully processed or stripped.

  13. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA·/TFA−, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts. PMID:26486863

  14. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA./TFA-, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts.

  15. Accelerated evolution of the Prdm9 speciation gene across diverse metazoan taxa.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Peter L; Goodstadt, Leo; Bayes, Joshua J; Birtle, Zoë; Roach, Kevin C; Phadnis, Nitin; Beatson, Scott A; Lunter, Gerton; Malik, Harmit S; Ponting, Chris P

    2009-12-01

    The onset of prezygotic and postzygotic barriers to gene flow between populations is a hallmark of speciation. One of the earliest postzygotic isolating barriers to arise between incipient species is the sterility of the heterogametic sex in interspecies' hybrids. Four genes that underlie hybrid sterility have been identified in animals: Odysseus, JYalpha, and Overdrive in Drosophila and Prdm9 (Meisetz) in mice. Mouse Prdm9 encodes a protein with a KRAB motif, a histone methyltransferase domain and several zinc fingers. The difference of a single zinc finger distinguishes Prdm9 alleles that cause hybrid sterility from those that do not. We find that concerted evolution and positive selection have rapidly altered the number and sequence of Prdm9 zinc fingers across 13 rodent genomes. The patterns of positive selection in Prdm9 zinc fingers imply that rapid evolution has acted on the interface between the Prdm9 protein and the DNA sequences to which it binds. Similar patterns are apparent for Prdm9 zinc fingers for diverse metazoans, including primates. Indeed, allelic variation at the DNA-binding positions of human PRDM9 zinc fingers show significant association with decreased risk of infertility. Prdm9 thus plays a role in determining male sterility both between species (mouse) and within species (human). The recurrent episodes of positive selection acting on Prdm9 suggest that the DNA sequences to which it binds must also be evolving rapidly. Our findings do not identify the nature of the underlying DNA sequences, but argue against the proposed role of Prdm9 as an essential transcription factor in mouse meiosis. We propose a hypothetical model in which incompatibilities between Prdm9-binding specificity and satellite DNAs provide the molecular basis for Prdm9-mediated hybrid sterility. We suggest that Prdm9 should be investigated as a candidate gene in other instances of hybrid sterility in metazoans.

  16. Evidence of accelerated evolution and ectodermal-specific expression of presumptive BDS toxin cDNAs from Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Aldo; Maggio, Teresa; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2013-10-30

    Anemonia viridis is a widespread and extensively studied Mediterranean species of sea anemone from which a large number of polypeptide toxins, such as blood depressing substances (BDS) peptides, have been isolated. The first members of this class, BDS-1 and BDS-2, are polypeptides belonging to the β-defensin fold family and were initially described for their antihypertensive and antiviral activities. BDS-1 and BDS-2 are 43 amino acid peptides characterised by three disulfide bonds that act as neurotoxins affecting Kv3.1, Kv3.2 and Kv3.4 channel gating kinetics. In addition, BDS-1 inactivates the Nav1.7 and Nav1.3 channels. The development of a large dataset of A. viridis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and the identification of 13 putative BDS-like cDNA sequences has attracted interest, especially as scientific and diagnostic tools. A comparison of BDS cDNA sequences showed that the untranslated regions are more conserved than the protein-coding regions. Moreover, the KA/KS ratios calculated for all pairwise comparisons showed values greater than 1, suggesting mechanisms of accelerated evolution. The structures of the BDS homologs were predicted by molecular modelling. All toxins possess similar 3D structures that consist of a triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and an additional small antiparallel β-sheet located downstream of the cleavage/maturation site; however, the orientation of the triple-stranded β-sheet appears to differ among the toxins. To characterise the spatial expression profile of the putative BDS cDNA sequences, tissue-specific cDNA libraries, enriched for BDS transcripts, were constructed. In addition, the proper amplification of ectodermal or endodermal markers ensured the tissue specificity of each library. Sequencing randomly selected clones from each library revealed ectodermal-specific expression of ten BDS transcripts, while transcripts of BDS-8, BDS-13, BDS-14 and BDS-15 failed to be retrieved, likely due to under-representation in our

  17. Evidence of Accelerated Evolution and Ectodermal-Specific Expression of Presumptive BDS Toxin cDNAs from Anemonia viridis

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, Aldo; Maggio, Teresa; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Anemonia viridis is a widespread and extensively studied Mediterranean species of sea anemone from which a large number of polypeptide toxins, such as blood depressing substances (BDS) peptides, have been isolated. The first members of this class, BDS-1 and BDS-2, are polypeptides belonging to the β-defensin fold family and were initially described for their antihypertensive and antiviral activities. BDS-1 and BDS-2 are 43 amino acid peptides characterised by three disulfide bonds that act as neurotoxins affecting Kv3.1, Kv3.2 and Kv3.4 channel gating kinetics. In addition, BDS-1 inactivates the Nav1.7 and Nav1.3 channels. The development of a large dataset of A. viridis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and the identification of 13 putative BDS-like cDNA sequences has attracted interest, especially as scientific and diagnostic tools. A comparison of BDS cDNA sequences showed that the untranslated regions are more conserved than the protein-coding regions. Moreover, the KA/KS ratios calculated for all pairwise comparisons showed values greater than 1, suggesting mechanisms of accelerated evolution. The structures of the BDS homologs were predicted by molecular modelling. All toxins possess similar 3D structures that consist of a triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and an additional small antiparallel β-sheet located downstream of the cleavage/maturation site; however, the orientation of the triple-stranded β-sheet appears to differ among the toxins. To characterise the spatial expression profile of the putative BDS cDNA sequences, tissue-specific cDNA libraries, enriched for BDS transcripts, were constructed. In addition, the proper amplification of ectodermal or endodermal markers ensured the tissue specificity of each library. Sequencing randomly selected clones from each library revealed ectodermal-specific expression of ten BDS transcripts, while transcripts of BDS-8, BDS-13, BDS-14 and BDS-15 failed to be retrieved, likely due to under-representation in our

  18. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Stellar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuin, N. Paul

    The best known low mass pre-main sequence stars, the T Tauri stars. have very active chromospheres and show a variable emission line spectrum. There is a large variety in activity amongst than. Recently another type of pre-main sequence stars was identified which may be post T Tauri stars (PTTS) and were named 'naked T Tauri stars' (NTTS). These PTTS/NTTS are strong X-Ray sources, and do not have a T Tauri type spectrum. The age of these sources is comparable to those of the T Tauri stars, which implies that either the activity evolves much faster in pre-main sequence stars than the timescale in which they move towards the main sequence, or that an external source is responsible for their activity. We propose to obtain low resolution long- and short wavelength RE spectra of two of the PTTS/NTTS and of a T Tauri star of comparable activity. Archival data will be used from three other T Tauri stars having larger activity. The data will enable us to derive models for the chromosphere and transition region. Those will clarify whether there is a gradual change in activity, or a sudden one as way be caused by the closing up of an open magnetic field. Because they cover a large range in chromoshperic activity the models will enable us to improve the alfven wave wind models used for T Tau and RU Lup. In particular the question of the wave dissipation scale length and wave leakage will be considered.

  19. Chloroplast gene sequences and the study of plant evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, M T

    1993-01-01

    A large body of sequence data has accumulated for the chloroplast-encoded gene ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) as the result of a cooperative effort involving many laboratories. The data span all seed plants, including most major lineages from the angiosperms, and as such they provide an unprecedented opportunity to study plant evolutionary history. The full analysis of this large data set poses many problems and opportunities for plant evolutionary biologists and for biostatisticians. PMID:8421667

  20. How evolution of genomes is reflected in exact DNA sequence match statistics.

    PubMed

    Massip, Florian; Sheinman, Michael; Schbath, Sophie; Arndt, Peter F

    2015-02-01

    Genome evolution is shaped by a multitude of mutational processes, including point mutations, insertions, and deletions of DNA sequences, as well as segmental duplications. These mutational processes can leave distinctive qualitative marks in the statistical features of genomic DNA sequences. One such feature is the match length distribution (MLD) of exactly matching sequence segments within an individual genome or between the genomes of related species. These have been observed to exhibit characteristic power law decays in many species. Here, we show that simple dynamical models consisting solely of duplication and mutation processes can already explain the characteristic features of MLDs observed in genomic sequences. Surprisingly, we find that these features are largely insensitive to details of the underlying mutational processes and do not necessarily rely on the action of natural selection. Our results demonstrate how analyzing statistical features of DNA sequences can help us reveal and quantify the different mutational processes that underlie genome evolution.

  1. How Evolution of Genomes Is Reflected in Exact DNA Sequence Match Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Massip, Florian; Sheinman, Michael; Schbath, Sophie; Arndt, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome evolution is shaped by a multitude of mutational processes, including point mutations, insertions, and deletions of DNA sequences, as well as segmental duplications. These mutational processes can leave distinctive qualitative marks in the statistical features of genomic DNA sequences. One such feature is the match length distribution (MLD) of exactly matching sequence segments within an individual genome or between the genomes of related species. These have been observed to exhibit characteristic power law decays in many species. Here, we show that simple dynamical models consisting solely of duplication and mutation processes can already explain the characteristic features of MLDs observed in genomic sequences. Surprisingly, we find that these features are largely insensitive to details of the underlying mutational processes and do not necessarily rely on the action of natural selection. Our results demonstrate how analyzing statistical features of DNA sequences can help us reveal and quantify the different mutational processes that underlie genome evolution. PMID:25398628

  2. Domain loss facilitates accelerated evolution and neofunctionalization of duplicate snake venom metalloproteinase toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Wagstaff, Simon C; Harrison, Robert A; Renjifo, Camila; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    Gene duplication is a key mechanism for the adaptive evolution and neofunctionalization of gene families. Large multigene families often exhibit complex evolutionary histories as a result of frequent gene duplication acting in concordance with positive selection pressures. Alterations in the domain structure of genes, causing changes in the molecular scaffold of proteins, can also result in a complex evolutionary history and has been observed in functionally diverse multigene toxin families. Here, we investigate the role alterations in domain structure have on the tempo of evolution and neofunctionalization of multigene families using the snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) as a model system. Our results reveal that the evolutionary history of viperid (Serpentes: Viperidae) SVMPs is repeatedly punctuated by domain loss, with the single loss of the cysteine-rich domain, facilitating the formation of P-II class SVMPs, occurring prior to the convergent loss of the disintegrin domain to form multiple P-I SVMP structures. Notably, the majority of phylogenetic branches where domain loss was inferred to have occurred exhibited highly significant evidence of positive selection in surface-exposed amino acid residues, resulting in the neofunctionalization of P-II and P-I SVMP classes. These results provide a valuable insight into the mechanisms by which complex gene families evolve and detail how the loss of domain structures can catalyze the accelerated evolution of novel gene paralogues. The ensuing generation of differing molecular scaffolds encoded by the same multigene family facilitates gene neofunctionalization while presenting an evolutionary advantage through the retention of multiple genes capable of encoding functionally distinct proteins.

  3. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. IV. Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Bridges, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequences have been compared in a 4,400-bp region for Escherichia coli K12 and 36 ECOR strains. Discontinuities in degree of similarity, previously inferred, are confirmed in detail. Three clonal frames are described on the basis of the present local high-resolution data, as well as previous analyses of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) covering small regions more widely dispersed on the chromosome. These three approaches show important consistency. The data illustrate the fact that, in the limited context of intraspecific genomic sequence variation, clonality and homology are synonymous. Two estimable quantitative properties are defined: recency of common ancestry (the reciprocal of the log(10) of the number of generations since the most recent common ancestor), and the number of nucleotide pairs over which a given recency of common ancestry applies. In principle, these parameters are measures of the degree and physical extent of homology. The small size of apparent recombinational replacements, together with the observation that they occasionally occur in discontinuous series, raises the question of whether they result from the superimposition of replacements of much larger size (as expected from an elementary interpretation of conjugation and transduction in experimental E. coli systems) or via an alternative mechanism. Length polymorphisms of several sorts are described. PMID:8095913

  4. Markovian and Non-Markovian Protein Sequence Evolution: Aggregated Markov Process Models

    PubMed Central

    Kosiol, Carolin; Goldman, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, there have been claims that evolution proceeds according to systematically different processes over different timescales and that protein evolution behaves in a non-Markovian manner. On the other hand, Markov models are fundamental to many applications in evolutionary studies. Apparent non-Markovian or time-dependent behavior has been attributed to influence of the genetic code at short timescales and dominance of physicochemical properties of the amino acids at long timescales. However, any long time period is simply the accumulation of many short time periods, and it remains unclear why evolution should appear to act systematically differently across the range of timescales studied. We show that the observed time-dependent behavior can be explained qualitatively by modeling protein sequence evolution as an aggregated Markov process (AMP): a time-homogeneous Markovian substitution model observed only at the level of the amino acids encoded by the protein-coding DNA sequence. The study of AMPs sheds new light on the relationship between amino acid-level and codon-level models of sequence evolution, and our results suggest that protein evolution should be modeled at the codon level rather than using amino acid substitution models. PMID:21718704

  5. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  6. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  7. Protein sequence-similarity search acceleration using a heuristic algorithm with a sensitive matrix.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungtaek; Yamada, Kazunori D; Frith, Martin C; Tomii, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    Protein database search for public databases is a fundamental step in the target selection of proteins in structural and functional genomics and also for inferring protein structure, function, and evolution. Most database search methods employ amino acid substitution matrices to score amino acid pairs. The choice of substitution matrix strongly affects homology detection performance. We earlier proposed a substitution matrix named MIQS that was optimized for distant protein homology search. Herein we further evaluate MIQS in combination with LAST, a heuristic and fast database search tool with a tunable sensitivity parameter m, where larger m denotes higher sensitivity. Results show that MIQS substantially improves the homology detection and alignment quality performance of LAST across diverse m parameters. Against a protein database consisting of approximately 15 million sequences, LAST with m = 10(5) achieves better homology detection performance than BLASTP, and completes the search 20 times faster. Compared to the most sensitive existing methods being used today, CS-BLAST and SSEARCH, LAST with MIQS and m = 10(6) shows comparable homology detection performance at 2.0 and 3.9 times greater speed, respectively. Results demonstrate that MIQS-powered LAST is a time-efficient method for sensitive and accurate homology search.

  8. Recognition Sequences and Substrate Evolution in Cyanobactin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptide (RiPP) natural products are of broad interest because of their intrinsic bioactivities and potential for synthetic biology. The RiPP cyanobactin pathways pat and tru have been experimentally shown to be extremely tolerant of mutations. In nature, the pathways exhibit “substrate evolution”, where enzymes remain constant while the substrates of those enzymes are hypervariable and readily evolvable. Here, we sought to determine the mechanism behind this promiscuity. Analysis of a series of different enzyme–substrate combinations from five different cyanobactin gene clusters, in addition to engineered substrates, led us to define short discrete recognition elements within substrates that are responsible for directing enzymes. We show that these recognition sequences (RSs) are portable and can be interchanged to control which functional groups are added to the final natural product. In addition to the previously assigned N- and C-terminal proteolysis RSs, here we assign the RS for heterocyclization modification. We show that substrate elements can be swapped in vivo leading to successful production of natural products in E. coli. The exchangeability of these elements holds promise in synthetic biology approaches to tailor peptide products in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24625112

  9. Positive selection drives accelerated evolution of mosquito salivary genes associated with blood-feeding

    PubMed Central

    Arcà, Bruno; Struchiner, Cláudio J.; Pham, Van M.; Sferra, Gabriella; Lombardo, Fabrizio; Pombi, Marco; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Saliva of bloodsucking animals contains dozens to hundreds of proteins that counteract their hosts’ hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity. It was previously observed that salivary proteins involved in hematophagy are much more divergent in their primary sequence than those of housekeeping function, when comparisons were made between closely related organisms. While this pattern of evolution could result from relaxed selection or drift, it could alternatively be the result of positive selection driven by the intense pressure of the host immune system. We investigated the polymorphism of five different genes associated with blood feeding in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae and obtained evidence in four genes for sites with signatures of positive selection. These results add salivary gland genes from bloodsucking arthropods to the small list of genes driven by positive selection. PMID:24237399

  10. Mid-infrared Evidence for Accelerated Evolution in Compact Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hibbard, John E.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Charlton, Jane C.; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2010-11-01

    Compact galaxy groups are at the extremes of the group environment, with high number densities and low velocity dispersions that likely affect member galaxy evolution. To explore the impact of this environment in detail, we examine the distribution in the mid-infrared (MIR) 3.6-8.0 μm color space of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) in comparison with several control samples, including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are strongly bimodal, with statistically significant evidence for a gap in their distribution. In contrast, none of the other samples show such a marked gap, and only galaxies in the Coma infall region have a distribution that is statistically consistent with the HCGs in this parameter space. To further investigate the cause of the HCG gap, we compare the galaxy morphologies of the HCG and LVL+SINGS galaxies, and also probe the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of the HCG galaxies. While galaxy morphology in HCG galaxies is strongly linked to position with MIR color space, the more fundamental property appears to be the SSFR, or star formation rate normalized by stellar mass. We conclude that the unusual MIR color distribution of HCG galaxies is a direct product of their environment, which is most similar to that of the Coma infall region. In both cases, galaxy densities are high, but gas has not been fully processed or stripped. We speculate that the compact group environment fosters accelerated evolution of galaxies from star-forming and neutral gas-rich to quiescent and neutral gas-poor, leaving few members in the MIR gap at any time.

  11. MID-INFRARED EVIDENCE FOR ACCELERATED EVOLUTION IN COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hibbard, John E.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Charlton, Jane C.; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2010-11-15

    Compact galaxy groups are at the extremes of the group environment, with high number densities and low velocity dispersions that likely affect member galaxy evolution. To explore the impact of this environment in detail, we examine the distribution in the mid-infrared (MIR) 3.6-8.0 {mu}m color space of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) in comparison with several control samples, including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are strongly bimodal, with statistically significant evidence for a gap in their distribution. In contrast, none of the other samples show such a marked gap, and only galaxies in the Coma infall region have a distribution that is statistically consistent with the HCGs in this parameter space. To further investigate the cause of the HCG gap, we compare the galaxy morphologies of the HCG and LVL+SINGS galaxies, and also probe the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of the HCG galaxies. While galaxy morphology in HCG galaxies is strongly linked to position with MIR color space, the more fundamental property appears to be the SSFR, or star formation rate normalized by stellar mass. We conclude that the unusual MIR color distribution of HCG galaxies is a direct product of their environment, which is most similar to that of the Coma infall region. In both cases, galaxy densities are high, but gas has not been fully processed or stripped. We speculate that the compact group environment fosters accelerated evolution of galaxies from star-forming and neutral gas-rich to quiescent and neutral gas-poor, leaving few members in the MIR gap at any time.

  12. Is the Size Evolution of Massive Galaxies Accelerated in Cluster Environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gillian

    2013-10-01

    At z 1.6 the main progenitors of present-day massive clusters are undergoing rapid collapse, and have the highest rates of galaxy merging and assembly. Recent observational studies have hinted at accelerated galaxy evolution in dense environments at this epoch, including increased merger rates and rapid growth in galaxy size relative to the field. We propose WFC3 G102 spectroscopy and F125W {Broad J} imaging of a sample of four massive spectroscopically-confirmed clusters at z = 1.6. Our primary scientific goal is to leverage the CANDELS Wide Legacy dataset to carry out a head-to-head comparison of the sizes of cluster members relative to the field {as a function of stellar mass and Sersic index}, and quantify the role of environment in the observed rapid evolution in galaxy sizes since z = 2. These clusters are four of the highest significance overdensities in the 50 square degree SWIRE fields, and will evolve over time to have present-day masses similar to Coma. They were detected using IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color, which identifies galaxy overdensities regardless of optically red or blue color. A heroic ground-based spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 44 spectroscopically-confirmed members. However this sample is heavily biased toward star-forming {SF} galaxies, and WFC3 spectroscopy is essential to definitively determine cluster membership for 200 members, without bias with respect to quiescent or SF type. The F125W {rest-frame V-band} imaging is necessary to measure the sizes and morphologies of cluster members. 17-passband broadband imaging spanning UV, optical, near-IR, Spitzer IR and Herschel far-IR is already in hand.

  13. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting that cis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  14. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H; Raichlen, David A; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W; Ross, Stephen R

    2016-05-19

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day(-1)) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day(-1), respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day(-1)), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history.

  15. Evolution of the solar wind acceleration region during 1990-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, M.; Kondo, T.; Takaba, H.; Mori, H.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-01-01

    The single-station measurements of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at 2 and 8 GHz have been made at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory in the period from 1990 to 1994. These IPS data are used to study the radial distribution of solar wind velocity and density fluctuations near the sun (i.e. 10-70 Rs), and the long-term variation in these properties. The IPS co-spectrum technique is applied here to estimate the solar wind velocity. Derived velocities show that the solar wind gains a speed significantly in the radial range from 10 to 30 Rs (solar radii). which is much farther than the source surface of the thermally driven solar wind model. From the scintillation index analysis. it is found that the radial fall of density fluctuations is well described by the power-law function. A series of IPS observations reveals that a pronounced change in velocity and turbulence level for this radial range occurs at the polar region of the sun during 1990-1994. That is, the high speed wind and the reduced turbulence region develop there as the solar activity declines. On the other hand, little long-term variation is observed for the solar wind acceleration region at a low latitude. From the comparison with He 1O83 nm observations. it is demonstrated that the change of the solar wind structure is closely linked with the evolution of the coronal hole on the solar surface.

  16. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history

    PubMed Central

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H.; Raichlen, David A.; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E.; Lambert, Estelle V.; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W.; Ross, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity1. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day−1) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day−1, respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day−1), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history. PMID:27144364

  17. Evolution in Fast Forward: a Potential Role for Mutators in Accelerating Staphylococcus aureus Pathoadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Gregory S.; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Foley, Matthew H.; Vore, Kelly L.; Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Gill, Ann L.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen evolution and subsequent phenotypic heterogeneity during chronic infection are proposed to enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival during human infection. We tested this theory by genetically and phenotypically characterizing strains with mutations constructed in the mismatch repair (MMR) and oxidized guanine (GO) system, termed mutators, which exhibit increased spontaneous-mutation frequencies. Analysis of these mutators revealed not only strain-dependent increases in the spontaneous-mutation frequency but also shifts in mutational type and hot spots consistent with loss of GO or MMR functions. Although the GO and MMR systems are relied upon in some bacterial species to prevent reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage, no deficit in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity was found when either of these DNA repair pathways was lost in S. aureus. To gain insight into the contribution of increased mutation supply to S. aureus pathoadaptation, we measured the rate of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation during serial passage. Detection of increased rates of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation in GO and MMR mutants suggests that these strains are capable of modifying virulence phenotypes implicated in mediating infection. Accelerated derivation of altered virulence phenotypes, combined with the absence of increased ROS sensitivity, highlights the potential of mutators to drive pathoadaptation in the host and serve as catalysts for persistent infections. PMID:23204459

  18. Maximum principle and mutation thresholds for four-letter sequence evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garske, T.; Grimm, U.

    2004-07-01

    A four-state mutation-selection model for the evolution of populations of DNA sequences is investigated with particular interest taken in the phenomenon of error thresholds. The mutation model considered is the Kimura 3ST mutation scheme; the fitness functions, which determine the selection process, come from the permutation invariant class. Error thresholds can be found for various fitness functions; the phase diagrams are more interesting than for equivalent two-state models. Results for (small) finite sequence lengths are compared with those for infinite sequence length, obtained via a maximum principle that is equivalent to the principle of minimal free energy in physics.

  19. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  20. Polymorphism, shared functions and convergent evolution of genes with sequences coding for polyalanine domains.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Hugo; Debeane, Francois; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Turcotte, Jean-Francois; Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Rouleau, Guy A; Brais, Bernard

    2003-11-15

    Mutations causing expansions of polyalanine domains are responsible for nine hereditary diseases. Other GC-rich sequences coding for some polyalanine domains were found to be polymorphic in human. These observations prompted us to identify all sequences in the human genome coding for polyalanine stretches longer than four alanines and establish their degree of polymorphism. We identified 494 annotated human proteins containing 604 polyalanine domains. Thirty-two percent (31/98) of tested sequences coding for more than seven alanines were polymorphic. The length of the polyalanine-coding sequence and its GCG or GCC repeat content are the major predictors of polymorphism. GCG codons are over-represented in human polyalanine coding sequences. Our data suggest that GCG and GCC codons play a key role in polyalanine-coding sequence appearance and polymorphism. The grouping by shared function of polyalanine-containing proteins in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans shows that the majority are involved in transcriptional regulation. Phylogenetic analyses of HOX, GATA and EVX protein families demonstrate that polyalanine domains arose independently in different members of these families, suggesting that convergent molecular evolution may have played a role. Finally polyalanine domains in vertebrates are conserved between mammals and are rarer and shorter in Gallus gallus and Danio rerio. Together our results show that the polymorphic nature of sequences coding for polyalanine domains makes them prime candidates for mutations in hereditary diseases and suggests that they have appeared in many different protein families through convergent evolution.

  1. Coupled enhancer and coding sequence evolution of a homeobox gene shaped leaf diversity

    PubMed Central

    Vuolo, Francesco; Mentink, Remco A.; Hajheidari, Mohsen; Bailey, C. Donovan; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate mechanisms underlying the diversification of biological forms using crucifer leaf shape as an example. We show that evolution of an enhancer element in the homeobox gene REDUCED COMPLEXITY (RCO) altered leaf shape by changing gene expression from the distal leaf blade to its base. A single amino acid substitution evolved together with this regulatory change, which reduced RCO protein stability, preventing pleiotropic effects caused by its altered gene expression. We detected hallmarks of positive selection in these evolved regulatory and coding sequence variants and showed that modulating RCO activity can improve plant physiological performance. Therefore, interplay between enhancer and coding sequence evolution created a potentially adaptive path for morphological evolution. PMID:27852629

  2. Evolution of endogenous sequences of banana streak virus: what can we learn from banana (Musa sp.) evolution?

    PubMed

    Gayral, Philippe; Blondin, Laurence; Guidolin, Olivier; Carreel, Françoise; Hippolyte, Isabelle; Perrier, Xavier; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line

    2010-07-01

    Endogenous plant pararetroviruses (EPRVs) are viral sequences of the family Caulimoviridae integrated into the nuclear genome of numerous plant species. The ability of some endogenous sequences of Banana streak viruses (eBSVs) in the genome of banana (Musa sp.) to induce infections just like the virus itself was recently demonstrated (P. Gayral et al., J. Virol. 83:6697-6710, 2008). Although eBSVs probably arose from accidental events, infectious eBSVs constitute an extreme case of parasitism, as well as a newly described strategy for vertical virus transmission in plants. We investigated the early evolutionary stages of infectious eBSV for two distinct BSV species-GF (BSGFV) and Imové (BSImV)-through the study of their distribution, insertion polymorphism, and structure evolution among selected banana genotypes representative of the diversity of 60 wild Musa species and genotypes. To do so, the historical frame of host evolution was analyzed by inferring banana phylogeny from two chloroplast regions-matK and trnL-trnF-as well as from the nuclear genome, using 19 microsatellite loci. We demonstrated that both BSV species integrated recently in banana evolution, circa 640,000 years ago. The two infectious eBSVs were subjected to different selective pressures and showed distinct levels of rearrangement within their final structure. In addition, the molecular phylogenies of integrated and nonintegrated BSVs enabled us to establish the phylogenetic origins of eBSGFV and eBSImV.

  3. OncoNEM: inferring tumor evolution from single-cell sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ross, Edith M; Markowetz, Florian

    2016-04-15

    Single-cell sequencing promises a high-resolution view of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution in cancer. However, methods to infer tumor evolution from single-cell sequencing data lag behind methods developed for bulk-sequencing data. Here, we present OncoNEM, a probabilistic method for inferring intra-tumor evolutionary lineage trees from somatic single nucleotide variants of single cells. OncoNEM identifies homogeneous cellular subpopulations and infers their genotypes as well as a tree describing their evolutionary relationships. In simulation studies, we assess OncoNEM's robustness and benchmark its performance against competing methods. Finally, we show its applicability in case studies of muscle-invasive bladder cancer and essential thrombocythemia.

  4. Clonal evolution of acute myeloid leukemia highlighted by latest genome sequencing studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Lv, Dekang; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Decades of years might be required for an initiated cell to become a fully-pledged, metastasized tumor. DNA mutations are accumulated during this process including background mutations that emerge scholastically, as well as driver mutations that selectively occur in a handful of cancer genes and confer the cell a growth advantage over its neighbors. A clone of tumor cells could be superseded by another clone that acquires new mutations and grows more aggressively. Tumor evolutional patterns have been studied for years using conventional approaches that focus on the investigation of a single or a couple of genes. Latest deep sequencing technology enables a global view of tumor evolution by deciphering almost all genome aberrations in a tumor. Tumor clones and the fate of each clone during tumor evolution can be depicted with the help of the concept of variant allele frequency. Here, we summarize the new insights of cancer evolutional progression in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27474172

  5. Synthetic biology for the directed evolution of protein biocatalysts: navigating sequence space intelligently

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Andrew; Swainston, Neil; Day, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein affects both its structure and its function. Thus, the ability to modify the sequence, and hence the structure and activity, of individual proteins in a systematic way, opens up many opportunities, both scientifically and (as we focus on here) for exploitation in biocatalysis. Modern methods of synthetic biology, whereby increasingly large sequences of DNA can be synthesised de novo, allow an unprecedented ability to engineer proteins with novel functions. However, the number of possible proteins is far too large to test individually, so we need means for navigating the ‘search space’ of possible protein sequences efficiently and reliably in order to find desirable activities and other properties. Enzymologists distinguish binding (K d) and catalytic (k cat) steps. In a similar way, judicious strategies have blended design (for binding, specificity and active site modelling) with the more empirical methods of classical directed evolution (DE) for improving k cat (where natural evolution rarely seeks the highest values), especially with regard to residues distant from the active site and where the functional linkages underpinning enzyme dynamics are both unknown and hard to predict. Epistasis (where the ‘best’ amino acid at one site depends on that or those at others) is a notable feature of directed evolution. The aim of this review is to highlight some of the approaches that are being developed to allow us to use directed evolution to improve enzyme properties, often dramatically. We note that directed evolution differs in a number of ways from natural evolution, including in particular the available mechanisms and the likely selection pressures. Thus, we stress the opportunities afforded by techniques that enable one to map sequence to (structure and) activity in silico, as an effective means of modelling and exploring protein landscapes. Because known landscapes may be assessed and reasoned about as a whole

  6. The achaete-scute complex in Diptera: patterns of noncoding sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Negre, B; Simpson, P

    2015-10-01

    The achaete-scute complex (AS-C) has been a useful paradigm for the study of pattern formation and its evolution. achaete-scute genes have duplicated and evolved distinct expression patterns during the evolution of cyclorraphous Diptera. Are the expression patterns in different species driven by conserved regulatory elements? If so, when did such regulatory elements arise? Here, we have sequenced most of the AS-C of the fly Calliphora vicina (including the genes achaete, scute and lethal of scute) to compare noncoding sequences with known cis-regulatory sequences in Drosophila. The organization of the complex is conserved with respect to Drosophila species. There are numerous small stretches of conserved noncoding sequence that, in spite of high sequence turnover, display binding sites for known transcription factors. Synteny of the blocks of conserved noncoding sequences is maintained suggesting not only conservation of the position of regulatory elements but also an origin prior to the divergence between these two species. We propose that some of these enhancers originated by duplication with their target genes.

  7. A novel satellite DNA sequence in the Peromyscus genome (PMSat): Evolution via copy number fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Sandra; Vieira-da-Silva, Ana; Mendes-da-Silva, Ana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Satellite DNAs (satDNA) are tandemly arrayed repeated sequences largely present in eukaryotic genomes, which play important roles in genome evolution and function, and therefore, their analysis is vital. Here, we describe the isolation of a novel satellite DNA family (PMSat) from the rodent Peromyscus eremicus (Cricetidae, Rodentia), which is located in pericentromeric regions and exhibits a typical satellite DNA genome organization. Orthologous PMSat sequences were isolated and characterized from three species belonging to Cricetidae: Cricetus cricetus, Phodopus sungorus and Microtus arvalis. In these species, PMSat is highly conserved, with the absence of fixed species-specific mutations. Strikingly, different numbers of copies of this sequence were found among the species, suggesting evolution by copy number fluctuation. Repeat units of PMSat were also found in the Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii BioProject, but our results suggest that these repeat units are from genome regions outside the pericentromere. The remarkably high evolutionary sequence conservation along with the preservation of a few numbers of copies of this sequence in the analyzed genomes may suggest functional significance but a different sequence nature/organization. Our data highlight that repeats are difficult to analyze due to the limited tools available to dissect genomes and the fact that assemblies do not cover regions of constitutive heterochromatin.

  8. Evolution and detectability of comet clouds during post-main-sequence stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Brandt, John C.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    The destruction of volatile-rich comet disks and Oort-type clouds around luminous post-main-sequence stars is modeled. The models are in agreement with several aspects of existing observations of water and complex molecules in the envelopes of giant and supergiant stars. If confirmed, these results would establish the common existence of Oort-type clouds around other stars and would constitute indirect evidence for sites of past planetary formation.

  9. Rapid Sequence Evolution of Transcription Factors Controlling Neuron Differentiation in Caenorhabditis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Whether phenotypic evolution proceeds predominantly through changes in regulatory sequences is a controversial issue in evolutionary genetics. Ample evidence indicates that the evolution of gene regulatory networks via changes in cis-regulatory sequences is an important determinant of phenotypic diversity. However, recent experimental work suggests that the role of transcription factor (TF) divergence in developmental evolution may be underestimated. In order to help understand what levels of constraints are acting on the coding sequence of developmental regulatory genes, evolutionary rates were investigated among 48 TFs required for neuronal development in Caenorhabditis elegans. Allelic variation was then sampled for 28 of these genes within a population of the related species Caenorhabditis remanei. Neuronal TFs are more divergent, both within and between species, than structural genes. TFs affecting different neuronal classes are under different levels of selective constraints. The regulatory genes controlling the differentiation of chemosensory neurons evolve particularly fast and exhibit higher levels of within- and between-species nucleotide variation than TFs required for the development of several neuronal classes and TFs required for motorneuron differentiation. The TFs affecting chemosensory neuron development are also more divergent than chemosensory genes expressed in the neurons they differentiate. These results illustrate that TFs are not as highly constrained as commonly thought and suggest that the role of divergence in developmental regulatory genes during the evolution of gene regulatory networks requires further attention. PMID:19589887

  10. Gene expression and protein length influence codon usage and rates of sequence evolution in Populus tremula.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2007-03-01

    Codon bias is generally thought to be determined by a balance between mutation, genetic drift, and natural selection on translational efficiency. However, natural selection on codon usage is considered to be a weak evolutionary force and selection on codon usage is expected to be strongest in species with large effective population sizes. In this paper, I study associations between codon usage, gene expression, and molecular evolution at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites in the long-lived, woody perennial plant Populus tremula (Salicaceae). Using expression data for 558 genes derived from expressed sequence tags (EST) libraries from 19 different tissues and developmental stages, I study how gene expression levels within single tissues as well as across tissues affect codon usage and rates sequence evolution at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. I show that gene expression have direct effects on both codon usage and the level of selective constraint of proteins in P. tremula, although in different ways. Codon usage genes is primarily determined by how highly expressed a genes is, whereas rates of sequence evolution are primarily determined by how widely expressed genes are. In addition to the effects of gene expression, protein length appear to be an important factor influencing virtually all aspects of molecular evolution in P. tremula.

  11. Massive thermal acceleration of the emergence of primordial chemistry, the incidence of spontaneous mutation, and the evolution of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard

    2014-10-31

    Kelvin considered it unlikely that sufficient time had elapsed on the earth for life to have reached its present level of complexity. In the warm surroundings in which life first appeared, however, elevated temperatures would have reduced the kinetic barriers to reaction. Recent experiments disclose the profound extent to which very slow reactions are accelerated by elevated temperatures, collapsing the time that would have been required for early events in primordial chemistry before the advent of enzymes. If a primitive enzyme, like model catalysts and most modern enzymes, accelerated a reaction by lowering its enthalpy of activation, then the rate enhancement that it produced would have increased automatically as the environment cooled, quite apart from any improvements in catalytic activity that arose from mutation and natural selection. The chemical events responsible for spontaneous mutation are also highly sensitive to temperature, furnishing an independent mechanism for accelerating evolution.

  12. Massive Thermal Acceleration of the Emergence of Primordial Chemistry, the Incidence of Spontaneous Mutation, and the Evolution of Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Kelvin considered it unlikely that sufficient time had elapsed on the earth for life to have reached its present level of complexity. In the warm surroundings in which life first appeared, however, elevated temperatures would have reduced the kinetic barriers to reaction. Recent experiments disclose the profound extent to which very slow reactions are accelerated by elevated temperatures, collapsing the time that would have been required for early events in primordial chemistry before the advent of enzymes. If a primitive enzyme, like model catalysts and most modern enzymes, accelerated a reaction by lowering its enthalpy of activation, then the rate enhancement that it produced would have increased automatically as the environment cooled, quite apart from any improvements in catalytic activity that arose from mutation and natural selection. The chemical events responsible for spontaneous mutation are also highly sensitive to temperature, furnishing an independent mechanism for accelerating evolution. PMID:25210030

  13. Protein evolution analysis of S-hydroxynitrile lyase by complete sequence design utilizing the INTMSAlign software.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shogo; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-02-03

    Development of software and methods for design of complete sequences of functional proteins could contribute to studies of protein engineering and protein evolution. To this end, we developed the INTMSAlign software, and used it to design functional proteins and evaluate their usefulness. The software could assign both consensus and correlation residues of target proteins. We generated three protein sequences with S-selective hydroxynitrile lyase (S-HNL) activity, which we call designed S-HNLs; these proteins folded as efficiently as the native S-HNL. Sequence and biochemical analysis of the designed S-HNLs suggested that accumulation of neutral mutations occurs during the process of S-HNLs evolution from a low-activity form to a high-activity (native) form. Taken together, our results demonstrate that our software and the associated methods could be applied not only to design of complete sequences, but also to predictions of protein evolution, especially within families such as esterases and S-HNLs.

  14. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  15. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes.

  16. Modeling the expected lifetime and evolution of a deme's principal genetic sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The principal genetic sequence (PGS) is the most common genetic sequence in a deme. The PGS changes over time because new genetic sequences are created by inversions, compete with the current PGS, and a small fraction become PGSs. A set of coupled difference equations provides a description of the evolution of the PGS distribution function in an ensemble of demes. Solving the set of equations produces the survival probability of a new genetic sequence and the expected lifetime of an existing PGS as a function of inversion size and rate, recombination rate, and deme size. Additionally, the PGS distribution function is used to explain the transition pathway from old to new PGSs. We compare these results to a cellular automaton based representation of a deme and the drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. yakuba.

  17. Systematic Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Brain Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Qin, Chunxia; Cao, Guoqiong; Xin, Wenfeng; Feng, Chengqiang; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, despite considerable research in this area, the comprehensive and systematic understanding of lncRNAs in AD is still limited. The emergence of RNA sequencing provides a predictor and has incomparable advantage compared with other methods, including microarray. In this study, we identified lncRNAs in a 7-month-old mouse brain through deep RNA sequencing using the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) models. A total of 599,985,802 clean reads and 23,334 lncRNA transcripts were obtained. Then, we identified 97 significantly upregulated and 114 significantly downregulated lncRNA transcripts from all cases in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1 mice. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that these significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were involved in regulating the development of AD from various angles, such as nerve growth factor term (GO: 1990089), mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, and AD pathway. Furthermore, the most probable AD-associated lncRNAs were predicted and listed in detail. Our study provided the systematic dissection of lncRNA profiling in SAMP8 mouse brain and accelerated the development of lncRNA biomarkers in AD. These attracting biomarkers could provide significant insights into AD therapy in the future. PMID:27483026

  18. Genome sequence diversity and clues to the evolution of variola (smallpox) virus.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Joseph J; Sammons, Scott A; Frace, A Michael; Osborne, John D; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Zhang, Ming; Govil, Dhwani; Damon, Inger K; Kline, Richard; Laker, Miriam; Li, Yu; Smith, Geoffrey L; Meyer, Hermann; Leduc, James W; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2006-08-11

    Comparative genomics of 45 epidemiologically varied variola virus isolates from the past 30 years of the smallpox era indicate low sequence diversity, suggesting that there is probably little difference in the isolates' functional gene content. Phylogenetic clustering inferred three clades coincident with their geographical origin and case-fatality rate; the latter implicated putative proteins that mediate viral virulence differences. Analysis of the viral linear DNA genome suggests that its evolution involved direct descent and DNA end-region recombination events. Knowing the sequences will help understand the viral proteome and improve diagnostic test precision, therapeutics, and systems for their assessment.

