Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated stress conditions

  1. Influence of Accelerated Cooling Condition on Welding Thermal Cycle, Residual Stress, and Deformation in SM490A Steel ESW Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Sun, Jiamin; Dai, Deping; Jiang, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Electro-slag welding (ESW) has been widely used to join the box column because of high productivity. The heat input of ESW is far larger than those of other fusion welding processes, so ESW usually results in a long holding time over certain elevated temperature (∆ t H time), a long cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (∆ t 8/5 time), and a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ). It can be foreseen that the mechanical properties especially fracture toughness of the fusion zone and HAZ will be inferior to those of base metal. As a fundamental research, a computational approach based on MSC.Marc code was developed to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviors in a typical SM490A steel ESW joint under different cooling conditions. Meanwhile, the thermal cycles computed by numerical model were compared with the experimental measurements. Moreover, the influence of accelerated cooling methods on welding residual stress and deformation was examined numerically. Simulation results show that accelerated cooling methods not only can largely shorten ∆ t H time as well as ∆ t 8/5 time and reduce the size of HAZ, but also can affect the residual stress distribution and deformation. It is believed that the accelerated cooling methods proposed by this study potentially improve the mechanical properties of ESW joint.

  2. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A program to investigate the reliability characteristics of unencapsulated low-cost terrestrial solar cells using accelerated stress testing is described. Reliability (or parametric degradation) factors appropriate to the cell technologies and use conditions were studied and a series of accelerated stress tests was synthesized. An electrical measurement procedure and a data analysis and management system was derived, and stress test fixturing and material flow procedures were set up after consideration was given to the number of cells to be stress tested and measured and the nature of the information to be obtained from the process. Selected results and conclusions are presented.

  3. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  4. A study on task difficulty and acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Rogers, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of two experiments which relate to task difficulty and the effects of environmental stress on tracking performance are discussed and compared to subjective evaluations. The first experiment involved five different sum of sine tracking tasks which humans tracked both in a static condition and under a 5 Gz acceleration stress condition. The second experiment involved similar environmental stress conditions but in this case the tasks were constructed from deterministic functions with specially designed velocity and acceleration profiles. Phase Plane performance analysis was conducted to study potential measures of workload or tracking difficulty.

  5. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  6. Acceleration of degradation by highly accelerated stress test and air-included highly accelerated stress test in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Tanahashi, Tadanori; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of hyper-hygrothermal stresses with or without air on the degradation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules, to shorten the required duration of a conventional hygrothermal-stress test [i.e., the “damp heat (DH) stress test”, which is conducted at 85 °C/85% relative humidity for 1,000 h]. Interestingly, the encapsulant within a PV module becomes discolored under the air-included hygrothermal conditions achieved using DH stress test equipment and an air-included highly accelerated stress test (air-HAST) apparatus, but not under the air-excluded hygrothermal conditions realized using a highly accelerated stress test (HAST) machine. In contrast, the reduction in the output power of the PV module is accelerated irrespective of air inclusion in hyper-hygrothermal test atmosphere. From these findings, we conclude that the required duration of the DH stress test will at least be significantly shortened using air-HAST, but not HAST.

  7. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  8. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and posttraumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sadeh, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and then identify mechanisms by which PTSD might promote OXS and accelerated aging. We review studies on OXS-related genes and the role that they may play in moderating the effects of PTSD on neural integrity and conclude with a discussion of directions for future research on antioxidant treatments and biomarkers of accelerated aging in PTSD. PMID:25245500

  9. Cable aging phenomena under accelerated aging conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, A.K.; Beck, C.E.; Alsammarae, A.

    1996-06-01

    A test program was conducted to determine the impact of accelerated (temperature and radiation) aging on the insulation of power cables. The intent was to develop a more realistic model for cable degradation mechanisms, and a more realistic technique for determining a cable`s qualified life. Samples of new cables and samples of cables obtained from an operating plant were subjected to a series of tests. The test showed that the order of imposing the harsh conditions, the presence of oxygen, and the use of a compressive measurement technique each had a significant impact on the results. This paper discusses the test methodology and test samples, the order of imposing artificial aging, and the results. Also presented are issues planned to be addressed in future testing.

  10. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  11. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  12. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  13. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  14. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam. PMID:26932039

  15. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  16. Accelerated Aging during Chronic Oxidative Stress: A Role for PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Boesten, Daniëlle M. P. H. J.; de Vos-Houben, Joyce M. J.; Timmermans, Leen; den Hartog, Gertjan J. M.; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory disease and it has also been linked to accelerated telomere shortening. Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of linear chromosomes that protect these ends from degradation and fusion. Telomeres shorten with each cell division eventually leading to cellular senescence. Research has shown that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and subtelomeric methylation play a role in telomere stability. We hypothesized that PARP-1 plays a role in accelerated aging in chronic inflammatory diseases due to its role as coactivator of NF-κb and AP-1. Therefore we evaluated the effect of chronic PARP-1 inhibition (by fisetin and minocycline) in human fibroblasts (HF) cultured under normal conditions and under conditions of chronic oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). Results showed that PARP-1 inhibition under normal culturing conditions accelerated the rate of telomere shortening. However, under conditions of chronic oxidative stress, PARP-1 inhibition did not show accelerated telomere shortening. We also observed a strong correlation between telomere length and subtelomeric methylation status of HF cells. We conclude that chronic PARP-1 inhibition appears to be beneficial in conditions of chronic oxidative stress but may be detrimental under relatively normal conditions. PMID:24319532

  17. Measuring Science Teachers' Stress Level Triggered by Multiple Stressful Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halim, Lilia; Samsudin, Mohd Ali; Meerah, T. Subahan M.; Osman, Kamisah

    2006-01-01

    The complexity of science teaching requires science teachers to encounter a range of tasks. Some tasks are perceived as stressful while others are not. This study aims to investigate the extent to which different teaching situations lead to different stress levels. It also aims to identify the easiest and most difficult conditions to be regarded…

  18. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  19. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  20. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  1. Can hydromorphic conditions accelerate soil development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Horváth-Szabó, Kata; Réka Balázs, Brigitta; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The formation and development of waterlogged (hydromorphic) soils are primarily determined by long-term water saturation. The presence of water in the profile can result increasing speed of soil forming processes including the accumulation of organic matter or other components and mineralogical transformations. Original papers refer more than hundreds of years for this kinds of mineral transformations. We suppose that this process could be more rapid. This study focuses on the mineralogical investigation of a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) located in a swampy area in Central Hungary. The starting time of the soil formation is a well documented fact: the parent material deposited during an extremely heavy flood event in the 1960s. Therefore, the studied soil profile is the result of the last half century. Our aim was to explore the degree of mineral phase alteration via soil formation during a half-century under hydromorphic conditions. Routine laboratory measurements (selective dissolution methods for the determination of amorphous and crystalline Fe, and Mn content, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurements for elemental composition determination, X-ray powder diffraction for mineralogical composition, and particle sizing by laser diffraction) were implemented. Morphological and chemical study of carbonate and iron nodules was carried out by electron microprobe. Simple chemical tests (eg. Fe2+ indication by dipiridil test) and morphological observations were performed on the field. Redox potential (Eh) and pH were measured in 20 cm and 40 cm depths by field monitoring station during the vegetation period. Results show that well developed horizons have emerged during fifty years in the studied soil profile. The most intense mineralogical transformations developed in the zone of the heaviest redox oscillation. Soil formation under hydromorphic conditions proceeds at higher speeds contrariwise to the century time scale reported in

  2. Stability of lysozyme in aqueous extremolyte solutions during heat shock and accelerated thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Avanti, Christina; Saluja, Vinay; van Streun, Erwin L P; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of lysozyme in aqueous solutions in the presence of various extremolytes (betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose, ectoine, and firoin) under different stress conditions. The stability of lysozyme was determined by Nile red Fluorescence Spectroscopy and a bioactivity assay. During heat shock (10 min at 70°C), betaine, trehalose, ectoin and firoin protected lysozyme against inactivation while hydroxyectoine, did not have a significant effect. During accelerated thermal conditions (4 weeks at 55°C), firoin also acted as a stabilizer. In contrast, betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose and ectoine destabilized lysozyme under this condition. These findings surprisingly indicate that some extremolytes can stabilize a protein under certain stress conditions but destabilize the same protein under other stress conditions. Therefore it is suggested that for the screening extremolytes to be used for protein stabilization, an appropriate storage conditions should also be taken into account. PMID:24465983

  3. Comparison of the conditioning of high gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Wuensch, Walter; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV /m , at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous prototype CLIC accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of rf pulses and not with the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  4. Simulation of cardiovascular response to acceleration stress following weightless exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Leonard, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    Physiological adjustments taking place during space flight tend to reduce the tolerance of the crew to headward (+Gz) acceleration experienced during the reentry phase of the flight. This reduced tolerance to acceleration stress apparently arises from an adaptation to the microgravity environment of space, including a decrease in the total circulating blood volume. Countermeasures such as anti-g garments have long been known to improve the tolerance to headward g-force, but their effectiveness in space flight has not been fully evaluated. The simulation study presented in this paper is concerned with the response of the cardiovascular system to g-stress following cardiovascular deconditioning, resulting from exposure to weightlessness, or any of its ground-based experimental analogs. The results serve to demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling and computer simulation for studying the causes of orthostatic intolerance and the remedial measures to lessen it.

  5. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  6. Activation of NADPH-recycling systems in leaves and roots of Arabidopsis thaliana under arsenic-induced stress conditions is accelerated by knock-out of Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) gene.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Aguayo-Trinidad, Simeón; Ogawa, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2016-03-15

    NADPH is an important cofactor in cell growth, proliferation and detoxification. Arabidopsis thaliana Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) belongs to a family of proteins defined by the conserved amino-acid sequence GX5-EX7REUXEEXGU which has the capacity to hydrolyze NADPH as a physiological substrate in vivo. Given the importance of NADPH in the cellular redox homeostasis of plants, the present study compares the responses of the main NADPH-recycling systems including NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (ME) in the leaves and roots of Arabidopsis wild-type (Wt) and knock-out (KO) AtNUDX19 mutant (Atnudx19) plants under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions. Two major features were observed in the behavior of the main NADPH-recycling systems: (i) under optimal conditions in both organs, the levels of these activities were higher in nudx19 mutants than in Wt plants; and, (ii) under 500μM AsV conditions, these activities increase, especially in nudx19 mutant plants. Moreover, G6PDH activity in roots was the most affected enzyme in both Wt and nudx19 mutant plants, with a 4.6-fold and 5.0-fold increase, respectively. In summary, the data reveals a connection between the absence of chloroplastic AtNUDX19 and the rise in all NADP-dehydrogenase activities under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions, particularly in roots. This suggests that AtNUDX19 could be a key factor in modulating the NADPH pool in plants and consequently in redox homeostasis. PMID:26878367

  7. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to {minus}2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO{sub 2} exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO{sub 2}. This CO{sub 2}-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO{sub 2} recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations.

  8. Roof support performance in high stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mucho, T.P.; Mark, C.; Zelanko, J.C.; Compton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    To document the performance of mine roof and roof support systems the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) has been installing instrumentation at selected sites in US coal mines. Much of this support and roof instrumentation has been installed in high stress conditions to maximize differences in performance. Summarized in this paper are the results of four such site investigations. The roof geology at the four sites is quite different and is quantified using the USBM`s Coal Mine Roof Rating (CMRR). The studies included detailed measurements of roof movement using multi-point extensometers, as well as measurements and monitoring of bolt loading. The investigations include developmental loading and abutment loading from longwall and room-and-pillar mining operations. Some of the issues examined are the effect of the horizontal stress field, the effect of installed tension (torque-tension versus resin bolts), the effect of reduced annulus bolt holes, and the differences between similar bolts supplied by different manufacturers.

  9. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  10. Transport synthetic acceleration with opposing reflecting boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme is extended to problems with opposing reflecting boundary conditions. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. A procedure is developed that allows the use of the conjugate gradient (CG) method to solve the resulting low-order system of equations. Several well-known transport iteration algorithms are cast in a linear algebraic form to show their equivalence to standard iterative techniques. Source iteration in the presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions is shown to be equivalent to a (poorly) preconditioned stationary Richardson iteration, with the preconditioner defined by the method of iterating on the incident fluxes on the reflecting boundaries. The TSA method (and any synthetic method) amounts to a further preconditioning of the Richardson iteration. The presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions requires special consideration when developing a procedure to realize the CG method for the proposed system of equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite matrices; this condition requires the algebraic elimination of the boundary angular corrections from the low-order equations. As a consequence of this elimination, evaluating the action of the resulting matrix on an arbitrary vector involves two transport sweeps and a transmission iteration. Results of applying the acceleration scheme to a simple test problem are presented.

  11. Accelerated stress testing of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, W. G.; Davis, C. W.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for performing accelerated stress tests of large-area thin a-Si solar cells is presented. A computer-controlled short-interval test system employing low-cost ac-powered ELH illumination and a simulated a-Si reference cell (seven individually bandpass-filtered zero-biased crystalline PIN photodiodes) calibrated to the response of an a-Si control cell is described and illustrated with flow diagrams, drawings, and graphs. Preliminary results indicate that while most tests of a program developed for c-Si cells are applicable to a-Si cells, spurious degradation may appear in a-Si cells tested at temperatures above 130 C.

  12. Psychological stress associated with cardiogenetic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hidayatallah, Nadia; Silverstein, Louise B; Stolerman, Marina; McDonald, Thomas; Walsh, Christine A; Paljevic, Esma; Cohen, Lilian L; Marion, Robert W; Wasserman, David; Hreyo, Sarah; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2014-01-01

    Aim Genetic testing now makes it possible to identify specific mutations that may lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. This article presents data from a qualitative research study that explored the subjective experiences of individuals and families with cardiogenetic conditions. We focus on describing patients’ experiences of psychological stresses associated with having a cardiogenetic condition, illustrating the importance of integrating psychological and medical care. This integration of care is particularly important as personalized genomic medicine continues to evolve and the implications of genetic testing have a profound effect on individuals and families. Methods The researchers interviewed 50 participants from 32 families. The research team used a systematic, grounded theory procedure to code and analyze interview and focus group transcripts, incorporating multiple coders at several stages of the data analysis process. Results Three major themes emerged: a bereavement trajectory associated with sudden death in the absence of prior symptoms; high anxiety about transmitting a genetic mutation; and resilience reflected in positive lifestyle changes and participation in support groups. Conclusion This article identifies patient perspectives on personalized genomic medicine in cardiogenetics that can improve clinical care, including: specialized bereavement counseling; improving education about cardiogenetic conditions for medical professionals; parent guidelines for discussing cardiogenetic conditions with their children; information about support groups; and the routine inclusion of clinical psychologists in interdisciplinary treatment teams. Given recent advances in technology and decreasing costs, whole-genome sequencing is likely to become common practice in the near future. Therefore, these recommendations are likely to be relevant for other genetic conditions, as well as the entire field of personalized genomic medicine. PMID:25431604