  19. Comparative analysis of secreted protein evolution using expressed sequence tags from four poplar leaf rusts (Melampsora spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obligate biotrophs such as rust fungi are believed to establish long-term relationships by modulating plant defenses through a plethora of effector proteins, whose most recognizable feature is the presence of a signal peptide for secretion. Since the phenotypes of these effectors extend to host cells, their genes are expected to be under accelerated evolution stimulated by host-pathogen coevolutionary arms races. Recently, whole genome sequence data has allowed the prediction of secretomes, facilitating the identification of putative effectors. Results We generated cDNA libraries from four poplar leaf rust pathogens (Melampsora spp.) and used computational approaches to identify and annotate putative secreted proteins with the aim of uncovering new knowledge about the nature and evolution of the rust secretome. While more than half of the predicted secretome members encoded lineage-specific proteins, similarities with experimentally characterized fungal effectors were also identified. A SAGE analysis indicated a strong stage-specific regulation of transcripts encoding secreted proteins. The average sequence identity of putative secreted proteins to their closest orthologs in the wheat stem rust Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici was dramatically reduced compared with non-secreted ones. A comparative genomics approach based on homologous gene groups unravelled positive selection in putative members of the secretome. Conclusion We uncovered robust evidence that different evolutionary constraints are acting on the rust secretome when compared to the rest of the genome. These results are consistent with the view that these genes are more likely to exhibit an effector activity and be involved in coevolutionary arms races with host factors. PMID:20615251

  20. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trung D; Cao, Hieu X; Jovtchev, Gabriele; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, Miloslava; Vu, Giang T H; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Ingo; Fuchs, Joerg

    2015-12-01

    Linear chromosomes of eukaryotic organisms invariably possess centromeres and telomeres to ensure proper chromosome segregation during nuclear divisions and to protect the chromosome ends from deterioration and fusion, respectively. While centromeric sequences may differ between species, with arrays of tandemly repeated sequences and retrotransposons being the most abundant sequence types in plant centromeres, telomeric sequences are usually highly conserved among plants and other organisms. The genome size of the carnivorous genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae) is highly variable. Here we study evolutionary sequence plasticity of these chromosomal domains at an intrageneric level. We show that Genlisea nigrocaulis (1C = 86 Mbp; 2n = 40) and G. hispidula (1C = 1550 Mbp; 2n = 40) differ as to their DNA composition at centromeres and telomeres. G. nigrocaulis and its close relative G. pygmaea revealed mainly 161 bp tandem repeats, while G. hispidula and its close relative G. subglabra displayed a combination of four retroelements at centromeric positions. G. nigrocaulis and G. pygmaea chromosome ends are characterized by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric repeats (TTTAGGG); G. hispidula and G. subglabra instead revealed two intermingled sequence variants (TTCAGG and TTTCAGG). These differences in centromeric and, surprisingly, also in telomeric DNA sequences, uncovered between groups with on average a > 9-fold genome size difference, emphasize the fast genome evolution within this genus. Such intrageneric evolutionary alteration of telomeric repeats with cytosine in the guanine-rich strand, not yet known for plants, might impact the epigenetic telomere chromatin modification.

  1. Morphological evolution of cluster red sequence galaxies in the past 9 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Phillipps, Steven

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies arrive on the red sequences of clusters at high redshift (z > 1) once their star formation is quenched and evolve passively thereafter. However, we have previously found that cluster red sequence galaxies (CRSGs) undergo significant morphological evolution subsequent to the cessation of star formation, at some point in the past 9-10 Gyr. Through a detailed study of a large sample of cluster red sequence galaxies spanning 0.2 < z < 1.4 we elucidate the details of this evolution. Below z ˜ 0.5-0.6 (in the last 5-6 Gyr) there is little or no morphological evolution in the population as a whole, unlike in the previous 4-5 Gyr. Over this earlier time (i) disc-like systems with Sérsic n < 2 progressively disappear, as (ii) the range of their axial ratios similarly decreases, removing the most elongated systems (those consistent with thin discs seen at an appreciable inclination angle) and (iii) radial colour gradients (bluer outwards) decrease in an absolute sense from significant age-related gradients to a residual level consistent with the metallicity-induced gradients seen in low-redshift cluster members. The distribution of their effective radii shows some evidence of evolution, consistent with growth of at most a factor <1.5 between z ˜ 1.4 and ˜0.5, significantly less than for comparable field galaxies, while the distribution of their central (<1 kpc) bulge surface densities shows no evolution at least at z < 1. A simple model involving the fading and thickening of a disc component after comparatively recent quenching (after z ˜ 1.5) around an otherwise passively evolving older spheroid component is consistent with all of these findings.

  2. Large-scale coding sequence change underlies the evolution of postdevelopmental novelty in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Jasper, William Cameron; Linksvayer, Timothy A; Atallah, Joel; Friedman, Daniel; Chiu, Joanna C; Johnson, Brian R

    2015-02-01

    Whether coding or regulatory sequence change is more important to the evolution of phenotypic novelty is one of biology's major unresolved questions. The field of evo-devo has shown that in early development changes to regulatory regions are the dominant mode of genetic change, but whether this extends to the evolution of novel phenotypes in the adult organism is unclear. Here, we conduct ten RNA-Seq experiments across both novel and conserved tissues in the honey bee to determine to what extent postdevelopmental novelty is based on changes to the coding regions of genes. We make several discoveries. First, we show that with respect to novel physiological functions in the adult animal, positively selected tissue-specific genes of high expression underlie novelty by conferring specialized cellular functions. Such genes are often, but not always taxonomically restricted genes (TRGs). We further show that positively selected genes, whether TRGs or conserved genes, are the least connected genes within gene expression networks. Overall, this work suggests that the evo-devo paradigm is limited, and that the evolution of novelty, postdevelopment, follows additional rules. Specifically, evo-devo stresses that high network connectedness (repeated use of the same gene in many contexts) constrains coding sequence change as it would lead to negative pleiotropic effects. Here, we show that in the adult animal, the converse is true: Genes with low network connectedness (TRGs and tissue-specific conserved genes) underlie novel phenotypes by rapidly changing coding sequence to perform new-specialized functions.

  3. Biophysical Models of Protein Evolution: Understanding the Patterns of Evolutionary Sequence Divergence.

    PubMed

    Echave, Julian; Wilke, Claus O

    2017-03-15

    For decades, rates of protein evolution have been interpreted in terms of the vague concept of functional importance. Slowly evolving proteins or sites within proteins were assumed to be more functionally important and thus subject to stronger selection pressure. More recently, biophysical models of protein evolution, which combine evolutionary theory with protein biophysics, have completely revolutionized our view of the forces that shape sequence divergence. Slowly evolving proteins have been found to evolve slowly because of selection against toxic misfolding and misinteractions, linking their rate of evolution primarily to their abundance. Similarly, most slowly evolving sites in proteins are not directly involved in function, but mutating these sites has a large impact on protein structure and stability. In this article, we review the studies in the emerging field of biophysical protein evolution that have shaped our current understanding of sequence divergence patterns. We also propose future research directions to develop this nascent field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biophysics Volume 46 is May 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Population genetics and molecular evolution of DNA sequences in transposable elements. I. A simulation framework.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T E; Innan, Hideki

    2013-11-01

    A population genetic simulation framework is developed to understand the behavior and molecular evolution of DNA sequences of transposable elements. Our model incorporates random transposition and excision of transposable element (TE) copies, two modes of selection against TEs, and degeneration of transpositional activity by point mutations. We first investigated the relationships between the behavior of the copy number of TEs and these parameters. Our results show that when selection is weak, the genome can maintain a relatively large number of TEs, but most of them are less active. In contrast, with strong selection, the genome can maintain only a limited number of TEs but the proportion of active copies is large. In such a case, there could be substantial fluctuations of the copy number over generations. We also explored how DNA sequences of TEs evolve through the simulations. In general, active copies form clusters around the original sequence, while less active copies have long branches specific to themselves, exhibiting a star-shaped phylogeny. It is demonstrated that the phylogeny of TE sequences could be informative to understand the dynamics of TE evolution.

  5. Molecular phylogeny, population genetics, and evolution of heterocystous cyanobacteria using nifH gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Singh, Satya Shila; Elster, Josef; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2013-06-01

    In order to assess phylogeny, population genetics, and approximation of future course of cyanobacterial evolution based on nifH gene sequences, 41 heterocystous cyanobacterial strains collected from all over India have been used in the present study. NifH gene sequence analysis data confirm that the heterocystous cyanobacteria are monophyletic while the stigonematales show polyphyletic origin with grave intermixing. Further, analysis of nifH gene sequence data using intricate mathematical extrapolations revealed that the nucleotide diversity and recombination frequency is much greater in Nostocales than the Stigonematales. Similarly, DNA divergence studies showed significant values of divergence with greater gene conversion tracts in the unbranched (Nostocales) than the branched (Stigonematales) strains. Our data strongly support the origin of true branching cyanobacterial strains from the unbranched strains.

  6. Developing insights into the mechanisms of evolution of bacterial pathogens from whole-genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of bacterial pathogen populations has been detected in a variety of ways including phenotypic tests, such as metabolic activity, reaction to antisera and drug resistance and genotypic tests that measure variation in chromosome structure, repetitive loci and individual gene sequences. While informative, these methods only capture a small subset of the total variation and, therefore, have limited resolution. Advances in sequencing technologies have made it feasible to capture whole-genome sequence variation for each sample under study, providing the potential to detect all changes at all positions in the genome from single nucleotide changes to large-scale insertions and deletions. In this review, we focus on recent work that has applied this powerful new approach and summarize some of the advances that this has brought in our understanding of the details of how bacterial pathogens evolve. PMID:23075447

  7. Optimal sequence selection in proteins of known structure by simulated evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Hellinga, H W; Richards, F M

    1994-01-01

    Rational design of protein structure requires the identification of optimal sequences to carry out a particular function within a given backbone structure. A general solution to this problem requires that a potential function describing the energy of the system as a function of its atomic coordinates be minimized simultaneously over all available sequences and their three-dimensional atomic configurations. Here we present a method that explicitly minimizes a semiempirical potential function simultaneously in these two spaces, using a simulated annealing approach. The method takes the fixed three-dimensional coordinates of a protein backbone and stochastically generates possible sequences through the introduction of random mutations. The corresponding three-dimensional coordinates are constructed for each sequence by "redecorating" the backbone coordinates of the original structure with the corresponding side chains. These are then allowed to vary in their structure by random rotations around free torsional angles to generate a stochastic walk in configurational space. We have named this method protein simulated evolution, because, in loose analogy with natural selection, it randomly selects for allowed solutions in the sequence of a protein subject to the "selective pressure" of a potential function. Energies predicted by this method for sequences of a small group of residues in the hydrophobic core of the phage lambda cI repressor correlate well with experimentally determined biological activities. This "genetic selection by computer" approach has potential applications in protein engineering, rational protein design, and structure-based drug discovery. PMID:8016069

  8. SW#db: GPU-Accelerated Exact Sequence Similarity Database Search

    PubMed Central

    Korpar, Matija; Šošić, Martin; Blažeka, Dino; Šikić, Mile

    2015-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed a growth in sequencing yield, the number of samples sequenced, and as a result–the growth of publicly maintained sequence databases. The increase of data present all around has put high requirements on protein similarity search algorithms with two ever-opposite goals: how to keep the running times acceptable while maintaining a high-enough level of sensitivity. The most time consuming step of similarity search are the local alignments between query and database sequences. This step is usually performed using exact local alignment algorithms such as Smith-Waterman. Due to its quadratic time complexity, alignments of a query to the whole database are usually too slow. Therefore, the majority of the protein similarity search methods prior to doing the exact local alignment apply heuristics to reduce the number of possible candidate sequences in the database. However, there is still a need for the alignment of a query sequence to a reduced database. In this paper we present the SW#db tool and a library for fast exact similarity search. Although its running times, as a standalone tool, are comparable to the running times of BLAST, it is primarily intended to be used for exact local alignment phase in which the database of sequences has already been reduced. It uses both GPU and CPU parallelization and was 4–5 times faster than SSEARCH, 6–25 times faster than CUDASW++ and more than 20 times faster than SSW at the time of writing, using multiple queries on Swiss-prot and Uniref90 databases PMID:26719890

  9. Conservation of Tubulin-Binding Sequences in TRPV1 throughout Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Puspendu; Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Background Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub type 1 (TRPV1), commonly known as capsaicin receptor can detect multiple stimuli ranging from noxious compounds, low pH, temperature as well as electromagnetic wave at different ranges. In addition, this receptor is involved in multiple physiological and sensory processes. Therefore, functions of TRPV1 have direct influences on adaptation and further evolution also. Availability of various eukaryotic genomic sequences in public domain facilitates us in studying the molecular evolution of TRPV1 protein and the respective conservation of certain domains, motifs and interacting regions that are functionally important. Methodology and Principal Findings Using statistical and bioinformatics tools, our analysis reveals that TRPV1 has evolved about ∼420 million years ago (MYA). Our analysis reveals that specific regions, domains and motifs of TRPV1 has gone through different selection pressure and thus have different levels of conservation. We found that among all, TRP box is the most conserved and thus have functional significance. Our results also indicate that the tubulin binding sequences (TBS) have evolutionary significance as these stretch sequences are more conserved than many other essential regions of TRPV1. The overall distribution of positively charged residues within the TBS motifs is conserved throughout evolution. In silico analysis reveals that the TBS-1 and TBS-2 of TRPV1 can form helical structures and may play important role in TRPV1 function. Conclusions and Significance Our analysis identifies the regions of TRPV1, which are important for structure – function relationship. This analysis indicates that tubulin binding sequence-1 (TBS-1) near the TRP-box forms a potential helix and the tubulin interactions with TRPV1 via TBS-1 have evolutionary significance. This interaction may be required for the proper channel function and regulation and may also have significance in the context of Taxol

  10. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  11. Characterization, evolution and chromosomal distribution of two satellite DNA sequence families in Lathyrus species.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, M; Sarri, V; Polizzi, E; Andreozzi, G; Cionini, P G

    2010-06-01

    DNA clones containing highly repetitive DNA sequences were selected from partial libraries of Lathyrus sativus and L. sylvestris. Two satellite DNA sequence families were isolated from the genome of the former species. A first family was made up of repeats that varied in length from 54-56 bp, and shared 51.7-94.8% nucleotide sequence similarity. The repeats of the second sequence family were 52-62 bp in length, and shared a 58.5-78.5% nucleotide sequence similarity. All the repeat units contained in a clone from L. sylvestris were 41 bp in length and showed an almost perfect structural conservation (95.1-100% nucleotide sequence similarity). The evolution of the first sequence family from L. sativus and of that isolated from L. sylvestris was studied by dot-blot hybridization to the genomic DNA of these species and 3 other Lathyrus species, L. clymenum, L. latifolius and L. odoratus. The former repeats were found to be species-specific and their redundancy was calculated to be 2.9 x 10(7). The satellite DNA sequence isolated from L. sylvestris was present also in L.latifolius, with a redundancy of 1.4 x 10(7) and 1.1 x 10(7), respectively. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to investigate the chromosomal distribution of the two sequence families and of 45S and 5S ribosomal genes. The species-specific sequences of L. sativus were located around the centromere of chromosome pair IV, where they occupied a very broad region, and, in a much smaller amount, close to the centromere in the short arm of pair II. Sequences related to the repeat units isolated from L. sylvestris were found, both in this species and L. latifolius, in all of the chromosome pairs at terminal and interstitial regions, where they co-localize with the vast majority of DAPI bands. The pattern of distribution of the satellite DNA sequences investigated, together with that of DAPI bands and ribosomal DNA, allowed each chromosome pair of the 3 complements studied to be identified

  12. Documentation of reticulate evolution in peonies (Paeonia) using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA: implications for biogeography and concerted evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Sang, T; Crawford, D J; Stuessy, T F

    1995-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA of 33 species of genus Paeonia (Paeoniaceae) were sequenced. In section Paeonia, different patterns of nucleotide additivity were detected in 14 diploid and tetraploid species at sites that are variable in the other 12 species of the section, suggesting that reticulate evolution has occurred. Phylogenetic relationships of species that do not show additivity, and thus ostensibly were not derived through hybridization, were reconstructed by parsimony analysis. The taxa presumably derived through reticulate evolution were then added to the phylogenetic tree according to additivity from putative parents. The study provides an example of successfully using ITS sequences to reconstruct reticulate evolution in plants and further demonstrates that the sequence data could be highly informative and accurate for detecting hybridization. Maintenance of parental sequences in the species of hybrid origin is likely due to slowing of concerted evolution caused by the long generation time of peonies. The partial and uneven homogenization of parental sequences displayed in nine species of putative hybrid origin may have resulted from gradients of gene conversion. The documented hybridizations may have occurred since the Pleistocene glaciations. The species of hybrid origin and their putative parents are now distantly allopatric. Reconstruction of reticulate evolution with sequence data, therefore, provides gene records for distributional histories of some of the parental species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7624325

  13. Protecting and accelerating adiabatic passage with time-delayed pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Pablo; Chang, Bo Y; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-05-21

    Using numerical simulations of two-photon electronic absorption with femtosecond pulses in Na2 we show that: (i) it is possible to avoid the characteristic saturation or dumped Rabi oscillations in the yield of absorption by time-delaying the laser pulses; (ii) it is possible to accelerate the onset of adiabatic passage by using the vibrational coherence starting in a wave packet; and (iii) it is possible to prepare the initial wave packet in order to achieve full state-selective transitions with broadband pulses. The findings can be used, for instance, to achieve ultrafast adiabatic passage by light-induced potentials and understand its intrinsic robustness.

  14. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  15. Galaxy Zoo Hubble: First results of the redshift evolution of disk fraction in the red sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Scarlata, Claudia; Beck, Melanie; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The transition of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence is commonly linked to a morphological transformation from disk to elliptical structure. However, the correlation between color and morphology is not one-to-one, as evidenced by the existence of a significant population of red disks. As this stage in a galaxy's evolution is likely to be transitory, the mechanism by which red disks are formed offers insight to the processes that trigger quenching of star formation and the galaxy's position on the star-forming sequence. To study the population of disk galaxies in the red sequence as a function of cosmic time, we utilize data from the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble project, which uses crowdsourced visual classifications of images of galaxies selected from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. We construct a large sample of over 10,000 disk galaxies spanning a wide (0 < z < 1.0) redshift range. We use this sample to examine the change in the fraction of disks in the red sequence with respect to all disks from z˜1 to the present day. Preliminary results confirm that the fraction of disks in the red sequence decreases as the Universe evolves. We discuss the quenching processes which may explain this trend, and which morphological transformations are most affected by it.

  16. Mass spectrometric identification, sequence evolution, and intraspecific variability of dimeric peptides encoded by cockroach akh genes.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Sebastian; Predel, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally the most diverse group of messenger molecules of the nervous system. Regarding neuropeptide identification, distribution, function, and evolution, insects are among the best studied invertebrates. Indeed, more than 100 neuropeptides are known from single species. Most of these peptides can easily be identified by direct tissue or cell profiling using MALDI-TOF MS. In these experiments, protein hormones with extensive post-translational modifications such as inter- and intramolecular disulfides are usually missed. It is evident that an exclusion of these bioactive molecules hinders the utilization of direct profiling methods in comprehensive peptidomic analyses. In the current study, we focus on the detection and structural elucidation of homo- and heterodimeric adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs) of cockroaches. The physiological relevance of these molecules with highly conserved sequences in insects is still uncertain. Sequence similarities with vertebrate growth hormone-releasing factors have been reported, but remarkably, few data regarding APRP processing exist and these data are restricted to locusts. Here, we elucidated sequences of carbamidomethylated APRP monomers of different cockroaches by means of MALDI-TOF MS(2), and we were able to identify a surprisingly large number of APRP sequences, resulting either from intraspecific amino acid substitutions within the APRP sequences or C-terminal truncated APRPs.

  17. Evolution of Repeated Sequence Arrays in the D-Loop Region of Bat Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, G. S.; Mayer, F.; Kerth, G.; Petri, B.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 species of bats representing 11 families revealed that repeated sequence arrays near the tRNA-Pro gene are present in all vespertilionine bats. Across 18 species tandem repeats varied in size from 78 to 85 bp and contained two to nine repeats. Heteroplasmy ranged from 15% to 63%. Fewer repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in a species with up to nine repeats indicates selection may act against long arrays. A lower limit of two repeats and more repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in two species with few repeats suggests length mutations are biased. Significant regressions of heteroplasmy, θ and π, on repeat number further suggest that repeat duplication rate increases with repeat number. Comparison of vespertilionine bat consensus repeats to mammal control region sequences revealed that tandem repeats of similar size, sequence and number also occur in shrews, cats and bighorn sheep. The presence of two conserved protein-binding sequences in all repeat units indicates that convergent evolution has occurred by duplication of functional units. We speculate that D-loop region tandem repeats may provide signal redundancy and a primitive repair mechanism in the event of somatic mutations to these binding sites. PMID:9215906

  18. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution.

  19. Sequencing the genome of Marssonina brunnea reveals fungus-poplar co-evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The fungus Marssonina brunnea is a causal pathogen of Marssonina leaf spot that devastates poplar plantations by defoliating susceptible trees before normal fall leaf drop. Results We sequence the genome of M. brunnea with a size of 52 Mb assembled into 89 scaffolds, representing the first sequenced Dermateaceae genome. By inoculating this fungus onto a poplar hybrid clone, we investigate how M. brunnea interacts and co-evolves with its host to colonize poplar leaves. While a handful of virulence genes in M. brunnea, mostly from the LysM family, are detected to up-regulate during infection, the poplar down-regulates its resistance genes, such as nucleotide binding site domains and leucine rich repeats, in response to infection. From 10,027 predicted proteins of M. brunnea in a comparison with those from poplar, we identify four poplar transferases that stimulate the host to resist M. brunnea. These transferas-encoding genes may have driven the co-evolution of M. brunnea and Populus during the process of infection and anti-infection. Conclusions Our results from the draft sequence of the M. brunnea genome provide evidence for genome-genome interactions that play an important role in poplar-pathogen co-evolution. This knowledge could help to design effective strategies for controlling Marssonina leaf spot in poplar. PMID:22876864

  20. Sequence evolution and expression regulation of stress-responsive genes in natural populations of wild tomato.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Iris; Steige, Kim A; Stephan, Wolfgang; Mboup, Mamadou

    2013-01-01

    The wild tomato species Solanum chilense and S. peruvianum are a valuable non-model system for studying plant adaptation since they grow in diverse environments facing many abiotic constraints. Here we investigate the sequence evolution of regulatory regions of drought and cold responsive genes and their expression regulation. The coding regions of these genes were previously shown to exhibit signatures of positive selection. Expression profiles and sequence evolution of regulatory regions of members of the Asr (ABA/water stress/ripening induced) gene family and the dehydrin gene pLC30-15 were analyzed in wild tomato populations from contrasting environments. For S. chilense, we found that Asr4 and pLC30-15 appear to respond much faster to drought conditions in accessions from very dry environments than accessions from more mesic locations. Sequence analysis suggests that the promoter of Asr2 and the downstream region of pLC30-15 are under positive selection in some local populations of S. chilense. By investigating gene expression differences at the population level we provide further support of our previous conclusions that Asr2, Asr4, and pLC30-15 are promising candidates for functional studies of adaptation. Our analysis also demonstrates the power of the candidate gene approach in evolutionary biology research and highlights the importance of wild Solanum species as a genetic resource for their cultivated relatives.

  1. Genome sequences of Phytophthora enable translational plant disease management and accelerate research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole and partial genome sequences are becoming available at an ever-increasing pace. For many plant pathogen systems, we are moving into the era of genome resequencing. The first Phytophthora genomes, P. ramorum and P. sojae, became available in 2004, followed shortly by P. infestans in 2006. Ava...

  2. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  3. Improved measurement of brain deformation during mild head acceleration using a novel tagged MRI sequence.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Andrew K; Magrath, Elizabeth; McEntee, Julie E; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L; Bayly, Philip V; Butman, John A; Pham, Dzung L

    2014-11-07

    In vivo measurements of human brain deformation during mild acceleration are needed to help validate computational models of traumatic brain injury and to understand the factors that govern the mechanical response of the brain. Tagged magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive technique to track tissue motion in vivo which has been used to quantify brain deformation in live human subjects. However, these prior studies required from 72 to 144 head rotations to generate deformation data for a single image slice, precluding its use to investigate the entire brain in a single subject. Here, a novel method is introduced that significantly reduces temporal variability in the acquisition and improves the accuracy of displacement estimates. Optimization of the acquisition parameters in a gelatin phantom and three human subjects leads to a reduction in the number of rotations from 72 to 144 to as few as 8 for a single image slice. The ability to estimate accurate, well-resolved, fields of displacement and strain in far fewer repetitions will enable comprehensive studies of acceleration-induced deformation throughout the human brain in vivo.

  4. Evolution of high-repetition-rate induction accelerators through advancements in switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Caporaso, G. J.; Newton, M. A.; Yu, S. S.

    1992-08-01

    Future applications of linear and recirculating induction accelerators include microwave sources for plasma heating and linear colliders, industrial manufacturing processes, and heavy ion fusion. These applications require pulsed sources capable of sustained operation at high pulse-repetition rates. Powering these new accelerators places severe switching demands on the source, demands that often can not be met withcommercially-available technology. Consequently, several new accelerator switching schemes have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our transition from spark-gap technology to magnetic switching has merged the formerly independent roles of source and cell into a single system and reshaped our design methods to emphasize high efficiency. Treatment of the accelerator as a system has also enabled us to optimize new accelerator designs based on cost considerations. Presently, we are developing a technology for driving a heavy-ion induction recirculator at pulse rates exceeding 100 kHz. In this case, the switching method is all solid state and the source and cell have evolved into a unified device.

  5. Genome sequence of Perigonia lusca single nucleopolyhedrovirus: insights into the evolution of a nucleotide metabolism enzyme in the family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Lima, Rayane Nunes; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Huang, Ning; Báo, Sônia Nair; Sosa-Gómez, Daniel R.; Ribeiro, Bergmann M.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a novel group II alphabaculovirus, Perigonia lusca single nucleopolyhedrovirus (PeluSNPV), was sequenced and shown to contain 132,831 bp with 145 putative ORFs (open reading frames) of at least 50 amino acids. An interesting feature of this novel genome was the presence of a putative nucleotide metabolism enzyme-encoding gene (pelu112). The pelu112 gene was predicted to encode a fusion of thymidylate kinase (tmk) and dUTP diphosphatase (dut). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that baculoviruses have independently acquired tmk and dut several times during their evolution. Two homologs of the tmk-dut fusion gene were separately introduced into the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) genome, which lacks tmk and dut. The recombinant baculoviruses produced viral DNA, virus progeny, and some viral proteins earlier during in vitro infection and the yields of viral occlusion bodies were increased 2.5-fold when compared to the parental virus. Interestingly, both enzymes appear to retain their active sites, based on separate modeling using previously solved crystal structures. We suggest that the retention of these tmk-dut fusion genes by certain baculoviruses could be related to accelerating virus replication and to protecting the virus genome from deleterious mutation. PMID:27273152

  6. Accelerated body size evolution during cold climatic periods in the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Julien; Morlon, Hélène

    2017-04-03

    How ecological and morphological diversity accumulates over geological time is much debated. Adaptive radiation theory has been successful in testing the effects of biotic interactions on the rapid divergence of phenotypes within a clade, but this theory ignores abiotic effects. The role of abiotic drivers on the tempo of phenotypic evolution has been tested only in a few lineages or small clades from the fossil record. Here, we develop a phylogenetic comparative framework for testing if and how clade-wide rates of phenotypic evolution vary with abiotic drivers. We apply this approach to comprehensive bird and mammal phylogenies, body size data for 9,465 extant species, and global average temperature trends over the Cenozoic. Across birds and mammals, we find that the rate of body size evolution is primarily driven by past climate. Unexpectedly, evolutionary rates are inferred to be higher during periods of cold rather than warm climates in most groups, suggesting that temperature influences evolutionary rates by modifying selective pressures rather than through its effect on energy availability and metabolism. The effect of climate on the rate of body size evolution seems to be a general feature of endotherm evolution, regardless of wide differences in species' ecology and evolutionary history. These results suggest that climatic changes played a major role in shaping species' evolution in the past and could also play a major role in shaping their evolution in the future.

  7. Whole-genome sequence comparisons reveal the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Chan Hee; Nair, G Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of the whole-genome sequences of Vibrio cholerae strains from previous and current cholera pandemics has demonstrated that genomic changes and alterations in phage CTX (particularly in the gene encoding the B subunit of cholera toxin) were major features in the evolution of V. cholerae. Recent studies have revealed the genetic mechanisms in these bacteria by which new variants of V. cholerae are generated from type-specific strains; these mechanisms suggest that certain strains are selected by environmental or human factors over time. By understanding the mechanisms and driving forces of historical and current changes in the V. cholerae population, it would be possible to predict the direction of such changes and the evolution of new variants; this has implications for the battle against cholera.

  8. The evolution of tooling, techniques, and quality control for accelerator dipole magnet cables

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1992-08-01

    The present generation of particle accelerators are utilizing the flattened, compacted, single layer cable design introduced nearly 20 years ago at Rutherford Laboratory. However, the requirements for current density, filament size, dimensional control long lengths, and low current degradation are much more stringent for the present accelerators compared with the earlier Tevatron and HERA accelerators. Also, in order to achieve higher field strengths with efficient use of superconductor, the new designs require wider cables with more strands. These requirements have stimulated an active research effort which has led to significant improvements in critical current density and conductor manufacturing. In addition they have stimulated the development of new cabling techniques, improved tooling, and better measurement techniques. The need to produce over 20 million meters of cable has led to the development of high speed cabling machines and on-line quality assurance measurements. These new developments will be discussed, and areas still requiring improvement will be identified.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Stress evolution and earthquake sequence of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Peiyu; Hu, Caibo; Shi, Yaolin

    2015-04-01

    The India-Eurasia's collision produces N-S compression and results in large thrust fault in the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau. Differential eastern flow of the lower crust of the plateau leads to large strike-slip faults and normal faults within the plateau. From 1904 to 2014, more than 30 earthquakes of Mw > 6.5 occurred sequentially in this distinctive tectonic environment. How did the stresses evolve during the last 110 years, how did the earthquakes interact with each other? Can this knowledge help us to forecast the future seismic hazards? In this essay, we tried to simulate the evolution of the stress field and the earthquake sequence in the Tibetan plateau within the last 110 years with a 2-D finite element model. Given an initial state of stress, the boundary condition was constrained by the present-day GPS observation, which was assumed as a constant rate during the 110 years. We calculated stress evolution year by year, and earthquake would occur if stress exceed the crustal strength. Stress changes due to each large earthquake in the sequence was calculated and contributed to the stress evolution. A key issue is the choice of initial stress state of the modeling, which is actually unknown. Usually, in the study of earthquake triggering, people assume the initial stress is zero, and only calculate the stress changes by large earthquakes - the Coulomb failure stress changes (Δ CFS). To some extent, this simplified method is a powerful tool because it can reveal which fault or which part of a fault becomes more risky or safer relatively. Nonetheless, it has not utilized all information available to us. The earthquake sequence reveals, though far from complete, some information about the stress state in the region. If the entire region is close to a self-organized critical or subcritical state, earthquake stress drop provides an estimate of lower limit of initial state. For locations no earthquakes occurred during the period, initial stress has to be

  10. Large-scale sequencing of human influenza reveals the dynamic nature of viral genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Sengamalay, Naomi A; Shumway, Martin; Zaborsky, Jennifer; Feldblyum, Tamara; Subbu, Vik; Spiro, David J; Sitz, Jeff; Koo, Hean; Bolotov, Pavel; Dernovoy, Dmitry; Tatusova, Tatiana; Bao, Yiming; St George, Kirsten; Taylor, Jill; Lipman, David J; Fraser, Claire M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Salzberg, Steven L

    2005-10-20

    Influenza viruses are remarkably adept at surviving in the human population over a long timescale. The human influenza A virus continues to thrive even among populations with widespread access to vaccines, and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The virus mutates from year to year, making the existing vaccines ineffective on a regular basis, and requiring that new strains be chosen for a new vaccine. Less-frequent major changes, known as antigenic shift, create new strains against which the human population has little protective immunity, thereby causing worldwide pandemics. The most recent pandemics include the 1918 'Spanish' flu, one of the most deadly outbreaks in recorded history, which killed 30-50 million people worldwide, the 1957 'Asian' flu, and the 1968 'Hong Kong' flu. Motivated by the need for a better understanding of influenza evolution, we have developed flexible protocols that make it possible to apply large-scale sequencing techniques to the highly variable influenza genome. Here we report the results of sequencing 209 complete genomes of the human influenza A virus, encompassing a total of 2,821,103 nucleotides. In addition to increasing markedly the number of publicly available, complete influenza virus genomes, we have discovered several anomalies in these first 209 genomes that demonstrate the dynamic nature of influenza transmission and evolution. This new, large-scale sequencing effort promises to provide a more comprehensive picture of the evolution of influenza viruses and of their pattern of transmission through human and animal populations. All data from this project are being deposited, without delay, in public archives.

  11. Mass loss from pre-main-sequence accretion disks. I - The accelerating wind of FU Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the wind of the pre-main-sequence object FU Orionis arises from the surface of the luminous accretion disk. A disk wind model calculated assuming radiative equilibrium explains the differential behavior of the observed asymmetric absorption-line profiles. The model predicts that strong lines should be asymmetric and blueshifted, while weak lines should be symmetric and double-peaked due to disk rotation, in agreement with observations. We propose that many blueshifted 'shell' absorption features are not produced in a true shell of material, but rather form in a differentially expanding wind that is rapidly rotating. The inference of rapid rotation supports the proposal that pre-main-sequence disk winds are rotationally driven.

  12. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating local complexity analysis of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kirmitzoglou, Ioannis; Promponas, Vasilis J; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2013-01-01

    The use of GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in Bioinformatics showed promising results [1]. As such a similar approach can be used to speedup other algorithms such as CAST, a popular tool used for masking low-complexity regions (LCRs) in protein sequences [2] with increased sensitivity. We developed and implemented a CUDA-enabled version (GPU_CAST) of the multi-threaded version of CAST software first presented in [3] and optimized in [4]. The proposed software implementation uses the nVIDIA CUDA libraries and the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the CAST algorithm to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The GPU-based implementation presented in this work, is compared against the multi-threaded, multi-core optimized version of CAST [4] and yielded speedups of 5x-10x for large protein sequence datasets.

  13. BALSA: integrated secondary analysis for whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, accelerated by GPU

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lap-Kei; Cheung, Jeanno; Liu, Chi-Man

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an integrated solution, called BALSA, for the secondary analysis of next generation sequencing data; it exploits the computational power of GPU and an intricate memory management to give a fast and accurate analysis. From raw reads to variants (including SNPs and Indels), BALSA, using just a single computing node with a commodity GPU board, takes 5.5 h to process 50-fold whole genome sequencing (∼750 million 100 bp paired-end reads), or just 25 min for 210-fold whole exome sequencing. BALSA’s speed is rooted at its parallel algorithms to effectively exploit a GPU to speed up processes like alignment, realignment and statistical testing. BALSA incorporates a 16-genotype model to support the calling of SNPs and Indels and achieves competitive variant calling accuracy and sensitivity when compared to the ensemble of six popular variant callers. BALSA also supports efficient identification of somatic SNVs and CNVs; experiments showed that BALSA recovers all the previously validated somatic SNVs and CNVs, and it is more sensitive for somatic Indel detection. BALSA outputs variants in VCF format. A pileup-like SNAPSHOT format, while maintaining the same fidelity as BAM in variant calling, enables efficient storage and indexing, and facilitates the App development of downstream analyses. BALSA is available at: http://sourceforge.net/p/balsa. PMID:24949238

  14. BALSA: integrated secondary analysis for whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, accelerated by GPU.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ruibang; Wong, Yiu-Lun; Law, Wai-Chun; Lee, Lap-Kei; Cheung, Jeanno; Liu, Chi-Man; Lam, Tak-Wah

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an integrated solution, called BALSA, for the secondary analysis of next generation sequencing data; it exploits the computational power of GPU and an intricate memory management to give a fast and accurate analysis. From raw reads to variants (including SNPs and Indels), BALSA, using just a single computing node with a commodity GPU board, takes 5.5 h to process 50-fold whole genome sequencing (∼750 million 100 bp paired-end reads), or just 25 min for 210-fold whole exome sequencing. BALSA's speed is rooted at its parallel algorithms to effectively exploit a GPU to speed up processes like alignment, realignment and statistical testing. BALSA incorporates a 16-genotype model to support the calling of SNPs and Indels and achieves competitive variant calling accuracy and sensitivity when compared to the ensemble of six popular variant callers. BALSA also supports efficient identification of somatic SNVs and CNVs; experiments showed that BALSA recovers all the previously validated somatic SNVs and CNVs, and it is more sensitive for somatic Indel detection. BALSA outputs variants in VCF format. A pileup-like SNAPSHOT format, while maintaining the same fidelity as BAM in variant calling, enables efficient storage and indexing, and facilitates the App development of downstream analyses. BALSA is available at: http://sourceforge.net/p/balsa.

  15. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  16. Parameters of the proteome evolution from the distribution of sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Axelsen, Jacob; Maslov, Sergei

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is driven by gene duplications, deletions and modifications of amino-acid sequences of already existing proteins. The information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. We introduced a simple mathematical framework that allows one to extract some of this hidden information. It was then applied to the proteome-wide set of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. We estimated the stationary per-gene deletion and duplication rates, the distribution of amino-acid substitution rate of these organisms. The validity of our mathematical framework was further confirmed by numerical simulations of a simple evolutionary model of a fixed-size proteome.

  17. Genome Sequence and Comparative Genome Analysis of Lactobacillus casei: Insights into Their Niche-Associated Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Thompson, Rebecca; Budinich, Mateo F.; Broadbent, Jeff R.

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is remarkably adaptable to diverse habitats and widely used in the food industry. To reveal the genomic features that contribute to its broad ecological adaptability and examine the evolution of the species, the genome sequence of L. casei ATCC 334 is analyzed and compared with other sequenced lactobacilli. This analysis reveals that ATCC 334 contains a high number of coding sequences involved in carbohydrate utilization and transcriptional regulation, reflecting its requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. A comparison of the genome sequences of ATCC 334 to L. casei BL23 reveals 12 and 19 genomic islands, respectively. For a broader assessment of the genetic variability within L. casei, gene content of 21 L. casei strains isolated from various habitats (cheeses, n = 7; plant materials, n = 8; and human sources, n = 6) was examined by comparative genome hybridization with an ATCC 334-based microarray. This analysis resulted in identification of 25 hypervariable regions. One of these regions contains an overrepresentation of genes involved in carbohydrate utilization and transcriptional regulation and was thus proposed as a lifestyle adaptation island. Differences in L. casei genome inventory reveal both gene gain and gene decay. Gene gain, via acquisition of genomic islands, likely confers a fitness benefit in specific habitats. Gene decay, that is, loss of unnecessary ancestral traits, is observed in the cheese isolates and likely results in enhanced fitness in the dairy niche. This study gives the first picture of the stable versus variable regions in L. casei and provides valuable insights into evolution, lifestyle adaptation, and metabolic diversity of L. casei. PMID:20333194

  18. A Redox Shuttle Accelerates O2 Evolution of Photocatalysts Formed In Situ under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Xin; Ye, Chen; Li, Xu-Bing; Li, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Xue-Wang; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2017-02-20

    A redox shuttle strategy is demonstrated to be a promising approach to accelerate hole removal for efficient O2 production with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride, WO3 , BiVO4 , NiTi-LDH, and Ag3 PO4 water-oxidation catalysts under visible-light irradiation.