  13. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  14. Accelerated aging of outdoor insulation under acid rain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Nancy Ellen

    2000-11-01

    Outdoor insulation has evolved from glass to ceramics to epoxy in the past decades, and more recently into the area of polymer composites. Accelerated aging must be performed to examine the effectiveness of materials prior to use under actual service conditions. Traditionally this aging has been performed with sodium chloride as the conductive component in the high humidity and wet tests. This approach does not necessarily represent actual service conditions, as globally the precipitation is acidic in nature and contains many constituents in addition to sodium and chloride. The main focus of this work was to examine the effect of acid precipitation on materials used in outdoor insulation applications. This was achieved through the use of a rotating tracking wheel and a controlled high humidity chamber with the application of a synthetic acid rain solution. The analysis techniques utilized to examine the results of the accelerated aging were leakage current monitoring, evaluation of changes in dielectric properties as well as electron microscopy. In addition, changes in hydrophobicity were quantified. Based on experimental observations, a first order life prediction model was developed to investigate the usefulness of the acid rain aging technique. This model was founded on the results of a series of tests conducted with varying solution conductivity, while maintaining constant acid content. This model permits the prediction of the life of a material at normal precipitation conductivity levels.

  15. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  16. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL PARTICLES UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Zhang, M. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2013-02-10

    The acceleration of suprathermal charged particles in the heliosphere under pressure balance conditions including for the first time the radial spatial particle diffusion and convection in the solar wind is investigated. The physical conditions are derived for which the stationary phase space distribution of suprathermal particles approaches the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5}, which is often seen in spacecraft observations. For separable source distributions in momentum and position we analytically solve the stationary particle transport equation for a radially constant solar wind speed V {sub 0} and a momentum-independent radial spatial diffusion coefficient. The resulting stationary solution at any position within the finite heliosphere is the superposition of an infinite sum of power laws in momentum below and above the (assumed mono-momentum) injection momentum p{sub I} . The smallest spatial eigenvalue determines the flattest power law, to which the full stationary solution approaches at large and small enough momenta. Only for the case of a reflecting inner and a free-escape outer spatial boundary, does one small eigenvalue exist, yielding the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5} at sufficiently large momentum values. The other three spatial boundary conditions imply steeper momentum spectra. Momentum spectra and radial profiles of suprathermal particles are calculated by adopting a uniform outer ring spatial source distribution.

  17. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clint J; Søvik, Eirik; Myerscough, Mary R; Barron, Andrew B

    2015-03-17

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience. PMID:25675508

  18. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Clint J.; Myerscough, Mary R.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience. PMID:25675508

  19. Early life stress accelerates behavioral and neural maturation of the hippocampus in male mice.

    PubMed

    K G, Bath; G, Manzano-Nieves; H, Goodwill

    2016-06-01

    Early life stress (ELS) increases the risk for later cognitive and emotional dysfunction. ELS is known to truncate neural development through effects on suppressing cell birth, increasing cell death, and altering neuronal morphology, effects that have been associated with behavioral profiles indicative of precocious maturation. However, how earlier silencing of growth drives accelerated behavioral maturation has remained puzzling. Here, we test the novel hypothesis that, ELS drives a switch from growth to maturation to accelerate neural and behavioral development. To test this, we used a mouse model of ELS, fragmented maternal care, and a cross-sectional dense sampling approach focusing on hippocampus and measured effects of ELS on the ontogeny of behavioral development and biomarkers of neural maturation. Consistent with previous work, ELS was associated with an earlier developmental decline in expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and differentiation (doublecortin). However, ELS also led to a precocious arrival of Parvalbumin-positive cells, led to an earlier switch in NMDA receptor subunit expression (marker of synaptic maturity), and was associated with an earlier rise in myelin basic protein expression (key component of the myelin sheath). In addition, in a contextual fear-conditioning task, ELS accelerated the timed developmental suppression of contextual fear. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that ELS serves to switch neurodevelopment from processes of growth to maturation and promotes accelerated development of some forms of emotional learning. PMID:27155103

  20. StressMicrobesInfo: Database of Microorganisms Responsive to Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Rai, Anil

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms are continuously exposed to numerous stress conditions and had evolved with numerous evolutionary adaptations and physiological acclimation mechanisms against stress effects. Any information related to the microbes responsive to stress conditions will help scientists working in the area of stress biology. Currently, there is lack of information resource on this aspect and for getting information about microbes susceptible or tolerant to different environmental changes, literature searching is the only option. Here, we present a database StressMicrobesInfo that was developed with a mandate to provide information about microbes responding to various biotic and abiotic stress conditions. This database currently contains information about 183 microbes along with a brief detail for each. StressMicrobesInfo will facilitate researchers working on stress-related microbes as a starting point and will facilitate them with the microbes which are susceptible or resistant towards particular stress conditions. PMID:26264053

  1. Protein Quality Control Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the E. coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and of how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  2. Protein quality control under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-04-10

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and we will review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the Escherichia coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobulin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  3. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior for Pt catalysts supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Vulcan XC-72 in proton exchange membrane fuel cells under accelerated stress test was examined by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization technique. Pt catalyst supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes exhibited highly stable electrochemical surface area, oxygen reduction kinetics, and fuel cell performance at a highly oxidizing condition, indicating multiwalled carbon nanotubes show high corrosion resistance and strong interaction with Pt nanoparticles. The Tafel slope, ohmic resistances, and limiting current density determined were used to differentiate kinetic, ohmic, mass-transfer polarization losses from the actual polarization curve. Kinetic contribution to the total overpotential was larger throughout the stress test. However, the fraction of kinetic overpotential decreased and mass-transfer overpotential portion remained quite constant during accelerated stress test, whereas the fraction of ohmic overpotential primarily originating from severe proton transport limitation in the catalyst layer increased under the anodic potential hold.

  4. Fault stability under conditions of variable normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Linker, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of fault slip under conditions of varying normal stress is modelled as a spring and slider system with rate- and state-dependent friction. Coupling of normal stress to shear stress is achieved by inclining the spring at an angle, ??, to the sliding surface. Linear analysis yields two conditions for unstable slip. The first, of a type previously identified for constant normal stress systems, results in instability if stiffness is below a critical value. Critical stiffness depends on normal stress, constitutive parameters, characteristic sliding distance and the spring angle. Instability of the first type is possible only for velocity-weakening friction. The second condition yields instability if spring angle ?? <-cot-1??ss, where ??ss is steady-state sliding friction. The second condition can arise under conditions of velocity strengthening or weakening. Stability fields for finite perturbations are investigated by numerical simulation. -Authors

  5. Long-term moderate exercise accelerates the recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yuan-Chang; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Yu, Lung; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Wu, Fong-Sen; Jen, Chauying J; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an important global health problem. It is well documented that stress increases the incidences of various cardiovascular disorders. Regular exercise is known to reduce resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). This study was designed to clarify the effects of long-term exercise on stress-evoked cardiovascular responses and to emphasize post-stress recovery effects. Male Wistar rats underwent 8 weeks of moderate treadmill training, with cardiovascular responses, autonomic nervous system activities and local Fos reactivity changes in the cardiovascular regulation center were monitored before, during and after immobilization stress. A spectral analysis of cardiovascular parameters was used to examine autonomic nervous activities. We found that long-term exercise (i) lowered resting BP, HR and sympathetic activity, but increased resting parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS); (ii) accelerated post-stress recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular and sympathetic responses along with increased BRS and (iii) accelerated post-stress recovery of stress-evoked neuron activations in the paraventricular nucleus, but delayed it in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius. We conclude that, in rats, long-term exercise accelerated recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular responses differentially altering hypothalamic and medullar neuron activities. PMID:26473638

  6. Comparison of acceleration and impact stress as possible loading factors in phonation: a computer modeling study.

    PubMed

    Horácek, Jaromír; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Sidlof, Petr; Murphy, Peter; Svec, Jan G

    2009-01-01

    Impact stress (the impact force divided by the contact area of the vocal folds) has been suspected to be the main traumatizing mechanism in voice production, and the main cause of vocal fold nodules. However, there are also other factors, such as the repetitive acceleration and deceleration, which may traumatize the vocal fold tissues. Using an aeroelastic model of voice production, the present study quantifies the acceleration and impact stress values in relation to lung pressure, fundamental frequency (F0) and prephonatory glottal half-width. Both impact stress and acceleration were found to increase with lung pressure. Compared to impact stress, acceleration was less dependent on prephonatory glottal width and, thus, on voice production type. Maximum acceleration values were about 5-10 times greater for high F0 (approx. 400 Hz) compared to low F0 (approx. 100 Hz), whereas maximum impact stress remained nearly unchanged. This suggests that acceleration, i.e. the inertia forces, may present at high F0 a greater load for the vocal folds, and in addition to the collision forces may contribute to the fact that females develop vocal fold nodules and other vocal fold traumas more frequently than males. PMID:19571548

  7. Calculation of structural dynamic forces and stresses using mode acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul

    1989-01-01

    While the standard mode acceleration formulation in structural dynamics has often been interpreted to suggest that the reason for improved convergence obtainable is that the dynamic correction factor is divided by the modal frequencies-squared, an alternative formulation is presented which clearly indicates that the only difference between mode acceleration and mode displacement data recovery is the addition of a static correction term. Attention is given to the advantages in numerical implementation associated with this alternative, as well as to an illustrative example.

  8. Helical flows of second grade fluid due to constantly accelerated shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, M.; Rauf, A.; Fetecau, C.; Khan, N. A.

    2011-04-01

    The helical flows of second grade fluid between two infinite coaxial circular cylinders is considered. The motion is produced by the inner cylinder that at the initial moment applies torsional and longitudinal constantly accelerated shear stresses to the fluid. The exact analytic solutions, obtained by employing the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in term of usual Bessel functions of first and second kind, satisfy both the governing equations and all imposed initial and boundary conditions. In the limiting case when α → 0, the solutions for Newtonian fluid are obtained for the same motion. The large-time solutions and transient solutions for second grade fluid are also obtained, and effect of material parameter α and kinematic viscosity ν is discussed. In the last, the effects of various parameters of interest on fluid motion as well as the comparison between second grade and Newtonian fluids are analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  9. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  10. Modeling heat stress under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Carabaño, M J; Logar, B; Bormann, J; Minet, J; Vanrobays, M-L; Díaz, C; Tychon, B; Gengler, N; Hammami, H

    2016-05-01

    Renewed interest in heat stress effects on livestock productivity derives from climate change, which is expected to increase temperatures and the frequency of extreme weather events. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of temperature and humidity on milk production in highly selected dairy cattle populations across 3 European regions differing in climate and production systems to detect differences and similarities that can be used to optimize heat stress (HS) effect modeling. Milk, fat, and protein test day data from official milk recording for 1999 to 2010 in 4 Holstein populations located in the Walloon Region of Belgium (BEL), Luxembourg (LUX), Slovenia (SLO), and southern Spain (SPA) were merged with temperature and humidity data provided by the state meteorological agencies. After merging, the number of test day records/cows per trait ranged from 686,726/49,655 in SLO to 1,982,047/136,746 in BEL. Values for the daily average and maximum temperature-humidity index (THIavg and THImax) ranges for THIavg/THImax were largest in SLO (22-74/28-84) and shortest in SPA (39-76/46-83). Change point techniques were used to determine comfort thresholds, which differed across traits and climatic regions. Milk yield showed an inverted U-shaped pattern of response across the THI scale with a HS threshold around 73 THImax units. For fat and protein, thresholds were lower than for milk yield and were shifted around 6 THI units toward larger values in SPA compared with the other countries. Fat showed lower HS thresholds than protein traits in all countries. The traditional broken line model was compared with quadratic and cubic fits of the pattern of response in production to increasing heat loads. A cubic polynomial model allowing for individual variation in patterns of response and THIavg as heat load measure showed the best statistical features. Higher/lower producing animals showed less/more persistent production (quantity and quality) across the THI scale. The

  11. Sustained acceleration of colonic transit following chronic homotypic stress in oxytocin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2011-05-01

    Acute restraint stress delays gastric emptying and accelerates colonic transit via central corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in rats. In contrast, central oxytocin has anxiolytic effects and attenuates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in response to stress. Our recent study showed that up regulated oxytocin expression attenuates hypothalamic CRF expression and restores impaired gastric motility following chronic homotypic stress in mice. We studied the effects of acute and chronic homotypic stress on colonic transit and hypothalamic CRF mRNA expression in wild type (WT) and oxytocin knockout (OXT-KO) mice. Colonic transit was measured following acute restraint stress or chronic homotypic stress (repeated restraint stress for 5 consecutive days). (51)Cr was injected via a catheter into the proximal colon. Ninety minutes after restraint stress loading, the entire colon was removed. The geometric center (GC) was calculated to evaluate colonic transit. Expression of CRF mRNA in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) was measured by real time RT-PCR. Colonic transit was significantly accelerated following acute stress in WT (GC=8.1±0.8; n=7) and OXT KO mice (GC=9.4±0.3; n=7). The accelerated colonic transit was significantly attenuated in WT mice (GC=6.6±0.5; n=9) following chronic homotypic stress while it was still accelerated in OXT KO mice (GC=9.3±0.5; n=8). The increase in CRF mRNA expression at the SON was much greater in OXT-KO mice, compared to WT mice following chronic homotypic stress. It is suggested that oxytocin plays a pivotal role in mediating the adaptation mechanism following chronic homotypic stress in mice. PMID:21439349

  12. Maximum von Mises Stress in the Loading Environment of Mass Acceleration Curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Robert J.; Chen, Long Y.

    2006-01-01

    Method for calculating stress due to acceleration loading: 1) Part has been designed by FEA and hand calculation in one critical loading direction judged by the analyst; 2) Maximum stress can be due to loading in another direction; 3) Analysis procedure to be presented determines: a) The maximum Mises stress at any point; and b) The direction of maximum loading associated with the "stress". Concept of Mass Acceleration Curves (MAC): 1) Developed by JPL to perform preliminary structural sizing (i.e. Mariners, Voyager, Galileo, Pathfinder, MER,...MSL); 2) Acceleration of physical masses are bounded by a curve; 3) G-levels of vibro-acoustic and transient environments; 4) Convergent process before the couple loads cycle; and 5) Semi-empirical method to effectively bound the loads, not a simulation of the actual response.