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of Rh2 opsins in birds demonstrate an episode of accelerated evolution in the New World warblers (Setophaga)

    PubMed Central

    Price, Trevor D.

    2015-01-01

    Low rates of sequence evolution associated with purifying selection can be interrupted by episodic changes in selective regimes. Visual pigments are a unique system in which we can investigate the functional consequences of genetic changes, therefore connecting genotype to phenotype in the context of natural and sexual selection pressures. We study the RH2 and RH1 visual pigments (opsins) across 22 bird species belonging to two ecologically convergent clades, the New World warblers (Parulidae) and Old World warblers (Phylloscopidae), and evaluate rates of evolution in these clades along with data from 21 additional species. We demonstrate generally slow evolution of these opsins: both Rh1 and Rh2 are highly conserved across Old World and New World warblers. However, Rh2 underwent a burst of evolution within the New World genus Setophaga, where it accumulated substitutions at 6 amino acid sites across the species we studied. Evolutionary analyses revealed a significant increase in dN/dS in Setophaga, implying relatively strong selective pressures to overcome long-standing purifying selection. We studied the effects of each substitution on spectral tuning and found they do not cause large spectral shifts. Thus substitutions may reflect other aspects of opsin function, such as those affecting photosensitivity and/or dark-light adaptation. Although it is unclear what these alterations mean for color perception, we suggest that rapid evolution is linked to sexual selection, given the exceptional plumage colour diversification in Setophaga. PMID:25827331

  20. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  1. Protein sequence conservation and stable molecular evolution reveals influenza virus nucleoprotein as a universal druggable target.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-08-01

    The high mutation rate in influenza virus genome and appearance of drug resistance calls for a constant effort to identify alternate drug targets and develop new antiviral strategies. The internal proteins of the virus can be exploited as a potential target for therapeutic interventions. Among these, the nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant protein that provides structural and functional support to the viral replication machinery. The current study aims at analysis of protein sequence polymorphism patterns, degree of molecular evolution and sequence conservation as a function of potential druggability of nucleoprotein. We analyzed a universal set of amino acid sequences, (n=22,000) and, in order to identify and correlate the functionally conserved, druggable regions across different parameters, classified them on the basis of host organism, strain type and continental region of sample isolation. The results indicated that around 95% of the sequence length was conserved, with at least 7 regions conserved across the protein among various classes. Moreover, the highly variable regions, though very limited in number, were found to be positively selected indicating, thereby, the high degree of protein stability against various hosts and spatio-temporal references. Furthermore, on mapping the conserved regions on the protein, 7 drug binding pockets in the functionally important regions of the protein were revealed. The results, therefore, collectively indicate that nucleoprotein is a highly conserved and stable viral protein that can potentially be exploited for development of broadly effective antiviral strategies.

  2. The importance of sequence diversity in the aggregation and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caroline F; Teichmann, Sarah A; Clarke, Jane; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-12-08

    Incorrect folding of proteins, leading to aggregation and amyloid formation, is associated with a group of highly debilitating medical conditions including Alzheimer's disease and late-onset diabetes. The issue of how unwanted protein association is normally avoided in a living system is particularly significant in the context of the evolution of multidomain proteins, which account for over 70% of all eukaryotic proteins, where the effective local protein concentration in the vicinity of each domain is very high. Here we describe the aggregation kinetics of multidomain protein constructs of immunoglobulin domains and the ability of different homologous domains to aggregate together. We show that aggregation of these proteins is a specific process and that the efficiency of coaggregation between different domains decreases markedly with decreasing sequence identity. Thus, whereas immunoglobulin domains with more than about 70% identity are highly prone to coaggregation, those with less than 30-40% sequence identity do not detectably interact. A bioinformatics analysis of consecutive homologous domains in large multidomain proteins shows that such domains almost exclusively have sequence identities of less than 40%, in other words below the level at which coaggregation is likely to be efficient. We propose that such low sequence identities could have a crucial and general role in safeguarding proteins against misfolding and aggregation.

  3. Advances in understanding tumour evolution through single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jack; Jahn, Katharina; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2017-02-11

    The mutational heterogeneity observed within tumours poses additional challenges to the development of effective cancer treatments. A thorough understanding of a tumour's subclonal composition and its mutational history is essential to open up the design of treatments tailored to individual patients. Comparative studies on a large number of tumours permit the identification of mutational patterns which may refine forecasts of cancer progression, response to treatment and metastatic potential. The composition of tumours is shaped by evolutionary processes. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing offer the possibility to analyse the evolutionary history and accompanying heterogeneity of tumours at an unprecedented resolution, by sequencing single cells. New computational challenges arise when moving from bulk to single-cell sequencing data, leading to the development of novel modelling frameworks. In this review, we present the state of the art methods for understanding the phylogeny encoded in bulk or single-cell sequencing data, and highlight future directions for developing more comprehensive and informative pictures of tumour evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby.

  4. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  5. Acceleration and transport of anomalous cosmic rays: Investigating the spectral evolution at Voyager 1 beyond the termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Udara K.

    Interstellar neutral atoms entering the heliosphere could become ionized by photo-ionization or charge exchange with solar-wind ions. These newly created ions are picked up by the solar wind and carried to the termination shock (TS) where they are believed to be accelerated by the diffusive shock acceleration process to high energies (˜1-100 MeV n-1). The accelerated ions are known as anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs). When NASA's space probe, Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. However, over the next few years, in the declining phase of the solar cycle, the spectra began to evolve into the expected power-law profile. The model developed here is based on the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, but away from the Voyager crossing points. First, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary of 0.5 MeV n-1, is reached. Next, we propose that the solar cycle had an important effect on the evolving of the spectra in the heliosheath. To investigate this, a magnetohydrodynamic background model with stationary solar-wind inner boundary conditions was used to model the transport of helium and oxygen ions. In addition, we developed a charge consistent stochastic model to simulate multiply charged oxygen ACRs. It is shown that the spectral evolution of ACRs in the heliosheath at Voyager 1 could be explained by combining intermediate-energy particles arriving from the heliotail

  6. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg and Evolution Analysis within the Malvales Order

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhan, Di-Feng; Jia, Xian; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp) genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A. sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A. sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A. sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A. sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A. sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A. sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional medicinal

  7. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg and Evolution Analysis within the Malvales Order.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhan, Di-Feng; Jia, Xian; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp) genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A. sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A. sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A. sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A. sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A. sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A. sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional medicinal

  8. Sperm competition shapes gene expression and sequence evolution in the ocellated wrasse.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Wright, Alison E; Marsh-Rollo, Susan E; Nugent, Bridget M; Alonzo, Suzanne H; Mank, Judith E

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression differences between males and females often underlie sexually dimorphic phenotypes, and the expression levels of genes that are differentially expressed between the sexes are thought to respond to sexual selection. Most studies on the transcriptomic response to sexual selection treat sexual selection as a single force, but postmating sexual selection in particular is expected to specifically target gonadal tissue. The three male morphs of the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus) make it possible to test the role of postmating sexual selection in shaping the gonadal transcriptome. Nesting males hold territories and have the highest reproductive success, yet we detected feminization of their gonadal gene expression compared to satellite males. Satellite males are less brightly coloured and experience more intense sperm competition than nesting males. In line with postmating sexual selection affecting gonadal gene expression, we detected a more masculinized expression profile in satellites. Sneakers are the lowest quality males and showed both de-masculinization and de-feminization of gene expression. We also detected higher rates of gene sequence evolution of male-biased genes compared to unbiased genes, which could at least in part be explained by positive selection. Together, these results reveal the potential for postmating sexual selection to drive higher rates of gene sequence evolution and shape the gonadal transcriptome profile.

  9. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed. PMID:8177172

  10. Ectodomain Architecture Affects Sequence and Functional Evolution of Vertebrate Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlan; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Deling

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial components of innate immunity that specifically recognize diverse pathogen-associated molecular patterns from pathogens. The continuous hydrogen-bond network (asparagine ladder) formed among the asparagine residues on the concave surfaces of neighboring leucine-rich repeat modules assists in stabilizing the overall shape of TLR ectodomains responsible for ligand recognition. Analysis of 28 types of vertebrate TLRs showed that their ectodomains possessed three types of architectures: a single-domain architecture with an intact asparagine ladder, a three-domain architecture with the ladder interrupted in the middle, and a trans-three-domain architecture with the ladder broken in both termini. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the three vertebrate TLR architectures arose during early evolution. The 1428 vertebrate TLRs can be divided into eight families based on sequence and structural differences. TLRs ligand specificities are affected by their ectodomain architectures. Three-domain TLRs bind hydrophobic ligands, whereas single-domain and trans-three-domain TLRs mainly recognize hydrophilic ligands. Analysis of 39 vertebrate genomes suggested that the number of single-domain TLR genes in terrestrial vertebrate genomes decreased by half compared to aquatic vertebrate genomes. Single-domain TLR genes underwent stronger purifying selective pressures than three-domain TLR genes in mammals. Overall, ectodomain architecture influences the sequence and functional evolution of vertebrate TLRs. PMID:27216145

  11. Accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast imaging of MR compatible metallic devices based on modified fast spin echo sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Caiyun; Xie, Guoxi; Zhang, Yongqin; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Min; Su, Shi; Dong, Ying; Liu, Xin; Ji, Jim

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to develop an accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast MR imaging method for visualizing MR compatible metallic devices. A modified fast spin echo sequence is used to accelerate data acquisition. Each readout gradient in the modified fast spin echo is slightly shifted by a short distance T shift. Phase changes accumulated within T shift are then used to calculate the susceptibility map by using a kernel deconvolution algorithm with a regularized ℓ1 minimization. To evaluate the proposed fast spin echo method, three phantom experiments were conducted and compared to a spin echo based technique and the gold standard CT for visualizing biopsy needles and brachytherapy seeds. Compared to the spin echo based technique, the data sampling speed of the proposed method was faster by 2–4 times while still being able to accurately visualize and identify the location of the biopsy needle and brachytherapy seeds. These results were confirmed by CT images of the same devices. Results also demonstrated that the proposed fast spin echo method can achieve good visualization of the brachytherapy seeds in positive contrast and in different orientations. It is also capable of correctly differentiating brachytherapy seeds from other similar structures on conventional magnitude images.

  12. A population genetic study of the evolution of SINEs. II. Sequence evolution under the master copy model

    SciTech Connect

    Tachida, Hidenori

    1996-06-01

    A transient population genetic model of SINE (short interspersed repetitive element) evolution is presented, assuming the master copy model is theoretically investigated. Means and variances of consensus frequency of nucleotides, nucleotide homozygosity, and the number of shared differences that are considered to have been caused by mutations occurring in the master copy lineages are computed. All quantities investigated are shown to be monotone functions of the duration of the expansion period. Thus, they can be used to estimate the expansion period although their sampling variances are generally large. Using the theoretical results, the Sb subfamily of human Alu sequences is analyzed. First, the expansion period is estimated from the observed mean and variance of homozygosity. The expansion period is shown to be short compared to the time since the end of the expansion of the subfamily. However, the observed number of the shared differences is more than twice that expected under the master copy model with the estimated expansion period. Alternative models to explain this observation are discussed, including one with multiple master copy loci. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Biased Gene Conversion and GC-Content Evolution in the Coding Sequences of Reptiles and Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins. PMID:25527834

  14. Biased gene conversion and GC-content evolution in the coding sequences of reptiles and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2014-12-19

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins.

  15. Accelerated rates of protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes might be legacy of domestication.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tao; Dimitrov, Ivan; Zhang, Yinling; Tax, Frans E; Yi, Jing; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia

    2015-10-01

    Traits related to grain and reproductive organs in grass crops have been under continuous directional selection during domestication. Barley is one of the oldest domesticated crops in human history. Thus genes associated with the grain and reproductive organs in barley may show evidence of dramatic evolutionary change. To understand how artificial selection contributes to protein evolution of biased genes in different barley organs, we used Digital Gene Expression analysis of six barley organs (grain, pistil, anther, leaf, stem and root) to identify genes with biased expression in specific organs. Pairwise comparisons of orthologs between barley and Brachypodium distachyon, as well as between highland and lowland barley cultivars mutually indicated that grain and pistil biased genes show relatively higher protein evolutionary rates compared with the median of all orthologs and other organ biased genes. Lineage-specific protein evolutionary rates estimation showed similar patterns with elevated protein evolution in barley grain and pistil biased genes, yet protein sequences generally evolve much faster in the lowland barley cultivar. Further functional annotations revealed that some of these grain and pistil biased genes with rapid protein evolution are related to nutrient biosynthesis and cell cycle/division. Our analyses provide insights into how domestication differentially shaped the evolution of genes specific to different organs of a crop species, and implications for future functional studies of domestication genes.

  16. Emergence and Evolution of Hominidae-Specific Coding and Noncoding Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Saber, Morteza Mahmoudi; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-07-12

    Family Hominidae, which includes humans and great apes, is recognized for unique complex social behavior and intellectual abilities. Despite the increasing genome data, however, the genomic origin of its phenotypic uniqueness has remained elusive. Clade-specific genes and highly conserved noncoding sequences (HCNSs) are among the high-potential evolutionary candidates involved in driving clade-specific characters and phenotypes. On this premise, we analyzed whole genome sequences along with gene orthology data retrieved from major DNA databases to find Hominidae-specific (HS) genes and HCNSs. We discovered that Down syndrome critical region 4 (DSCR4) is the only experimentally verified gene uniquely present in Hominidae. DSCR4 has no structural homology to any known protein and was inferred to have emerged in several steps through LTR/ERV1, LTR/ERVL retrotransposition, and transversion. Using the genomic distance as neutral evolution threshold, we identified 1,658 HS HCNSs. Polymorphism coverage and derived allele frequency analysis of HS HCNSs showed that these HCNSs are under purifying selection, indicating that they may harbor important functions. They are overrepresented in promoters/untranslated regions, in close proximity of genes involved in sensory perception of sound and developmental process, and also showed a significantly lower nucleosome occupancy probability. Interestingly, many ancestral sequences of the HS HCNSs showed very high evolutionary rates. This suggests that new functions emerged through some kind of positive selection, and then purifying selection started to operate to keep these functions.

  17. Insights into the Evolution of Cotton Diploids and Polyploids from Whole-Genome Re-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Page, Justin T.; Huynh, Mark D.; Liechty, Zach S.; Grupp, Kara; Stelly, David; Hulse, Amanda M.; Ashrafi, Hamid; Van Deynze, Allen; Wendel, Jonathan F.; Udall, Joshua A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the composition, evolution, and function of the Gossypium hirsutum (cotton) genome is complicated by the joint presence of two genomes in its nucleus (AT and DT genomes). These two genomes were derived from progenitor A-genome and D-genome diploids involved in ancestral allopolyploidization. To better understand the allopolyploid genome, we re-sequenced the genomes of extant diploid relatives that contain the A1 (Gossypium herbaceum), A2 (Gossypium arboreum), or D5 (Gossypium raimondii) genomes. We conducted a comparative analysis using deep re-sequencing of multiple accessions of each diploid species and identified 24 million SNPs between the A-diploid and D-diploid genomes. These analyses facilitated the construction of a robust index of conserved SNPs between the A-genomes and D-genomes at all detected polymorphic loci. This index is widely applicable for read mapping efforts of other diploid and allopolyploid Gossypium accessions. Further analysis also revealed locations of putative duplications and deletions in the A-genome relative to the D-genome reference sequence. The approximately 25,400 deleted regions included more than 50% deletion of 978 genes, including many involved with starch synthesis. In the polyploid genome, we also detected 1,472 conversion events between homoeologous chromosomes, including events that overlapped 113 genes. Continued characterization of the Gossypium genomes will further enhance our ability to manipulate fiber and agronomic production of cotton. PMID:23979935

  18. Emergence and Evolution of Hominidae-Specific Coding and Noncoding Genomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Morteza Mahmoudi; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    Family Hominidae, which includes humans and great apes, is recognized for unique complex social behavior and intellectual abilities. Despite the increasing genome data, however, the genomic origin of its phenotypic uniqueness has remained elusive. Clade-specific genes and highly conserved noncoding sequences (HCNSs) are among the high-potential evolutionary candidates involved in driving clade-specific characters and phenotypes. On this premise, we analyzed whole genome sequences along with gene orthology data retrieved from major DNA databases to find Hominidae-specific (HS) genes and HCNSs. We discovered that Down syndrome critical region 4 (DSCR4) is the only experimentally verified gene uniquely present in Hominidae. DSCR4 has no structural homology to any known protein and was inferred to have emerged in several steps through LTR/ERV1, LTR/ERVL retrotransposition, and transversion. Using the genomic distance as neutral evolution threshold, we identified 1,658 HS HCNSs. Polymorphism coverage and derived allele frequency analysis of HS HCNSs showed that these HCNSs are under purifying selection, indicating that they may harbor important functions. They are overrepresented in promoters/untranslated regions, in close proximity of genes involved in sensory perception of sound and developmental process, and also showed a significantly lower nucleosome occupancy probability. Interestingly, many ancestral sequences of the HS HCNSs showed very high evolutionary rates. This suggests that new functions emerged through some kind of positive selection, and then purifying selection started to operate to keep these functions. PMID:27289096

  19. Insight into the evolution and origin of leprosy bacilli from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium lepromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Benjak, Andrej; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Herbig, Alexander; Avanzi, Charlotte; Busso, Philippe; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is an uncultured human pathogen associated with diffuse lepromatous leprosy and a reactional state known as Lucio's phenomenon. By using deep sequencing with and without DNA enrichment, we obtained the near-complete genome sequence of M. lepromatosis present in a skin biopsy from a Mexican patient, and compared it with that of Mycobacterium leprae, which has undergone extensive reductive evolution. The genomes display extensive synteny and are similar in size (∼3.27 Mb). Protein-coding genes share 93% nucleotide sequence identity, whereas pseudogenes are only 82% identical. The events that led to pseudogenization of 50% of the genome likely occurred before divergence from their most recent common ancestor (MRCA), and both M. lepromatosis and M. leprae have since accumulated new pseudogenes or acquired specific deletions. Functional comparisons suggest that M. lepromatosis has lost several enzymes required for amino acid synthesis whereas M. leprae has a defective heme pathway. M. lepromatosis has retained all functions required to infect the Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system and therefore may also be neuropathogenic. A phylogeographic survey of 227 leprosy biopsies by differential PCR revealed that 221 contained M. leprae whereas only six, all from Mexico, harbored M. lepromatosis. Phylogenetic comparisons indicate that M. lepromatosis is closer than M. leprae to the MRCA, and a Bayesian dating analysis suggests that they diverged from their MRCA approximately 13.9 Mya. Thus, despite their ancient separation, the two leprosy bacilli are remarkably conserved and still cause similar pathologic conditions. PMID:25831531

  20. Beyond genome sequencing: lineage tracking with barcodes to study the dynamics of evolution, infection, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Jamie R; Levy, Sasha F

    2014-12-01

    Evolving cellular communities, such as the gut microbiome, pathogenic infections, and cancer, consist of large populations of ~10(7)-10(14) cells. Because of their large population sizes, adaptation within these populations can be driven by many beneficial mutations that never rise above extremely low frequencies. Genome sequencing methods such as clonal, single cell, or whole population sequencing are poorly suited to detect these rare beneficial lineages, and, more generally, to characterize which mutations are most important to the population dynamics. Here, we introduce an alternative approach: high-resolution lineage tracking with DNA barcodes. In contrast to whole genome sequencing, lineage tracking can detect a beneficial mutation at an extremely low frequency within the population, and estimate its time of occurrence and fitness effect. Many lineage trajectories can be observed in parallel, allowing one to observe the population dynamics in exquisite detail. We describe some of the technical and analytical challenges to lineage tracking with DNA barcodes and discuss its applications to studies of evolution, infectious disease and cancer.

  1. Phylogeny and evolution of the Betulaceae as inferred from DNA sequences, morphology, and paleobotany.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z D; Manchester, S R; Sun, H Y

    1999-08-01

    Phylogeny of the Betulaceae is assessed on the basis of rbcL, ITS, and morphological data. Based upon 26 rbcL sequences representing most "higher" hamamelid families, the Betulaceae are monophyletic, with Casuarinaceae as its sister group, regardless of whether the outgroup is Cunoniaceae, Cercidiphyllaceae, Hamamelidaceae, or Nothofagus. Within the Betulaceae, two sister clades are evident, corresponding to the subfamilies Betuloideae and Coryloideae. However, with only 13 phylogenetically informative sites, the rbcL sequences provide limited intra-subfamilial resolution. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences provided 96 phylogenetically informative sites from 491 aligned sites resulting in a single most parsimonious tree of 374 steps (consistency index = 0.791) with two major lineages corresponding to the two traditional subfamilies: Betuloideae (Alnus, Betula) and Coryloideae (Corylus, Ostryopsis, Carpinus, Ostrya). This arrangement is mostly consistent with those from rbcL and morphology and is greatly reinforced by analyses with the three data sets combined. In the Coryloideae, the Ostryopsis-Carpinus-Ostrya clade is well supported, with Corylus as its sister group. The sister-group relationship between Ostryopsis and the Carpinus-Ostrya clade is well supported by ITS, rbcL, and morphological data. Phylogenetic relationships among the extant genera deduced by these analyses are compatible with inferences from ecological evolution and the extensive fossil record.

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing and Mutagenesis to Accelerate the Domestication of Microlaena stipoides as a New Food Crop

    PubMed Central

    Shapter, Frances M.; Cross, Michael; Ablett, Gary; Malory, Sylvia; Chivers, Ian H.; King, Graham J.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Global food demand, climatic variability and reduced land availability are driving the need for domestication of new crop species. The accelerated domestication of a rice-like Australian dryland polyploid grass, Microlaena stipoides (Poaceae), was targeted using chemical mutagenesis in conjunction with high throughput sequencing of genes for key domestication traits. While M. stipoides has previously been identified as having potential as a new grain crop for human consumption, only a limited understanding of its genetic diversity and breeding system was available to aid the domestication process. Next generation sequencing of deeply-pooled target amplicons estimated allelic diversity of a selected base population at 14.3 SNP/Mb and identified novel, putatively mutation-induced polymorphisms at about 2.4 mutations/Mb. A 97% lethal dose (LD97) of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment was applied without inducing sterility in this polyploid species. Forward and reverse genetic screens identified beneficial alleles for the domestication trait, seed-shattering. Unique phenotypes observed in the M2 population suggest the potential for rapid accumulation of beneficial traits without recourse to a traditional cross-breeding strategy. This approach may be applicable to other wild species, unlocking their potential as new food, fibre and fuel crops. PMID:24367532

  3. Accelerated Gene Evolution and Subfunctionalization in thePseudotetraploid Frog Xenopus Laevis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, Uffe; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Grammar, Timothy C.; Harland,Richard M.; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    Ancient whole genome duplications have been implicated in the vertebrate and teleost radiations, and in the emergence of diverse angiosperm lineages, but the evolutionary response to such a perturbation is still poorly understood. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis experienced a relatively recent tetraploidization {approx} 40 million years ago. Analysis of the considerable amount of EST sequence available for this species together with the genome sequence of the related diploid Xenopus tropicalis provides a unique opportunity to study the genomic response to whole genome duplication.

  4. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Molodtsova, Daria; Harpur, Brock A.; Kent, Clement F.; Seevananthan, Kajendra; Zayed, Amro

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behavior are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behavior is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behavior arise if behavior is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behavior, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behavior of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behavior can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network. PMID:25566318

  5. Evolution of Group Galaxies from the First Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M.

    2012-04-01

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f red) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 <= z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the "probability friends-of-friends" algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z ~ 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z >~ 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f red than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f red by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M *), total group stellar mass (M *, grp, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r grp), and local galaxy density (Σ5). We find that M * is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f red and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f red on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M *. Massive galaxies (M * >~ 1011 M ⊙) show little dependence of f red on r grp, M *, grp, and Σ5 over the redshift range. The dependence of f red on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M * <~ 1010.6 M ⊙. We observe an apparent "group down-sizing" effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f red. We find a dependence of f red on both r grp and Σ5 after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r grp, there is a significant dependence of f red on Σ5, while r grp gradients of f red are seen for galaxies in similar Σ5 regions. This indicates that galaxy group environment has a residual effect over that of local galaxy density (or vice versa), and both parameters need

  6. Accelerated evolution of the mitochondrial genome in an alloplasmic line of durum wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat is not only an important crop but also an excellent plant species for nuclear mitochondrial interaction studies. To investigate the level of sequence changes introduced into the mitochondrial genome under the alloplasmic conditions, three mitochondrial genomes of Triticum-Aegilops species w...

  7. Future evolution and finite-time singularities in F(R) gravity unifying inflation and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2008-08-15

    We study the future evolution of quintessence/phantom-dominated epoch in modified F(R) gravity which unifies the early-time inflation with late-time acceleration and which is consistent with observational tests. Using the reconstruction technique it is demonstrated that there are models where any known (big rip, II, III, or IV type) singularity may classically occur. From another side, in Einstein frame (scalar-tensor description) only IV type singularity occurs. Near the singularity the classical description breaks up, and it is demonstrated that quantum effects act against the singularity and may prevent its appearance. The realistic F(R) gravity which is future singularity free is proposed. We point out that additional modification of any F(R) gravity by the terms relevant at the early universe is possible, in such a way that future singularity does not occur even classically.

  8. Mulan: Multiple-Sequence Local Alignment and Visualization for Studying Function and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, I; Loots, G; Giardine, B; Hou, M; Ma, J; Hardison, R; Stubbs, L; Miller, W

    2004-07-14

    Multiple sequence alignment analysis is a powerful approach for understanding phylogenetic relationships, annotating genes and detecting functional regulatory elements. With a growing number of partly or fully sequenced vertebrate genomes, effective tools for performing multiple comparisons are required to accurately and efficiently assist biological discoveries. Here we introduce Mulan (http://mulan.dcode.org/), a novel method and a network server for comparing multiple draft and finished-quality sequences to identify functional elements conserved over evolutionary time. Mulan brings together several novel algorithms: the tba multi-aligner program for rapid identification of local sequence conservation and the multiTF program for detecting evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in multiple alignments. In addition, Mulan supports two-way communication with the GALA database; alignments of multiple species dynamically generated in GALA can be viewed in Mulan, and conserved transcription factor binding sites identified with Mulan/multiTF can be integrated and overlaid with extensive genome annotation data using GALA. Local multiple alignments computed by Mulan ensure reliable representation of short-and large-scale genomic rearrangements in distant organisms. Mulan allows for interactive modification of critical conservation parameters to differentially predict conserved regions in comparisons of both closely and distantly related species. We illustrate the uses and applications of the Mulan tool through multi-species comparisons of the GATA3 gene locus and the identification of elements that are conserved differently in avians than in other genomes allowing speculation on the evolution of birds. Source code for the aligners and the aligner-evaluation software can be freely downloaded from http://bio.cse.psu.edu/.

  9. Nonlinear evolution of Buneman instability and its implication for electron acceleration in high Mach number collisionless perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2009-10-01

    Nonlinear evolution of the Buneman instability and its application to electron acceleration in collisionless shocks are discussed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the saturation level of the instability is reduced from one-dimensional simulation results. It is demonstrated that the reduced saturation level is due to the resonant wave-particle interactions with large amplitude obliquely propagating waves. A new estimate for the saturation level is given by considering the interactions with oblique modes. The effects of the large amplitude oblique modes on electron shock surfing acceleration that is mainly controlled by the Buneman instability are also investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the shock transition region are performed by adopting a local model with the periodic boundary condition. The results indicate that the presence of oblique modes introduces a stochastic behavior to the trajectories of energetic electrons. The maximum energy is limited by the finite lifetime of the instability in the present periodic model. However, this will not be the case in the realistic shock transition region. The application to realistic shocks with Mach numbers typical of supernova remnants is also discussed.

  10. Nonlinear evolution of Buneman instability and its implication for electron acceleration in high Mach number collisionless perpendicular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    Nonlinear evolution of the Buneman instability and its application to electron acceleration in collisionless shocks are discussed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the saturation level of the instability is reduced from one-dimensional simulation results. It is demonstrated that the reduced saturation level is due to the resonant wave-particle interactions with large amplitude obliquely propagating waves. A new estimate for the saturation level is given by considering the interactions with oblique modes. The effects of the large amplitude oblique modes on electron shock surfing acceleration that is mainly controlled by the Buneman instability are also investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the shock transition region are performed by adopting a local model with the periodic boundary condition. The results indicate that the presence of oblique modes introduces a stochastic behavior to the trajectories of energetic electrons. The maximum energy is limited by the finite lifetime of the instability in the present periodic model. However, this will not be the case in the realistic shock transition region. The application to realistic shocks with Mach numbers typical of supernova remnants is also discussed.

  11. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  12. Rapid antigenic-type replacement and DNA sequence evolution of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, C R; Aquadro, C F; Strassheim, M L; Evermann, J F; Sgro, J Y; Mohammed, H O

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of canine parvovirus (CPV) isolates with a panel of monoclonal antibodies showed that after 1986, most viruses isolated from dogs in many parts of the United States differed antigenically from the viruses isolated prior to that date. The new antigenic type (designated CPV type 2b) has largely replaced the previous antigenic type (CPV type 2a) among virus isolates from the United States. This represents the second occurrence of a new antigenic type of this DNA virus since its emergence in 1978, as the original CPV type (CPV type 2) had previously been replaced between 1979 and 1981 by the CPV type 2a strain. DNA sequence comparisons showed that CPV types 2b and 2a differed by as few as two nonsynonymous (amino acid-changing) nucleotide substitutions in the VP-1 and VP-2 capsid protein genes. One mutation, resulting in an Asn-Asp difference at residue 426 in the VP-2 sequence, was shown by comparison with a neutralization-escape mutant selected with a non-CPV type 2b-reactive monoclonal antibody to determine the antigenic change. The mutation selected by that monoclonal antibody, a His-Tyr difference in VP-2 amino acid 222, was immediately adjacent to residue 426 in the three-dimensional structure of the CPV capsid. The CPV type 2b isolates are phylogenetically closely related to the CPV type 2a isolates and are probably derived from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis showed a progressive evolution away from the original CPV type. This pattern of viral evolution appears most similar to that seen in some influenza A viruses. Images PMID:1942246

  13. The slowly pulsating B-star 18 Pegasi: A testbed for upper main sequence stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, A.; Desphande, A.; Moehler, S.; Mugrauer, M.; Janousch, D.

    2016-06-01

    The predicted width of the upper main sequence in stellar evolution models depends on the empirical calibration of the convective overshooting parameter. Despite decades of discussions, its precise value is still unknown and further observational constraints are required to gauge it. Based on a photometric and preliminary asteroseismic analysis, we show that the mid B-type giant 18 Peg is one of the most evolved members of the rare class of slowly pulsating B-stars and, thus, bears tremendous potential to derive a tight lower limit for the width of the upper main sequence. In addition, 18 Peg turns out to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic binary system with an eccentric orbit that is greater than 6 years. Further spectroscopic and photometric monitoring and a sophisticated asteroseismic investigation are required to exploit the full potential of this star as a benchmark object for stellar evolution theory. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 265.C-5038(A), 069.C-0263(A), and 073.D-0024(A). Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), proposals H2005-2.2-016 and H2015-3.5-008. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, proposal W15BN015. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University.

  14. Community-level education accelerates the cultural evolution of fertility decline.

    PubMed

    Colleran, Heidi; Jasienska, Grazyna; Nenko, Ilona; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Mace, Ruth

    2014-03-22

    Explaining why fertility declines as populations modernize is a profound theoretical challenge. It remains unclear whether the fundamental drivers are economic or cultural in nature. Cultural evolutionary theory suggests that community-level characteristics, for example average education, can alter how low-fertility preferences are transmitted and adopted. These assumptions have not been empirically tested. Here, we show that community-level education accelerates fertility decline in a way that is neither predicted by individual characteristics, nor by the level of economic modernization in a population. In 22 high-fertility communities in Poland, fertility converged on a smaller family size as average education in the community increased-indeed community-level education had a larger impact on fertility decline than did individual education. This convergence was not driven by educational levels being more homogeneous, but by less educated women having fewer children than expected, and more highly educated social networks, when living among more highly educated neighbours. The average level of education in a community may influence the social partners women interact with, both within and beyond their immediate social environments, altering the reproductive norms they are exposed to. Given a critical mass of highly educated women, less educated neighbours may adopt their reproductive behaviour, accelerating the pace of demographic transition. Individual characteristics alone cannot capture these dynamics and studies relying solely on them may systematically underestimate the importance of cultural transmission in driving fertility declines. Our results are inconsistent with a purely individualistic, rational-actor model of fertility decline and suggest that optimization of reproduction is partly driven by cultural dynamics beyond the individual.

  15. The interplay between DNA methylation and sequence divergence in recent human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Heyn, Holger; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Vidal, Enrique; Fernandez-Bellon, Hugo; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sharp, Andrew J.; Esteller, Manel; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge about DNA methylation, the understanding of human epigenome evolution is in its infancy. Using whole genome bisulfite sequencing we identified hundreds of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in humans compared to non-human primates and estimated that ∼25% of these regions were detectable throughout several human tissues. Human DMRs were enriched for specific histone modifications and the majority were located distal to transcription start sites, highlighting the importance of regions outside the direct regulatory context. We also found a significant excess of endogenous retrovirus elements in human-specific hypomethylated. We reported for the first time a close interplay between inter-species genetic and epigenetic variation in regions of incomplete lineage sorting, transcription factor binding sites and human differentially hypermethylated regions. Specifically, we observed an excess of human-specific substitutions in transcription factor binding sites located within human DMRs, suggesting that alteration of regulatory motifs underlies some human-specific methylation patterns. We also found that the acquisition of DNA hypermethylation in the human lineage is frequently coupled with a rapid evolution at nucleotide level in the neighborhood of these CpG sites. Taken together, our results reveal new insights into the mechanistic basis of human-specific DNA methylation patterns and the interpretation of inter-species non-coding variation. PMID:26170231

  16. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  17. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroshi; Lim, Byung-Lak; Osawa, Syozo

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other. PMID:16593540

  18. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation by differential evolution with self-adaptive randomized subspace sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Hyman, James M; Robinson, Bruce A; Higdon, Dave; Ter Braak, Cajo J F; Diks, Cees G H

    2008-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have found widespread use in many fields of study to estimate the average properties of complex systems, and for posterior inference in a Bayesian framework. Existing theory and experiments prove convergence of well constructed MCMC schemes to the appropriate limiting distribution under a variety of different conditions. In practice, however this convergence is often observed to be disturbingly slow. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves in the Markov Chain. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC simulation can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution learning strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme, entitled DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis or DREAM, runs multiple different chains simultaneously for global exploration, and automatically tunes the scale and orientation of the proposal distribution in randomized subspaces during the search. Ergodicity of the algorithm is proved, and various examples involving nonlinearity, high-dimensionality, and multimodality show that DREAM is generally superior to other adaptive MCMC sampling approaches. The DREAM scheme significantly enhances the applicability of MCMC simulation to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  19. Accelerated evolution of developmentally biased genes in the tetraphenic ant Cardiocondyla obscurior.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Lukas; Helanterä, Heikki; Oettler, Jan

    2016-12-20

    Plastic gene expression underlies phenotypic plasticity and plastically expressed genes evolve under different selection regimes compared to ubiquitously expressed genes. Social insects are well-suited models to elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of plastic genes for their genetically and environmentally induced discrete polymorphisms. Here, we study the evolution of plastically expressed genes in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior - a species that produces two discrete male morphs in addition to the typical female polymorphism of workers and queens. Based on individual-level gene expression data from 28 early third instar larvae, we test whether the same evolutionary dynamics that pertain to plastically expressed genes in adults also pertain to genes with plastic expression during development. In order to quantify plasticity of gene expression over multiple contrasts, we develop a novel geometric measure. For genes expressed during development, we show that plasticity of expression is positively correlated with evolutionary rates. We furthermore find a strong correlation between expression plasticity and expression variation within morphs, suggesting a close link between active and passive plasticity of gene expression. Our results support the notion of relaxed selection and neutral processes as important drivers in the evolution of adaptive plasticity.

  20. Tolerance whole of genome doubling propagates chromosomal instability and accelerates cancer genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Grönroos, Eva; Endesfelder, David; Joshi, Tejal; Mouradov, Dmitri; Gibbs, Peter; Ward, Robyn L.; Hawkins, Nicholas J.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Sieber, Oliver M.; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of whole genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumour evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells that survive genome doubling demonstrate increased tolerance to chromosome aberrations. Tetraploid cells do not exhibit increased frequencies of structural or numerical CIN per chromosome. However, the tolerant phenotype in tetraploid cells, coupled with a doubling of chromosome aberrations per cell, allows chromosome abnormalities to evolve specifically in tetraploids, recapitulating chromosomal changes in genomically complex colorectal tumours. Finally, a genome-doubling event is independently predictive of poor relapse-free survival in early stage disease in two independent cohorts in multivariate analyses (discovery data: HR=4.70, 95% CI 1.04-21.37, validation data: HR=1.59, 95% CI 1.05-2.42). These data highlight an important role for the tolerance of genome doubling in driving cancer genome evolution. PMID:24436049

  1. Geologic evolution and sequence stratigraphy of the offshore Pelotas Basin, southeast Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Brazilian marginal basins have been studied since the beginning of the 70s. At least nine large basins are distributed along the entire Eastern continental margin. The sedimentary infill of these basins consists of lower Cretaceous (continental/lacustrine) rift section underlying marine upper Cretaceous (carbonate platforms) and marine upper Cretaceous/Tertiary sections, corresponding to the drift phase. The sedimentary deposits are a direct result of the Jurassic to lower Cretaceous break-up of the Pangea. This study will focus on the geologic evolution and sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pelotas basin (offshore), located in the Southeast portion of the Brazilian continental margin between 28{degrees} and 34{degrees} S, covering approximately 50,000 Km{sup 2}. During the early Cretaceous, when the break-up of the continent began in the south, thick basaltic layers were deposited in the Pelotas basin. These basalts form a thick and broad wedge of dipping seaward reflections interpreted as a transitional crust. During Albian to Turonian times, due to thermal subsidence, an extensive clastic/carbonate platform was developed, in an early drift stage. The sedimentation from the upper Cretaceous to Tertiary was characterized by a predominance of siliciclastics in the southeast margin, marking an accentuate deepening of the basin, showing several cycles related to eustatic fluctuations. Studies have addressed the problems of hydrocarbon exploration in deep water setting within a sequence stratigraphic framework. Thus Pelotas basin can provide a useful analogue for exploration efforts worldwide in offshore passive margins.

  2. Geologic evolution and sequence stratigraphy of the offshore Pelotas Basin, southeast Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, V.S. )

    1996-01-01

    The Brazilian marginal basins have been studied since the beginning of the 70s. At least nine large basins are distributed along the entire Eastern continental margin. The sedimentary infill of these basins consists of lower Cretaceous (continental/lacustrine) rift section underlying marine upper Cretaceous (carbonate platforms) and marine upper Cretaceous/Tertiary sections, corresponding to the drift phase. The sedimentary deposits are a direct result of the Jurassic to lower Cretaceous break-up of the Pangea. This study will focus on the geologic evolution and sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pelotas basin (offshore), located in the Southeast portion of the Brazilian continental margin between 28[degrees] and 34[degrees] S, covering approximately 50,000 Km[sup 2]. During the early Cretaceous, when the break-up of the continent began in the south, thick basaltic layers were deposited in the Pelotas basin. These basalts form a thick and broad wedge of dipping seaward reflections interpreted as a transitional crust. During Albian to Turonian times, due to thermal subsidence, an extensive clastic/carbonate platform was developed, in an early drift stage. The sedimentation from the upper Cretaceous to Tertiary was characterized by a predominance of siliciclastics in the southeast margin, marking an accentuate deepening of the basin, showing several cycles related to eustatic fluctuations. Studies have addressed the problems of hydrocarbon exploration in deep water setting within a sequence stratigraphic framework. Thus Pelotas basin can provide a useful analogue for exploration efforts worldwide in offshore passive margins.