  13. Setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, J.; Karlis, G.F.; Malinowski, L.J.; Beer, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a methodology for setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models is proposed. The developed algorithm is applicable to discrete or coupled discrete/continuum modeling of underground excavation employing the discrete element method (DEM). Since the DEM works with contact forces rather than stresses there is a need for the conversion of pre-excavation stresses to contact forces for the DEM model. Different possibilities of setting up virgin stress conditions in the DEM model are reviewed and critically assessed. Finally, a new method to obtain a discrete element model with contact forces equivalent to given macroscopic virgin stresses is proposed. The test examples presented show that good results may be obtained regardless of the shape of the DEM domain. PMID:27087731

  14. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  15. Bacopa monnieri promotes longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Phulara, Suresh C.; Shukla, Virendra; Tiwari, Sudeep; Pandey, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacopa monnieri (L.) Pennell, commonly known as Brahmi is an important medicinal plant traditionally used as memory enhancer and antiepileptic agent. Objective: The present study investigated antioxidant and stress resistance potentials of B. monnieri aqueous extract (BMW) using Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity of the BMW was measured using in vitro (DPPH, reducing power and total polyphenol content) and in vivo (DCF-DA assay) assays. The antistress potential of BMW (0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 mg/ml) was evaluated through thermal stress (37°C) and oxidative stress (10 mM paraquat) using C. elegans. Quantification of the HSP-16.2 level was done using CL2070 transgenic worms. Results: Present study reveals that BMW possess in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. BMW significantly enhanced stress tolerance and increased the mean lifespan of worms during thermal and oxidative stress, although it did not extend lifespan at 20°C and attenuated age dependent decline in physiological behaviors. Moreover, it was shown that BMW was able to up-regulate expression of stress associated gene hsp-16.2, which significantly (P < 0.001) extends the mean lifespan of worms under stress conditions. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that BMW acts as an antistressor and potent reactive oxygen species scavenger which enhances the survival of the worms in different stress conditions. PMID:25829783

  16. Power-conditioning system for the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Smith, M.E.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, D.R.; Cook, E.G.; Copp, R.L.; Lee, F.D.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D.; Speckert, G.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed, linear induction, electron accelerator currently under construction and nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 near Livermore, California. The ATA is a 50 MeV, 10 kA machine capable of generating electron beam pulses at a 1 kHz rate in a 10 pulse burst, 5 pps average, with a pulse width of 70 ns FWHM. Ten 18 kV power supplies are used to charge 25 capacitor banks with a total energy storage of 8 megajoules. Energy is transferred from the capacitor banks in 500 microsecond pulses through 25 Command Resonant Charge units (CRC) to 233 Thyratron Switch Chassis. Each Thyratron Switch Chassis contains a 2.5 microfarad capacitor and is charged to 25 kV (780 joules) with voltage regulation of +- .05%. These capacitors are switched into 10:1 step-up resonant transformers to charge 233 Blumleins to 250 kV in 20 microseconds. A magnetic modulator is used instead of a Blumlein to drive the grid of the injector.

  17. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  18. Bayesian Analysis of Step-Stress Accelerated Life Test with Exponential Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Pan, R.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we propose a general Bayesian inference approach to the step-stress accelerated life test with type II censoring. We assume that the failure times at each stress level are exponentially distributed and the test units are tested in an increasing order of stress levels. We formulate the prior distribution of the parameters of life-stress function and integrate the engineering knowledge of product failure rate and acceleration factor into the prior. The posterior distribution and the point estimates for the parameters of interest are provided. Through the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrate a nonconjugate prior case using an industrial example. It is shown that with the Bayesian approach, the statistical precision of parameter estimation is improved and, consequently, the required number of failures could be reduced.

  19. Association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity emerges under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Everaerd, Daphne; Klumpers, Floris; van Wingen, Guido; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-05-15

    Increased amygdala reactivity in response to salient stimuli is seen in patients with affective disorders, in healthy subjects at risk for these disorders, and in stressed individuals, making it a prime target for mechanistic studies into the pathophysiology of affective disorders. However, whereas individual differences in neuroticism are thought to modulate the effect of stress on mental health, the mechanistic link between stress, neuroticism and amygdala responsivity is unknown. Thus, we studied the relationship between experimentally induced stress, individual differences in neuroticism, and amygdala responsivity. To this end, fearful and happy faces were presented to a large cohort of young, healthy males (n=120) in two separate functional MRI sessions (stress versus control) in a randomized, controlled cross-over design. We revealed that amygdala reactivity was modulated by an interaction between the factors of stress, neuroticism, and the emotional valence of the facial stimuli. Follow-up analysis showed that neuroticism selectively enhanced amygdala responses to fearful faces in the stress condition. Thus, we show that stress unmasks an association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity to potentially threatening stimuli. This effect constitutes a possible mechanistic link within the complex pathophysiology of affective disorders, and our novel approach appears suitable for further studies targeting the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25776217

  20. Enhancement of wind stress evaluation method under storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjian; Yu, Xiping

    2016-02-01

    Wind stress is an important driving force for many meteorological and oceanographical processes. However, most of the existing methods for evaluation of the wind stress, including various bulk formulas in terms of the wind speed at a given height and formulas relating the roughness height of the sea surface with wind conditions, predict an ever-increasing tendency of the wind stress coefficient as the wind speed increases, which is inconsistent with the field observations under storm conditions. The wave boundary layer model, which is based on the momentum and energy conservation, has the advantage to take into account the physical details of the air-sea interaction process, but is still invalid under storm conditions without a modification. By including the energy dissipation due to the presence of sea spray, which is speculated to be an important aspect of the air-sea interaction under storm conditions, the wave boundary layer model is improved in this study. The improved model is employed to estimate the wind stress caused by an idealized tropical cyclone motion. The computational results show that the wind stress coefficient reaches its maximal value at a wind speed of about 40 m/s and decreases as the wind speed further increases. This is in fairly good agreement with the field data.

  1. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Simon, Terrence W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong streamwise acceleration. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. Mean flow characteristics as well as turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Spectral analysis was applied to describe the effects of turbulence scales of different sizes during transition. To the authors'knowledge, this is the first detailed documentation of boundary layer transition under such high free-stream turbulence conditions.

  2. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  3. Characterization of soluble microbial products (SMP) under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Tong

    2010-10-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) in the wastewater treatment process not only cause fouling to the membrane, but also generate disinfection by-products (DBP) in the effluent, thus get increasing attention. In this study, SMP produced by activated sludge and isolates under different stressful conditions, i.e. starvation, salinity, heavy metals, low pH and high temperature, were characterized to investigate the effects of these conditions on the amount of SMP and their compositions. The analysis results using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fluorescence excitation emission matrix (FEEM) showed that activated sludge and isolates suffered with the same stressful condition contained almost the same concentration and composition of SMP, indicating that the stressful condition instead of the microbial species played the crucial role in the production of SMP. Among of stressful conditions tested, high temperature had stimulated the production of polysaccharides and polycarboxylate-type humic acid with high hydrophilicity, which is in positive proportion to the foulants formation potential, thus should be avoided in membrane bioreactors. Low pH had promoted the generation of hydrophobic humic acid-like or protein-like organics, which had been proved as the main disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor, thus should be avoided in the biological treatment. Starvation had less effect on SMP production as the seeding microbes had no substrates. PMID:20655085

  4. Quantum corrections to the stress-energy tensor in thermodynamic equilibrium with acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Grossi, E.