  3. Genome sequence and rapid evolution of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Steven L; Sommer, Daniel D; Schatz, Michael C; Phillippy, Adam M; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Tsuge, Seiji; Furutani, Ayako; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Delcher, Arthur L; Kelley, David; Madupu, Ramana; Puiu, Daniela; Radune, Diana; Shumway, Martin; Trapnell, Cole; Aparna, Gudlur; Jha, Gopaljee; Pandey, Alok; Patil, Prabhu B; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Meyer, Damien F; Szurek, Boris; Verdier, Valerie; Koebnik, Ralf; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P; Hirata, Hisae; Tsuyumu, Shinji; Won Lee, Sang; Ronald, Pamela C; Sonti, Ramesh V; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Leach, Jan E; White, Frank F; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2008-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major disease that constrains production of this staple crop in many parts of the world. We report here on the complete genome sequence of strain PXO99A and its comparison to two previously sequenced strains, KACC10331 and MAFF311018, which are highly similar to one another. Results The PXO99A genome is a single circular chromosome of 5,240,075 bp, considerably longer than the genomes of the other strains (4,941,439 bp and 4,940,217 bp, respectively), and it contains 5083 protein-coding genes, including 87 not found in KACC10331 or MAFF311018. PXO99A contains a greater number of virulence-associated transcription activator-like effector genes and has at least ten major chromosomal rearrangements relative to KACC10331 and MAFF311018. PXO99A contains numerous copies of diverse insertion sequence elements, members of which are associated with 7 out of 10 of the major rearrangements. A rapidly-evolving CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats) region contains evidence of dozens of phage infections unique to the PXO99A lineage. PXO99A also contains a unique, near-perfect tandem repeat of 212 kilobases close to the replication terminus. Conclusion Our results provide striking evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for strain-specific adaptations of this pathogen that help to explain the extraordinary diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae genotypes and races that have been isolated from around the world. PMID:18452608

  4. ECHO Project: a series of tools for studying and characterizing seismic sequences evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Giuseppe; De Santis, Angelo; Di Giovambattista, Rita; Cianchini, Gianfranco; Murru, Maura; Calderoni, Giovanna; Lucente, Pio Francesco; De Gori, Pasquale; Frepoli, Alberto; Signanini, Patrizio; Rainone, Mario; Vessia, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    One of the most ubiquitous problems in seismology is to discriminate between seismic sequences (a series of small-to-moderate earthquakes that culminate with a mainshock) and swarms (diffuse seismicity w/o mainshock), that can be easily done only after a certain class of earthquakes have occurred. We propose to put these phenomena under the same framework provided by the geosystemics (De Santis, 2009, 2014), where the planet Earth and its processes are seen from a holistic point of view, and the New Geophysics (Crampin et al., 2013), where fluid-saturated microcracks in almost all crustal rocks are so closely-spaced they verge on failure and hence are highly-compliant critical systems (Signanini and De Santis, 2012). In this context, nonlinear concepts typical of Chaos and Information theories are fundamental to study and characterize the various features of the series of seismic events, and, eventually, to discriminate between seismic sequences and swarms. The two theories imply the use of non-linear techniques which are innovative in seismology. The project ECHO ("Entropy and CHaOs: tools for studying and characterizing seismic sequences evolution"), a recent INGV-funded project, would aim at applying the above approaches in a more integrated way mainly to establish a suite of effective tools to disclose and characterise the principal features of the series of earthquakes which are of interest. In our view this will represent the very first step before to face the more challenging (but longer-term) problem of discriminating between the two kinds of series of seismic events. This poster will describe these kinds of preliminary activities and relative results in the framework of the project.

  5. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  6. Accelerated evolution of mitochondrial but not nuclear genomes of Hymenoptera: new evidence from crabronid wasps.

    PubMed

    Kaltenpoth, Martin; Showers Corneli, Patrice; Dunn, Diane M; Weiss, Robert B; Strohm, Erhard; Seger, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genes in animals are especially useful as molecular markers for the reconstruction of phylogenies among closely related taxa, due to the generally high substitution rates. Several insect orders, notably Hymenoptera and Phthiraptera, show exceptionally high rates of mitochondrial molecular evolution, which has been attributed to the parasitic lifestyle of current or ancestral members of these taxa. Parasitism has been hypothesized to entail frequent population bottlenecks that increase rates of molecular evolution by reducing the efficiency of purifying selection. This effect should result in elevated substitution rates of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, but to date no extensive comparative study has tested this hypothesis in insects. Here we report the mitochondrial genome of a crabronid wasp, the European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum, Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), and we use it to compare evolutionary rates among the four largest holometabolous insect orders (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) based on phylogenies reconstructed with whole mitochondrial genomes as well as four single-copy nuclear genes (18S rRNA, arginine kinase, wingless, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). The mt-genome of P. triangulum is 16,029 bp in size with a mean A+T content of 83.6%, and it encodes the 37 genes typically found in arthropod mt genomes (13 protein-coding, 22 tRNA, and two rRNA genes). Five translocations of tRNA genes were discovered relative to the putative ancestral genome arrangement in insects, and the unusual start codon TTG was predicted for cox2. Phylogenetic analyses revealed significantly longer branches leading to the apocritan Hymenoptera as well as the Orussoidea, to a lesser extent the Cephoidea, and, possibly, the Tenthredinoidea than any of the other holometabolous insect orders for all mitochondrial but none of the four nuclear genes tested. Thus, our results suggest that the ancestral parasitic lifestyle of Apocrita is unlikely

  7. Evolution on neutral networks accelerates the ticking rate of the molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Manrubia, Susanna; Cuesta, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Large sets of genotypes give rise to the same phenotype, because phenotypic expression is highly redundant. Accordingly, a population can accept mutations without altering its phenotype, as long as the genotype mutates into another one on the same set. By linking every pair of genotypes that are mutually accessible through mutation, genotypes organize themselves into neutral networks (NNs). These networks are known to be heterogeneous and assortative, and these properties affect the evolutionary dynamics of the population. By studying the dynamics of populations on NNs with arbitrary topology, we analyse the effect of assortativity, of NN (phenotype) fitness and of network size. We find that the probability that the population leaves the network is smaller the longer the time spent on it. This progressive ‘phenotypic entrapment’ entails a systematic increase in the overdispersion of the process with time and an acceleration in the fixation rate of neutral mutations. We also quantify the variation of these effects with the size of the phenotype and with its fitness relative to that of neighbouring alternatives. PMID:25392402

  8. How to Make a Singleton sdB Star via Accelerated Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Drew; Wade, Richard A.

    2011-06-01

    Many hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are in close binaries, and the favored formation channels for subdwarfs rely on mass transfer in a binary system to strip a core He-burning star of its envelope. However, these channels cannot account for sdBs that have been observed in long-period binaries nor the narrow mass distribution of isolated (or "singleton") sdBs. We propose a new formation channel involving the merger of a helium white dwarf and a low-mass, hydrogen-burning star, which addresses these issues. Hierarchical triples whose inner binaries merge and form sdBs by this process could explain the observed long-period subdwarf+main-sequence binaries. This process would also naturally explain the observed slow rotational speeds of singleton sdBs. We also briefly discuss the implications of this formation channel for extreme horizontal branch morphology in globular clusters and the UV upturn in elliptical galaxies.

  9. Postcopulatory sexual selection is associated with accelerated evolution of sperm morphology.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Melissah; Albrecht, Tomáš; Cramer, Emily R A; Johnsen, Arild; Laskemoen, Terje; Weir, Jason T; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2015-04-01

    Rapid diversification of sexual traits is frequently attributed to sexual selection, though explicit tests of this hypothesis remain limited. Spermatozoa exhibit remarkable variability in size and shape, and studies report a correlation between sperm morphology (sperm length and shape) and sperm competition risk or female reproductive tract morphology. However, whether postcopulatory processes (e.g., sperm competition and cryptic female choice) influence the speed of evolutionary diversification in sperm form is unknown. Using passerine birds, we quantified evolutionary rates of sperm length divergence among lineages (i.e., species pairs) and determined whether these rates varied with the level of sperm competition (estimated as relative testes mass). We found that relative testes mass was significantly and positively associated with more rapid phenotypic divergence in sperm midpiece and flagellum lengths, as well as total sperm length. In contrast, there was no association between relative testes mass and rates of evolutionary divergence in sperm head size, and models suggested that head length is evolutionarily constrained. Our results are the first to show an association between the strength of sperm competition and the speed of sperm evolution, and suggest that postcopulatory sexual selection promotes rapid evolutionary diversification of sperm morphology.

  10. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst. PMID:26365764

  11. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  12. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; ...

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, althoughmore » the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.« less

  13. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D; Peters, Aaron W; Kubiak, Cliff P; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm(-2). Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  14. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm-2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  15. Collective properties of injection-induced earthquake sequences: 2. Spatiotemporal evolution and magnitude frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, David; Suckale, Jenny; Huang, Yihe

    2016-05-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for induced seismicity depends on reliable estimates of the locations, rate, and magnitude frequency properties of earthquake sequences. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how variations in these properties emerge from interactions between an evolving fluid pressure distribution and the mechanics of rupture on heterogeneous faults. We use an earthquake sequence model, developed in the first part of this two-part series, that computes pore pressure evolution, hypocenter locations, and rupture lengths for earthquakes triggered on 1-D faults with spatially correlated shear stress. We first consider characteristic features that emerge from a range of generic injection scenarios and then focus on the 2010-2011 sequence of earthquakes linked to wastewater disposal into two wells near the towns of Guy and Greenbrier, Arkansas. Simulations indicate that one reason for an increase of the Gutenberg-Richter b value for induced earthquakes is the different rates of reduction of static and residual strength as fluid pressure rises. This promotes fault rupture at lower stress than equivalent tectonic events. Further, b value is shown to decrease with time (the induced seismicity analog of b value reduction toward the end of the seismic cycle) and to be higher on faults with lower initial shear stress. This suggests that faults in the same stress field that have different orientations, and therefore different levels of resolved shear stress, should exhibit seismicity with different b-values. A deficit of large-magnitude events is noted when injection occurs directly onto a fault and this is shown to depend on the geometry of the pressure plume. Finally, we develop models of the Guy-Greenbrier sequence that captures approximately the onset, rise and fall, and southwest migration of seismicity on the Guy-Greenbrier fault. Constrained by the migration rate, we estimate the permeability of a 10 m thick critically stressed basement

  16. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5}, while r{sub grp

  17. The salivary gland transcriptome of the neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi reveals accelerated evolution of genes relevant to hematophagy

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Eric; Pham, Van M; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José MC

    2009-01-01

    Background Mosquito saliva, consisting of a mixture of dozens of proteins affecting vertebrate hemostasis and having sugar digestive and antimicrobial properties, helps both blood and sugar meal feeding. Culicine and anopheline mosquitoes diverged ~150 MYA, and within the anophelines, the New World species diverged from those of the Old World ~95 MYA. While the sialotranscriptome (from the Greek sialo, saliva) of several species of the Cellia subgenus of Anopheles has been described thoroughly, no detailed analysis of any New World anopheline has been done to date. Here we present and analyze data from a comprehensive salivary gland (SG) transcriptome of the neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi (subgenus Nyssorhynchus). Results A total of 2,371 clones randomly selected from an adult female An. darlingi SG cDNA library were sequenced and used to assemble a database that yielded 966 clusters of related sequences, 739 of which were singletons. Primer extension experiments were performed in selected clones to further extend sequence coverage, allowing for the identification of 183 protein sequences, 114 of which code for putative secreted proteins. Conclusion Comparative analysis of sialotranscriptomes of An. darlingi and An. gambiae reveals significant divergence of salivary proteins. On average, salivary proteins are only 53% identical, while housekeeping proteins are 86% identical between the two species. Furthermore, An. darlingi proteins were found that match culicine but not anopheline proteins, indicating loss or rapid evolution of these proteins in the old world Cellia subgenus. On the other hand, several well represented salivary protein families in old world anophelines are not expressed in An. darlingi. PMID:19178717

  18. The evolution of proteins from random amino acid sequences: II. Evidence from the statistical distributions of the lengths of modern protein sequences.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1994-04-01

    entirely consistent with the observations of Brown et al. (1990a,b, Nucleic Acids Res 18:2079-2086 and 18: 6339-6345) which show that tetra-nucleotides (stop codon plus following nucleotide) are the actual signals for termination of translation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Second, the strong dependence of statistical length distributions on sequence-termination signaling codes implies that the evolution of stop codons and translation-termination processes was as important as gene splicing in early evolution. Third, because the theory is based upon a simple no-exon stochastic model, it provides a plausible alternative to a limited universe of exons from which all proteins evolved by gene duplication and exon splicing (Dorit et al. 1990, Science 250:1377-1382).

  19. Recalibrating Equus evolution using the genome sequence of an early Middle Pleistocene horse.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ludovic; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Zhang, Guojie; Froese, Duane; Albrechtsen, Anders; Stiller, Mathias; Schubert, Mikkel; Cappellini, Enrico; Petersen, Bent; Moltke, Ida; Johnson, Philip L F; Fumagalli, Matteo; Vilstrup, Julia T; Raghavan, Maanasa; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Vogt, Josef; Szklarczyk, Damian; Kelstrup, Christian D; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Stenderup, Jesper; Velazquez, Amhed M V; Cahill, James; Rasmussen, Morten; Wang, Xiaoli; Min, Jiumeng; Zazula, Grant D; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie; Magnussen, Kim; Thompson, John F; Weinstock, Jacobo; Gregersen, Kristian; Røed, Knut H; Eisenmann, Véra; Rubin, Carl J; Miller, Donald C; Antczak, Douglas F; Bertelsen, Mads F; Brunak, Søren; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Ryder, Oliver; Andersson, Leif; Mundy, John; Krogh, Anders; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kjær, Kurt; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Olsen, Jesper V; Hofreiter, Michael; Nielsen, Rasmus; Shapiro, Beth; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-07-04

    The rich fossil record of equids has made them a model for evolutionary processes. Here we present a 1.12-times coverage draft genome from a horse bone recovered from permafrost dated to approximately 560-780 thousand years before present (kyr BP). Our data represent the oldest full genome sequence determined so far by almost an order of magnitude. For comparison, we sequenced the genome of a Late Pleistocene horse (43 kyr BP), and modern genomes of five domestic horse breeds (Equus ferus caballus), a Przewalski's horse (E. f. przewalskii) and a donkey (E. asinus). Our analyses suggest that the Equus lineage giving rise to all contemporary horses, zebras and donkeys originated 4.0-4.5 million years before present (Myr BP), twice the conventionally accepted time to the most recent common ancestor of the genus Equus. We also find that horse population size fluctuated multiple times over the past 2 Myr, particularly during periods of severe climatic changes. We estimate that the Przewalski's and domestic horse populations diverged 38-72 kyr BP, and find no evidence of recent admixture between the domestic horse breeds and the Przewalski's horse investigated. This supports the contention that Przewalski's horses represent the last surviving wild horse population. We find similar levels of genetic variation among Przewalski's and domestic populations, indicating that the former are genetically viable and worthy of conservation efforts. We also find evidence for continuous selection on the immune system and olfaction throughout horse evolution. Finally, we identify 29 genomic regions among horse breeds that deviate from neutrality and show low levels of genetic variation compared to the Przewalski's horse. Such regions could correspond to loci selected early during domestication.

  20. Dissecting the roles of local packing density and longer-range effects in protein sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-06-01

    What are the structural determinants of protein sequence evolution? A number of site-specific structural characteristics have been proposed, most of which are broadly related to either the density of contacts or the solvent accessibility of individual residues. Most importantly, there has been disagreement in the literature over the relative importance of solvent accessibility and local packing density for explaining site-specific sequence variability in proteins. We show that this discussion has been confounded by the definition of local packing density. The most commonly used measures of local packing, such as contact number and the weighted contact number, represent the combined effects of local packing density and longer-range effects. As an alternative, we propose a truly local measure of packing density around a single residue, based on the Voronoi cell volume. We show that the Voronoi cell volume, when calculated relative to the geometric center of amino-acid side chains, behaves nearly identically to the relative solvent accessibility, and each individually can explain, on average, approximately 34% of the site-specific variation in evolutionary rate in a data set of 209 enzymes. An additional 10% of variation can be explained by nonlocal effects that are captured in the weighted contact number. Consequently, evolutionary variation at a site is determined by the combined effects of the immediate amino-acid neighbors of that site and effects mediated by more distant amino acids. We conclude that instead of contrasting solvent accessibility and local packing density, future research should emphasize on the relative importance of immediate contacts and longer-range effects on evolutionary variation. Proteins 2016; 84:841-854. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. EVOLUTION OF COLD STREAMS AND THE EMERGENCE OF THE HUBBLE SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-07-01

    A new physical framework for the emergence of the Hubble sequence is outlined, based on novel analyses performed to quantify the evolution of cold streams of a large sample of galaxies from a state-of-the-art ultra-high resolution, large-scale adaptive mesh-refinement hydrodynamic simulation in a fully cosmological setting. It is found that the following three key physical variables of galactic cold inflows crossing the virial sphere substantially decrease with decreasing redshift: the number of streams N {sub 90} that make up 90% of concurrent inflow mass flux, average inflow rate per stream M-dot {sub 90} and mean (mass flux weighted) gas density in the streams n {sub gas}. Another key variable, the stream dimensionless angular momentum parameter λ, is found to instead increase with decreasing redshift. Assimilating these trends and others naturally leads to a physically coherent scenario for the emergence of the Hubble sequence, including the following expectations: (1) the predominance of a mixture of disproportionately small irregular and complex disk galaxies at z ≥ 2 when most galaxies have multiple concurrent streams, (2) the beginning of the appearance of flocculent spirals at z ∼ 1-2 when the number of concurrent streams are about 2-3, (3) the grand-design spiral galaxies appear at z ≤ 1 when galaxies with only one major cold stream significantly emerge. These expected general trends are in good accord with observations. Early-type galaxies are those that have entered a perennial state of zero cold gas stream, with their abundance increasing with decreasing redshift.

  2. Repetitive DNA sequences as an insight into Aeglidae (Crustacea, Anomura) evolution.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, M E; Corach, D

    1997-08-01

    The evolutionary relationships of five Atlantic Aeglidae species (Aegla neuquensis affinis, A. humahuaca, A. jujuyana, A. platensis, and A. uruguayana) were studied by (i) satellite DNA analysis using a restriction enzyme digestion and hybridization pattern approach and (ii) genome screening by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing. The identical restriction patterns and intense interspecific hybridization patterns obtained in this study strongly suggest a recent cladogenetic event for the Aeglidae. The species-specific amplification products which were detected using RAPD markers allowed species characterization. A total of 49 amplification products were used to construct trees by cluster analysis. The new scheme agrees in part with previous proposals based on biogeography and morphology. We considered that the subdivision northwestern-platensis species was probably due to the rising of the Andes, which started in the Middle Miocene. Divergence due to altitude is suggested by the different altitudinal distribution of three northwestern species along the same river. The possible role of selection by ecological factor/s was observed at the population level in A. jujuyana, which has a wider altitudinal range distribution. RAPD markers revealed a high level of intraspecific diversity and important genetic flow among populations. However, a few markers showed significant differences in frequency or H between the lowermost population and the other populations, located in a different biogeographical region. The differences were not in relation to geographical distance, and we interpreted them as being due to selection. Repetitive sequences constitute an important reservoir of genetic variation, and these results show their usefulness in testing and proposing evolutionary hypothesis in crabs. These sequences seem to have played an important role in aeglid evolution. Ecological factors related to altitude have probably influenced macro- and

  3. Polyphyly and convergent morphological evolution in Commelinales and Commelinidae: evidence from rbcL sequence data.

    PubMed

    Givnish, T J; Evans, T M; Pires, J C; Sytsma, K J

    1999-08-01

    speciation, such as restricted seed dispersal (especially in forest interior groups with fleshy fruits), polyploidy, aneuploidy, and apomixis. Species diversity is unrelated to the rate/amount of rbcL sequence evolution.

  4. The evolution of angular momentum among zero-age main-sequence solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Stauffer, John R.; Macgregor, Keith B.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a survey of rotation among F, G, and K dwarfs of the Pleiades in the context of other young clusters (Alpha Persei and the Hyades) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars (in Taurus-Auriga and Orion) in order to examine how the angular momentum of a star like the sun evolves during its early life on the main sequence. The rotation of PMS stars can be evolved into distributions like those seen in the young clusters if there is only modest, rotation-independent angular momentum loss prior to the ZAMS. Even then, the ultrafast rotators (UFRs, or ZAMS G and K dwarfs with v sin i equal to or greater than 30 km/s) must owe their extra angular momentum to their conditions of formation and to different angular momentum loss rates above a threshold velocity, for it is unlikely that these stars had angular momentum added as they neared the ZAMS, nor can a spread in ages within a cluster account for the range of rotation seen. Only a fraction of solar-type stars are thus capable of becoming UFRs, and it is not a phase that all stars experience. Simple scaling relations (like the Skumanich relation) applied to the observed surface rotation rates of young solar-type stars cannot reproduce the way in which the Pleiades evolve into the Hyades. We argue that invoking internal differential rotation in these ZAMS stars can explain several aspects of the observations and thus can provide a consistent picture of ZAMS angular momentum evolution.

  5. Confronting uncertainties in stellar physics. II. Exploring differences in main-sequence stellar evolution tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, R. J.; Fossati, L.; Passy, J.-C.; Schneider, F. R. N.

    2016-02-01

    We assess the systematic uncertainties in stellar evolutionary calculations for low- to intermediate-mass, main-sequence stars. We compare published stellar tracks from several different evolution codes with our own tracks computed using the stellar codes stars and mesa. In particular, we focus on tracks of 1 and 3 M⊙ at solar metallicity. We find that the spread in the available 1 M⊙ tracks (computed before the recent solar composition revision) can be covered by tracks between 0.97-1.01 M⊙ computed with the stars code. We assess some possible causes of the origin of this uncertainty, including how the choice of input physics and the solar constraints used to perform the solar calibration affect the tracks. We find that for a 1 M⊙ track, uncertainties of around 10% in the initial hydrogen abundance and initial metallicity produce around a 2% error in mass. For the 3 M⊙ tracks, there is very little difference between the tracks from the various different stellar codes. The main difference comes in the extent of the main sequence, which we believe results from the different choices of the implementation of convective overshooting in the core. Uncertainties in the initial abundances lead to a 1-2% error in the mass determination. These uncertainties cover only part of the total error budget, which should also include uncertainties in the input physics (e.g., reaction rates, opacities, convective models) and any missing physics (e.g., radiative levitation, rotation, magnetic fields). Uncertainties in stellar surface properties such as luminosity and effective temperature will further reduce the accuracy of any potential mass determinations.

  6. Mosaic evolution of neural development in anurans: acceleration of spinal cord development in the direct developing frog Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gerhard

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that spinal cord development in direct developing frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus, which have evolutionarily lost the tadpole stage, differs from that in biphasically developing anurans (with the larval and the adult stage separated by metamorphosis). The present study of spinal cord development in Eleutherodactylus coqui provides additional information about neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and growth analyzed by immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in situ hybridization for NeuroD, and morphometric measurements in various developmental stages. Furthermore, spinal cord development in the frogs Discoglossus pictus, Xenopus laevis, and Physalaemus pustulosus, which belong to different anuran families but all exhibit biphasic development, was similarly analyzed. This comparative analysis allows inference of the ancestral anuran pattern of spinal cord development and how it has been modified during the evolution of Eleutherodactylus. All biphasically developing frogs analyzed share a similar pattern of spinal cord development, suggesting that this is ancestral for anurans: after neural tube closure, levels of proliferation and neurogenesis in the spinal cord were low throughout embryogenesis until they were upregulated drastically at early larval stages followed by development of the lateral motor columns. In contrast, no such quiescent embryonic period exists in E. coqui, where rapid growth, high levels of proliferation and neurogenesis, and early formation of lateral motor columns occur shortly after neural tube closure, while other parts of the central nervous system develop more slowly. Thus, spinal cord development has been accelerated during the evolution of Eleutherodactylus relative to the development of other parts of the central nervous system, probably related to the precocious development of limbs in this lineage.

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus whole-genome sequencing identifies convergent evolution of sequence duplication in the C-terminus of the G gene

    PubMed Central

    Schobel, Seth A.; Stucker, Karla M.; Moore, Martin L.; Anderson, Larry J.; Larkin, Emma K.; Shankar, Jyoti; Bera, Jayati; Puri, Vinita; Shilts, Meghan H.; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Shrivastava, Susmita; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Hartert, Tina V.; Das, Suman R.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and is the most important respiratory viral pathogen in infants. Extensive sequence variability within and between RSV group A and B viruses and the ability of multiple clades and sub-clades of RSV to co-circulate are likely mechanisms contributing to the evasion of herd immunity. Surveillance and large-scale whole-genome sequencing of RSV is currently limited but would help identify its evolutionary dynamics and sites of selective immune evasion. In this study, we performed complete-genome next-generation sequencing of 92 RSV isolates from infants in central Tennessee during the 2012–2014 RSV seasons. We identified multiple co-circulating clades of RSV from both the A and B groups. Each clade is defined by signature N- and O-linked glycosylation patterns. Analyses of specific RSV genes revealed high rates of positive selection in the attachment (G) gene. We identified RSV-A viruses in circulation with and without a recently reported 72-nucleotide G gene sequence duplication. Furthermore, we show evidence of convergent evolution of G gene sequence duplication and fixation over time, which suggests a potential fitness advantage of RSV with the G sequence duplication. PMID:27212633

  8. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  9. Diversity, distribution, and evolution of tomato viruses in China uncovered by small RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Taylor, Angela; Jiao, Chen; Xu, Yimin; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Chenhui; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Quanxi; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2017-03-22

    Tomato is a major vegetable crop that has tremendous popularity. However, viral disease is still a major factor limiting tomato production. Here we report the tomato virome identified through sequencing small RNAs of 170 field-grown samples collected in China. A total of 22 viruses were identified including both well-documented and newly detected viruses. The tomato viral community is dominated by a few species, and they exhibit polymorphisms and recombination in the genomes with coldspots and hotspots. Most samples were co-infected by multiple viruses and the majority of identified viruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis of one of the most dominant tomato viruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), predicts its origin and the time back to its most recent common ancestor. The broadly sampled data has enabled us to identify several unreported viruses in tomato including a completely new virus, which has a genome of ∼13.4 kb and groups with aphid-transmitted viruses in genus Cytorhabdovirus Although both DNA and RNA viruses can trigger the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs), we show that features such as length distribution, paired distance and base selection bias of vsiRNA sequences reflect different plant Dicer-like proteins and Argonautes involved in vsiRNA biogenesis. Collectively, this study offers insights into host-virus interaction in tomato and provides valuable information to facilitate the management of viral diseases.IMPORTANCE Tomato is an important source of micronutrient in human diet and is extensively consumed in the world. Virus is among the major constrains to tomato production. Categorizing virus species that are capable of infecting tomato and understanding their diversity and evolution are challenging due to difficulties in detecting such fast evolving biological entities. Here we report the landscape of tomato virome in China, the leading country of tomato production. We

  10. Unstable microsatellite repeats facilitate rapid evolution of coding and regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Jansen, A; Gemayel, R; Verstrepen, K J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repeats are intrinsically highly variable sequences since repeat units are often lost or gained during replication or following unequal recombination events. Because of their low complexity and their instability, these repeats, which are also called satellite repeats, are often considered to be useless 'junk' DNA. However, recent findings show that tandem repeats are frequently found within promoters of stress-induced genes and within the coding regions of genes encoding cell-surface and regulatory proteins. Interestingly, frequent changes in these repeats often confer phenotypic variability. Examples include variation in the microbial cell surface, rapid tuning of internal molecular clocks in flies, and enhanced morphological plasticity in mammals. This suggests that instead of being useless junk DNA, some variable tandem repeats are useful functional elements that confer 'evolvability', facilitating swift evolution and rapid adaptation to changing environments. Since changes in repeats are frequent and reversible, repeats provide a unique type of mutation that bridges the gap between rare genetic mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, and highly unstable but reversible epigenetic inheritance.

  11. Plastid sequence evolution: a new pattern of nucleotide substitutions in the Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Decker-Walters, Deena S; Chung, Sang-Min; Staub, Jack E

    2004-05-01

    Nucleotide substitutions (i.e., point mutations) are the primary driving force in generating DNA variation upon which selection can act. Substitutions called transitions, which entail exchanges between purines (A = adenine, G = guanine) or pyrimidines (C = cytosine, T = thymine), typically outnumber transversions (e.g., exchanges between a purine and a pyrimidine) in a DNA strand. With an increasing number of plant studies revealing a transversion rather than transition bias, we chose to perform a detailed substitution analysis for the plant family Cucurbitaceae using data from several short plastid DNA sequences. We generated a phylogenetic tree for 19 taxa of the tribe Benincaseae and related genera and then scored conservative substitution changes (e.g., those not exhibiting homoplasy or reversals) from the unambiguous branches of the tree. Neither the transition nor (A+T)/(G+C) biases found in previous studies were supported by our overall data. More importantly, we found a novel and symmetrical substitution bias in which Gs had been preferentially replaced by A, As by C, Cs by T, and Ts by G, resulting in the G-->A-->C-->T-->G substitution series. Understanding this pattern will lead to new hypotheses concerning plastid evolution, which in turn will affect the choices of substitution models and other tree-building algorithms for phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide data.

  12. Expression Divergence Is Correlated with Sequence Evolution but Not Positive Selection in Conifers.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Yeaman, Sam; Nurkowski, Kristin A; Rieseberg, Loren H; Aitken, Sally N

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary and genomic determinants of sequence evolution in conifers are poorly understood, and previous studies have found only limited evidence for positive selection. Using RNAseq data, we compared gene expression profiles to patterns of divergence and polymorphism in 44 seedlings of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and 39 seedlings of interior spruce (Picea glauca × engelmannii) to elucidate the evolutionary forces that shape their genomes and their plastic responses to abiotic stress. We found that rapidly diverging genes tend to have greater expression divergence, lower expression levels, reduced levels of synonymous site diversity, and longer proteins than slowly diverging genes. Similar patterns were identified for the untranslated regions, but with some exceptions. We found evidence that genes with low expression levels had a larger fraction of nearly neutral sites, suggesting a primary role for negative selection in determining the association between evolutionary rate and expression level. There was limited evidence for differences in the rate of positive selection among genes with divergent versus conserved expression profiles and some evidence supporting relaxed selection in genes diverging in expression between the species. Finally, we identified a small number of genes that showed evidence of site-specific positive selection using divergence data alone. However, estimates of the proportion of sites fixed by positive selection (α) were in the range of other plant species with large effective population sizes suggesting relatively high rates of adaptive divergence among conifers.

  13. Evolution Models of Helium White Dwarf–Main-sequence Star Merger Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianfei; Hall, Philip D.; Jeffery, C. Simon; Bi, Shaolan

    2017-02-01

    It is predicted that orbital decay by gravitational-wave radiation and tidal interaction will cause some close binary stars to merge within a Hubble time. The merger of a helium-core white dwarf with a main-sequence (MS) star can produce a red giant branch star that has a low-mass hydrogen envelope when helium is ignited and thus become a hot subdwarf. Because detailed calculations have not been made, we compute post-merger models with a stellar evolution code. We find the evolutionary paths available to merger remnants and find the pre-merger conditions that lead to the formation of hot subdwarfs. We find that some such mergers result in the formation of stars with intermediate helium-rich surfaces. These stars later develop helium-poor surfaces owing to diffusion. Combining our results with a model population and comparing to observed stars, we find that some observed intermediate helium-rich hot subdwarfs can be explained as the remnants of the mergers of helium-core white dwarfs with low-mass MS stars.

  14. Recent acceleration of ice loss in the Northern Patagonia Icefield based on an updated decennial evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, P.; Casassa, G.

    2011-12-01

    Ice elevation changes of the Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) were analyzed by comparing three Digital Elevation Models (DEM) corresponding to 1975 (constructed based on topographic maps), the SRTM DEM of 2000 yr and a SPOT 5 DEM of 2005. In addition, the glacier length fluctuations and the surface area evolution between 2001 and 2011 of 25 glaciers of the NPI were studied: the information extracted from the Landsat ETM+ satellite image of 11 March 2001 was compared to the measurements performed based on the Landsat ETM+ satellite image of 19 February 2011. From a global point of view, the majority of the studied glaciers thinned, retreated and lost surface between 2001 and 2011, only few glaciers (Leones, Nef, Pared Sur and Soler) located on the eastern side of the NPI have been stable. Glaciers located on the western side of the NPI suffered a stronger wasting compared to the glaciers located on the eastern side. Overall, over the ablation areas of the NPI (below 1150 m a.s.l.) a more rapid thinning of 2.6 m yr-1 occurred between 2000 and 2005 yr compared to the period 1975-2000, in which a mean thinning of 1.7 m yr-1 was measured for the same zones of the NPI. For the whole period (1975-2005) the most important thinning of the ablation areas has been estimated for HPN-1 Glacier (4.4 m yr-1) followed by Benito (3.4 m yr-1), Fraenkel (2.4 m yr-1), Gualas (2.1 m yr-1) and Acodado glaciers, all of them located on the western side of the NPI. Between 2001 and 2011, a noteworthy retreat of 1.9 km was experienced by Gualas Glacier and by Reichert Glacier with 1.6 km, both located on the north-western side of the NPI. On the south-western side of the NPI, during the same decennia, Steffen Glacier experienced a remarkable retreat of 1.6 km as well. During the 2001-2011 period, Steffen Glacier more than doubled its rate of retreat (compared to the 1979-2001 period) and experienced the disintegration of its main front as well as a lateral tongue that retreated 3.1 km. The

  15. Evolution of the microstructure of unmodified and polymer modified asphalt binders with aging in an accelerated weathering tester.

    PubMed

    Menapace, Ilaria; Masad, Eyad

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents findings on the evolution of the surface microstructure of two asphalt binders, one unmodified and one polymer modified, directly exposed to aging agents with increasing durations. The aging is performed using an accelerated weathering tester, where ultraviolet radiation, oxygen and an increased temperature are applied to the asphalt binder surface. Ultraviolet and dark cycles, which simulated the succession of day and night, alternated during the aging process, and also the temperature varied, which corresponded to typical summer day and night temperatures registered in the state of Qatar. Direct aging of an exposed binder surface is more effective in showing microstructural modifications than previously applied protocols, which involved the heat treatment of binders previously aged with standardized methods. With the new protocol, any molecular rearrangements in the binder surface after aging induced by the heat treatment is prevented. Optical photos show the rippling and degradation of the binder surface due to aging. Microstructure images obtained by means of atomic force microscopy show gradual alteration of the surface due to aging. The original relatively flat microstructure was substituted with a profoundly different microstructure, which significantly protrudes from the surface, and is characterized by various shapes, such as rods, round structures and finally 'flower' or 'leaf' structures.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea reveals extremely conservative mitochondrial genome evolution in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xue, Jiayu; Li, Libo; Liu, Yang; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have been known to be highly unusual in their large sizes, frequent intra-genomic rearrangement, and generally conservative sequence evolution. Recent studies show that in early land plants the mitochondrial genomes exhibit a mixed mode of conservative yet dynamic evolution. Here, we report the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome from the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea. The circular genome has a size of 168,526 base pairs, containing 43 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA genes, 25 tRNA genes, and 31 group I or II introns. It differs from the Marchantia polymorpha mitochondrial genome, the only other liverwort chondriome that has been sequenced, in lacking two genes (trnRucg and trnTggu) and one intron (rrn18i1065gII). The two genomes have identical gene orders and highly similar sequences in exons, introns, and intergenic spacers. Finally, a comparative analysis of duplicated trnRucu and other trnR genes from the two liverworts and several other organisms identified the recent lateral origin of trnRucg in Marchantia mtDNA through modification of a duplicated trnRucu. This study shows that the mitochondrial genomes evolve extremely slowly in liverworts, the earliest-diverging lineage of extant land plants, in stark contrast to what is known of highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial genomes in seed plants.

  17. Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplast sequence data are widely used to infer phylogenies of plants and algae. With the increasing availability of complete chloroplast genome sequences, the opportunity arises to resolve ancient divergences that were heretofore problematic. On the flip side, properly analyzing large multi-gene data sets can be a major challenge, as these data may be riddled with systematic biases and conflicting signals. Our study contributes new data from nine complete and four fragmentary chloroplast genome sequences across the green algal order Sphaeropleales. Our phylogenetic analyses of a 56-gene data set show that analyzing these data on a nucleotide level yields a well-supported phylogeny - yet one that is quite different from a corresponding amino acid analysis. We offer some possible explanations for this conflict through a range of analyses of modified data sets. In addition, we characterize the newly sequenced genomes in terms of their structure and content, thereby further contributing to the knowledge of chloroplast genome evolution.

  18. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  19. THE QUADRUPLE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE SYSTEM LkCa 3: IMPLICATIONS FOR STELLAR EVOLUTION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Prato, L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Badenas, Mariona; Schaefer, G. H.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2013-08-10

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close ({approx}0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of {alpha}{sub ML} = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models.

  20. The Quadruple Pre-main-sequence System LkCa 3: Implications for Stellar Evolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Badenas, Mariona; Prato, L.; Schaefer, G. H.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Latham, David W.

    2013-08-01

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close (~0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of αML = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models.

  1. A High Performance Platform Based on cDNA Display for Efficient Synthesis of Protein Fusions and Accelerated Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Kubo, Tai

    2016-02-08

    We describe a high performance platform based on cDNA display technology by developing a new modified puromycin linker-oligonucleotide. The linker consists of four major characteristics: a "ligation site" for hybridization and ligation of mRNA by T4 RNA ligase, a "puromycin arm" for covalent linkage of the protein, a "polyadenosine site" for a longer puromycin arm and purification of protein fusions (optional) using oligo-dT matrices, and a "reverse transcription site" for the formation of stable cDNA protein fusions whose cDNA is covalently linked to its encoded protein. The linker was synthesized by a novel branching strategy and provided >8-fold higher yield than previous linkers. This linker enables rapid and highly efficient ligation of mRNA (>90%) and synthesis of protein fusions (∼ 50-95%) in various cell-free expression systems. Overall, this new cDNA display method provides 10-200 fold higher end-usage fusions than previous methods and benefits higher diversity libraries crucial for directed protein/peptide evolution. With the increased efficiency, this system was able to reduce the time for one selection cycle to <8 h and is potentially amenable to high-throughput systems. We demonstrate the efficiency of this system for higher throughput selections of various biomolecular interactions and achieved 30-40-fold enrichment per selection cycle. Furthermore, a 4-fold higher enrichment of Flag-tag was obtained from a doped mixture compared with that of the previous cDNA display method. A three-finger protein library was evolved to isolate superior nanomolar range binding candidates for vascular endothelial growth factor. This method is expected to provide a beneficial impact to accelerated drug discovery and proteome analysis.

  2. Development of a state machine sequencer for the Keck Interferometer: evolution, development, and lessons learned using a CASE tool approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reder, Leonard J.; Booth, Andrew; Hsieh, Jonathan; Summers, Kellee R.

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the evolution of a sequencer from a simple Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) based sequencer into a complex implementation designed utilizing UML (Unified Modeling Language) methodologies and a Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool approach. The main purpose of the Interferometer Sequencer (called the IF Sequencer) is to provide overall control of the Keck Interferometer to enable science operations to be carried out by a single operator (and/or observer). The interferometer links the two 10m telescopes of the W. M. Keck Observatory at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The IF Sequencer is a high-level, multi-threaded, Harel finite state machine software program designed to orchestrate several lower-level hardware and software hard real-time subsystems that must perform their work in a specific and sequential order. The sequencing need not be done in hard real-time. Each state machine thread commands either a high-speed real-time multiple mode embedded controller via CORBA, or slower controllers via EPICS Channel Access interfaces. The overall operation of the system is simplified by the automation. The UML is discussed and our use of it to implement the sequencer is presented. The decision to use the Rhapsody product as our CASE tool is explained and reflected upon. Most importantly, a section on lessons learned is presented and the difficulty of integrating CASE tool automatically generated C++ code into a large control system consisting of multiple infrastructures is presented.

  3. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) identifies immune-selected HIV variants

    DOE PAGES

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; ...

    2015-10-21

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations ofmore » mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. Here, with well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Finally, practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.« less

  4. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) identifies immune-selected HIV variants

    SciTech Connect

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gnanakaran, S.; Lapedes, Alan S.; Learn, Gerald H.; Kreider, Edward F.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Montefiori, David C.; Alam, S. Munir; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton

    2015-10-21

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations of mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. Here, with well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Finally, practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.

  5. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) Identifies Immune-Selected HIV Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; Giorgi, Elena E.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gnanakaran, S.; Lapedes, Alan S.; Learn, Gerald H.; Kreider, Edward F.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Montefiori, David C.; Alam, S. Munir; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations of mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. With well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines. PMID:26506369

  6. Development of a State Machine Sequencer for the Keck Interferometer: Evolution, Development and Lessons Learned using a CASE Tool Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rede, Leonard J.; Booth, Andrew; Hsieh, Jonathon; Summer, Kellee

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the evolution of a sequencer from a simple EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) based sequencer into a complex implementation designed utilizing UML (Unified Modeling Language) methodologies and a CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) tool approach. The main purpose of the sequencer (called the IF Sequencer) is to provide overall control of the Keck Interferometer to enable science operations be carried out by a single operator (and/or observer). The interferometer links the two 10m telescopes of the W. M. Keck Observatory at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The IF Sequencer is a high-level, multi-threaded, Hare1 finite state machine, software program designed to orchestrate several lower-level hardware and software hard real time subsystems that must perform their work in a specific and sequential order. The sequencing need not be done in hard real-time. Each state machine thread commands either a high-speed real-time multiple mode embedded controller via CORB A, or slower controllers via EPICS Channel Access interfaces. The overall operation of the system is simplified by the automation. The UML is discussed and our use of it to implement the sequencer is presented. The decision to use the Rhapsody product as our CASE tool is explained and reflected upon. Most importantly, a section on lessons learned is presented and the difficulty of integrating CASE tool automatically generated C++ code into a large control system consisting of multiple infrastructures is presented.

  7. A hydrogenase model system based on the sequence of cytochrome c: photochemical hydrogen evolution in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yohei; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi

    2011-08-07

    The diiron carbonyl cluster is held by a native CXXC motif, which includes Cys14 and Cys17, in the cytochrome c sequence. It is found that the diiron carbonyl complex works well as a catalyst for H(2) evolution. It has a TON of ∼80 over 2 h at pH 4.7 in the presence of a Ru-photosensitizer and ascorbate as a sacrificial reagent in aqueous media.

  8. The N/O Ratio in Early B-Type Main Sequence Stars as an Indicator of Their Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that, in the case of early B-type main-sequence stars, of the three ratios N/C, C/O, and N/O which are regarded as indicators of stellar evolution, the ratio N/O is more reliable since it seems to be insensitive to overionization of the NII and OII ions. On the other hand, the N/C and C/O ratios, which include carbon, may contain systematic errors for stars with Teff > 18500 K because of neglected overionization of CII ions. The ratio N/O is studied in the atmospheres of 46 early main-sequence B stars. These values of N/O are examined as functions of the effective temperature, age, rotation speed, and mass of the stars. Most early B-stars in the main sequence are found to have [N/O] ≈ 0, which indicates that N/O varies little during the main sequence stage, and this result is independent of the basic parameters listed above. There are two explanations for the large number of stars with [N/O] ≈ 0 : it is predicted theoretically that for an initial rotation velocity V0 < 100 km/s, N/O varies little toward the end of the main sequence stage ([N/O] < 0.2) and observations show that most early main-sequence B-stars do actually have low initial rotation velocities V0. The few early main-sequence B-stars with higher [N/O] = 0.4-0.8 correspond to models with rotation velocities V0 = 200-300 km/s. This conclusion is consistent with earlier data for stars with the same masses in a later stage of evolution: the AFGsupergiant and bright giant stage.

  9. Post-main Sequence Evolution of Icy Minor Planets: Implications for Water Retention and White Dwarf Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-12-01

    Most observations of polluted white dwarf atmospheres are consistent with accretion of water-depleted planetary material. Among tens of known cases, merely two involve accretion of objects that contain a considerable mass fraction of water. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative scarcity of these detections. Based on a new and highly detailed model, we evaluate the retention of water inside icy minor planets during the high-luminosity stellar evolution that follows the main sequence. Our model fully considers the thermal, physical, and chemical evolution of icy bodies, following their internal differentiation as well as water depletion, from the moment of their birth and through all stellar evolution phases preceding the formation of the white dwarf. We also account for different initial compositions and formation times. Our results differ from previous studies, which have either underestimated or overestimated water retention. We show that water can survive in a variety of circumstances and in great quantities, and therefore other possibilities are discussed in order to explain the infrequency of water detection. We predict that the sequence of accretion is such that water accretes earlier, and more rapidly, than the rest of the silicate disk, considerably reducing the chance of its detection in H-dominated atmospheres. In He-dominated atmospheres, the scarcity of water detections could be observationally biased. It implies that the accreted material is typically intrinsically dry, which may be the result of the inside-out depopulation sequence of minor planets.

  10. Depositional sequence evolution, Paleozoic and early Mesozoic of the central Saharan platform, North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, A.R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Over 30 depositional sequences have been identified in the Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic of the Ghadames basin of eastern Algeria, southern Tunisia, and western Libya. Well logs and lithologic information from more than 500 wells were used to correlate the 30 sequences throughout the basin (total area more than 1 million km{sup 2}). Based on systematic change in the log response of strata in successively younger sequences, five groups of sequences with distinctive characteristics have been identified: Cambro-Ordivician, Upper Silurian-Middle Devonian, Upper Devonian, Carboniferous, and Middle Triassic-Middle Jurassic. Each sequence group is terminated by a major, tectonically enhanced sequence boundary that is immediately overlain (except for the Carboniferous) by a shale-prone interval deposited in response to basin-wide flooding. The four Paleozoic sequence groups were deposited on the Saharan platform, a north facing, clastic-dominated shelf that covered most of North Africa during the Paleozoic. The sequence boundary at the top of the Carboniferous sequence group is one of several Permian-Carboniferous angular unconformities in North Africa related to the Hercynian orogeny. The youngest sequence group (Middle Triassic to Middle Jurassic) is a clastic-evaporite package that onlaps southward onto the top of Paleozoic sequence boundary. The progressive changes from the Cambrian to the Jurassic, in the nature of the Ghadames basin sequences is a reflection of the interplay between basin morphology and tectonics, vegetation, eustasy, climate, and sediment supply.

  11. Evolution of MHC class I loci in marsupials: characterization of sequences from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed

    Houlden, B A; Greville, W D; Sherwin, W B

    1996-10-01

    We demonstrate that koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) MHC class I constitutes a variable multigene family. A total of nine partial exon 2 and 3 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I sequences are presented, including six sequences from at least three loci from one koala. Variation was detected by examination of sequences from a number of individuals and family groups. The koala is the second marsupial species characterized to date, and comparisons reveal approximately 80% similarity with sequences from the red necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus). The latter sequences represent at least two, and probably three, different loci. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that all koala sequences are more related to one another than they are to any of the wallaby loci. This indicates that the koala sequences are probably not orthologous to the wallaby genes, and thus represent a new class I gene family. In addition, marsupial gene families cluster away from human gene families, supporting a different origin of MHC genes for marsupials and eutherians.

  12. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed

  13. alpha-Crystallin A sequences of Alligator mississippiensis and the lizard Tupinambis teguixin: molecular evolution and reptilian phylogeny.

    PubMed

    de Jong, W W; Zweers, A; Versteeg, M; Dessauer, H C; Goodman, M

    1985-11-01

    The amino acid sequences of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A from many mammalian and avian species, two frog species, and a dogfish have provided detailed information about the molecular evolution of this protein and allowed some useful inferences about phylogenetic relationships among these species. We now have isolated and sequenced the alpha-crystallins of the American alligator and the common tegu lizard. The reptilian alpha A chains appear to have evolved as slowly as those of other vertebrates, i.e., at two to three amino acid replacements per 100 residues in 100 Myr. The lack of charged replacements and the general types and distribution of replacements also are similar to those in other vertebrate alpha A chains. Maximum-parsimony analyses of the total data set of 67 vertebrate alpha A sequences support the monophyletic origin of alligator, tegu, and birds and favor the grouping of crocodilians and birds as surviving sister groups in the subclass Archosauria.

  14. A 5.8S nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequence database: applications to ecology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K. W.; Vogler, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    We complied a 5.8S nuclear ribosomal gene sequence database for animals, plants, and fungi using both newly generated and GenBank sequences. We demonstrate the utility of this database as an internal check to determine whether the target organism and not a contaminant has been sequenced, as a diagnostic tool for ecologists and evolutionary biologists to determine the placement of asexual fungi within larger taxonomic groups, and as a tool to help identify fungi that form ectomycorrhizae.

  15. Accelerated evolution of CES7, a gene encoding a novel major urinary protein in the cat family.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Janecka, Jan E; Murphy, William J

    2011-02-01

    Cauxin is a novel urinary protein recently identified in the domestic cat that regulates the excretion of felinine, a pheromone precursor involved in sociochemical communication and territorial marking of domestic and wild felids. Understanding the evolutionary history of cauxin may therefore illuminate molecular adaptations involved in the evolution of pheromone-based communication, recognition, and mate selection in wild animals. We sequenced the gene encoding cauxin, CES7, in 22 species representing all major felid lineages, and multiple outgroups and showed that it has undergone rapid evolutionary change preceding and during the diversification of the cat family. A comparison between feline cauxin and orthologous carboxylesterases from other mammalian lineages revealed evidence of strong positive Darwinian selection within and between several cat lineages, enriched at functionally important sites of the protein. The higher rate of radical amino acid replacements in small felids, coupled with the lack of felinine and extremely low levels of cauxin in the urine of the great cats (Panthera), correlates with functional divergence of this gene in Panthera, and its putative loss in the snow leopard. Expression studies found evidence for several alternatively spliced transcripts in testis and brain, suggesting additional roles in male reproductive fitness and behavior. Our work presents the first report of strong positive natural selection acting on a major urinary protein of nonrodent mammals, providing evidence for parallel selection pressure on the regulation of pheromones in different mammalian lineages, despite the use of different metabolic pathways. Our results imply that natural selection may drive rapid changes in the regulation of pheromones in urine among the different cat species, which in turn may influence social behavior, such as territorial marking and conspecific recognition, therefore serving as an important mechanism for the radiation of this group

  16. Characterization and evolution of ovine MHC class II DQB sequence polymorphism.

    PubMed

    van Oorschot, R A; Maddox, J F; Adams, L J; Fabb, S A

    1994-12-01

    The second exons of OLA-DQB genes from 13 merino sheep were sequenced following amplification by the polymerase chain reaction or isolation from a cDNA library. Ten distinct exon 2 sequences, coding for 10 novel amino acid sequences, were characterized in these sheep. The single-strand conformation polymorphism technique was shown to be capable of discriminating between all sequences. This brings the total number of different OLA-DQB exon 2 sequences (nucleotide and amino acid) which have been characterized to 12, and demonstrates that the OLA-DQB region is highly polymorphic with 29% of nucleotide and 46% of amino acid sites showing variation. Evidence is presented that the OLA-DQB sequences belong to at least two lineages of DQB genes. Some ovine DQB sequences are more like bovine DQB counterparts than other ovine DQB sequences suggesting that the artiodactyl DQB gene and allele lineages predate the separation of the ovine and bovine species 20 million years ago.

  17. An ITS phylogeny of Leccinum and an analysis of the evolution of minisatellite-like sequences within ITS1.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Gravendeel, Barbara; Kuyper, Thomas W

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the European species of Leccinum (Boletales, Boletaceae) were investigated by maximum parsimony, Bayesian and likelihood analyses of nrITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S sequences. The separate gene trees inferred were largely concordant, and their combined analysis indicates that several traditional sectional and species-level taxonomic schemes are artificial. In Leccinum, the nrITS region ranges in size from 694 to 1480 bp. This extreme length heterogeneity is localized to a part of the ITS1 spacer that contains a minisatellite characterized by the repeated presence of CTATTGAAAAG and CTAATAGAAAG core sequences and mutational derivatives thereof. The number of core sequences present in the minisatellite varied from 12 to 36. Intra-individual sequence variation of the minisatellite was always smaller than between different species, indicating that concerted evolution proceeds rapidly enough to retain phylogenetic signal at the infraspecific level. In contrast, the evolutionary pattern exhibited by the major ITS1 repeat types found was homoplastic when mapped onto the species lineages inferred from the combined 5.8S-ITS2 sequences. The minisatellite therefore appears not to be useful for phylogeny reconstruction at or above the species level.

  18. Lithium evolution from Pre-Main Sequence to the Spite plateau: an environmental solution to the cosmological lithium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoting; Bressan, Alessandro; Molaro, Paolo; Marigo, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Lithium abundance derived in metal-poor main sequence stars is about three times lower than the primordial value of the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis prediction. This disagreement is referred to as the lithium problem. We reconsider the stellar Li evolution from the pre-main sequence to the end of main sequence phase by introducing the effects of overshooting and residual mass accretion. We show that 7Li could be significantly depleted by convective overshooting in the pre-main sequence phase and then partially restored in the stellar atmosphere by residual accretion which follows the Li depletion phase and could be regulated by EUV photo-evaporation. By considering the conventional nuclear burning and diffusion along the main sequence we can reproduce the Spite plateau for stars with initial mass m 0=0.62-0.80 M ⊙, and the Li declining branch for lower mass dwarfs, e.g, m 0=0.57-0.60 M ⊙, for a wide range of metallicities (Z=0.00001 to Z=0.0005), starting from an initial Li abundance A(Li) = 2.72.

  19. Parallel signatures of sequence evolution among hearing genes in echolocating mammals: an emerging model of genetic convergence

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K T J; Cotton, J A; Kirwan, J D; Teeling, E C; Rossiter, S J

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings of sequence convergence in the Prestin gene among some bats and cetaceans suggest that parallel adaptations for high-frequency hearing have taken place during the evolution of echolocation. To determine if this gene is an exception, or instead similar processes have occurred in other hearing genes, we have examined Tmc1 and Pjvk, both of which are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in mammals. These genes were amplified and sequenced from a number of mammalian species, including echolocating and non-echolocating bats and whales, and were analysed together with published sequences. Sections of both genes showed phylogenetic signals that conflicted with accepted species relationships, with coding regions uniting laryngeal echolocating bats in a monophyletic clade. Bayesian estimates of posterior probabilities of convergent and divergent substitutions provided more direct evidence of sequence convergence between the two groups of laryngeal echolocating bats as well as between echolocating bats and dolphins. We found strong evidence of positive selection acting on some echolocating bat species and echolocating cetaceans, contrasting with purifying selection on non-echolocating bats. Signatures of sequence convergence and molecular adaptation in two additional hearing genes suggest that the acquisition of high-frequency hearing has involved multiple loci. PMID:22167055

  20. Parallel signatures of sequence evolution among hearing genes in echolocating mammals: an emerging model of genetic convergence.

    PubMed

    Davies, K T J; Cotton, J A; Kirwan, J D; Teeling, E C; Rossiter, S J

    2012-05-01

    Recent findings of sequence convergence in the Prestin gene among some bats and cetaceans suggest that parallel adaptations for high-frequency hearing have taken place during the evolution of echolocation. To determine if this gene is an exception, or instead similar processes have occurred in other hearing genes, we have examined Tmc1 and Pjvk, both of which are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in mammals. These genes were amplified and sequenced from a number of mammalian species, including echolocating and non-echolocating bats and whales, and were analysed together with published sequences. Sections of both genes showed phylogenetic signals that conflicted with accepted species relationships, with coding regions uniting laryngeal echolocating bats in a monophyletic clade. Bayesian estimates of posterior probabilities of convergent and divergent substitutions provided more direct evidence of sequence convergence between the two groups of laryngeal echolocating bats as well as between echolocating bats and dolphins. We found strong evidence of positive selection acting on some echolocating bat species and echolocating cetaceans, contrasting with purifying selection on non-echolocating bats. Signatures of sequence convergence and molecular adaptation in two additional hearing genes suggest that the acquisition of high-frequency hearing has involved multiple loci.

  1. Genome sequence of cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum TM-1) provides insights into genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuguang; Fan, Guangyi; Lu, Cairui; Xiao, Guanghui; Zou, Changsong; Kohel, Russell J; Ma, Zhiying; Shang, Haihong; Ma, Xiongfeng; Wu, Jianyong; Liang, Xinming; Huang, Gai; Percy, Richard G; Liu, Kun; Yang, Weihua; Chen, Wenbin; Du, Xiongming; Shi, Chengcheng; Yuan, Youlu; Ye, Wuwei; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xueyan; Liu, Weiqing; Wei, Hengling; Wei, Shoujun; Huang, Guodong; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhang, He; Sun, Fengming; Wang, Xingfen; Liang, Jie; Wang, Jiahao; He, Qiang; Huang, Leihuan; Wang, Jun; Cui, Jinjie; Song, Guoli; Wang, Kunbo; Xu, Xun; Yu, John Z; Zhu, Yuxian; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-05-01

    Gossypium hirsutum has proven difficult to sequence owing to its complex allotetraploid (AtDt) genome. Here we produce a draft genome using 181-fold paired-end sequences assisted by fivefold BAC-to-BAC sequences and a high-resolution genetic map. In our assembly 88.5% of the 2,173-Mb scaffolds, which cover 89.6%∼96.7% of the AtDt genome, are anchored and oriented to 26 pseudochromosomes. Comparison of this G. hirsutum AtDt genome with the already sequenced diploid Gossypium arboreum (AA) and Gossypium raimondii (DD) genomes revealed conserved gene order. Repeated sequences account for 67.2% of the AtDt genome, and transposable elements (TEs) originating from Dt seem more active than from At. Reduction in the AtDt genome size occurred after allopolyploidization. The A or At genome may have undergone positive selection for fiber traits. Concerted evolution of different regulatory mechanisms for Cellulose synthase (CesA) and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase1 and 3 (ACO1,3) may be important for enhanced fiber production in G. hirsutum.

  2. Inter-Protein Sequence Co-Evolution Predicts Known Physical Interactions in Bacterial Ribosomes and the Trp Operon.

    PubMed

    Feinauer, Christoph; Szurmant, Hendrik; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between proteins is a fundamental mechanism that underlies virtually all biological processes. Many important interactions are conserved across a large variety of species. The need to maintain interaction leads to a high degree of co-evolution between residues in the interface between partner proteins. The inference of protein-protein interaction networks from the rapidly growing sequence databases is one of the most formidable tasks in systems biology today. We propose here a novel approach based on the Direct-Coupling Analysis of the co-evolution between inter-protein residue pairs. We use ribosomal and trp operon proteins as test cases: For the small resp. large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts protein-interaction partners at a true-positive rate of 70% resp. 90% within the first 10 predictions, with areas of 0.69 resp. 0.81 under the ROC curves for all predictions. In the trp operon, it assigns the two largest interaction scores to the only two interactions experimentally known. On the level of residue interactions we show that for both the small and the large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts interacting residues in the system with a true positive rate of 60% and 85% in the first 20 predictions. We use artificial data to show that the performance of our approach depends crucially on the size of the joint multiple sequence alignments and analyze how many sequences would be necessary for a perfect prediction if the sequences were sampled from the same model that we use for prediction. Given the performance of our approach on the test data we speculate that it can be used to detect new interactions, especially in the light of the rapid growth of available sequence data.

  3. The UV-Optical Galaxy Color-Magnitude Diagram. III. Constraints on Evolution from the Blue to the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Schiminovich, David; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Welsh, Barry Y.; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R. Michael; Szalay, Alex S.; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a new quantity, the mass flux density of galaxies evolving from the blue sequence to the red sequence. We propose a simple technique for constraining this mass flux using the volume-corrected number density in the extinction-corrected UV-optical color-magnitude distribution, the stellar age indexes HδA and Dn(4000), and a simple prescription for spectral evolution using a quenched star formation history. We exploit the excellent separation of red and blue sequences in the NUV-r band Hess function. The final value we measure, ρT˙=0.033 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, is strictly speaking an upper limit due to the possible contributions of bursting, composite, and extincted galaxies. However, it compares favorably with estimates of the average mass flux that we make based on the red luminosity function evolution derived from the DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys, ρ˙R=+0.034 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3. We find that the blue sequence mass has remained roughly constant since z=1 (ρB˙~=0.01 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, but the average on-going star formation of ρ˙SF~=0.037 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3 over 0sequence. We explore the nature of the galaxies in the transition zone with particular attention to the frequency and impact of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The AGN fraction peaks in the transition zone. We find circumstantial, albeit weak evidence that the quench rates are higher in higher luminosity AGNs.

  4. Inter-Protein Sequence Co-Evolution Predicts Known Physical Interactions in Bacterial Ribosomes and the Trp Operon

    PubMed Central

    Feinauer, Christoph; Szurmant, Hendrik; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between proteins is a fundamental mechanism that underlies virtually all biological processes. Many important interactions are conserved across a large variety of species. The need to maintain interaction leads to a high degree of co-evolution between residues in the interface between partner proteins. The inference of protein-protein interaction networks from the rapidly growing sequence databases is one of the most formidable tasks in systems biology today. We propose here a novel approach based on the Direct-Coupling Analysis of the co-evolution between inter-protein residue pairs. We use ribosomal and trp operon proteins as test cases: For the small resp. large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts protein-interaction partners at a true-positive rate of 70% resp. 90% within the first 10 predictions, with areas of 0.69 resp. 0.81 under the ROC curves for all predictions. In the trp operon, it assigns the two largest interaction scores to the only two interactions experimentally known. On the level of residue interactions we show that for both the small and the large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts interacting residues in the system with a true positive rate of 60% and 85% in the first 20 predictions. We use artificial data to show that the performance of our approach depends crucially on the size of the joint multiple sequence alignments and analyze how many sequences would be necessary for a perfect prediction if the sequences were sampled from the same model that we use for prediction. Given the performance of our approach on the test data we speculate that it can be used to detect new interactions, especially in the light of the rapid growth of available sequence data. PMID:26882169

  5. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  6. A comprehensive draft genome sequence for lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), an emerging health food: insights into plant-microbe interactions and legume evolution.

    PubMed

    Hane, James K; Ming, Yao; Kamphuis, Lars G; Nelson, Matthew N; Garg, Gagan; Atkins, Craig A; Bayer, Philipp E; Bravo, Armando; Bringans, Scott; Cannon, Steven; Edwards, David; Foley, Rhonda; Gao, Ling-Ling; Harrison, Maria J; Huang, Wei; Hurgobin, Bhavna; Li, Sean; Liu, Cheng-Wu; McGrath, Annette; Morahan, Grant; Murray, Jeremy; Weller, James; Jian, Jianbo; Singh, Karam B

    2017-03-01

    Lupins are important grain legume crops that form a critical part of sustainable farming systems, reducing fertilizer use and providing disease breaks. It has a basal phylogenetic position relative to other crop and model legumes and a high speciation rate. Narrow-leafed lupin (NLL; Lupinus angustifolius L.) is gaining popularity as a health food, which is high in protein and dietary fibre but low in starch and gluten-free. We report the draft genome assembly (609 Mb) of NLL cultivar Tanjil, which has captured >98% of the gene content, sequences of additional lines and a dense genetic map. Lupins are unique among legumes and differ from most other land plants in that they do not form mycorrhizal associations. Remarkably, we find that NLL has lost all mycorrhiza-specific genes, but has retained genes commonly required for mycorrhization and nodulation. In addition, the genome also provided candidate genes for key disease resistance and domestication traits. We also find evidence of a whole-genome triplication at around 25 million years ago in the genistoid lineage leading to Lupinus. Our results will support detailed studies of legume evolution and accelerate lupin breeding programmes.

  7. Epoch-based likelihood models reveal no evidence for accelerated evolution of viviparity in squamate reptiles in response to cenozoic climate change.

    PubMed

    King, Benedict; Lee, Michael S Y

    2015-09-01

    A broad scale analysis of the evolution of viviparity across nearly 4,000 species of squamates revealed that origins increase in frequency toward the present, raising the question of whether rates of change have accelerated. We here use simulations to show that the increased frequency is within the range expected given that the number of squamate lineages also increases with time. Novel, epoch-based methods implemented in BEAST (which allow rates of discrete character evolution to vary across time-slices) also give congruent results, with recent epochs having very similar rates to older epochs. Thus, contrary to expectations, there was no accelerated burst of origins of viviparity in response to global cooling during the Cenozoic or glacial cycles during the Plio-Pleistocene. However, if one accepts the conventional view that viviparity is more likely to evolve than to be lost, and also the evidence here that viviparity has evolved with similar regularity throughout the last 200 Ma, then the absence of large, ancient clades of viviparous squamates (analogs to therian mammals) requires explanation. Viviparous squamate lineages might be more prone to extinction than are oviparous lineages, due to their prevalance at high elevations and latitudes and thus greater susceptibility to climate fluctuations. If so, the directional bias in character evolution would be offset by the bias in extinction rates.

  8. Dynamic Sequence Evolution of a Sex-Associated B Chromosome in Lake Malawi Cichlid Fish.

    PubMed

    Clark, Frances E; Conte, Matthew A; Ferreira-Bravo, Irani A; Poletto, Andreia B; Martins, Cesar; Kocher, Thomas D

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes found in many species of plants, animals, and fungi. B chromosomes often manipulate common cellular processes to increase their frequency, sometimes to the detriment of organismal fitness. Here, we characterize B chromosomes in several species of Lake Malawi cichlid fish. Whole genome sequencing of Metriaclima zebra "Boadzulu" individuals revealed blocks of sequence with unusually high sequence coverage, indicative of increased copy number of those sequences. These regions of high sequence coverage were found only in females. SNPs unique to the high copy number sequences permitted the design of specific amplification primers. These primers amplified fragments only in Metriaclima lombardoi individuals that carried a cytologically identified B chromosome (B-carriers), indicating these extra copies are located on the B chromosome. These same primers were used to identify B-carrying individuals in additional species from Lake Malawi. Across 7 species, a total of 43 B-carriers were identified among 323 females. B-carriers were exclusively female; no B chromosomes were observed in the 317 males surveyed from these species. Quantitative analysis of the copy number variation of B-specific sequence blocks suggests that B-carriers possess a single B chromosome, consistent with previous karyotyping of M. lombardoi A single B chromosome in B-carriers is consistent with 2 potential drive mechanisms: one involving nondisjunction and preferential segregation in a mitotic division prior to the germ-line, and the other involving preferential segregation during meiosis I.

  9. Sequencing three crocodilian genomes to illuminate the evolution of archosaurs and amniotes.

    PubMed

    St John, John A; Braun, Edward L; Isberg, Sally R; Miles, Lee G; Chong, Amanda Y; Gongora, Jaime; Dalzell, Pauline; Moran, Christopher; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Abzhanov, Arkhat; Burgess, Shane C; Cooksey, Amanda M; Castoe, Todd A; Crawford, Nicholas G; Densmore, Llewellyn D; Drew, Jennifer C; Edwards, Scott V; Faircloth, Brant C; Fujita, Matthew K; Greenwold, Matthew J; Hoffmann, Federico G; Howard, Jonathan M; Iguchi, Taisen; Janes, Daniel E; Khan, Shahid Yar; Kohno, Satomi; de Koning, Ap Jason; Lance, Stacey L; McCarthy, Fiona M; McCormack, John E; Merchant, Mark E; Peterson, Daniel G; Pollock, David D; Pourmand, Nader; Raney, Brian J; Roessler, Kyria A; Sanford, Jeremy R; Sawyer, Roger H; Schmidt, Carl J; Triplett, Eric W; Tuberville, Tracey D; Venegas-Anaya, Miryam; Howard, Jason T; Jarvis, Erich D; Guillette, Louis J; Glenn, Travis C; Green, Richard E; Ray, David A

    2012-01-31

    The International Crocodilian Genomes Working Group (ICGWG) will sequence and assemble the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and Indian gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) genomes. The status of these projects and our planned analyses are described.

  10. Sequencing three crocodilian genomes to illuminate the evolution of archosaurs and amniotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The International Crocodilian Genomes Working Group (ICGWG) will sequence and assemble the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and Indian gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) genomes. The status of these projects and our planned analyses are described. PMID:22293439

  11. Separate F-Type Plasmids Have Shaped the Evolution of the H30 Subclone of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Llop, Katharine; Munoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Flores-Figueroa, Cristian; Aziz, Maliha; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Price, Lance B.; Johnson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) H30 subclone of sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) has emerged abruptly as a dominant lineage of ExPEC responsible for human disease. The ST131-H30 lineage has been well described phylogenetically, yet its plasmid complement is not fully understood. Here, single-molecule, real-time sequencing was used to generate the complete plasmid sequences of ST131-H30 isolates and those belonging to other ST131 clades. Comparative analyses revealed separate F-type plasmids that have shaped the evolution of the main fluoroquinolone-resistant ST131-H30 clades. Specifically, an F1:A2:B20 plasmid is strongly associated with the H30R/C1 clade, whereas an F2:A1:B− plasmid is associated with the H30Rx/C2 clade. A series of plasmid gene losses, gains, and rearrangements involving IS26 likely led to the current plasmid complements within each ST131-H30 sublineage, which contain several overlapping gene clusters with putative functions in virulence and fitness, suggesting plasmid-mediated convergent evolution. Evidence suggests that the H30Rx/C2-associated F2:A1:B− plasmid type was present in strains ancestral to the acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance and prior to the introduction of a multidrug resistance-encoding gene cassette harboring blaCTX-M-15. In vitro experiments indicated a host strain-independent low frequency of plasmid transfer, differential levels of plasmid stability even between closely related ST131-H30 strains, and possible epistasis for carriage of these plasmids within the H30R/Rx lineages. IMPORTANCE A clonal lineage of Escherichia coli known as ST131 has emerged as a dominating strain type causing extraintestinal infections in humans. The evolutionary history of ST131 E. coli is now well understood. However, the role of plasmids in ST131’s evolutionary history is poorly defined. This study utilized real-time, single-molecule sequencing to compare plasmids from various current and historical

  12. Cretaceous sequence stratigraphy of the Northern South American Passive Margin: Implications for tectonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, E.G.; Villamil, T.; Johnson, C.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The passive margin of northern South America, from Colombia to northeastern Venezuela, was relatively stable through the Cretaceous and only broadly affected by the entry of the Caribbean Plate into the Protocaribbean Basin. This region offers a unique opportunity to test the relative effects of global sealevel change, autocyclic sedimentologic processed, and regional tectonics in shaping the stratigraphic record of Cretaceous passive margins. High-resolution stratigraphic studies of Colombia and Venezuela have established a precise system of regional chronology and correlation with resolution <1 Ma (50-500 ka for the middle Cretaceous). This allows precise separation of allocyclic and autocyclic controls on facies development. This new chronology integrates assemblage zone biostratigraphy with event/cycle chronostratigraphy. Newly measured Cretaceous sections in Venezuela and throughout Colombia are calibrated to this new chronology, and sequence stratigraphic units independently defined to the third-order of resolution. Graphic correlation of all sections is used to identify sequences with regional stratigraphic expression, and those which correlate to sequence stratigraphic standards of North America, Europe and the global cycles of Hag et al. (1988). 50-60 percent of the stratigraphic sequences across the South American passive margin correlate to other continents and to the global sequence stratigraphic standard, reflecting strong eustatic influence on Cretaceous sedimentation across northern South America. The remaining sequences in this region reflect tectonic modification of the passive margin and autocyclic sedimentary processes.

  13. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  14. Molecular phylogenetics in 2D: ITS2 rRNA evolution and sequence-structure barcode from Veneridae to Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Mariottini, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the nuclear ITS2 rRNA primary sequence and secondary structure in Veneridae and comparatively with 20 Bivalvia taxa to test the phylogenetic resolution of this marker and its suitability for molecular diagnosis at different taxonomic levels. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees based on primary sequences were congruent with (profile-) neighbor-joining trees based on a combined model of sequence-structure evolution. ITS2 showed higher resolution below the subfamily level, providing a phylogenetic signal comparable to (mitochondrial/nuclear) gene fragments 2-5 times longer. Structural elements of the ITS2 folding, such as specific mismatch pairing and compensatory base changes, provided further support for the monophyly of some groups and for their phylogenetic relationships. Veneridae ITS2 folding is structured in six domains (DI-VI) and shows five striking sequence-structure features. Two of them, the Basal and Apical STEMs, are common to Bivalvia, while the presence of both the Branched STEM and the Y/R stretches occurs in five superfamilies of the two Heterodonta orders Myoida and Veneroida, thus questioning their reciprocal monophyly. Our results validated the ITS2 as a suitable marker for venerids phylogenetics and taxonomy, and underlined the significance of including secondary structure information for both applications at several systematic levels within bivalves.

  15. 2b or Not 2b: Experimental Evolution of Functional Exogenous Sequences in a Plant RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Mark P.; Ambrós, Silvia; Carrasco, José L.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is pervasive in viruses and thought to be a key mechanism in their evolution. On the other hand, strong selective constraints against increasing genome size are an impediment for HGT, rapidly purging horizontally transferred sequences and thereby potentially hindering evolutionary innovation. Here, we explore experimentally the evolutionary fate of viruses with simulated HGT events, using the plant RNA virus Tobacco etch virus (TEV), by separately introducing two functional, exogenous sequences to its genome. One of the events simulates the acquisition of a new function though HGT of a conserved AlkB domain, responsible for the repair of alkylation or methylation damage in many organisms. The other event simulates the acquisition of a sequence that duplicates an existing function, through HGT of the 2b RNA silencing suppressor from Cucumber mosaic virus. We then evolved these two viruses, tracked the maintenance of the horizontally transferred sequences over time, and for the final virus populations, sequenced their genome and measured viral fitness. We found that the AlkB domain was rapidly purged from the TEV genome, restoring fitness to wild-type levels. Conversely, the 2b gene was stably maintained and did not have a major impact on viral fitness. Moreover, we found that 2b is functional in TEV, as it provides a replicative advantage when the RNA silencing suppression domain of HC-Pro is mutated. These observations suggest a potentially interesting role for HGT of short functional sequences in ameliorating evolutionary constraints on viruses, through the duplication of functions. PMID:28137747

  16. Evolution of a zoonotic pathogen: investigating prophage diversity in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 by long-read sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, Sharif; Cowley, Lauren A.; McAteer, Sean P.; Jenkins, Claire; Dallman, Timothy J.; Bono, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157 is a zoonotic pathogen for which colonization of cattle and virulence in humans is associated with multiple horizontally acquired genes, the majority present in active or cryptic prophages. Our understanding of the evolution and phylogeny of EHEC O157 continues to develop primarily based on core genome analyses; however, such short-read sequences have limited value for the analysis of prophage content and its chromosomal location. In this study, we applied Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing, using the Pacific Biosciences long-read sequencing platform, to isolates selected from the main sub-clusters of this clonal group. Prophage regions were extracted from these sequences and from published reference strains. Genome position and prophage diversity were analysed along with genetic content. Prophages could be assigned to clusters, with smaller prophages generally exhibiting less diversity and preferential loss of structural genes. Prophages encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) 2a and Stx1a were the most diverse, and more variable compared to prophages encoding Stx2c, further supporting the hypothesis that Stx2c-prophage integration was ancestral to acquisition of other Stx types. The concept that phage type (PT) 21/28 (Stx2a+, Stx2c+) strains evolved from PT32 (Stx2c+) was supported by analysis of strains with excised Stx-encoding prophages. Insertion sequence elements were over-represented in prophage sequences compared to the rest of the genome, showing integration in key genes such as stx and an excisionase, the latter potentially acting to capture the bacteriophage into the genome. Prophage profiling should allow more accurate prediction of the pathogenic potential of isolates. PMID:28348836

  17. 2b or not 2b: Experimental evolution of functional exogenous sequences in a plant RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Anouk; Zwart, Mark P; Ambrós, Silvia; Carrasco, José L; Elena, Santiago F

    2017-01-30

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is pervasive in viruses, and thought to be a key mechanism in their evolution. On the other hand, strong selective constraints against increasing genome size are an impediment for HGT, rapidly purging horizontally transferred sequences and thereby potentially hindering evolutionary innovation. Here we explore experimentally the evolutionary fate of viruses with simulated HGT events, using the plant RNA virus Tobacco etch virus (TEV), by separately introducing two functional, exogenous sequences to its genome. One of the events simulates the acquisition of a new function though HGT of a conserved AlkB domain, responsible for the repair of alkylation or methylation damage in many organisms. The other event simulates the acquisition of a sequence that duplicates an existing function, through HGT of the 2b RNA silencing suppressor from Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). We then evolved these two viruses, tracked the maintenance of the horizontally transferred sequences over time, and for the final virus populations, sequenced their genome and measured viral fitness. We found that the AlkB domain was rapidly purged from the TEV genome, restoring fitness to wild-type levels. Conversely, the 2b gene was stably maintained and did not have a major impact on viral fitness. Moreover, we found that 2b is functional in TEV, as it provides a replicative advantage when the RNA silencing suppression domain of HC-Pro is mutated. These observations suggest a potentially interesting role for HGT of short functional sequences in ameliorating evolutionary constraints on viruses, through the duplication of functions.

  18. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  19. Large Scale Sequencing of Dothideomycetes Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Haridas, Sajeet; Crous, Pedro; Binder, Manfred; Spatafora, Joseph; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-16

    Dothideomycetes is the largest and most diverse class of ascomycete fungi with 23 orders 110 families, 1300 genera and over 19,000 known species. We present comparative analysis of 70 Dothideomycete genomes including over 50 that we sequenced and are as yet unpublished. This extensive sampling has almost quadrupled the previous study of 18 species and uncovered a 10 fold range of genome sizes. We were able to clarify the phylogenetic positions of several species whose origins were unclear in previous morphological and sequence comparison studies. We analyzed selected gene families including proteases, transporters and small secreted proteins and show that major differences in gene content is influenced by speciation.

  20. Clonal Evolution Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis Transformed to Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Daniel A.C.; Miller, Christopher A.; McLellan, Michael D.; Fulton, Robert S.; Moore, Deborah M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Oh, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal architecture in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is poorly understood. Here we report genomic analyses of a patient with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) transformed to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on PMF and sAML diagnosis samples, with skin included as a germline surrogate. Deep sequencing validation was performed on the WGS samples and an additional sample obtained during sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Clustering analysis of 649 validated somatic single nucleotide variants revealed four distinct clonal groups, each including putative driver mutations. The first group (including JAK2 and U2AF1), representing the founding clone, included mutations with high frequency at all three disease stages. The second clonal group (including MYB) was present only in PMF, suggesting the presence of a clone that was dispensable for transformation. The third group (including ASXL1) contained mutations with low frequency in PMF and high frequency in subsequent samples, indicating evolution of the dominant clone with disease progression. The fourth clonal group (including IDH1 and RUNX1) was acquired at sAML transformation and was predominantly absent at sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Taken together, these findings illustrate the complex clonal dynamics associated with disease evolution in MPNs and sAML. PMID:25252869

  1. The map-based genome sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza aligned with its chromosomes, a reference for karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu Xuan; Vu, Giang Thi Ha; Wang, Wenqin; Appenroth, Klaus J; Messing, Joachim; Schubert, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Duckweeds are aquatic monocotyledonous plants of potential economic interest with fast vegetative propagation, comprising 37 species with variable genome sizes (0.158-1.88 Gbp). The genomic sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza, the smallest and the most ancient duckweed genome, needs to be aligned to its chromosomes as a reference and prerequisite to study the genome and karyotype evolution of other duckweed species. We selected physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing Spirodela DNA inserts with little or no repetitive elements as probes for multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mcFISH), using an optimized BAC pooling strategy, to validate its physical map and correlate it with its chromosome complement. By consecutive mcFISH analyses, we assigned the originally assembled 32 pseudomolecules (supercontigs) of the genomic sequences to the 20 chromosomes of S. polyrhiza. A Spirodela cytogenetic map containing 96 BAC markers with an average distance of 0.89 Mbp was constructed. Using a cocktail of 41 BACs in three colors, all chromosome pairs could be individualized simultaneously. Seven ancestral blocks emerged from duplicated chromosome segments of 19 Spirodela chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated genome of S. polyrhiza and the established prerequisites for comparative chromosome painting enable future studies on the chromosome homoeology and karyotype evolution of duckweed species.