    2015-08-01

    We show that the stress-energy tensor has additional terms with respect to the ideal form in states of global thermodynamic equilibrium in flat spacetime with nonvanishing acceleration and vorticity. These corrections are of quantum origin and their leading terms are second order in the gradients of the thermodynamic fields. Their relevant coefficients can be expressed in terms of correlators of the stress-energy tensor operator and the generators of the Lorentz group. With respect to previous assessments, we find that there are more second-order coefficients and that all thermodynamic functions including energy density receive acceleration and vorticity dependent corrections. Notably, also the relation between ρ and p , that is, the equation of state, is affected by acceleration and vorticity. We have calculated the corrections for a free real scalar field—both massive and massless—and we have found that they increase, particularly for a massive field, at very high acceleration and vorticity and very low temperature. Finally, these nonideal terms depend on the explicit form of the stress-energy operator, implying that different stress-energy tensors of the scalar field—canonical or improved—are thermodynamically inequivalent.

  5. NRF2 Regulates PINK1 Expression under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Hitoshi; Takamatsu, Hitoshi; Liu, Sulai; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam-ho; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson’s disease. Recent studies have revealed that PINK1 is an essential factor for controlling mitochondrial quality, and that it protects cells from oxidative stresses. Although there has been considerable progress in the elucidation of various aspects of PINK1 protein regulation such as activation, stability and degradation, the transcriptional regulation of PINK1 mRNA under stress conditions remains unclear. In this study, we found that nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), an antioxidant transcription factor, regulates PINK1 expression under oxidative stress conditions. Damaged mitochondria arising from stress conditions induced NRF2-dependent transcription of the PINK1 gene through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either an ROS scavenger or forced expression of KEAP1, a potent inhibitory partner to NRF2, restricted PINK1 expression induced by activated NRF2. Transcriptionally up-regulated PINK1 diminished oxidative stress-associated cell death. The results indicate that PINK1 expression is positively regulated by NRF2 and that the NRF2-PINK1 signaling axis is deeply involved in cell survival. PMID:26555609

  6. Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization in stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caimi, Perry G; Emptage, Mark; Li, Xu; Viitanen, Paul V; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min

    2013-06-18

    Strains of xylose utilizing Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization and ethanol production during fermentation in stress conditions were obtained using an adaptation method. The adaptation involved continuously growing xylose utilizing Zymomonas in media containing high sugars, acetic acid, ammonia, and ethanol.

  7. Stressed and Deformed Condition of the Grounds Around Driven Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhusupbekov, A. Zh.; Zhusupbekov, A. A.; Zhakulin, A. S.; Tanaka, T.; Okajima, K.; Belovitch, A. J.; Sultanov, G. A.

    The paper highlights the soil characteristics on the territory of the Republic of Kazakhstan along with the basic theses of the elastic and plastic soil models elaborated by the authors through solving the physical non-linear mixed problem of the elasticity and plasticity theory to describe the initial stressed and deformed condition of water saturated grounds with consideration of the pore pressure.

  8. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of accelerated stress testing of four different types of silicon terrestrial solar cells are discussed. The accelerated stress tests used included bias-temperature tests, bias-temperature-humidity tests, thermal cycle and thermal shock tests, and power cycle tests. Characterization of the cells was performed before stress testing and at periodic down-times, using electrical measurement, visual inspection, and metal adherence pull tests. Electrical parameters measured included short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and output power, voltage, and current at the maximum power point. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of the prestress electrical data for all cell types. Data were also obtained on cell series and shunt resistance.

  9. Behavior of Materials Under Conditions of Thermal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S S

    1954-01-01

    A review is presented of available information on the behavior of brittle and ductile materials under conditions of thermal stress and thermal shock. For brittle materials, a simple formula relating physical properties to thermal-shock resistance is derived and used to determine the relative significance of two indices currently in use for rating materials. For ductile materials, thermal-shock resistance depends upon the complex interrelation among several metallurgical variables which seriously affect strength and ductility. These variables are briefly discussed and illustrated from literature sources. The importance of simulating operating conditions in tests for rating materials is especially to be emphasized because of the importance of testing conditions in metallurgy. A number of practical methods that have been used to minimize the deleterious effects of thermal stress and thermal shock are outlined.

  10. Accelerated resolution therapy: an innovative mental health intervention to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Kip, K; Hernandez, D; McGhee, S; Rosenzweig, L; Hynes, C; Thomas, M

    2016-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling trauma and stress-related disorder that may occur after a person experiences a traumatic event, and evokes a combination of intrusion and avoidance symptoms, negative alterations in cognitions and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. Accelerated resolution therapy (ART) is an emerging psychotherapy that provides fast and lasting resolution for mental health problems such as PTSD. ART has been shown to achieve a positive result in one to five sessions, typically over a 2-week period, and requires no homework, skills practice or repeated exposure to targeted events. Initial research, including one randomised control trial, has demonstrated that ART interventions can significantly reduce symptoms of psychological trauma in both civilians and US service members and veterans. These results suggest that ART be considered as either a primary treatment option or for refractory PTSD in those with a suboptimal response to endorsed first-line therapies. Conservative estimates indicate substantial potential cost savings in PTSD treatment. Despite the need for more definitive clinical trials, there is increasing interest in ART in the USA, including in the US Army. The growing positive empirical evidence is compelling, and there appears to be sufficient evidence to warrant UK researchers undertaking ART research. The armed forces offer the potential for comparative international trials. However, equally important are veterans, emergency services personnel and those subjected to violence. ART appears to also have application in other conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol or drug misuse. ART can potentially help personnel traumatised by the unique challenges of war and conflict zones by providing brief psychotherapy in a readily accessible and culturally competent manner. ART facilitates the provision of interventions and resolutions in theatre, thus enhancing forces' fighting capability

  11. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  12. Accelerated versus traditional nursing students: a comparison of stress, critical thinking ability and performance.

    PubMed

    Yousseff, F A; Goodrich, N

    1996-02-01

    A high demand for graduate nurses and a dwindling pool of nursing school applicants have led several collegiate nursing programs to adopt innovative programs to increase the number of eligible applicants. One option is the development of accelerated nursing program. Because of the relative newness of these programs, the need to ascertain data about accelerated students and their success in these programs is vital. This prospective study examines the differences in stress levels, critical thinking ability, and performance of traditional and accelerated nursing students. A voluntary convenient sample (n = 94) was used from nursing students enrolled in the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Scale of Judgmental Abilities were used to measure the two independent variables. The grade point average in nursing courses and the National Council Licensure Exam scores were employed to measure performance of students. Results revealed that accelerated students showed consistently higher stress levels than those of the traditional students. Moreover, the accelerated group had significantly higher grade averages in nursing courses than traditional students. Implications for nurse educators and recommendations for further studies were made. PMID:8655267

  13. Resistance of functional Lactobacillus plantarum strains against food stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Verónica; Quiberoni, Andrea; Reinhemer, Jorge; Suárez, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    The survival of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains (Lp 790, Lp 813 and Lp 998) with functional properties was studied taking into account their resistance to thermal, osmotic and oxidative stress factors. Stress treatments applied were: 52 °C-15 min (Phosphate Buffer pH 7, thermal shock), H2O2 0.1% (p/v) - 30 min (oxidative shock) and NaCl aqueous solution at 17, 25 and 30% (p/v) (room temperature - 1 h, osmotic shock). The osmotic stress was also evaluated on cell growth in MRS broth added of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% (p/v) of NaCl, during 20 h at 30 °C. The cell thermal adaptation was performed in MRS broth, selecting 45 °C for 30 min as final conditions for all strains. Two strains (Lp 813 and Lp 998) showed, in general, similar behaviour against the three stress factors, being clearly more resistant than Lp 790. An evident difference in growth kinetics in presence of NaCl was observed between Lp 998 and Lp 813, Lp998 showing a higher optical density (OD570nm) than Lp 813 at the end of the assay. Selected thermal adaptation improved by 2 log orders the thermal resistance of both strains, but cell growth in presence of NaCl was enhanced only in Lp 813. Oxidative resistance was not affected with this thermal pre-treatment. These results demonstrate the relevance of cell technological resistance when selecting presumptive "probiotic" cultures, since different stress factors might considerably affect viability or/and performance of the strains. The incidence of stress conditions on functional properties of the strains used in this work are currently under research in our group. PMID:25790993