  2. Evolution of elongation factor-like (EFL) protein in Rhizaria is revised by radiolarian EFL gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ishitani, Yoshiyuki; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Yabuki, Akinori; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Inagaki, Yuji; Takishita, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) and elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins are considered to carry out equivalent functions in translation in eukaryotic cells. Elongation factor 1α and EFL genes are patchily distributed in the global eukaryotic tree, suggesting that the evolution of these elongation factors cannot be reconciled without multiple lateral gene transfer and/or ancestral co-occurrence followed by differential loss of either of the two factors. Our current understanding of the EF-1α/EFL evolution in the eukaryotic group Rhizaria, composed of Foraminifera, Radiolaria, Filosa, and Endomyxa, remains insufficient, as no information on EF-1α/EFL gene is available for any members of Radiolaria. In this study, EFL genes were experimentally isolated from four polycystine radiolarians (i.e. Dictyocoryne, Eucyrtidium, Collozoum, and Sphaerozoum), as well as retrieved from publicly accessible expressed sequence tag data of two acantharean radiolarians (i.e. Astrolonche and Phyllostaurus) and the endomyxan Gromia. The EFL homologs from radiolarians, foraminiferans, and Gromia formed a robust clade in both maximum-likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that EFL genes were vertically inherited from their common ancestor. We propose an updated model for EF-1α/EFL evolution in Rhizaria by incorporating new EFL data obtained in this study.

  3. Whole-genome sequence of a flatfish provides insights into ZW sex chromosome evolution and adaptation to a benthic lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songlin; Zhang, Guojie; Shao, Changwei; Huang, Quanfei; Liu, Geng; Zhang, Pei; Song, Wentao; An, Na; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Hong, Yunhan; Li, Qiye; Sha, Zhenxia; Zhou, Heling; Xie, Mingshu; Yu, Qiulin; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Hui; Wang, Na; Wu, Kui; Yang, Changgeng; Zhou, Qian; Liao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linfeng; Hu, Qiaomu; Zhang, Jilin; Meng, Liang; Jin, Lijun; Tian, Yongsheng; Lian, Jinmin; Yang, Jingfeng; Miao, Guidong; Liu, Shanshan; Liang, Zhuo; Yan, Fang; Li, Yangzhen; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Ying; Du, Min; Zhao, Yongwei; Schartl, Manfred; Tang, Qisheng; Wang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Genetic sex determination by W and Z chromosomes has developed independently in different groups of organisms. To better understand the evolution of sex chromosomes and the plasticity of sex-determination mechanisms, we sequenced the whole genomes of a male (ZZ) and a female (ZW) half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). In addition to insights into adaptation to a benthic lifestyle, we find that the sex chromosomes of these fish are derived from the same ancestral vertebrate protochromosome as the avian W and Z chromosomes. Notably, the same gene on the Z chromosome, dmrt1, which is the male-determining gene in birds, showed convergent evolution of features that are compatible with a similar function in tongue sole. Comparison of the relatively young tongue sole sex chromosomes with those of mammals and birds identified events that occurred during the early phase of sex-chromosome evolution. Pertinent to the current debate about heterogametic sex-chromosome decay, we find that massive gene loss occurred in the wake of sex-chromosome 'birth'.

  4. Whole-genome sequence of the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri and the comparative evolution of tetrapod genomes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Xiong, Zi-Jun; Xiang, Xue-Yan; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Min-Min; Chen, Hong-Man; Li, Fang; Zhou, Long; Feng, Shao-Hong; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Guo-Jie; Irwin, David; Hillis, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Yang, Huan-Ming; Che, Jing; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-03-17

    The development of efficient sequencing techniques has resulted in large numbers of genomes being available for evolutionary studies. However, only one genome is available for all amphibians, that of Xenopus tropicalis, which is distantly related from the majority of frogs. More than 96% of frogs belong to the Neobatrachia, and no genome exists for this group. This dearth of amphibian genomes greatly restricts genomic studies of amphibians and, more generally, our understanding of tetrapod genome evolution. To fill this gap, we provide the de novo genome of a Tibetan Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri, and compare it to that of X. tropicalis and other vertebrates. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, a number similar to that of Xenopus. Although the genome size of Nanorana is considerably larger than that of Xenopus (2.3 vs. 1.5 Gb), most of the difference is due to the respective number of transposable elements in the two genomes. The two frogs exhibit considerable conserved whole-genome synteny despite having diverged approximately 266 Ma, indicating a slow rate of DNA structural evolution in anurans. Multigenome synteny blocks further show that amphibians have fewer interchromosomal rearrangements than mammals but have a comparable rate of intrachromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis also identifies 11 Mb of anuran-specific highly conserved elements that will be useful for comparative genomic analyses of frogs. The Nanorana genome offers an improved understanding of evolution of tetrapod genomes and also provides a genomic reference for other evolutionary studies.

  5. Cambro-ordovician sea-level fluctuations and sequence boundaries: The missing record and the evolution of new taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehnert, O.; Miller, J.F.; Leslie, Stephen A.; Repetski, J.E.; Ethington, Raymond L.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of early Palaeozoic conodont faunas shows a clear connection to sea-level changes. One way that this connection manifests itself is that thick successions of carbonates are missing beneath major sequence boundaries due to karstification and erosion. From this observation arises the question of how many taxa have been lost from different conodont lineages in these incomplete successions. Although many taxa suffered extinction due to the environmental stresses associated with falling sea-levels, some must have survived in these extreme conditions. The number of taxa missing in the early Palaeozoic tropics always will be unclear, but it will be even more difficult to evaluate the missing record in detrital successions of higher latitudes. A common pattern in the evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician conodont lineages is appearances of new species at sea-level rises and disappearances at sea-level drops. This simple picture can be complicated by intervals that consistently have no representatives of a particular lineage, even after extensive sampling of the most complete sections. Presumably the lineages survived in undocumented refugia. In this paper, we give examples of evolution in Cambrian-Ordovician shallowmarine conodont faunas and highlight problems of undiscovered or truly missing segments of lineages. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  6. Unique patterns of pelvic fin evolution: a case study of balistoid fishes (Pisces: Tetraodontiformes) based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamanoue, Yusuke; Miya, Masaki; Matsuura, Keiichi; Sakai, Harumi; Katoh, Masaya; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2009-01-01

    Balistoid fishes have a unique and reduced pelvic fin structure, which does not exhibit paired structures. The pelvic complex exhibits reductive trends, but its rudimentary structure was retained among balistoids, and its unidirectional and parsimonious reduction in more derived lineages has been hypothesized based on morphology. We investigated the evolution of pelvic complex reduction in balistoids using whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) data from 33 species (27 newly determined during the study) that represent the entire morphological diversity of balistoids. Partitioned maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses were conducted with two datasets that comprised concatenated nucleotide sequences from 13 protein-coding genes (all positions included; third codon positions converted into purine [R] and pyrimidine [Y] [RY-coding]) plus 22 transfer RNA and two ribosomal RNA genes. The resultant trees were well resolved and largely congruent, with most internal branches having high support values. The mitogenomic datasets strongly supported monophylies of both balistids and monacanthids, but rejected previous hypotheses on the intra-relationships in each family. The present tree topology revealed that highly reduced pelvic complexes had multiple origins, and optimization of the traits on the resultant tree strongly suggested the non-unidirectional and independent reduction of pelvic complexes in balistoids. The evolution of balistoid pelvic structure is very different among fishes that exhibit its reductive trends, and this uniqueness in pelvic evolution may be a link to their reproductive behaviors.

  7. Delayed gratification habitable zones: when deep outer solar system regions become balmy during post-main sequence stellar evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, S Alan

    2003-01-01

    Like all low- and moderate-mass stars, the Sun will burn as a red giant during its later evolution, generating of solar luminosities for some tens of millions of years. During this post-main sequence phase, the habitable (i.e., liquid water) thermal zone of our Solar System will lie in the region where Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects orbit. Compared with the 1 AU habitable zone where Earth resides, this "delayed gratification habitable zone" (DGHZ) will enjoy a far less biologically hazardous environment - with lower harmful radiation levels from the Sun, and a far less destructive collisional environment. Objects like Triton, Pluto-Charon, and Kuiper Belt objects, which are known to be rich in both water and organics, will then become possible sites for biochemical and perhaps even biological evolution. The Kuiper Belt, with >10(5) objects > or =50 km in radius and more than three times the combined surface area of the four terrestrial planets, provides numerous sites for possible evolution once the Sun's DGHZ reaches it. The Sun's DGHZ might be thought to only be of academic interest owing to its great separation from us in time. However, approximately 10(9) Milky Way stars burn as luminous red giants today. Thus, if icy-organic objects are common in the 20-50 AU zones of these stars, as they are in our Solar System (and as inferred in numerous main sequence stellar disk systems), then DGHZs may form a niche type of habitable zone that is likely to be numerically common in the Galaxy.

  8. Dynamical Evolution of Short Period Planets in the Multiple Systems during the Host-Stars Contraction to the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, M.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2005-05-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of short-period extrasolar planets orbiting young host stars with other eccentric planets. During the fast stages of planet formation, the host-stars are in pre-main sequence stage and are surrounded by protoplanetary disks. As the host-stars evolve onto to the main sequence, the disks are depleted and the stellar radii and the speed of rotation change. All these effects influence the evolution of the orbits of short-period planets. In addition, when the short period planets whose period is less than 6 days have large eccentricities, the tidal dissipation of energy during the circularization would induce interior heating, inflation, Roche lobe overflow, and ultimately mass losses. We study the necessary conditions for the survival of hot Jupiters including the potential of the evolving disk, the potential due to the flattening of the star produced by the increasing stellar rotation, and the post-Newtonian potential of the host star. We find that the short-period planets orbiting around young stellar objects whose spin periods are longer than a few days may be highly vulnerable to the dissipation of the disk and evolution of the stars. Based on these results, we suggest that fast rotators have more short-period planets in multiple systems than slow rotating stars. This work was partly performed while MN held a JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad (Heisei 14). This work is supported in part by NASA through grant NAG5-11779 to D. N. C. Lin.

  9. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  10. Testing deep reticulate evolution in Amaryllidaceae Tribe Hippeastreae (Asparagales) with ITS and chloroplast sequence data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogeny of Amaryllidaceae tribe Hippeastreae was inferred using chloroplast (3’ycf1, ndhF, trnL-F) and nuclear (ITS rDNA) sequence data under maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood frameworks. Network analyses were applied to resolve conflicting signals among data sets and putative scenarios...

  11. Genome sequence of cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum TM-1) provides insights into genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and genomic analyses of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) are difficult because it has a complex allotetraploid (AADD; 2n = 4x = 52) genome. Here we sequenced, assembled and analyzed the world's most important cultivated cotton genome with 246.2 gigabase (Gb) clean data obtained using whol...

  12. The channel catfish genome sequence provides insights into the evolution of scale formation in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanjiang; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Yun; Jiang, Chen; Sun, Luyang; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tao; Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Gao, Sen; Li, Ning; Koren, Sergey; Jiang, Yanliang; Zimin, Aleksey; Xu, Peng; Phillippy, Adam M.; Geng, Xin; Song, Lin; Sun, Fanyue; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Chen, Ailu; Jin, Yulin; Yuan, Zihao; Yang, Yujia; Tan, Suxu; Peatman, Eric; Lu, Jianguo; Qin, Zhenkui; Dunham, Rex; Li, Zhaoxia; Sonstegard, Tad; Feng, Jianbin; Danzmann, Roy G.; Schroeder, Steven; Scheffler, Brian; Duke, Mary V.; Ballard, Linda; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Liu, Haixia; Armbruster, Jonathan; Xie, Yangjie; Kirby, Mona L.; Tian, Yi; Flanagan, Mary Elizabeth; Mu, Weijie; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Catfish represent 12% of teleost or 6.3% of all vertebrate species, and are of enormous economic value. Here we report a high-quality reference genome sequence of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), the major aquaculture species in the US. The reference genome sequence was validated by genetic mapping of 54,000 SNPs, and annotated with 26,661 predicted protein-coding genes. Through comparative analysis of genomes and transcriptomes of scaled and scaleless fish and scale regeneration experiments, we address the genomic basis for the most striking physical characteristic of catfish, the evolutionary loss of scales and provide evidence that lack of secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins accounts for the evolutionary loss of scales in catfish. The channel catfish reference genome sequence, along with two additional genome sequences and transcriptomes of scaled catfishes, provide crucial resources for evolutionary and biological studies. This work also demonstrates the power of comparative subtraction of candidate genes for traits of structural significance. PMID:27249958

  13. Rethinking the Undergraduate Public Relations Sequence: Evolution of Thought 1975-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Rick

    Public relations sequence heads have the luxury of a strong and supportive foundation on which to build a program of instruction. The field has a rich collection of thinking and recommendations relating to public relations education. The Association for Education in Journalism (AEJ) and the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) conducted a…

  14. Identifying Learning Behaviors by Contextualizing Differential Sequence Mining with Action Features and Performance Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnebrew, John S.; Biswas, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Our learning-by-teaching environment, Betty's Brain, captures a wealth of data on students' learning interactions as they teach a virtual agent. This paper extends an exploratory data mining methodology for assessing and comparing students' learning behaviors from these interaction traces. The core algorithm employs sequence mining techniques to…

  15. Genome Comparisons Reveal a Dominant Mechanism of Chromosome Number Reduction in Grasses and Accelerated Genome Evolution in Triticeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphism was employed in the construction of a high-resolution, expressed sequence tag (EST) map of Aegilops tauschii, the diploid source of the wheat D genome. Comparison of the map with the rice and sorghum genome sequences revealed 50 inversions and translocations; 2, 8, and...

  16. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  17. Genome-wide analysis reveals diverged patterns of codon bias, gene expression, and rates of sequence evolution in picea gene families.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2015-03-05

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms.

  18. Accelerating Gene Discovery by Phenotyping Whole-Genome Sequenced Multi-mutation Strains and Using the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT)

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Stephanie J.; Mohan, Swetha; Flibotte, Stephane; Muncaster, Quintin; Cai, Jerry; Rademakers, Suzanne; Moerman, Donald G.; Leroux, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetic screens represent powerful, unbiased approaches to uncover novel components in any biological process. Such screens suffer from a major bottleneck, however, namely the cloning of corresponding genes causing the phenotypic variation. Reverse genetic screens have been employed as a way to circumvent this issue, but can often be limited in scope. Here we demonstrate an innovative approach to gene discovery. Using C. elegans as a model system, we used a whole-genome sequenced multi-mutation library, from the Million Mutation Project, together with the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT), to rapidly screen for and identify genes associated with a phenotype of interest, namely defects in dye-filling of ciliated sensory neurons. Such anomalies in dye-filling are often associated with the disruption of cilia, organelles which in humans are implicated in sensory physiology (including vision, smell and hearing), development and disease. Beyond identifying several well characterised dye-filling genes, our approach uncovered three genes not previously linked to ciliated sensory neuron development or function. From these putative novel dye-filling genes, we confirmed the involvement of BGNT-1.1 in ciliated sensory neuron function and morphogenesis. BGNT-1.1 functions at the trans-Golgi network of sheath cells (glia) to influence dye-filling and cilium length, in a cell non-autonomous manner. Notably, BGNT-1.1 is the orthologue of human B3GNT1/B4GAT1, a glycosyltransferase associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS). WWS is a multigenic disorder characterised by muscular dystrophy as well as brain and eye anomalies. Together, our work unveils an effective and innovative approach to gene discovery, and provides the first evidence that B3GNT1-associated Walker-Warburg syndrome may be considered a ciliopathy. PMID:27508411

  19. The Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Banerjee, Rahul; Varshochi, Hilda; Khan, Manoranjan; Lawrie, Andrew; Variable g RT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    From detailed numerical simulations of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories, we report on several findings of relevance to the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules. The incompressible, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) were performed in two- and three-dimensions, and over a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We have investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles g(t) of the general form tn, with n > -2. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations are compared with a potential flow model developed and reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with an extension to the drag buoyancy model with modifications for time-dependent acceleration histories. We have come up with simple analytic solutions to the Drag Buoyancy model for variable g flows, and compared the solution with the 2D and 3D DNS results. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  20. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  1. Evolution of foot-and-mouth disease virus intra-sample sequence diversity during serial transmission in bovine hosts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    RNA virus populations within samples are highly heterogeneous, containing a large number of minority sequence variants which can potentially be transmitted to other susceptible hosts. Consequently, consensus genome sequences provide an incomplete picture of the within- and between-host viral evolutionary dynamics during transmission. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an RNA virus that can spread from primary sites of replication, via the systemic circulation, to found distinct sites of local infection at epithelial surfaces. Viral evolution in these different tissues occurs independently, each of them potentially providing a source of virus to seed subsequent transmission events. This study employed the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to sequence 18 FMDV samples collected from a chain of sequentially infected cattle. These data generated snap-shots of the evolving viral population structures within different animals and tissues. Analyses of the mutation spectra revealed polymorphisms at frequencies >0.5% at between 21 and 146 sites across the genome for these samples, while 13 sites acquired mutations in excess of consensus frequency (50%). Analysis of polymorphism frequency revealed that a number of minority variants were transmitted during host-to-host infection events, while the size of the intra-host founder populations appeared to be smaller. These data indicate that viral population complexity is influenced by small intra-host bottlenecks and relatively large inter-host bottlenecks. The dynamics of minority variants are consistent with the actions of genetic drift rather than strong selection. These results provide novel insights into the evolution of FMDV that can be applied to reconstruct both intra- and inter-host transmission routes. PMID:23452550

  2. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, P.; Karkhanis, V.; Banerjee, R.; Varshochi, H.; Khan, M.; Lawrie, A. G. W.

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g (t ) ˜tn , with n ≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g (t ) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s2, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids—at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s2 and Z , while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models.

  3. The cone visual pigments of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii): sequence, spectral tuning, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Samir S; Wakefield, Matthew J; Tada, Takashi; Marotte, Lauren; Yokoyama, Shozo; Marshall Graves, Jenny A

    2003-10-01

    Studies on marsupial color vision have been limited to very few species. There is evidence from behavioral, electroretinographic (ERG), and microspectrophotometric (MSP) measurements for the existence of both dichromatic and trichromatic color vision. No studies have yet investigated the molecular mechanisms of spectral tuning in the visual pigments of marsupials. Our study is the first to determine the mRNA sequence, infer the amino acid sequence, and determine, by in vitro expression, the spectra of the cone opsins of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). This yielded some information on mechanisms and evolution of spectral tuning of these pigments. The tammar wallaby retina contains only short-wavelength sensitive (SWS) and middle-wavelength sensitive (MWS) pigment mRNAs. This predicts dichromatic color vision, which is consistent with conclusions from previous behavioral studies ( Hemmi 1999). We found that the wallaby has a SWS1 class pigment of 346 amino acids. Sequence comparison with eutherian SWS pigments predicts that this SWS1 pigment absorbs maximally (lambdamax) at 424 nm and, therefore, is a blue rather than a UV pigment. This (lambdamax) is close to that of the in vitro-expressed wallaby SWS pigment (lambdamax of 420 +/- 2 nm) and to that determined behaviorally (420 nm). The difference from the mouse UV pigment (lambdamax of 359 nm) is largely accounted for by the F86Y substitution, in agreement with in vitro results comparing a variety of other SWS pigments. This suggests that spectral tuning employing F86Y substitution most likely arose independently in the marsupials and ungulates as a result of convergent evolution. An apparently different mechanism of spectral tuning of the SWS1 pigments, involving five amino acid positions, evolved in primates. The wallaby MWS pigment has 363 amino acids. Species comparisons at positions critical to spectral tuning predict a lambdamax near 530 nm, which is close to that of the in vitro

  4. 5-color multiplexed microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence: detection and analysis of multiple DNA sequences from within one sample well within a few seconds.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-11-01

    We present a potentially highly sensitive and selective bio-assay for the potential detection of any five different DNA sequences from one sample in one well. The assay is based on a DNA "rapid catch and signal" (DNA-RCS) technology developed for the detection of different DNA sequences from a sample well area. Our signal amplification utilizes the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of dyes attached to the probe-DNAs, which hybridizes with the pre-formed mixture of anchor-DNA scaffolds on silver island films (SiFs). Low-power microwave irradiation accelerates both the formation of the anchor-DNA scaffold on the SiF-surface and anchor/probe DNA hybridization, i.e. "rapid catch" of target DNAs from a bulk solution, decreasing the assay run time from hours to only a few seconds. Localization of signaling dye-labels close to the SiFs make them extremely photostable, which allows for collecting/integrating the signal over a long time period. To demonstrate a 5 color DNA assay (5-plex) we have used a range of readily available Alexa™ dyes. Advantages and perspectives of the RCS-technologies ability to detect 5 different DNA sequences from within one plate-well are discussed.

  5. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-02-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift-mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicum chinense and Capsicum frutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili.

  6. Evolution of the ISM in main-sequence versus starburst galaxies: A motivation for molecular deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, Manuel

    In the last decade, significant progress has been made to understand the evolution with redshift of star formation processes in galaxies. Its is now clear that the majority of galaxies at z<3 form a nearly linear correlation between their stellar mass and star formation rates and appear to create most of their stars in timescales of ~1 Gyr. At the highest luminosities, a significant fraction of galaxies deviate from this main-sequence, showing short duty cycles and thus producing most of their stars in a single burst of star formation within ~100 Myr, being likely driven by major merger activity. Despite the large luminosities of starbursts, main-sequence galaxies appear to dominate the star formation density of the Universe at its peak. While progress has been impressive, a number of questions are still unanswered. In this paper, I briefly review our current observational understanding of this main-sequence vs starburst galaxy paradigm, and address how future observations will help us to have better insights into the fundamental properties of the interstellar medium of these galaxies. Finally, I show recent attempts to conduct molecular deep field observations and the motivation to perform molecular deep field spectroscopy with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

  7. Co-evolution of tRNA 3′ trailer sequences with 3′ processing enzymes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHONGWEI; GONG, XIN; JOSHI, VEDANG H.; LI, MUXIN

    2005-01-01

    Maturation of the tRNA 3′ terminus is a complicated process in bacteria. Usually, it is initiated by an endonucleolytic cleavage carried out by RNase E and Z in different bacteria. In Escherichia coli, RNase E cleaves AU-rich sequences downstream of tRNA, producing processing intermediates with a few extra residues at the 3′ end; these are then removed by exoribonuclease trimming to generate the mature 3′ end. Here we show that essentially all E. coli tRNA precursors contain a potential RNase E cleavage site, the AU-rich sequence element (AUE), in the 3′ trailer. This suggests that RNase E cleavage and exonucleolytic trimming is a general pathway for tRNA maturation in this organism. Remarkably, the AUE immediately downstream of each tRNA is selectively conserved in bacteria having RNase E and tRNA-specific exoribonucleases, suggesting that this pathway for tRNA processing is also commonly used in these bacteria. Two types of RNase E-like proteins are identified in actinobacteria and the α-subdivision of proteobacteria. The tRNA 3′ proximal AUE is conserved in bacteria with only one type of E-like protein. Selective conservation of the AUE is usually not observed in bacteria without RNase E. These results demonstrate a novel example of co-evolution of RNA sequences with processing activities. PMID:15811923

  8. Sequence Evolution of the Drosophila Heat Shock Locus Hsrω. I. the Nonrepeated Portion of the Gene

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, J. C.; Bendena, W. G.; Pardue, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The locus which we now call hsrω was originally identified as a large heat shock puff in polytene region 93D of Drosophila melanogaster. This puff was subsequently found to have several phenotypic characteristics that distinguished it from other heat shock puffs. These characteristics include induction by a number of agents that do not induce other puffs and the presence of large ribonucleotide particles that are not found elsewhere. Each Drosophila species has one heat shock puff with these phenotypes. In contrast to the strong sequence conservation seen in puffs coding for heat shock proteins, very little cross-hybridization is detected between hsrω loci in different species, suggesting that the hsrω loci are diverging rapidly. Comparative analyses of the hsrω locus from D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. hydei show that, despite the sequence change, the structure of the locus and its transcripts has been conserved, along with a number of short regions of the sequence. The short regions of conservation offer some clues to the function of this unusual locus. In addition, these comparisons offer a view of the evolution of a gene whose primary function does not appear to be protein coding. PMID:2475389

  9. Insights into the evolution of mitochondrial genome size from complete sequences of Citrullus lanatus and Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Alverson, Andrew J; Wei, XiaoXin; Rice, Danny W; Stern, David B; Barry, Kerrie; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2010-06-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of seed plants are unusually large and vary in size by at least an order of magnitude. Much of this variation occurs within a single family, the Cucurbitaceae, whose genomes range from an estimated 390 to 2,900 kb in size. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Citrullus lanatus (watermelon: 379,236 nt) and Cucurbita pepo (zucchini: 982,833 nt)--the two smallest characterized cucurbit mitochondrial genomes--and determined their RNA editing content. The relatively compact Citrullus mitochondrial genome actually contains more and longer genes and introns, longer segmental duplications, and more discernibly nuclear-derived DNA. The large size of the Cucurbita mitochondrial genome reflects the accumulation of unprecedented amounts of both chloroplast sequences (>113 kb) and short repeated sequences (>370 kb). A low mutation rate has been hypothesized to underlie increases in both genome size and RNA editing frequency in plant mitochondria. However, despite its much larger genome, Cucurbita has a significantly higher synonymous substitution rate (and presumably mutation rate) than Citrullus but comparable levels of RNA editing. The evolution of mutation rate, genome size, and RNA editing are apparently decoupled in Cucurbitaceae, reflecting either simple stochastic variation or governance by different factors.

  10. Sequence and evolution of the blue cone pigment gene in old and new world primates

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.M.; Cowing, J.A.; Patel, R.

    1995-06-10

    The sequences of the blue cone photopigments in the talapoin monkey (Miopithecus talapoin), an Old World primate, and in the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a New World monkey, are presented. Both genes are composed of 5 exons separated by 4 introns. In this respect, they are identical to the human blue gene, and intron sizes are also similar. Based on the level of amino acid identity, both monkey pigments are members of the S branch of pigments. Alignment of these sequences with the human gene requires the insertion/deletion of two separate codons in exon 1. The silent site divergence between these primate blue genes indicates a separation of the Old and New World primate lineages around 43 million years ago. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Timing of human protein evolution as revealed by massively parallel capture of Neandertal nuclear DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Hodges, Emily; Green, Richard E.; Briggs, Adrian W.; Krause, Johannes; Meyer, Matthias; Good, Jeffrey M.; Maricic, Tomislav; Johnson, Philipp L.F.; Xuan, Zhenyu; Rooks, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Brizuela, Leonardo; Albert, Frank W.; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Lachmann, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequencing is now possible for extinct organisms, as well as the targeted capture of specific regions. However, targeted resequencing of megabase sized parts of nuclear genomes has yet to be demonstrated for ancient DNA. Here we show that hybridization capture on microarrays can be used to generate large scale targeted data from Neandertal DNA even in the presence of ~99.8% microbial DNA. It is thus now possible to generate high quality data from large regions of the nuclear genome from Neandertals and other extinct organisms. Using this approach we have sequenced ~14,000 protein coding positions that have been inferred to have changed on the human lineage since the last common ancestor shared with chimpanzees. We identify 88 amino acid substitutions that have become fixed in all humans since the divergence from the Neandertals. PMID:20448179

  12. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Park, Minkyu; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Yong-Min; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eunyoung; Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Kyongyong; Lee, Gir-Won; Oh, Sang-Keun; Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Shin-Young; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Yang, Hee-Bum; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Won-Hee; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Shin, Chanseok; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, June Hyun; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Byung-Dong; Cohen, Oded; Paran, Ilan; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Saet Buyl; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Shin, Younhee; Noh, Seung-Jae; Park, Junhyung; Seo, Young Sam; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyun A; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Sang-Bong; Bosland, Paul W; Reeves, Gregory; Jo, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Bong-Woo; Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Choi, Hee-Seung; Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Yeisoo; Do Choi, Yang; Park, Beom-Seok; van Deynze, Allen; Ashrafi, Hamid; Hill, Theresa; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Yeam, Inhwa; Giovannoni, James J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Sørensen, Iben; Lee, Sang-Jik; Kim, Ryan W; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Beom-Soon; Lim, Jong-Sung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-03-01

    Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the Americas, is the most widely grown spice crop in the world. We report whole-genome sequencing and assembly of the hot pepper (Mexican landrace of Capsicum annuum cv. CM334) at 186.6× coverage. We also report resequencing of two cultivated peppers and de novo sequencing of the wild species Capsicum chinense. The genome size of the hot pepper was approximately fourfold larger than that of its close relative tomato, and the genome showed an accumulation of Gypsy and Caulimoviridae family elements. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses suggested that change in gene expression and neofunctionalization of capsaicin synthase have shaped capsaicinoid biosynthesis. We found differential molecular patterns of ripening regulators and ethylene synthesis in hot pepper and tomato. The reference genome will serve as a platform for improving the nutritional and medicinal values of Capsicum species.

  13. Latest Proterozoic to early Cambrian sedimentary-tectonic evolution of a passive margin sequence, northeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, K.A.; Gaylord, D.R.

    1987-08-01

    The late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian Three Sisters formation, Addy Quartzite, and Gypsy Quartzite lie near the base of the Cordilleran miogeocline in northeastern Washington. Detailed stratigraphic and sedimentary examination of these units extends understanding of the evolution of western North America. These units were deposited on a newly rifted passive margin and record the final stages of late Proterozoic rifting and the early stages of subsequent early Paleozoic subsidence and transgression. The three Sisters formation, Addy Quartzite, and Gypsy Quartzite are correlative with the Brigham Group in southeastern Idaho and Utah, the Gold Creek Quartzite in northern Idaho, and the Flathead Quartzite in Montana and Wyoming.

  14. Sequence co-evolution gives 3D contacts and structures of protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A; Schärfe, Charlotta P I; Rodrigues, João P G L M; Green, Anna G; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Sander, Chris; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Marks, Debora S

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are fundamental to many biological processes. Experimental screens have identified tens of thousands of interactions, and structural biology has provided detailed functional insight for select 3D protein complexes. An alternative rich source of information about protein interactions is the evolutionary sequence record. Building on earlier work, we show that analysis of correlated evolutionary sequence changes across proteins identifies residues that are close in space with sufficient accuracy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein complexes. We evaluate prediction performance in blinded tests on 76 complexes of known 3D structure, predict protein–protein contacts in 32 complexes of unknown structure, and demonstrate how evolutionary couplings can be used to distinguish between interacting and non-interacting protein pairs in a large complex. With the current growth of sequences, we expect that the method can be generalized to genome-wide elucidation of protein–protein interaction networks and used for interaction predictions at residue resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03430.001 PMID:25255213

  15. The impact of the neisserial DNA uptake sequences on genome evolution and stability

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J; Ambur, Ole Herman; Tonjum, Tone; Rocha, Eduardo PC

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient natural transformation in Neisseria requires the presence of short DNA uptake sequences (DUSs). Doubts remain whether DUSs propagate by pure selfish molecular drive or are selected for 'safe sex' among conspecifics. Results Six neisserial genomes were aligned to identify gene conversion fragments, DUS distribution, spacing, and conservation. We found a strong link between recombination and DUS: DUS spacing matches the size of conversion fragments; genomes with shorter conversion fragments have more DUSs and more conserved DUSs; and conversion fragments are enriched in DUSs. Many recent and singly occurring DUSs exhibit too high divergence with homologous sequences in other genomes to have arisen by point mutation, suggesting their appearance by recombination. DUSs are over-represented in the core genome, under-represented in regions under diversification, and absent in both recently acquired genes and recently lost core genes. This suggests that DUSs are implicated in genome stability rather than in generating adaptive variation. DUS elements are most frequent in the permissive locations of the core genome but are themselves highly conserved, undergoing mutation selection balance and/or molecular drive. Similar preliminary results were found for the functionally analogous uptake signal sequence in Pasteurellaceae. Conclusion As do many other pathogens, Neisseria and Pasteurellaceae have hyperdynamic genomes that generate deleterious mutations by intrachromosomal recombination and by transient hypermutation. The results presented here suggest that transformation in Neisseria and Pasteurellaceae allows them to counteract the deleterious effects of genome instability in the core genome. Thus, rather than promoting hypervariation, bacterial sex could be regenerative. PMID:18366792

  16. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination.

    PubMed

    Ammayappan, Arun; Upadhyay, Chitra; Gelb, Jack; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2008-12-22

    An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI) virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A) tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR), 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro) and the polymerase (RdRp) sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  17. Evolution of viruses by acquisition of cellular RNA or DNA nucleotide sequences and genes: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    2000-01-01

    The origins of virus evolution may be traced to Archeabacteria since Inouye and Inouye (6) discovered a retroelement with a gene for reverse transcriptase in the bacterial genome and in the satellite, multiple copy single stranded DNA (msDNA) in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. It was possible (8) to define the evolution of retroelements in eukaryotic cells of plants, insects (gypsy retrovirus) and vertebrates. The replication of RNA viruses in eukaryotic cells allowed for the viral RNA genome to integrate a cellular ubiquitin mRNA, as reported for BVDV (24). Another example is the integration of 28S ribosomal RNA into the hemagglutinin gene of an influenza virus. This change in the hemagglutinin gene led to an increased pathogenicity of the influenza virus (25). In contrast to RNA viruses, DNA viruses had evolved by inserting cDNA molecules derived from mRNA transcripts of cellular genes or foreign viral RNA. It is of interest that the virus acquired cellular genes in the genomes of DNA viruses represent genes that code for proteins that inhibit cellular molecular processes related to HLA class I and II molecules. The other acquired genes are cellular genes that code for cytokines that are capable of inhibiting antigen presentation to T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) by dendritic Langerhans cells. The acquisition of cellular genes by DNA viruses enhances their pathogenicity by inhibiting the hosts' defense systems.

  18. Evolution of Mhc Class i Complex Region with Special Reference to Fragmentary Line Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yoshio; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-03-01

    We reviewed the origin and evolution of the two pairs of immune genes, (MHC-B and MHC-C) and (MICA and MICB) in man, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey based mainly on our previous work. Since those genes were well known to have been subject to strong natural selection in evolution, they themselves were not suitable for our study. We thus took another approach to use fragmented and nonfunctional LINEs that had coevolved with the two pairs in the same genomic fragments. Our results showed that MHC-B and MHC-C duplicated about 22 Mry (million years) ago, and MICA and MICB duplicated about 14 Myr ago. Interestingly, rhesus monkey was found not to have either pair but many repeats similar to MHC-B. Therefore, we estimated the divergence time of the monkey, and found that it diverged out from a common ancestor of man and chimpanzee about 30 Myr ago. The divergence time was consistent with the duplication times of the two pairs of immune genes. Based on our results we would predict that orangutan and gorilla also have the two pairs, because the both primate species are considered to have diverged less than 14 Myr ago.

  19. Recognition of two classes of oligoproline sequences in profilin- mediated acceleration of actin-based Shigella motility

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The gram negative rod Shigella flexneri uses it surface protein IcsA to induce host cell actin assembly and to achieve intracellular motility. Yet, the IcsA protein lacks the oligoproline sequences found in ActA, the surface protein required for locomotion of the gram positive rod Listeria monocytogenes. Microinjection of a peptide matching the second ActA oligoproline repeat (FEFPPPPTDE) stops Listeria locomotion (Southwick, F.S., and D.L. Purich. 1994a. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:5168-5172), and submicromolar concentrations (intracellular concentration 80-800 nM) similarly arrest Shigella rocket-tail assembly and intracellular motility. Coinjection of a binary solution containing profilin and the ActA analogue increased the observed rates of intracellular motility by a factor of three (mean velocity 0.90 +/- 0.07 mu m/s, SD n=16 before injection vs 0.3 +/- 0.1 mu m/s, n=33 postinjection, intracellular concentration = 80 nM profilin plus 80 nM ActA analogue). Recent evidence suggests the ActA analogue may act by displacing the profilin-binding protein VASP (Pistor, S.C., T. Chakaborty, V. Walter, and J. Wehland. 1995. Curr. Biol. 5:517-525). At considerably higher intracellular concentrations (10 muM), the VASP oligoproline sequence (GPPPPP)3 thought to represent the profilin- binding site (Reinhard, M., K. Giehl, K. Abel, C. Haffner, T. Jarchau, V. Hoppe, B.M. Jockusch, and U. Walter. 1995. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 14:1583-1589) also inhibited Shigella movement. A binary mixture of the VASP analogue and profilin (each 10 muM intracellular concentration) led to a doubling of Shigella intracellular migration velocity (0.09 +/- 0.06 mu m/s, n = 25 preinjection vs 0.18 +/- 0.10 mu m/s, n = 61 postinjection). Thus, the two structurally divergent bacteria, Listeria and Shigella, have adopted convergent mechanisms involving profilin recognition of VASP oligoproline sequences and VASP recognition of oligoproline sequences in ActA or an ActA-like host protein

  20. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  1. Genome Evolution and Meiotic Maps by Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing: Spotted Gar, an Outgroup for the Teleost Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Ferrara, Allyse; Fontenot, Quenton; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic resources for hundreds of species of evolutionary, agricultural, economic, and medical importance are unavailable due to the expense of well-assembled genome sequences and difficulties with multigenerational studies. Teleost fish provide many models for human disease but possess anciently duplicated genomes that sometimes obfuscate connectivity. Genomic information representing a fish lineage that diverged before the teleost genome duplication (TGD) would provide an outgroup for exploring the mechanisms of evolution after whole-genome duplication. We exploited massively parallel DNA sequencing to develop meiotic maps with thrift and speed by genotyping F1 offspring of a single female and a single male spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) collected directly from nature utilizing only polymorphisms existing in these two wild individuals. Using Stacks, software that automates the calling of genotypes from polymorphisms assayed by Illumina sequencing, we constructed a map containing 8406 markers. RNA-seq on two map-cross larvae provided a reference transcriptome that identified nearly 1000 mapped protein-coding markers and allowed genome-wide analysis of conserved synteny. Results showed that the gar lineage diverged from teleosts before the TGD and its genome is organized more similarly to that of humans than teleosts. Thus, spotted gar provides a critical link between medical models in teleost fish, to which gar is biologically similar, and humans, to which gar is genomically similar. Application of our F1 dense mapping strategy to species with no prior genome information promises to facilitate comparative genomics and provide a scaffold for ordering the numerous contigs arising from next generation genome sequencing. PMID:21828280

  2. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization.

  3. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found. PMID:26372604

  4. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Scacchetti, Priscilla Cardim; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found.

  5. Wavelet Analysis of DNA Bending Profiles reveals Structural Constraints on the Evolution of Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cédric; Arnéodo, Alain; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2004-03-01

    Analyses of genomic DNA sequences have shown in previous works that base pairs are correlated at large distances with scale-invariant statistical properties. We show in the present study that these correlations between nucleotides (letters) result in fact from long-range correlations (LRC) between sequence-dependent DNA structural elements (words) involved in the packaging of DNA in chromatin. Using the wavelet transform technique, we perform a comparative analysis of the DNA text and of the corresponding bending profiles generated with curvature tables based on nucleosome positioning data. This exploration through the optics of the so-called `wavelet transform microscope' reveals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two regimes of different LRC. We focus here on the existence of LRC in the small-scale regime (≲ 200 bp). Analysis of genomes in the three kingdoms reveals that this regime is specifically associated to the presence of nucleosomes. Indeed, small scale LRC are observed in eukaryotic genomes and to a less extent in archaeal genomes, in contrast with their absence in eubacterial genomes. Similarly, this regime is observed in eukaryotic but not in bacterial viral DNA genomes. There is one exception for genomes of Poxviruses, the only animal DNA viruses that do not replicate in the cell nucleus and do not present small scale LRC. Furthermore, no small scale LRC are detected in the genomes of all examined RNA viruses, with one exception in the case of retroviruses. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that small-scale LRC are a signature of the nucleosomal structure. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of these small-scale LRC in terms of the mechanisms that govern the positioning, the stability and the dynamics of the nucleosomes along the DNA chain. This paper is maily devoted to a pedagogical presentation of the theoretical concepts and physical methods which are well suited to perform a statistical analysis of genomic

  6. Phylogenetic analyses of termite post-embryonic sequences illuminate caste and developmental pathway evolution.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Frédéric; Whiting, Michael F; Grandcolas, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Termites are highly eusocial insects with a caste polyphenism (i.e., discontinuous morphological differences between castes) and elaborated behaviors. While the developmental pathways leading to caste occurrence are well-known in many species, the evolutionary origin of these pathways is still obscure. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggest multiple independent origins of sterile castes in termites, reviving a 30 years old debate. We demonstrate here that diploid sterile castes ("true" workers) evolved several times independently in this group and that this caste was lost at least once in a lineage with developmentally more flexible workers called pseudergates or "false" workers. We also infer that flexibility in post-embryonic development was acquired multiple times independently during termite evolution. We suggest that focusing on detailed developmental pathways in phylogenetic analyses is essential for elucidating the origin of caste polyphenism in termites.

  7. Hippos stem from the longest sequence of terrestrial cetartiodactyl evolution in Africa.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Fabrice; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo; Ducrocq, Stéphane

    2015-02-24

    According to molecular data, hippopotamuses and cetaceans form a clade excluding other extant cetartiodactyls. Despite a wealth of spectacular specimens documenting cetacean evolution, this relationship remains poorly substantiated by the fossil record. Indeed, the evolutionary path leading from the hippo-cetacean ancestor to Hippopotamidae is plagued by missing fossil data and phylogenetic uncertainties. Only an origination within the extinct anthracotheres is compatible with molecular results, substantial filling of phyletic gaps and recent discoveries of early Miocene hippopotamids. Yet, the anthracothere stock that gave rise to Hippopotamidae has not been identified. Consequently, recent phylogenetic accounts do not properly integrate the anthracotheriid hypothesis, and relate Hippopotamidae to a stretched ghost lineage and/or close to Suina. Here we describe a new anthracothere from Lokone (Kenya) that unambiguously roots the Hippopotamidae into a well-identified group of bothriodontines, the first large mammals to invade Africa. The hippos are deeply anchored into the African Paleogene.

  8. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation.

  9. Evolution of satellite DNA sequences in two tribes of Bovidae: A cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Nieddu, Mariella; Mezzanotte, Roberto; Pichiri, Giuseppina; Coni, Pier Paolo; Dedola, Gian Luca; Dettori, Maria Luisa; Pazzola, Michele; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo; Robledo, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two clones, Bt1 from Bos taurus and Om1 from Ovis orientalis musimon, were used as probes for hybridization on genomic DNA and on metaphase chromosomes in members of Bovini and Caprini tribes. Bt1 and Om1 are sequences respectively belonging to the 1.715 and 1.714 DNA satellite I families. Southern blots and fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments showed completely coherent results: the Bovini probe Bt1 hybridized only to members of the Bovini tribe and not to members of Caprini. Likewise, the Caprini probe Om1 hybridized only to members of the Caprini tribe and not to members of Bovini. Hybridization signals were detected in the heterochromatic regions of every acrocentric autosome, except for two pairs of autosomes from Capra hircus that did not show hybridization to probe Om1. No signal was detected on X and Y chromosomes or on bi-armed autosomes. Remarkably, probe Om1 showed almost 100% homology with a bacterial sequence reported in Helicobacter pylori. PMID:26692159

  10. Revisiting the pre-main-sequence evolution of stars. I. Importance of accretion efficiency and deuterium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitomo, Masanobu; Guillot, Tristan; Takeuchi, Taku; Ida, Shigeru

    2017-02-01

    Context. Protostars grow from the first formation of a small seed and subsequent accretion of material. Recent theoretical work has shown that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolution of stars is much more complex than previously envisioned. Instead of the traditional steady, one-dimensional solution, accretion may be episodic and not necessarily symmetrical, thereby affecting the energy deposited inside the star and its interior structure. Aims: Given this new framework, we want to understand what controls the evolution of accreting stars. Methods: We use the MESA stellar evolution code with various sets of conditions. In particular, we account for the (unknown) efficiency of accretion in burying gravitational energy into the protostar through a parameter, ξ, and we vary the amount of deuterium present. Results: We confirm the findings of previous works that, in terms of evolutionary tracks on an Hertzprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, the evolution changes significantly with the amount of energy that is lost during accretion. We find that deuterium burning also regulates the PMS evolution. In the low-entropy accretion scenario, the evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram are significantly different from the classical tracks and are sensitive to the deuterium content. A comparison of theoretical evolutionary tracks and observations allows us to exclude some cold accretion models (ξ 0) with low deuterium abundances. Conclusions: We confirm that the luminosity spread seen in clusters can be explained by models with a somewhat inefficient injection of accretion heat. The resulting evolutionary tracks then become sensitive to the accretion heat efficiency, initial core entropy, and deuterium content. In this context, we predict that clusters with a higher D/H ratio should have less scatter in luminosity than clusters with a smaller D/H. Future work on this issue should include radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to determine the efficiency of accretion heating and further

  11. Molecular evolution, adaptive radiation, and geographic diversification in the amphiatlantic family Rapateaceae: evidence from ndhF sequences and morphology.

    PubMed

    Givnish, T J; Evans, T M; Zjhra, M L; Patterson, T B; Berry, P E; Sytsma, K J

    2000-12-01

    Rapateaceae (16 genera, approximately 100 species) is largely restricted to the tepuis and sandplains of the Guayana Shield in northern South America, with Maschalocephalus endemic to West Africa. The family has undergone extensive radiation in flower form, leaf shape, habit, and habitat. To analyze the evolution of these distributions and traits, we derived a molecular phylogeny for representatives of 14 genera, based on sequence variation in the chloroplast-encoded ndhF gene. The lowland subfamily Rapateoideae is paraphyletic and includes the largely montane subfamily Saxofridericioideae as a monophyletic subset. Overall, the morphological/anatomical data differ significantly from ndhF sequences in phylogenetic structure, but show a high degree of concordance with the molecular tree in three of four tribes. Branch lengths are consistent with the operation of a molecular clock. Maschalocephalus diverges only slightly from other Monotremae: it is the product of relatively recent, long-distance dispersal, not continental drift--only its habitat atop rifted, nutrient-poor sandstones is vicariant. The family appears to have originated approximately 65 Mya in inundated lowlands of the Guayana Shield, followed by: (1) wide geographic spread of lowland taxa along riverine corridors; (2) colonization of Amazonian white-sand savannas in the western Shield; (3) invasion of tepui habitats with frequent speciation, evolution of narrow endemism, and origin of hummingbird pollination in the western Shield; and (4) reinvasion of lowland white-sand savannas. The apparent timing of speciation in the Stegolepis alliance about 6-12 Mya occurred long after the tepuis began to be dissected from each other as the Atlantic rifted approximately 90 Mya. Given the narrow distributions of most montane taxa, this suggests that infrequent long-distance dispersal combined with vicariance accounts for speciation atop tepuis in the Stegolepis alliance.

  12. Molecular systematics and evolution of the "Apollo" butterflies of the genus Parnassius (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Keiichi; Katoh, Toru; Chichvarkhin, Anton; Yagi, Takashi

    2004-02-04

    Sequences of 777 bp of mtDNA-ND5 locus were determined in order to shed light on the molecular systematics and evolution of the "Apollo" butterflies. Examined were nearly all of about 50 species of the genus Parnassius, together with seven species of the allied genera in the subfamily Parnassiinae (Papilionidae). The NJ and the MP phylogenetic trees show that the "Apollos" constitute a monophyletic group, comprising a number of cluster groups probably reflecting a relatively rapid radiation in evolution. The clusters of species-groups denoted I-VIII correspond to those species-groups recognized on the basis of morphological characters. Our findings will also help understand the biological relationships among several species or subspecies on which the classical taxonomy is in dispute. The unexpected finding is that among the samples of allied genera compared, Hypermnestra helios appears to be the most closely related to the "Apollos", despite morphological and behavioral dissimilarity. Furthermore, in contrast to the previous higher taxonomy, Archon apollinus which is classified in the tribe Parnassiini was found genetically closer to the tribe Zerynthiini, raising a taxonomic controversy.

  13. Insights into the evolution of Darwin’s finches from comparative analysis of the Geospiza magnirostris genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A classical example of repeated speciation coupled with ecological diversification is the evolution of 14 closely related species of Darwin’s (Galápagos) finches (Thraupidae, Passeriformes). Their adaptive radiation in the Galápagos archipelago took place in the last 2–3 million years and some of the molecular mechanisms that led to their diversification are now being elucidated. Here we report evolutionary analyses of genome of the large ground finch, Geospiza magnirostris. Results 13,291 protein-coding genes were predicted from a 991.0 Mb G. magnirostris genome assembly. We then defined gene orthology relationships and constructed whole genome alignments between the G. magnirostris and other vertebrate genomes. We estimate that 15% of genomic sequence is functionally constrained between G. magnirostris and zebra finch. Genic evolutionary rate comparisons indicate that similar selective pressures acted along the G. magnirostris and zebra finch lineages suggesting that historical effective population size values have been similar in both lineages. 21 otherwise highly conserved genes were identified that each show evidence for positive selection on amino acid changes in the Darwin's finch lineage. Two of these genes (Igf2r and Pou1f1) have been implicated in beak morphology changes in Darwin’s finches. Five of 47 genes showing evidence of positive selection in early passerine evolution have cilia related functions, and may be examples of adaptively evolving reproductive proteins. Conclusions These results provide insights into past evolutionary processes that have shaped G. magnirostris genes and its genome, and provide the necessary foundation upon which to build population genomics resources that will shed light on more contemporaneous adaptive and non-adaptive processes that have contributed to the evolution of the Darwin’s finches. PMID:23402223

  14. Tectonic and sequence stratigraphic evolution of asymmetric extensional back-arc basins: seismic interpretations in the Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, Attila; Matenco, Liviu; Magyar, Imre; Horváth, Ferenc; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of the Pannonian Basin is generally thought to be driven by subduction roll-back associated with mantle flow dynamics. The Miocene back-arc extension resulted in the formation of dominantly half-grabens in the hanging wall of low-angle detachments and listric normal faults, associated with coeval large-scale exhumation of their footwalls. To quantify the evolution of these asymmetric extensional structures, a novel kinematic and seismic sequence stratigraphic interpretation was performed. Based on reflection terminations and characteristic seismic facies we separated systems tracts of the half-graben deposits that formed as a result of interplay between subsidence, sedimentation and water-level variations. Lower order systems tracts were defined by separating rift initiation, rift climax, immediate post-rift and late post-rift systems tracts, while a higher order transgressive-regressive cyclicity and associated unconformities were locally identified in the syn-tectonic basin fill. Connecting these observations demonstrates that extension migrated in time and space across the basin. Extension started during Early Miocene in the oldest sub-basins, while Middle Miocene rift climax is quite common in the entire study area. The youngest syn-tectonic strata were deposited during Late Miocene times in the eastern parts of the Pannonian Basin, for instance, in the Derecske, Makó and Szeged Troughs. The syn-rift/post-rift boundary cannot be interpreted as a discrete event in the entire basin system, because it is a progressive, process-related expression. The obtained results significantly improve the classic ideas of syn-rift/post-rift evolution of the Pannonian Basin.

  15. Phylogeny and evolution of the auks (subfamily Alcinae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moum, Truls; Johansen, Steinar; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Piatt, John F.

    1994-01-01

    The genetic divergence and phylogeny of the auks was assessed by mitochondrial DNA sequence comparisons in a study using 19 of the 22 auk species and two outgroup representatives. We compared more than 500 nucleotides from each of two mitochondrial genes encoding 12S rRNA and the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6. Divergence times were estimated from transversional substitutions. The dovekie (Alle alle) is related to the razorbill (Alca torda) and the murres (Uria spp). Furthermore, the Xantus's murrelet (Synthliboramphus hypoleucus) and the ancient (Synthliboramphus antiquus) and Japanese murrelets (Synthliboramphus wumizusume) are genetically distinct members of the same main lineage, whereas brachyramphine and synthliboramphine murrelets are not closely related. An early adaptive radiation of six main species groups of auks seems to trace back to Middle Miocene. Later speciation probably involved ecological differentiations and geographical isolations.

  16. Sequence stratigraphy as a scientific enterprise: the evolution and persistence of conflicting paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miall, Andrew D.; Miall, Charlene E.

    2001-08-01

    In the 1970s, seismic stratigraphy represented a new paradigm in geological thought. The development of new techniques for analyzing seismic-reflection data constituted a "crisis," as conceptualized by T.S. Kuhn, and stimulated a revolution in stratigraphy. We analyze here a specific subset of the new ideas, that pertaining to the concept of global-eustasy and the global cycle chart published by Vail et al. [Vail, P.R., Mitchum, R.M., Jr., Todd, R.G., Widmier, J.M., Thompson, S., III, Sangree, J.B., Bubb, J.N., Hatlelid, W.G., 1977. Seismic stratigraphy and global changes of sea-level. In: Payton, C.E. (Ed.), Seismic Stratigraphy—Applications to Hydrocarbon Exploration, Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol. Mem. 26, pp. 49-212.] The global-eustasy model posed two challenges to the "normal science" of stratigraphy then underway: (1) that sequence stratigraphy, as exemplified by the global cycle chart, constitutes a superior standard of geologic time to that assembled from conventional chronostratigraphic evidence, and (2) that stratigraphic processes are dominated by the effects of eustasy, to the exclusion of other allogenic mechanisms, including tectonism. While many stratigraphers now doubt the universal validity of the model of global-eustasy, what we term the global-eustasy paradigm, a group of sequence researchers led by Vail still adheres to it, and the two conceptual approaches have evolved into two conflicting paradigms. Those who assert that there are multiple processes generating stratigraphic sequences (possibly including eustatic processes) are adherents of what we term the complexity paradigm. Followers of this paradigm argue that tests of the global cycle chart amount to little more than circular reasoning. A new body of work documenting the European sequence record was published in 1998 by de Graciansky et al. These workers largely follow the global-eustasy paradigm. Citation and textual analysis of this work indicates that they have not responded to any of the

  17. Evolution of the rhodospirillaceae and mitochondria - A view based on sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Schwartz, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    New sequence data from several protein families and from 5S ribosomal RNA confirm and elaborate a previously proposed description of the phylogenetic connections between a variety of bacteria and the eukaryotes. Probably, the first organisms were nonphotosynthetic anaerobic prokaryotes, which were followed soon by photosynthetic anaerobes. From this photosynthetic stock, the aerobic line to Pseudomonadacae, Rhodospirillaceae, and blue-greens arose. The eukaryotes derived genetic material from the symbioses of at least three separate bacterial lines. Ancestors of Rhodopseudomonas globiformis gave rise to the eukaryote mitochondria, probably through at least three separate symbioses, one early on the flagellate line, one on the ciliate line, and one on the stem to the multicellular forms.

  18. Evolution of early life inferred from protein and ribonucleic acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Schwartz, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical structures of ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochrome sequences have been employed to construct a phylogenetic tree which connects all major photosynthesizing organisms: the three types of bacteria, blue-green algae, and chloroplasts. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, eukaryotic cytoplasmic components and mitochondria are also included in the phylogenetic tree. Anaerobic nonphotosynthesizing bacteria similar to Clostridium were the earliest organisms, arising more than 3.2 billion years ago. Bacterial photosynthesis evolved nearly 3.0 billion years ago, while oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, originating in the blue-green algal line, came into being about 2.0 billion years ago. The phylogenetic tree supports the symbiotic theory of the origin of eukaryotes.

  19. From sequence and forces to structure, function, and evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Forman-Kay, Julie D; Mittag, Tanja

    2013-09-03

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics, and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales, and compactness are shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. In the 20(th) anniversary of Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional, and evolutionary properties.

  20. From Sequence and Forces to Structure, Function and Evolution of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Mittag, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales and compactness is shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. On the 20th anniversary of this journal, Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional and evolutionary properties. PMID:24010708

  1. Insights into hominin phenotypic and dietary evolution from ancient DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H; Kistler, Logan; Kelaita, Mary A; Sams, Aaron J

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear genome sequence data from Neandertals, Denisovans, and archaic anatomically modern humans can be used to complement our understanding of hominin evolutionary biology and ecology through i) direct inference of archaic hominin phenotypes, ii) indirect inference of those phenotypes by identifying the effects of previously-introgressed alleles still present among modern humans, or iii) determining the evolutionary timing of relevant hominin-specific genetic changes. Here we review and reanalyze published Neandertal and Denisovan genome sequence data to illustrate an example of the third approach. Specifically, we infer the timing of five human gene presence/absence changes that may be related to particular hominin-specific dietary changes and discuss these results in the context of our broader reconstructions of hominin evolutionary ecology. We show that pseudogenizing (gene loss) mutations in the TAS2R62 and TAS2R64 bitter taste receptor genes and the MYH16 masticatory myosin gene occurred after the hominin-chimpanzee divergence but before the divergence of the human and Neandertal/Denisovan lineages. The absence of a functional MYH16 protein may explain our relatively reduced jaw muscles; this gene loss may have followed the adoption of cooking behavior. In contrast, salivary amylase gene (AMY1) duplications were not observed in the Neandertal and Denisovan genomes, suggesting a relatively recent origin for the AMY1 copy number gains that are observed in modern humans. Thus, if earlier hominins were consuming large quantities of starch-rich underground storage organs, as previously hypothesized, then they were likely doing so without the digestive benefits of increased salivary amylase production. Our most surprising result was the observation of a heterozygous mutation in the first codon of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor gene in the Neandertal individual, which likely would have resulted in a non-functional protein and inter-individual PTC

  2. Stratigraphic evolution of Mesozoic continental margin and oceanic sequences northwest Australia and north Himalayas

    SciTech Connect

    Gradstein, F.M. ); Von Rad, U. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors are investigating continental margin to ocean sequences of the incipient Indian Ocean as it replaced central Tethys. Objectives of this study are the dynamic relation between sedimentation, tectonics, and paleogeography. Principal basins formation along the northern edge of eastern Gondwana started in the Late Permian to the Triassic. By the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, platform carbonates with thin, organic-rich lagoonal shales were laid down in a subtropical climate. This unit, which harbors some of the oldest known nannofossils, shows repeated shallowing-upward sequences. Subsequent southward drift of the Gondwana margin during the Middle Jurassic increased siliciclastic input in Nepal, when widespread sediment starvation or erosion during local uplift took place off parts of northwest Australia. A middle Callovian-early Oxfordian hiatus in Nepal is submarine and appears global in extent. The overlying 250-m-thick organic-rich black shales, correlative to the Oxford/Kimmeridge clays of circum-Atlantic petroleum basins, may be traced along the northern Himalayan Range, and probably represent an extensive continental slope deposit formed under an oxygen minimum layer in southern Tethys. The deposit's diverse foraminiferal microfauna was previously only known from boreal Laurasia. The Callovian breakup unconformity, off northwest Australia, precedes onset of sea-floor spreading at least 15-25 Ma. Sea-floor spreading, leading to the present Indian Ocean started in the Argo Abyssal Plain around 140 Ma, at the end of the Jurassic, was about 15 m.y. later than previously postulated. Australia and Greater India separated as early as the Late Valanginian, about 130 Ma. Mafic volcaniclastics in Nepalese deltaic sediments probably testify to concurrent continental margin volcanic activity, which may be a precursor to the slightly younger Rajmahal traps in eastern India.

  3. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time.

  4. Reconstruction of cyclooxygenase evolution in animals suggests variable, lineage-specific duplications, and homologs with low sequence identity.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Kocot, Kevin M; Brannock, Pamela M; Cannon, Johanna T; Waits, Damien S; Weese, David A; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2015-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymatically converts arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G/H in animals and has importance during pregnancy, digestion, and other physiological functions in mammals. COX genes have mainly been described from vertebrates, where gene duplications are common, but few studies have examined COX in invertebrates. Given the increasing ease in generating genomic data, as well as recent, although incomplete descriptions of potential COX sequences in Mollusca, Crustacea, and Insecta, assessing COX evolution across Metazoa is now possible. Here, we recover 40 putative COX orthologs by searching publicly available genomic resources as well as ~250 novel invertebrate transcriptomic datasets. Results suggest the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria possessed a COX homolog similar to those of vertebrates, although such homologs were not found in poriferan and ctenophore genomes. COX was found in most crustaceans and the majority of molluscs examined, but only specific taxa/lineages within Cnidaria and Annelida. For example, all octocorallians appear to have COX, while no COX homologs were found in hexacorallian datasets. Most species examined had a single homolog, although species-specific COX duplications were found in members of Annelida, Mollusca, and Cnidaria. Additionally, COX genes were not found in Hemichordata, Echinodermata, or Platyhelminthes, and the few previously described COX genes in Insecta lacked appreciable sequence homology (although structural analyses suggest these may still be functional COX enzymes). This analysis provides a benchmark for identifying COX homologs in future genomic and transcriptomic datasets, and identifies lineages for future studies of COX.

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax Patient Samples Shows Evidence of Direct Evolution in Drug-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Tina; Akbari, Ali; Corey, Victoria C.; Gunawan, Felicia; Bright, A. Taylor; Abraham, Matthew; Sanchez, Juan F.; Santolalla, Meddly L.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Rosales, Luis A.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Bafna, Vineet; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax, the parasite that causes the most widespread form of human malaria, is complicated by the lack of a suitable long-term cell culture system for this parasite. In contrast to P. falciparum, which can be more readily manipulated in the laboratory, insights about parasite biology need to be inferred from human studies. Here we analyze the genomes of parasites within 10 human P. vivax infections from the Peruvian Amazon. Using next-generation sequencing we show that some P. vivax infections analyzed from the region are likely polyclonal. Despite their polyclonality we observe limited parasite genetic diversity by showing that three or fewer haplotypes comprise 94% of the examined genomes, suggesting the recent introduction of parasites into this geographic region. In contrast we find more than three haplotypes in putative drug-resistance genes, including the gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and the P. vivax multidrug resistance associated transporter, suggesting that resistance mutations have arisen independently. Additionally, several drug-resistance genes are located in genomic regions with evidence of increased copy number. Our data suggest that whole genome sequencing of malaria parasites from patients may provide more insight about the evolution of drug resistance than genetic linkage or association studies, especially in geographical regions with limited parasite genetic diversity. PMID:26719854

  6. Time scale for cyclostome evolution inferred with a phylogenetic diagnosis of hagfish and lamprey cDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2006-12-01

    The Cyclostomata consists of the two orders Myxiniformes (hagfishes) and Petromyzoniformes (lampreys), and its monophyly has been unequivocally supported by recent molecular phylogenetic studies. Under this updated vertebrate phylogeny, we performed in silico evolutionary analyses using currently available cDNA sequences of cyclostomes. We first calculated the GC-content at four-fold degenerate sites (GC(4)), which revealed that an extremely high GC-content is shared by all the lamprey species we surveyed, whereas no striking pattern in GC-content was observed in any of the hagfish species surveyed. We then estimated the timing of diversification in cyclostome evolution using nucleotide and amino acid sequences. We obtained divergence times of 470-390 million years ago (Mya) in the Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Periods for the interordinal split between Myxiniformes and Petromyzoniformes; 90-60 Mya in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Periods for the split between the two hagfish subfamilies, Myxininae and Eptatretinae; 280-220 Mya in the Permian-Triassic Periods for the split between the two lamprey subfamilies, Geotriinae and Petromyzoninae; and 30-10 Mya in the Tertiary Period for the split between the two lamprey genera, Petromyzon and Lethenteron. This evolutionary configuration indicates that Myxiniformes and Petromyzoniformes diverged shortly after the common ancestor of cyclostomes split from the future gnathostome lineage. Our results also suggest that intra-subfamilial diversification in hagfish and lamprey lineages (especially those distributed in the northern hemisphere) occurred in the Cretaceous or Tertiary Periods.

  7. The extended main-sequence turn-off cluster NGC 1856: rotational evolution in a coeval stellar ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antona, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Decressin, T.; Milone, A. P.; Vesperini, E.; Ventura, P.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple or extended turn-offs in young clusters in the Magellanic Clouds have recently received large attention. A number of studies have shown that they may be interpreted as the result of a significant age spread (several 108 yr in clusters aged 1-2 Gyr), while others attribute them to a spread in stellar rotation. We focus on the cluster NGC 1856, showing a splitting in the upper part of the main sequence, well visible in the colour mF336W - mF555W, and a very wide turn-off region. Using population synthesis available from the Geneva stellar models, we show that the cluster data can be interpreted as superposition of two main populations having the same age (˜350 Myr), composed for 2/3 of very rapidly rotating stars, defining the upper turn-off region and the redder main sequence, and for 1/3 of slowly/non-rotating stars. Since rapid rotation is a common property of the B-A type stars, the main question raised by this model concerns the origin of the slowly/non-rotating component. Binary synchronization is a possible process behind the slowly/non-rotating population; in this case, many slowly/non-rotating stars should still be part of binary systems with orbital periods in the range from 4 to 500 d. For these orbital periods, Roche lobe overflow occurs during the evolution of the primary off the main sequence, so most primaries may not be able to ignite core helium burning, consistently why the lack of a red clump progeny of the slowly rotating population.

  8. The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Bian, Chao; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Ke-Wei; Yoshida, Kouki; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yu; Su, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Li-Jun; Yin, Yayi; Lin, Min; Huang, Huixia; Deng, Hua; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Deng, Cao; Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Yang, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Luo, Yi-Bo; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-12

    Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC(*), involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae.

  9. Phylogenetic reconstruction of Bantu kinship challenges Main Sequence Theory of human social evolution.

    PubMed

    Opie, Christopher; Shultz, Susanne; Atkinson, Quentin D; Currie, Thomas; Mace, Ruth

    2014-12-09

    Kinship provides the fundamental structure of human society: descent determines the inheritance pattern between generations, whereas residence rules govern the location a couple moves to after they marry. In turn, descent and residence patterns determine other key relationships such as alliance, trade, and marriage partners. Hunter-gatherer kinship patterns are viewed as flexible, whereas agricultural societies are thought to have developed much more stable kinship patterns as they expanded during the Holocene. Among the Bantu farmers of sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral kinship patterns present at the beginning of the expansion are hotly contested, with some arguing for matrilineal and matrilocal patterns, whereas others maintain that any kind of lineality or sex-biased dispersal only emerged much later. Here, we use Bayesian phylogenetic methods to uncover the history of Bantu kinship patterns and trace the interplay between descent and residence systems. The results suggest a number of switches in both descent and residence patterns as Bantu farming spread, but that the first Bantu populations were patrilocal with patrilineal descent. Across the phylogeny, a change in descent triggered a switch away from patrifocal kinship, whereas a change in residence triggered a switch back from matrifocal kinship. These results challenge "Main Sequence Theory," which maintains that changes in residence rules precede change in other social structures. We also indicate the trajectory of kinship change, shedding new light on how this fundamental structure of society developed as farming spread across the globe during the Neolithic.

  10. The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Bian, Chao; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Ke-Wei; Yoshida, Kouki; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yu; Su, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Li-Jun; Yin, Yayi; Lin, Min; Huang, Huixia; Deng, Hua; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Deng, Cao; Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Yang, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Luo, Yi-Bo; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC*, involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae. PMID:26754549

  11. Phylogeny and evolution of Digitulati ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) inferred from mitochondrial ND5 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhi-Hui; Imura, Yûki; Okamoto, Munehiro; Kim, Choong-Gon; Zhou, Hong-Zhang; Paik, Jong-Cheol; Osawa, Syozo

    2004-01-01

    Genealogical trees have been constructed using mitochondrial ND5 gene sequences of 87 specimens consisting of 32 species which have been believed to belong to the division Digitulati (one of the lineages of the subtribe Carabina) of the world. There have been recognized six lineages, which are well separated from each other. Each lineage contains the following genus: (1) the lineage A: Ohomopterus from Japan; (2) the lineage B: Isiocarabus from eastern Eurasian Continent; (3) the lineage C: Carabus from China which are further subdivided into three sublineages; (4) the lineage D: Carabus from USA; (5) the lineage E: Carabus from the Eurasian Continent, Japan and North America; and (6) the lineage F: Eucarabus from the Eurasian Continent. Additionally, the genus Acrocarabus which had been treated as a constituent of the division Archicarabomorphi has been recognized to be the 7th lineage of the division Digitulati from the ND5 genealogical analysis as well as morphology. These lineages are assumed to have radiated within a short period and are largely linked to their geographic distribution.

  12. Evolution and biogeography of Centaurea section Acrocentron inferred from nuclear and plastid DNA sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Font, Mònica; Garcia-Jacas, Núria; Vilatersana, Roser; Roquet, Cristina; Susanna, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Section Acrocentron of the genus Centaurea is one of the largest sections of Centaurea with approx. 100 species. The geographic distribution, centred in the Mediterranean, makes it an excellent example for studies of the biogeographic history of this biodiversity-rich region. Methods Plastid (trnH-psbA) and nuclear (ITS and ETS) DNA sequence analysis was used for phylogenetic reconstruction. Ancestral biogeographic patterns were inferred by dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA). Key Results The resulting phylogeny has implications for the sectional classification of Acrocentron and confirms merging sect. Chamaecyanus into Acrocentron as a subsection. Previous suggestions of an eastern Mediterranean origin of the group are confirmed. The main centres of diversification established in previous studies are now strongly supported. Expansion of the group in two different radiations that followed patently diverse paths is inferred. Conclusions Radiation followed two waves, widely separated in time scale. The oldest one, from Turkey to Greece and the northern Balkans and then to North Africa and Iberia, should be dated at the end of the Miocene in the Messinian period. It reached the Iberian Peninsula from the south, following a route that is landmarked by several relictic taxa in Sicily and North Africa. A later radiation during the Holocene interglacial periods followed, involving species from the north of the Balkan Peninsula, along a Eurasian pathway running from Central Iberia to the steppes of Kazakhstan. A generalized pattern of reticulation is also evident from the results, indicating past contacts between presently separated species. Molecular data also confirmed the extent of hybridization within Acrocentron and were successful in reconstructing the paleogeography of the section. PMID:19228702

  13. E Pluribus Unum: 50 Years of Research, Millions of Viruses, and One Goal—Tailored Acceleration of AAV Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Dirk; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Fifty years ago, a Science paper by Atchison et al. reported a newly discovered virus that would soon become known as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and that would subsequently emerge as one of the most versatile and most auspicious vectors for human gene therapy. A large part of its attraction stems from the ease with which the viral capsid can be engineered for particle retargeting to cell types of choice, evasion from neutralizing antibodies or other desirable properties. Particularly powerful and in the focus of the current review are high-throughput methods aimed at expanding the repertoire of AAV vectors by means of directed molecular evolution, such as random mutagenesis, DNA family shuffling, in silico reconstruction of ancestral capsids, or peptide display. Here, unlike the wealth of prior reviews on this topic, we especially emphasize and critically discuss the practical aspects of the different procedures that affect the ultimate outcome, including diversification protocols, combinatorial library complexity, and selection strategies. Our overall aim is to provide general guidance that should help users at any level, from novice to expert, to safely navigate through the rugged space of directed AAV evolution while avoiding the pitfalls that are associated with these challenging but promising technologies. PMID:26388463

  14. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1) Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM), delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE), and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM); and 2) Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP), displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE), and strain encoding (SENC). Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention, which makes this

  15. Seismic evolution of the 1989-1990 eruption sequence of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Lahr, J.C.; Page, R.A.; Chouet, B.A.; Stephens, C.D.; Harlow, D.H.; Murray, T.L.; Davies, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska erupted between December 1989 and June 1990 in a sequence of events characterized by large tephra eruptions, pyroclastic flows, lahars and debris flows, and episodes of dome growth. The eruption was monitored by a network of five to nine seismic stations located 1 to 22 km from the summit crater. Notable features of the eruption seismicity include : (1) small long-period events beginning in September 1989 which increased slowly in number during November and early December; (2) an intense swarm of long-period events which preceded the initial eruptions on December 14 by 23 hours; (3) shallow swarms (0 to 3 km) of volcano-tectonic events following each eruption on December 15; (4) a persistent cluster of deep (6 to 10 km) volcano-tectonic earthquakes initiated by the eruptions on December 15, which continued throughout and beyond the eruption; (5) an intense swarm of long-period events which preceded the eruptions on January 2; and (6) nine additional intervals of increased long-period seismicity each of which preceded a tephra eruption. Hypocenters of volcano-tectonic earthquakes suggest the presence of a magma source region at 6-10 km depth. Earthquakes at these depths were initiated by the tephra eruptions on December 15 and likely represent the readjustment of stresses in the country rock associated with the removal of magma from these depths. The locations and time-history of these earthquakes coupled with the eruptive behavior of the volcano suggest this region was the source of most of the erupted material during the 1989-1990 eruption. This source region appears to be connected to the surface by a narrow pipe-like conduit as inferred from the hypocenters of volcano-tectonic earthquakes. Concentrations of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes followed each of the tephra eruptions on December 15; these shocks may represent stress readjustment in the wall rock related to the removal of magma and volatiles at these depths

  16. Seismic evolution of the 1989 1990 eruption sequence of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, John A.; Lahr, John C.; Page, Robert A.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Stephens, Christopher D.; Harlow, David H.; Murray, Thomas L.; Davies, John N.

    1994-08-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska erupted between December 1989 and June 1990 in a sequence of events characterized by large tephra eruptions, pyroclastic flows, lahars and debris flows, and episodes of dome growth. The eruption was monitored by a network of five to nine seismic stations located 1 to 22 km from the summit crater. Notable features of the eruption seismicity include : (1) small long-period events beginning in September 1989 which increased slowly in number during November and early December; (2) an intense swarm of long-period events which preceded the initial eruptions on December 14 by 23 hours; (3) shallow swarms (0 to 3 km) of volcano-tectonic events following each eruption on December 15; (4) a persistent cluster of deep (6 to 10 km) volcano-tectonic earthquakes initiated by the eruptions on December 15, which continued throughout and beyond the eruption; (5) an intense swarm of long-period events which preceded the eruptions on January 2; and (6) nine additional intervals of increased long-period seismicity each of which preceded a tephra eruption. Hypocenters of volcano-tectonic earthquakes suggest the presence of a magma source region at 6-10 km depth. Earthquakes at these depths were initiated by the tephra eruptions on December 15 and likely represent the readjustment of stresses in the country rock associated with the removal of magma from these depths. The locations and time-history of these earthquakes coupled with the eruptive behavior of the volcano suggest this region was the source of most of the erupted material during the 1989-1990 eruption. This source region appears to be connected to the surface by a narrow pipe-like conduit as inferred from the hypocenters of volcano-tectonic earthquakes. Concentrations of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes followed each of the tephra eruptions on December 15; these shocks may represent stress readjustment in the wall rock related to the removal of magma and volatiles at these depths

  17. From CoRoT 102899501 to the Sun. A time evolution model of chromospheric activity on the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondoin, P.; Gandolfi, D.; Fridlund, M.; Frasca, A.; Guenther, E. W.; Hatzes, A.; Deeg, H. J.; Parviainen, H.; Eigmüller, P.; Deleuil, M.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: The present study reports measurements of the rotation period of a young solar analogue, estimates of its surface coverage by photospheric starspots and of its chromospheric activity level, and derivations of its evolutionary status. Detailed observations of many young solar-type stars, such as the one reported in the present paper, provide insight into rotation and magnetic properties that may have prevailed on the Sun in its early evolution. Methods: Using a model based on the rotational modulation of the visibility of active regions, we analysed the high-accuracy CoRoT lightcurve of the active star CoRoT 102899501. Spectroscopic follow-up observations were used to derive its fundamental parameters. We compared the chromospheric activity level of Corot 102899501 with the R'HK index distribution vs age established on a large sample of solar-type dwarfs in open clusters. We also compared the chromospheric activity level of this young star with a model of chromospheric activity evolution established by combining relationships between the R'HK index and the Rossby number with a recent model of stellar rotation evolution on the main sequence. Results: We measure the spot coverage of the stellar surface as a function of time and find evidence for a tentative increase from 5 - 14% at the beginning of the observing run to 13-29% 35 days later. A high level of magnetic activity on Corot 102899501 is corroborated by a strong emission in the Balmer and Ca ii H and K lines (R'HK ~ -4). The starspots used as tracers of the star rotation constrain the rotation period to 1.625 ± 0.002 days and do not show evidence for differential rotation. The effective temperature (Teff = 5180 ± 80 K), surface gravity (log g = 4.35 ± 0.1), and metallicity ([M/H] = 0.05 ± 0.07 dex) indicate that the object is located near the evolutionary track of a 1.09 ± 0.12 M⊙ pre-main sequence star at an age of 23 ± 10 Myr. This value is consistent with the "gyro-age" of about 8-25 Myr

  18. EXPANDED SEARCH FOR z {approx} 10 GALAXIES FROM HUDF09, ERS, AND CANDELS DATA: EVIDENCE FOR ACCELERATED EVOLUTION AT z > 8?

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.

    2012-02-01

    We search for z {approx} 10 galaxies over {approx}160 arcmin{sup 2} of Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR data in the Chandra Deep Field South, using the public HUDF09, Early Release Science, and CANDELS surveys, that reach to 5{sigma} depths ranging from 26.9 to 29.4 in H{sub 160} AB mag. z {approx}> 9.5 galaxy candidates are identified via J{sub 125} - H{sub 160} > 1.2 colors and non-detections in any band blueward of J{sub 125}. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry is key for separating the genuine high-z candidates from intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 2-4) galaxies with evolved or heavily dust obscured stellar populations. After removing 16 sources of intermediate brightness (H{sub 160} {approx} 24-26 mag) with strong IRAC detections, we only find one plausible z {approx} 10 galaxy candidate in the whole data set, previously reported in Bouwens et al.. The newer data cover a 3 Multiplication-Sign larger area and provide much stronger constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function (LF). If the evolution of the z {approx} 4-8 LFs is extrapolated to z {approx} 10, six z {approx} 10 galaxies are expected in our data. The detection of only one source suggests that the UV LF evolves at an accelerated rate before z {approx} 8. The luminosity density is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude in only 170 Myr from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 8. This increase is {>=}4 Multiplication-Sign larger than expected from the lower redshift extrapolation of the UV LF. We are thus likely witnessing the first rapid buildup of galaxies in the heart of cosmic reionization. Future deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data, reaching to well beyond 29 mag, can enable a more robust quantification of the accelerated evolution around z {approx} 10.