  14. Function of a hearing aid under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Welsh, L W; Welsh, J J; Rosen, L F

    2000-10-01

    The auditory function of individuals with normal hearing was compared with that of hearing-aided subjects of similar age to determine whether amplification remediates hearing impairment under stressful auditory situations. The specific tests of listening in a competitive noise environment and identifying moderately compressed speech were introduced to adequately aided individuals. The data indicate that noise had an impact on auditory function to a much greater degree in aided individuals than in matched counterparts with normal hearing. The data derived from acceleration of simple sentences delivered to the aided group suggested that contrary to basic tonal sensitivity, the capacity to understand the stimulus was greatly compromised. The authors discuss cochlear damage and central auditory impairment as they relate to the limitations of amplification for sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:11051433

  15. Understanding Vocalization Might Help to Assess Stressful Conditions in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Alexandra Ferreira da Silva; Nääs, Irenilza de Alencar; Oliveira, Stanley R. M.; Violaro, Fabio; de Almeida, Andréia C. M.; Neves, Diego Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary This research aimed to analyze the possibility of assessing piglets’ welfare using the records of their vocalization. The trial was done in a pig commercial farm, and we recorded the vocal signals from piglets in several stressful exposure situations. Data mining techniques were applied to the processed signals in order to obtain a stress classification using the recorded data. We found that, using the piglets’ vocalization, it was possible to identify the most frequent stressful conditions at the farrowing phase, namely: pain, cold and hunger. Abstract Assessing pigs’ welfare is one of the most challenging subjects in intensive pig farming. Animal vocalization analysis is a noninvasive procedure and may be used as a tool for assessing animal welfare status. The objective of this research was to identify stress conditions in piglets reared in farrowing pens through their vocalization. Vocal signals were collected from 40 animals under the following situations: normal (baseline), feeling cold, in pain, and feeling hunger. A unidirectional microphone positioned about 15 cm from the animals’ mouth was used for recording the acoustic signals. The microphone was connected to a digital recorder, where the signals were digitized at the 44,100 Hz frequency. The collected sounds were edited and analyzed. The J48 decision tree algorithm available at the Weka® data mining software was used for stress classification. It was possible to categorize diverse conditions from the piglets’ vocalization during the farrowing phase (pain, cold and hunger), with an accuracy rate of 81.12%. Results indicated that vocalization might be an effective welfare indicator, and it could be applied for assessing distress from pain, cold and hunger in farrowing piglets. PMID:26479541

  16. Relevant shaking stress conditions for antibody preformulation development.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Annette; Weigandt, Markus; Hanefeld, Andrea; Bunjes, Heike

    2010-02-01

    In protein formulation development, shaking stress is often employed to assess the physical stability of antibody formulations against aggregation. Since there are currently no guidelines describing suitable test conditions, very different shaking stress designs are used. These different designs may influence the resulting stability data. The aim of this study was to establish a shaking stress design within the protein range of 2-5mg/ml which can rapidly distinguish between antibody formulations of poor stability and those with potential for further development. Small scale shaking stress experiments were performed with different monoclonal IgG antibodies (as buffered solutions or marketed formulations). Variables were the filling degree of the sample containers, the container type and size and the shaking intensity. The stability of the samples was assessed by visual inspection, UV-VIS spectrophotometric turbidity measurements and size exclusion chromatography. All tested parameters had a strong influence on the stability results. The most discriminating conditions were obtained when shaking of the formulations was performed at 200rpm in a 2ml injection vial filled with 1ml protein solution. This experimental setup led to clearly different stability results for buffered solutions and marketed products. Moreover, this setup required only relatively small amounts of protein solution which is advantageous in prefomulation studies. PMID:19922795

  17. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong (K = {nuover U_sp{infty} {2}}{dUinftyover dx} as high as 9times 10^{ -6}) acceleration. The high FSTI experiments are the main focus of the work. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. The high FSTI boundary layers undergo transition from a strongly disturbed non-turbulent state to a fully-turbulent state. Due to the stabilizing effect of strong acceleration, the transition zones are of extended length in spite of the high FSTI. Transitional values of skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers drop below flat-plate, low FSTI, turbulent flow correlations, but remain well above laminar flow values. Mean velocity and temperature profiles exhibit clear changes in shape as the flow passes through transition. Turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. Turbulent transport is strongly suppressed below values in unaccelerated turbulent boundary layers. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Octant analysis shows a fundamental difference between transitional and fully-turbulent boundary layers. Transitional boundary layers are characterized by incomplete mixing compared to fully-turbulent boundary layers. Similar octant analysis results are observed in both low and high FSTI cases. Spectral analysis suggests that the non-turbulent zone of the high FSTI flow is dominated by large scale

  18. Engineering Area Investigation of Reliability Attributes and Accelerated Stress Factors on Terrestrial Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained include the definition of a simplified stress test schedule for terrestrial solar cells based on the work performed during the first program year, and the design and fabrication of improved jigs and fixtures for electrical measurement and stress testing. Implementation of these advanced techniques for accelerated stress testing is underway on three solar cell types. In addition, review of the literature on second quadrant phenomena was begun and some preliminary second-quadrant electrical measurements were performed. Results obtained at the first down time for 75 C B-T testing and biased and unbiased T-H pressure cooker testing of type F cells showed little or no degradation in electrical parameters. Significant physical effects (large solder bubbles) were noted for type F cells subjected to the pressure cooker stress test.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of the Off-Normal Conditions of the SPIDER Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2011-09-26

    In the context of the development of the 1 MV neutral beam injector for the ITER tokamak, the study on beam formation and acceleration has considerable importance. This effort includes the ion source and accelerator SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an Rf plasma) ion source, planned to be built in Padova, and designed to extract and accelerate a 355 A/m{sup 2} current of H{sup -}(or 285 A/m{sup 2} D{sup -}) up to 100 kV. Exhaustive simulations were already carried out during the accelerator optimization leading to the present design. However, as it is expected that the accelerator shall operate also in case of pre-programmed or undesired off-normal conditions, the investigation of a large set of off-normal scenarios is necessary. These analyses will also be useful for the evaluation of the real performances of the machine, and should help in interpreting experimental results, or in identifying dangerous operating conditions.The present contribution offers an overview of the results obtained during the investigation of these off-normal conditions, by means of different modeling tools and codes. The results, showed a good flexibility of the device in different operating conditions. Where the consequences of the abnormalities appeared to be problematic further analysis were addressed.