  19. Functional continuity: did field-induced oriented aperiodic constraints at Life's origin aid its sequence-based evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra-Delmotte, G.; Mitra, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    A non-biological analog undergoing Darwinian-like evolution could have enhanced the probability of many crucial independent bottom-up emergent steps, engendered within its premises, and smoothen the inanimate-animate transition. Now, the higher-level environment-mutable DNA sequences influence the lower-level pattern of oriented templates (enzymes, lipid membranes, RNA) in the organized cell matrix and hence their associated substrate-dynamics; note how templates are akin to local fields, kinetically constraining reactant orientations. Since the lowerlevel is likely the more primitive of the two (rather than Cairns-Smith's "readily available" rigid clay crystal sequence-based replicators as a memory-like basis for slowly mutating predecessor-patterns enroute to complex RNA-based Darwinian evolution), a gradual thermodynamic-to-kinetic transition in an isotropic medium, is proposed as driven by some order-parameter --via "available" field-responsive dipolar colloid networks, as apart from bio-organics, mineral colloids also can display liquid crystal (LC) phases (see [1]). An access to solid-like orientational order in a fluid matrix suggests how aperiodic patterns can be influenced and sustained (a la homeostasis) via external inhomogeneous fields (e.g. magnetic rocks); this renders these cooperative networks with potential as confining host-media, whose environment-sensitivity can not only influence their sterically-coupled guest-substrates but also their network properties (the latter can enable 'functions' like spontaneous transport under non-equilibrium suggesting a natural basis for their selection by the environment). In turn LC systems could have been preceded by even simpler anisotropic fluid hosts, viz., external field-induced mineral magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) aggregates. Indeed, the capacity of an MNP to couple its magnetic and rotational d.o.f.s suggests how an environment-sensitive field-influenced network of interacting dipolar colloids close to

  20. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  1. Evolution of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Revealed through Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Henan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Chen, Hongbin; Zhang, Feifei; Zhu, Baoli

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a globally important nosocomial pathogen characterized by an evolving multidrug resistance. A total of 35 representative clinical A. baumannii strains isolated from 13 hospitals in nine cities in China from 1999 to 2011, including 32 carbapenem-resistant and 3 carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii strains, were selected for whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the earliest strain, strain 1999BJAB11, and two strains isolated in Zhejiang Province in 2004 were the founder strains of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. Ten types of AbaR resistance islands were identified, and a previously unreported AbaR island, which comprised a two-component response regulator, resistance-related proteins, and RND efflux system proteins, was identified in two strains isolated in Zhejiang in 2004. Multiple transposons or insertion sequences (ISs) existed in each strain, and these gradually tended to diversify with evolution. Some of these IS elements or transposons were the first to be reported, and most of them were mainly found in strains from two provinces. Genome feature analysis illustrated diversified resistance genes, surface polysaccharides, and a restriction-modification system, even in strains that were phylogenetically and epidemiologically very closely related. IS-mediated deletions were identified in the type VI secretion system region, the csuE region, and core lipooligosaccharide (LOS) loci. Recombination occurred in the heme utilization region, and intrinsic resistance genes (blaADC and blaOXA-51-like variants) and three novel blaOXA-51-like variants (blaOXA-424, blaOXA-425, and blaOXA-426) were identified. Our results could improve the understanding of the evolutionary processes that contribute to the emergence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii strains and help elucidate the molecular evolutionary mechanism in A. baumannii. PMID:25487793

  2. Opossum alcohol dehydrogenases: Sequences, structures, phylogeny and evolution: evidence for the tandem location of ADH genes on opossum chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S

    2009-03-16

    BLAT (BLAST-Like Alignment Tool) analyses and interrogations of the recently published opossum genome were undertaken using previously reported rat ADH amino acid sequences. Evidence is presented for six opossum ADH genes localized on chromosome 5 and organized in a comparable ADH gene cluster to that reported for human and rat ADH genes. The predicted amino acid sequences and secondary structures for the opossum ADH subunits and the intron-exon boundaries for opossum ADH genes showed a high degree of similarity with other mammalian ADHs, and four opossum ADH classes were identified, namely ADH1, ADH3, ADH6 and ADH4 (for which three genes were observed: ADH4A, ADH4B and ADH4C). Previous biochemical analyses of opossum ADHs have reported the tissue distribution and properties for these enzymes: ADH1, the major liver enzyme; ADH3, widely distributed in opossum tissues with similar kinetic properties to mammalian class 3 ADHs; and ADH4, for which several forms were localized in extrahepatic tissues, especially in the digestive system and in the eye. These ADHs are likely to perform similar functions to those reported for other mammalian ADHs in the metabolism of ingested and endogenous alcohols and aldehydes. Phylogenetic analyses examined opossum, human, rat, chicken and cod ADHs, and supported the proposed designation of opossum ADHs as class I (ADH1), class III (ADH3), class IV (ADH4A, ADH4B and ADH4C) and class VI (ADH6). Percentage substitution rates were examined for ADHs during vertebrate evolution which indicated that ADH3 is evolving at a much slower rate to that of the other ADH classes.

  3. Inferences from protein and nucleic acid sequences - Early molecular evolution, divergence of kingdoms and rates of change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Mclaughlin, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of new sensitive, objective methods for establishing the probable common ancestry of very distantly related sequences and the quantitative evolutionary change which has taken place. These methods are applied to four families of proteins and nucleic acids and evolutionary trees will be derived where possible. Of the three families containing duplications of genetic material, two are nucleic acids: transfer RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA. Both of these structures are functional in the synthesis of coded proteins, and prototypes must have been present in the cell at the inception of the fundamental coding process that all living things share. There are many types of tRNA which recognize the various nucleotide triplets and the 20 amino acids. These types are thought to have arisen as a result of many gene duplications. Relationships among these types are discussed. The 5S ribosomal RNA, presently functional in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is very likely descended from an early form incorporating almost a complete duplication of genetic material. The amount of evolution in the various lines can again be compared. The other two families containing duplications are proteins; ferredoxin and cytochrome c.

  4. From Amino Acid to Glucosinolate Biosynthesis: Protein Sequence Changes in the Evolution of Methylthioalkylmalate Synthase in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Methylthioalkylmalate synthase (MAM) catalyzes the committed step in the side chain elongation of Met, yielding important precursors for glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae species. MAM is believed to have evolved from isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS), an enzyme involved in Leu biosynthesis, based on phylogenetic analyses and an overlap of catalytic abilities. Here, we investigated the changes in protein structure that have occurred during the recruitment of IPMS from amino acid to glucosinolate metabolism. The major sequence difference between IPMS and MAM is the absence of 120 amino acids at the C-terminal end of MAM that constitute a regulatory domain for Leu-mediated feedback inhibition. Truncation of this domain in Arabidopsis IPMS2 results in loss of Leu feedback inhibition and quaternary structure, two features common to MAM enzymes, plus an 8.4-fold increase in the kcat/Km for a MAM substrate. Additional exchange of two amino acids in the active site resulted in a MAM-like enzyme that had little residual IPMS activity. Hence, combination of the loss of the regulatory domain and a few additional amino acid exchanges can explain the evolution of MAM from IPMS during its recruitment from primary to secondary metabolism. PMID:21205930

  5. Molecular Evolution and Spatial Transmission of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Based on Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Li; Luo, Li-Mei; Liu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Yue; Su, Xiang; Yu, Xue-jie

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was a novel tick-borne bunyavirus that caused hemorrhagic fever with a high fatality rate in East Asia. In this study we analyzed the complete genome sequences of 122 SFTSV strains to determine the phylogeny, evolution and reassortment of the virus. We revealed that the evolutionary rate of three genome segments were different, with highest in the S segment and lowest in the L segment. The SFTSV strains were phylogenetically classified into 5 lineages (A, B, C, D and E) with each genome segment. SFTSV strains from China were classified in all 5 lineages, strains from South Korea were classified into 3 lineages (A, D, and E), and all strains from Japan were classified in only linage E. Using the average evolutionary rate of the three genome segments, we found that the extant SFTSV originated 20–87 years ago in the Dabie Mountain area in central China. The viruses were then transmitted to other areas of China, Japan and South Korea. We also found that six SFTSV strains were reassortants. Selection pressure analysis suggested that SFTSV was under purifying selection according to the four genes (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein, nucleocapsid protein, non-structural protein), and two sites (37, 1033) of glycoproteins were identified as being under strong positive selection. We concluded that SFTSV originated in central China and spread to other places recently and the virus was under purifying selection with high frequency of reassortment. PMID:26999664

  6. Whole Genome Sequencing of the Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus) Provides Insights into the Evolution of Ray-Finned Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Christopher M.; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Larry J.; Hammer, Michael P.; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-01-01

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) is of commercial importance, conservation concern, and is a representative of one of the oldest lineages of ray-finned fish, the Osteoglossomorpha. To add to genomic knowledge of this species and the evolution of teleosts, the genome of a Malaysian specimen of arowana was sequenced. A draft genome is presented consisting of 42,110 scaffolds with a total size of 708 Mb (2.85% gaps) representing 93.95% of core eukaryotic genes. Using a k-mer-based method, a genome size of 900 Mb was also estimated. We present an update on the phylogenomics of fishes based on a total of 27 species (23 fish species and 4 tetrapods) using 177 orthologous proteins (71,360 amino acid sites), which supports established relationships except that arowana is placed as the sister lineage to all teleost clades (Bayesian posterior probability 1.00, bootstrap replicate 93%), that evolved after the teleost genome duplication event rather than the eels (Elopomorpha). Evolutionary rates are highly heterogeneous across the tree with fishes represented by both slowly and rapidly evolving lineages. A total of 94 putative pigment genes were identified, providing the impetus for development of molecular markers associated with the spectacular colored phenotypes found within this species. PMID:26446539

  7. Estimation of temporal evolution of the helium plasmasphere based on a sequence of IMAGE/EUV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, S.; Fok, M.-C.; Brandt, P. C.; Higuchi, T.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a technique for estimating the temporal evolution of the plasmaspheric helium ion density based on a sequence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data obtained from the IMAGE satellite. In the proposed technique, the estimation is obtained by incorporating EUV images from IMAGE into a two-dimensional fluid model of the plasmasphere using a data assimilation approach based on the ensemble transform Kalman filter. Since the motion and the spatial structure of the helium plasmasphere is strongly controlled by the electric field in the inner magnetosphere, the electric field around the plasmapause can also be estimated using the ensemble transform Kalman filter. We performed an experiment using synthetic images that were generated from the same numerical model under a certain condition. It was confirmed that the condition that generated the synthetic images was successfully reproduced. We also present some results obtained using real EUV imaging data. Finally, we discuss the possibility of estimating the density profile along a magnetic field line. Since each EUV image was taken from a different direction due to the motion of the IMAGE satellite, we could obtain the information on the density profile along a field line by combining multiple images.

  8. Phylogenetic position of Mediterranean Astereae and character evolution of daisies (Bellis, Asteraceae) inferred from nrDNA ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Fiz, Omar; Valcárcel, Virginia; Vargas, Pablo

    2002-10-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of nrITS sequences of Asteraceae revealed that the Bellis group is a natural assemblage comprising all the species of Bellis and Bellium, but not Rhynchospermum. In contrast, we propose to include the genera Bellis, Bellium, and Bellidastrum in the subtribe Bellidinae in the interest of circumscribing natural groups. Our results also suggest an early diversification in the western Mediterranean Basin of two monophyletic lineages, Bellis and Bellium. Three major groups can be distinguished within BELLIS: (1) the B. perennis group, containing five annual and perennial species with three ploidy levels (diploid, octoploid, and decaploid), which are distributed throughout the Mediterranean Basin despite lack of pappus; (2) the Bellis sylvestris group, with five annual and perennial species primarily from the western Mediterranean, in which there are five ploidy levels (diploid, tetraploid, hexaploid, octoploid, and decaploid); and (3) a basal grade consisting of three diploid, perennial species which displays remarkable diversification of morphologies. Striking characteristics, such as an annual life form, polyploidy, and loss of pappus, seem to have occurred in parallel several times and in different geographical areas during the early diversification of Bellis species in the western Mediterranean. Character evolution reconstructions allow us to describe a putative ancestor of the genus Bellis (proto-Bellis).

  9. Does the upper main sequence extend across the whole H-R diagram. [radiative opacities of stellar evolution models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of using Carson's (1976) radiative opacities in evolutionary sequences of stellar models has been studied over the mass range from 7 to 60 solar masses. The opacities are very large in the outer part of the envelope and induce such enormous radii for masses greater than about 30 solar masses for a heavy-element fraction of 0.02 or about 20 solar masses for a heavy-element fraction of 0.04 that the evolutionary tracks during the phase of core hydrogen burning extend across the whole H-R diagram. The choice of the Schwarschild or Ledoux criterion for convection makes very little difference for the behavior of the tracks. Evolution through the effective-temperature range (in logarithms) of 3.6 to 4.0 occurs in all cases on a rapid (secular) time scale. Core helium burning takes place exclusively in the red-supergiant configuration for stellar masses exceeding 8 solar masses (heavy-element fraction of 0.02) or 6 solar masses (heavy-element fraction of 0.04). These stellar models seem to be in significantly better agreement with the observed distribution of bright stars on the H-R diagram than are the older models based on the Cox-Stewart opacities. It can be inferred that a large envelope opacity (e.g., Carson's) exists and that substantial mass loss takes place in very massive late-type supergiants.

  10. Adaptive sequence evolution is driven by biotic stress in a pair of orchid species (Dactylorhiza) with distinct ecological optima.

    PubMed

    Balao, Francisco; Trucchi, Emiliano; Wolfe, Thomas; Hao, Bao-Hai; Lorenzo, Maria Teresa; Baar, Juliane; Sedman, Laura; Kosiol, Carolin; Amman, Fabian; Chase, Mark W; Hedrén, Mikael; Paun, Ovidiu

    2017-03-30

    The orchid family is the largest in the angiosperms, but little is known about the molecular basis of the significant variation they exhibit. We investigate here the transcriptomic divergence between two European terrestrial orchids, Dactylorhiza incarnata and D. fuchsii, and integrate these results in the context of their distinct ecologies that we also document. Clear signals of lineage-specific adaptive evolution of protein-coding sequences are identified, notably targeting elements of biotic defence, including both physical and chemical adaptations in the context of divergent pools of pathogens and herbivores. In turn, a substantial regulatory divergence between the two species appears linked to adaptation/acclimation to abiotic conditions. Several of the pathways affected by differential expression are also targeted by deviating post-transcriptional regulation via sRNAs. Finally, Dactylorhiza incarnata appears to suffer from insufficient sRNA control over the activity of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, resulting in increased activity of class I transposable elements and, over time, in larger genome size than that of D. fuchsii. The extensive molecular divergence between the two species suggests significant genomic and transcriptomic shock in their hybrids and offers insights into the difficulty of coexistence at the homoploid level. Altogether, biological response to selection, accumulated during the history of these orchids, appears governed by their microenvironmental context, in which biotic and abiotic pressures act synergistically to shape transcriptome structure, expression and regulation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing of the Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus) Provides Insights into the Evolution of Ray-Finned Fishes.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Larry J; Hammer, Michael P; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-10-06

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) is of commercial importance, conservation concern, and is a representative of one of the oldest lineages of ray-finned fish, the Osteoglossomorpha. To add to genomic knowledge of this species and the evolution of teleosts, the genome of a Malaysian specimen of arowana was sequenced. A draft genome is presented consisting of 42,110 scaffolds with a total size of 708 Mb (2.85% gaps) representing 93.95% of core eukaryotic genes. Using a k-mer-based method, a genome size of 900 Mb was also estimated. We present an update on the phylogenomics of fishes based on a total of 27 species (23 fish species and 4 tetrapods) using 177 orthologous proteins (71,360 amino acid sites), which supports established relationships except that arowana is placed as the sister lineage to all teleost clades (Bayesian posterior probability 1.00, bootstrap replicate 93%), that evolved after the teleost genome duplication event rather than the eels (Elopomorpha). Evolutionary rates are highly heterogeneous across the tree with fishes represented by both slowly and rapidly evolving lineages. A total of 94 putative pigment genes were identified, providing the impetus for development of molecular markers associated with the spectacular colored phenotypes found within this species.

  12. Phylogeny and character evolution of the fern genus Tectaria (Tectariaceae) in the Old World inferred from chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui-Hui; Chao, Yi-Shan; Callado, John Rey; Dong, Shi-Yong

    2014-11-01

    In this study we provide a phylogeny for the pantropical fern genus Tectaria, with emphasis on the Old World species, based on sequences of five plastid regions (atpB, ndhF plus ndhF-trnL, rbcL, rps16-matK plus matK, and trnL-F). Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference are used to analyze 115 individuals, representing ca. 56 species of Tectaria s.l. and 36 species of ten related genera. The results strongly support the monophyly of Tectaria in a broad sense, in which Ctenitopsis, Hemigramma, Heterogonium, Psomiocarpa, Quercifilix, Stenosemia, and Tectaridium should be submerged. Such broadly circumscribed Tectaria is supported by the arising pattern of veinlets and the base chromosome number (x=40). Four primary clades are well resolved within Tectaria, one from the Neotropic (T. trifoliata clade) and three from the Old World (T. subtriphylla clade, Ctenitopsis clade, and T. crenata clade). Tectaria crenata clade is the largest one including six subclades. Of the genera previously recognized as tectarioid ferns, Ctenitis, Lastreopsis, and Pleocnemia, are confirmed to be members in Dryopteridaceae; while Pteridrys and Triplophyllum are supported in Tectariaceae. To infer morphological evolution, 13 commonly used characters are optimized on the resulting phylogenetic trees and in result, are all homoplastic in Tectaria.

  13. Microstructural Evolution of SAC305 Solder Joints in Wafer Level Chip-Scale Packaging (WLCSP) with Continuous and Interrupted Accelerated Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Bite; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Four high-strain design wafer level chip scale packages were given accelerated thermal cycling with a 10°C/min ramp rate and 10 min hold times between 0°C and 100°C to examine the effects of continuous and interrupted thermal cycling on the number of cycles to failure. The interruptions given two of the samples were the result of periodic examinations using electron backscattered pattern mapping, leading to room temperature aging of 30 days-2.5 years after increments of about 100 cycles at several stages of the cycling history. The continuous thermal cycling resulted in solder joints with a much larger degree of recrystallization, whereas the interrupted thermal cycling tests led to much less recrystallization, which was more localized near the package side, and the crack was more localized near the interface and had less branching. The failure mode for both conditions was still the same, with cracks nucleating along the high angle grain boundaries formed during recrystallization. In conditions where there were few recrystallized grains, recovery led to formation of subgrains that strengthened the solder, and the higher strength led to a larger driving force for crack growth through the solder, leading to failure after less than half of the cycles in the continuous accelerated thermal cycling condition. This work shows that there is a critical point where sufficient strain energy accumulation will trigger recrystallization, but this point depends on the rate of strain accumulation in each cycle and various recovery processes, which further depends on local crystal orientations, stress state evolution, and specific activated slip and twinning systems.

  14. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  15. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  16. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-sky WISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Catherine; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-04-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in Spitzer IRAC infrared color space: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates (SSFRs) or prolifically forming stars—galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous Spitzer IRAC studies identifying this “canyon” have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate SSFRs. We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color space ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}12}{{f}4.6}\\right]\\right) versus ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}22}{{f}3.4}\\right]\\right) that we use to identify canyon galaxies from the larger sample. We confirm that compact group galaxies show a bimodal distribution in the mid-infrared and identify 37 canyon galaxies with reliable photometry and intermediate mid-IR colors. Morphologically, we find that the canyon harbors a large population of both Sa-Sbc and E/S0 type galaxies, and that they fall on the optical red sequence rather than the green valley. Finally, we provide a catalog of WISE photometry for 567 of 652 galaxies selected from the sample of 163 compact groups.

  17. Influence of volcanic activity on the population genetic structure of Hawaiian Tetragnatha spiders: fragmentation, rapid population growth and the potential for accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Vandergast, Amy G; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Roderick, George K

    2004-07-01

    Volcanic activity on the island of Hawaii results in a cyclical pattern of habitat destruction and fragmentation by lava, followed by habitat regeneration on newly formed substrates. While this pattern has been hypothesized to promote the diversification of Hawaiian lineages, there have been few attempts to link geological processes to measurable changes in population structure. We investigated the genetic structure of three species of Hawaiian spiders in forests fragmented by a 150-year-old lava flow on Mauna Loa Volcano, island of Hawaii: Tetragnatha quasimodo (forest and lava flow generalist), T. anuenue and T. brevignatha (forest specialists). To estimate fragmentation effects on population subdivision in each species, we examined variation in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (DNA sequences and allozymes, respectively). Population subdivision was higher for forest specialists than for the generalist in fragments separated by lava. Patterns of mtDNA sequence evolution also revealed that forest specialists have undergone rapid expansion, while the generalist has experienced more gradual population growth. Results confirm that patterns of neutral genetic variation reflect patterns of volcanic activity in some Tetragnatha species. Our study further suggests that population subdivision and expansion can occur across small spatial and temporal scales, which may facilitate the rapid spread of new character states, leading to speciation as hypothesized by H. L. Carson 30 years ago.

  18. Influence of volcanic activity on the population genetic structure of Hawaiian Tetragnatha spiders: Fragmentation, rapid population growth and the potential for accelerated evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Gillespie, R.G.; Roderick, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic activity on the island of Hawaii results in a cyclical pattern of habitat destruction and fragmentation by lava, followed by habitat regeneration on newly formed substrates. While this pattern has been hypothesized to promote the diversification of Hawaiian lineages, there have been few attempts to link geological processes to measurable changes in population structure. We investigated the genetic structure of three species of Hawaiian spiders in forests fragmented by a 150-year-old lava flow on Mauna Loa Volcano, island of Hawaii: Tetragnatha quasimodo (forest and lava flow generalist), T. anuenue and T. brevignatha (forest specialists). To estimate fragmentation effects on population subdivision in each species, we examined variation in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (DNA sequences and allozymes, respectively). Population subdivision was higher for forest specialists than for the generalist in fragments separated by lava. Patterns of mtDNA sequence evolution also revealed that forest specialists have undergone rapid expansion, while the generalist has experienced more gradual population growth. Results confirm that patterns of neutral genetic variation reflect patterns of volcanic activity in some Tetragnatha species. Our study further suggests that population subdivision and expansion can occur across small spatial and temporal scales, which may facilitate the rapid spread of new character states, leading to speciation as hypothesized by H. L. Carson 30 years ago.

  19. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    access to cDNA sequences in the absence of living specimens, even from commercial venom sources, to evaluate important regional differences in venom composition and to study snake venom protein evolution. PMID:27280639

  20. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    access to cDNA sequences in the absence of living specimens, even from commercial venom sources, to evaluate important regional differences in venom composition and to study snake venom protein evolution.

  1. Evolution of mitochondrial SSU-rDNA variable domain sequences and rRNA secondary structures, and phylogeny of the Agrocybe aegerita multispecies complex.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Labarère, Jacques

    2007-04-01

    Mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) rDNA variable (V1, V2, V4, V6, V8 and V9) domain sequences and rRNA secondary structures evidenced eight molecular groups within 32 strains of the Agrocybe aegerita multispecies complex from different continents. mtSSU-rRNA secondary structure evolution occurred mainly by insertion/deletion of sequences from 8 to 57nt long. Preferential insertion/deletion sites correlated with loops of the mtSSU-rRNA secondary structures, and suggested that these events occurred in regions without interactions in the ribosomal-protein assembly. Indels modified the stem length (V1 and V4 domains) or the size and loop number (V6 and V9 domains). Three indels inserted in the V1 and V4 domains had 76.5% to 94.7% identity with short sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase gene; this fact and the presence of inverted repeated motifs within indel sequences suggested a mechanism of evolution based on insertion/deletion of sequences from another region of the mitochondrial genome. Phylogenetic relationships inferred using both ribosomal DNA sequences and rRNA secondary structures were congruent and evidenced three clades within the A. aegerita complex: European, Argentinean, and a more distant Asian-American clade including A. aegerita and A. chaxingu strains. These results suggested that numerous genetic exchanges occurred between Asian-American strains after isolation of the European clade. V4-V6-V9 concatenated sequences of European and Argentinean clades had 86.1% identity, similar to the value calculated between two Agrocybe closely related species, suggesting that these clades could represent different species. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence test for rapid characterization of strains was developed.

  2. Discovery of Novel dsRNA Viral Sequences by In Silico Cloning and Implications for Viral Diversity, Host Range and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Ghabrial, Said A.; Li, Guoqing; Yi, Xianhong; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of viruses can contribute greatly to the study of viral evolution, diversity and the interaction between viruses and hosts. Traditional molecular cloning methods for obtaining RNA viral genomes are time-consuming and often difficult because many viruses occur in extremely low titers. DsRNA viruses in the families, Partitiviridae, Totiviridae, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, and other related unclassified dsRNA viruses are generally associated with symptomless or persistent infections of their hosts. These characteristics indicate that samples or materials derived from eukaryotic organisms used to construct cDNA libraries and EST sequencing might carry these viruses, which were not easily detected by the researchers. Therefore, the EST databases may include numerous unknown viral sequences. In this study, we performed in silico cloning, a procedure for obtaining full or partial cDNA sequence of a gene by bioinformatics analysis, using known dsRNA viral sequences as queries to search against NCBI Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database. From this analysis, we obtained 119 novel virus-like sequences related to members of the families, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, and Totiviridae. Many of them were identified in cDNA libraries of eukaryotic lineages, which were not known to be hosts for these viruses. Furthermore, comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these newly discovered virus-like sequences with known dsRNA viruses revealed that these dsRNA viruses may have co-evolved with respective host supergroups over a long evolutionary time while potential horizontal transmissions of viruses between different host supergroups also is possible. We also found that some of the plant partitiviruses may have originated from fungal viruses by horizontal transmissions. These findings extend our knowledge of the diversity and possible host range of dsRNA viruses and offer insight into the origin and evolution of relevant viruses with their hosts. PMID

  3. EVOLUTION OF VERY MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS WITH MASS ACCRETION FROM PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE TO COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Takuya; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Tsuruta, Sachiko E-mail: umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.j E-mail: naoki.yoshida@ipmu.j

    2009-12-01

    We calculate the evolution of zero-metallicity Population III (Pop III) stars whose mass grows from the initial mass of approx1 M{sub sun} by accreting the surrounding gases. Our calculations cover whole evolutionary stages from the pre-main sequence, via various nuclear burning stages, through the final core-collapse or pair-creation instability phases. We adopt two different sets of stellar mass accretion rates as our fiducial models. One is derived from a cosmological simulation of the first generation (PopIII.1) stars, and the other is derived from a simulation of the second generation stars that are affected by radiation from PopIII.1 stars. The latter represents one case of PopIII.2 stars. We also adopt additional models that include radiative feedback effects. We show that the final mass of Pop III.1 stars can be as large as approx1000 M {sub sun}, beyond the mass range (140-300 M{sub sun}) for the pair-instability supernovae. Such massive stars undergo core-collapse to form intermediate-mass black holes, which may be the seeds for merger trees to supermassive black holes. On the other hand, Pop III.2 stars become less massive (approx<40-60 M{sub sun}), being in the mass range of ordinary iron core-collapse stars. Such stars explode and eject heavy elements to contribute to chemical enrichment of the early universe as observed in the abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. In view of the large range of possible accretion rates, further studies are important to see if these fiducial models are actually the cases.

  4. Scale evolution, sequence phylogeny, and taxonomy of thaumatomonad Cercozoa: 11 new species and new genera Scutellomonas, Cowlomonas, Thaumatospina and Ovaloplaca.

    PubMed

    Scoble, Josephine M; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    We describe 11 new species of Thaumatomonadida using light and electron microscopy and rDNA gene sequences (18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2). We found clear distinctions between major clades in molecular and morphological traits that support now splitting Thaumatomastix into three genera: new marine genera Ovaloplaca (oval plate-scales) and Thaumatospina (triangular plate-scales), both with distinctive radially-symmetric bobbin-based spine-scales, restricting Thaumatomastix to freshwater species with putatively non-homologous eccentric-spine scales and thicker triangular plate-scales. New genus Scutellomonas lacks spine-scales, having oval plate-scales with deeply-dished upper tier as in Ovaloplaca, with which it forms a clade having short/absent anterior cilium. Cowlomonas gen. n. is possibly naked. We describe two new Allas species, two new Thaumatomonas, and one new Reckertia species, and transfer R. hindoni to Thaumatomonas. Triangular-scaled Reckertia has varied plate-scales and ciliary scales. Thaumatomonas rDNA trees reveal two clades: zhukovi/seravini (predominantly triangular scales); coloniensis/oxoniensis/lauterborni/constricta/solis (scales mostly oval). We hypothesise that the ancestor of Thaumatomonadidae had radially-symmetric bobbin-based spine-scales and triangular plate-scales, bobbin-based spine-scales being lost in one lineage and eccentric-spine scales evolving in Thaumatomastix. Bobbin-based spine-scales arguably evolved from triangular plate-scales and single-tier ciliary scales (Ovaloplaca and Reckertia only) from plate-scale rudiments. We present a unified scheme for scale evolution and development in Imbricatea.

  5. Expression and Sequence Evolution of Aromatase cyp19a1 and Other Sexual Development Genes in East African Cichlid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Böhne, Astrid; Heule, Corina; Boileau, Nicolas; Salzburger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Sex determination mechanisms are highly variable across teleost fishes and sexual development is often plastic. Nevertheless, downstream factors establishing the two sexes are presumably conserved. Here, we study sequence evolution and gene expression of core genes of sexual development in a prime model system in evolutionary biology, the East African cichlid fishes. Using the available five cichlid genomes, we test for signs of positive selection in 28 genes including duplicates from the teleost whole-genome duplication, and examine the expression of these candidate genes in three cichlid species. We then focus on a particularly striking case, the A- and B-copies of the aromatase cyp19a1, and detect different evolutionary trajectories: cyp19a1A evolved under strong positive selection, whereas cyp19a1B remained conserved at the protein level, yet is subject to regulatory changes at its transcription start sites. Importantly, we find shifts in gene expression in both copies. Cyp19a1 is considered the most conserved ovary-factor in vertebrates, and in all teleosts investigated so far, cyp19a1A and cyp19a1B are expressed in ovaries and the brain, respectively. This is not the case in cichlids, where we find new expression patterns in two derived lineages: the A-copy gained a novel testis-function in the Ectodine lineage, whereas the B-copy is overexpressed in the testis of the speciest-richest cichlid group, the Haplochromini. This suggests that even key factors of sexual development, including the sex steroid pathway, are not conserved in fish, supporting the idea that flexibility in sexual determination and differentiation may be a driving force of speciation. PMID:23883521

  6. Long-term evolution of three-planet systems to the post-main sequence and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustill, Alexander J.; Veras, Dimitri; Villaver, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We study the stability of systems of three giant planets orbiting 3-8 M⊙ stars at orbital distances of >10 au as the host star ages through the main sequence (MS) and well into the white dwarf (WD) stage. Systems are stable on the MS if the planets are separated by more than ˜9 Hill radii. Most systems surviving the MS will remain stable until the WD phase, although planets scattered on to small pericentres in unstable systems can be swallowed by the expanding stellar envelope when the star ascends the giant branches. Mass-loss at the end of the asymptotic giant branch triggers delayed instability in many systems, leading to instabilities typically occurring at WD cooling ages of a few 100 Myr. This instability occurs both in systems that survived the star's previous evolution unscathed, and in systems that previously underwent scattering instabilities. The outcome of such instability around WDs is overwhelmingly the ejection of one of the planets from the system, with several times more ejections occurring during the WD phase than during the MS. Furthermore, few planets are scattered close to the WD, just outside the Roche limit, where they can be tidally circularized. Hence, we predict that planets in WD systems rarely dynamically evolve to become `hot Jupiters'. Nor does it appear that the observed frequency of metal pollution in WD atmospheres can be entirely explained by planetesimals being destabilized following instability in systems of multiple giant planets, although further work incorporating low-mass planets and planetesimals is needed.

  7. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Projecto-Garcia, Joana; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E.; Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Green, Andy J.; Kopuchian, Cecilia; Tubaro, Pablo L.; Alza, Luis; Bulgarella, Mariana; Smith, Matthew M.; Wilson, Robert E.; Fago, Angela; McCracken, Kevin G.; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages), and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization). In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level. PMID:26637114

  8. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Projecto-Garcia, Joana; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E; Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Green, Andy J; Kopuchian, Cecilia; Tubaro, Pablo L; Alza, Luis; Bulgarella, Mariana; Smith, Matthew M; Wilson, Robert E; Fago, Angela; McCracken, Kevin G; Storz, Jay F

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages), and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization). In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level.

  9. Inter- and intraspecies phylogenetic analyses reveal extensive X-Y gene conversion in the evolution of gametologous sequences of human sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Beniamino; Sellitto, Daniele; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio

    2014-08-01

    It has long been believed that the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is genetically independent from the X chromosome. This idea has been recently dismissed due to the discovery that X-Y gametologous gene conversion may occur. However, the pervasiveness of this molecular process in the evolution of sex chromosomes has yet to be exhaustively analyzed. In this study, we explored how pervasive X-Y gene conversion has been during the evolution of the youngest stratum of the human sex chromosomes. By comparing about 0.5 Mb of human-chimpanzee gametologous sequences, we identified 19 regions in which extensive gene conversion has occurred. From our analysis, two major features of these emerged: 1) Several of them are evolutionarily conserved between the two species and 2) almost all of the 19 hotspots overlap with regions where X-Y crossing-over has been previously reported to be involved in sex reversal. Furthermore, in order to explore the dynamics of X-Y gametologous conversion in recent human evolution, we resequenced these 19 hotspots in 68 widely divergent Y haplogroups and used publicly available single nucleotide polymorphism data for the X chromosome. We found that at least ten hotspots are still active in humans. Hence, the results of the interspecific analysis are consistent with the hypothesis of widespread reticulate evolution within gametologous sequences in the differentiation of hominini sex chromosomes. In turn, intraspecific analysis demonstrates that X-Y gene conversion may modulate human sex-chromosome-sequence evolution to a greater extent than previously thought.

  10. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  12. A DNA sequence evolution analysis generalized by simulation and the markov chain monte carlo method implicates strand slippage in a majority of insertions and deletions.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Manami; Nishizawa, Kazuhisa

    2002-12-01

    To study the mechanisms for local evolutionary changes in DNA sequences involving slippage-type insertions and deletions, an alignment approach is explored that can consider the posterior probabilities of alignment models. Various patterns of insertion and deletion that can link the ancestor and descendant sequences are proposed and evaluated by simulation and compared by the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Analyses of pseudogenes reveal that the introduction of the parameters that control the probability of slippage-type events markedly augments the probability of the observed sequence evolution, arguing that a cryptic involvement of slippage occurrences is manifested as insertions and deletions of short nucleotide segments. Strikingly, approximately 80% of insertions in human pseudogenes and approximately 50% of insertions in murids pseudogenes are likely to be caused by the slippage-mediated process, as represented by BC in ABCD --> ABCBCD. We suggest that, in both human and murids, even very short repetitive motifs, such as CAGCAG, CACACA, and CCCC, have approximately 10- to 15-fold susceptibility to insertions and deletions, compared to nonrepetitive sequences. Our protocol, namely, indel-MCMC, thus seems to be a reasonable approach for statistical analyses of the early phase of microsatellite evolution.

  13. Evolution of the structure and composition of house mouse satellite DNA sequences in the subgenus Mus (Rodentia: Muridea): a cytogenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Cazaux, B; Catalan, J; Justy, F; Escudé, C; Desmarais, E; Britton-Davidian, J

    2013-06-01

    The composition and orientation of the house mouse satellite DNA sequences (minor, major, TLC) were investigated by a FISH and CO-FISH approach in 11 taxa belonging to three clades of the subgenus Mus. Using a phylogenetic framework, our results highlighted two distribution patterns. The TLC satellite, the most recently discovered satellite, was present in all clades but varied quantitatively among species. This distribution supported its appearance in the ancestor of the subgenus followed by independent evolution in species of each clade. In contrast, the minor and major satellites occurred in only two clades of the subgenus indicating the simultaneous and recent amplification of these sequences. In addition, although qualitative differences in the composition and orientation of the satellite sequences were observed among the taxa, none of the features studied were unique to the house mouse and could account for the extensive chromosomal plasticity evidenced in Mus musculus domesticus.

  14. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G. A.; Poelker, M.; Reece, C.; Tiefenback, M.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  15. Tephra sequences as indicators of magma evolution: 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and geochemistry of tephra sequences in the southwest Nevada volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huysken, K. T.; Vogel, T. A.; Layer, P. W.

    2001-04-01

    Changes in rock chemistry with 40Ar/ 39Ar ages in tephra layers record the temporal and magmatic history of two volcanic systems in southwestern Nevada. Tephra layers from the Post-Grouse Canyon tephra sequence record three distinct groups. These groups are chemically distinct and have 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of 13.52±0.06, 13.31±0.18, and 12.95±0.10 Ma. The age groups correspond to three distinct chemical groups based on trace element distributions. These chemical groups cannot be related by any reasonable fractional crystallization or magma mixing model and are interpreted as distinct magma batches. The Pre-Rainier Mesa tephra sequence records two 40Ar/ 39Ar ages (12.79±0.10 and 11.84±0.18 Ma). The upper portion of this sequence is equivalent in age and chemistry to part of the overlying Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet. The lower portion of the sequence is equivalent in age to the underlying Tiva Canyon ash-flow sheet but is chemically distinct from this sheet. The formation of this chemical group is consistent with mixing of low silica Tiva Canyon and high silica, low Th, Rainier Mesa magma. Post-Grouse Canyon magmas were most likely emplaced as a series of small, unrelated magma bodies, which allowed them to evolve independently. The mixed Pre-Rainier Mesa magma was produced by infilling of the Tiva Canyon magma chamber with Rainier Mesa-like magma after eruption of the Tiva Canyon ash-flow sheet at approximately 12.8 Ma. The upper portion of the Pre-Rainier Mesa tephra sequence represents eruption of Rainier Mesa magma less than 0.3 My. before that of the voluminous (1200 km 3) Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet at approximately 11.71 Ma.

  16. Evolution of the Students' Conceptual Understanding in the Case of a Teaching Sequence in Mechanics: Concept of Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Küçüközer, Asuman

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to better understand the construction of the meaning of physics concepts in mechanics during a teaching sequence at the upper secondary school level. In the teaching sessions, students were introduced to the concepts of interaction and force. During this teaching sequence the models called "interactions" and "laws of…

  17. Importance of purine and pyrimidine content of local nucleotide sequences (six bases long) for evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, H

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolves rapidly, and random base change is thought to act as a major factor in this evolution. However, segments of the viral genome differ in their variability: there is the highly variable env gene, particularly hypervariable regions located within env, and, in contrast, the conservative gag and pol genes. Computer analysis of the nucleotide sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates reveals that base substitution in this virus is nonrandom and affected by local nucleotide sequences. Certain local sequences 6 base pairs long are excessively frequent in the hypervariable regions. These sequences exhibit base-substitution hotspots at specific positions in their 6 bases. The hotspots tend to be nonsilent letters of codons in the hypervariable regions--thus leading to marked amino acid substitutions there. Conversely, in the conservative gag and pol genes the hotspots tend to be silent letters because of a difference in codon frame from the hypervariable regions. Furthermore, base substitutions in the local sequences that frequently appear in the conservative genes occurred at a low level, even within the variable env. Thus, despite the high variability of this virus, the conservative genes and their products could be conserved. These may be some of the strategies evolved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to allow for positive-selection pressures, such as the host immune system, and negative-selection pressures on the conservative gene products. Images PMID:1924392

  18. Chloroplast DNA analysis of Tunisian cork oak populations (Quercus suber L.): sequence variations and molecular evolution of the trnL (UAA)-trnF (GAA) region.

    PubMed

    Abdessamad, A; Baraket, G; Sakka, H; Ammari, Y; Ksontini, M; Hannachi, A Salhi

    2016-10-24

    Sequences of the trnL-trnF spacer and combined trnL-trnF region in chloroplast DNA of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) were analyzed to detect polymorphisms and to elucidate molecular evolution and demographic history. The aligned sequences varied in length and nucleotide composition. The overall ratio of transition/transversion (ti/tv) of 0.724 for the intergenic spacer and 0.258 for the pooled sequences were estimated, and indicated that transversions are more frequent than transitions. The molecular evolution and demographic history of Q. suber were investigated. Neutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu and Li) ruled out the null hypothesis of a strictly neutral model, and Fu's Fs and Ramos-Onsins and Rozas' R2 confirmed the recent expansion of cork oak trees, validating its persistency in North Africa since the last glaciation during the Quaternary. The observed uni-modal mismatch distribution and the Harpending's raggedness index confirmed the demographic history model for cork oak. A phylogenetic dendrogram showed that the distribution of Q. suber trees occurs independently of geographical origin, the relief of the population site, and the bioclimatic stages. The molecular history and cytoplasmic diversity suggest that in situ and ex situ conservation strategies can be recommended for preserving landscape value and facing predictable future climatic changes.

  19. Biodiversity Meets Neuroscience: From the