  20. Sex differences in fear conditioning in posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Inslicht, Sabra S.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Garcia, Natalia M.; Pineles, Suzanne L.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Orr, Scott P.; Marmar, Charles R.; Neylan, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women are twice as likely as men to develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Abnormal acquisition of conditioned fear has been suggested as a mechanism for the development of PTSD. While some studies of healthy humans suggest that women are either no different or express less conditioned fear responses during conditioning relative to men, differences in the acquisition of conditioned fear between men and women diagnosed with PTSD has not been examined. Methods Thirty-one participants (18 men; 13 women) with full or subsyndromal PTSD completed a fear conditioning task. Participants were shown computer-generated colored circles that were paired (CS+) or unpaired (CS−) with an aversive electrical stimulus and skin conductance levels were assessed throughout the task. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant sex by stimulus interaction during acquisition. Women had greater differential conditioned skin conductance responses (CS + trials compared to CS− trials) than did men, suggesting greater acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Conclusions In contrast to studies of healthy individuals, we found enhanced acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Greater fear conditioning in women may either be a pre-existing vulnerability trait or an acquired phenomenon that emerges in a sex-dependent manner after the development of PTSD. Characterizing the underlying mechanisms of these differences is needed to clarify sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of PTSD. PMID:23107307

  1. Accelerated Stress Testing of Thin-Film Modules with SnO2:F Transparent Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J. A.; Adelstein, J.; Puett, J.

    2003-05-01

    This paper reviews a testing program conducted at NREL for the past two years that applied voltage, water vapor, and light stresses to thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules with SnO2:F transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) deposited on soda-lime glass superstrates. Electrochemical corrosion at the glass-TCO interface was observed to result in delamination of the thin-film layers. Experimental testing was directed toward accelerating the corrosion and understanding the nature of the resulting damage.

  2. Repeatable electrical measurement instrumentation for use in the accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the construction, calibration, and performance of a repeatable measurement system for use in conjunction with the accelerated stress testing of a-Si:H cells. A filtered diode array is utilized to approximate the spectral response of any type of solar cell in discrete portions of the spectrum. It is noted that in order to achieve the necessary degree of overall repeatability, it is necessary to pay particular attention to methods of contacting and positioning the cells.

  3. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  4. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  5. Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Soto, Vanessa; Liu, Yuhong; Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality leading some to suggest this represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased in high fat-fed mice as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process. PMID:25558793

  6. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  7. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  8. Aerodynamic Surface Stress Intermittency and Conditionally Averaged Turbulence Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian erosion of dry, flat, semi-arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by kinetic energy fluxes in the aloft atmospheric surface layer. During saltation -- the mechanism responsible for surface fluxes of dust and sediment -- briefly suspended sediment grains undergo a ballistic trajectory before impacting and `splashing' smaller-diameter (dust) particles vertically. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment flux, q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic (basal) stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. Since basal stress (in fully rough, inertia-dominated flows) scales with the incoming velocity squared, u^2, it follows that q ~ u^2n (where u is some relevant component of the above flow field, u(x,t)). Thus, even small (turbulent) deviations of u from its time-averaged value may play an enormously important role in aeolian activity on flat, dry landscapes. The importance of this argument is further augmented given that turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer exhibits maximum Reynolds stresses in the fluid immediately above the landscape. In order to illustrate the importance of surface stress intermittency, we have used conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress during large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow over a flat landscape with momentum roughness length appropriate for the Llano Estacado in west Texas (a flat agricultural region that is notorious for dust transport). By using data from a field campaign to measure diurnal variability of aeolian activity and prevailing winds on the Llano Estacado, we have retrieved the threshold friction velocity (which can be used to compute threshold surface stress under the geostrophic balance with the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory). This averaging procedure provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Preliminary evidence indicates that surface stress peaks are associated with the passage of

  9. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  10. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  11. Testing the accelerating moment release (AMR) hypothesis in areas of high stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilhem, Aurélie; Bürgmann, Roland; Freed, Andrew M.; Ali, Syed Tabrez

    2013-11-01

    Several retrospective analyses have proposed that significant increases in moment release occurred prior to many large earthquakes of recent times. However, the finding of accelerating moment release (AMR) strongly depends on the choice of three parameters: (1) magnitude range, (2) area being considered surrounding the events and (3) the time period prior to the large earthquakes. Consequently, the AMR analysis has been criticized as being a posteriori data-fitting exercise with no new predictive power. As AMR has been hypothesized to relate to changes in the state of stress around the eventual epicentre, we compare here AMR results to models of stress accumulation in California. Instead of assuming a complete stress drop on all surrounding fault segments implied by a back-slip stress lobe method, we consider that stress evolves dynamically, punctuated by the occurrence of earthquakes, and governed by the elastic and viscous properties of the lithosphere. We study the seismicity of southern California and extract events for AMR calculations following the systematic approach employed in previous studies. We present several sensitivity tests of the method, as well as grid-search analyses over the region between 1955 and 2005 using fixed magnitude range, radius of the search area and period of time. The results are compared to the occurrence of large events and to maps of Coulomb stress changes. The Coulomb stress maps are compiled using the coseismic stress from all M > 7.0 earthquakes since 1812, their subsequent post-seismic relaxation, and the interseismic strain accumulation. We find no convincing correlation of seismicity rate changes in recent decades with areas of high stress that would support the AMR hypothesis. Furthermore, this indicates limited utility for practical earthquake hazard analysis in southern California, and possibly other regions.

  12. Failure of Anisotropic Shale under Triaxial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; Ambrose, J.; Suarez-Rivera, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    research is focused on collecting failure data under true-triaxial conditions, in which the minimum and intermediate principal stress are generally unequal.

  13. Study of fatigue durability of advanced composite materials under conditions of accelerated loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the tension-tension fatigue life of the T300/5208 graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminate system was investigated in an effort to develop an acceptable and reliable method of accelerated loading. Typical S log sub 10 N curves were determined experimentally at 25 C, 75 C, and 115 C. The time-temperature superposition principle was employed to find the shift factors of uniaxial fatigue strength, and a general linear equation of S log sub 10 N for shifting purpose was established. The combined techniques of cyclic creep measurements and optical microscopy upon fatigue failure allow some assessment of the possible physical basis of S log 10 N curve shifting. Before fatigue, the laminates at all test temperatures and stress levels undergo a unique damage mechanism during fatigue loading. It is concluded that an accelerated loading method is feasible.

  14. Lifetime Prediction for Degradation of Solar Mirrors using Step-Stress Accelerated Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Kennedy, C.; Gray, M.; Jones, W.

    2011-09-01

    This research is to illustrate the use of statistical inference techniques in order to quantify the uncertainty surrounding reliability estimates in a step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) scenario. SSADT can be used when a researcher is faced with a resource-constrained environment, e.g., limits on chamber time or on the number of units to test. We apply the SSADT methodology to a degradation experiment involving concentrated solar power (CSP) mirrors and compare the results to a more traditional multiple accelerated testing paradigm. Specifically, our work includes: (1) designing a durability testing plan for solar mirrors (3M's new improved silvered acrylic "Solar Reflector Film (SFM) 1100") through the ultra-accelerated weathering system (UAWS), (2) defining degradation paths of optical performance based on the SSADT model which is accelerated by high UV-radiant exposure, and (3) developing service lifetime prediction models for solar mirrors using advanced statistical inference. We use the method of least squares to estimate the model parameters and this serves as the basis for the statistical inference in SSADT. Several quantities of interest can be estimated from this procedure, e.g., mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) and warranty time. The methods allow for the estimation of quantities that may be of interest to the domain scientists.

  15. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors of terrestrial solar cells. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.W.; Prince, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    The work covered in this report represents the second year's effort of a continuing program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells. Three main tasks were undertaken during the reporting period: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant, (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state of the art cells and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four Block II type silicon cells at 78/sup 0/C and 135/sup 0/C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant - a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Electrical parameters measured included I/sub SC/, V/sub OC/, P/sub M/, and I/sub M/. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of prestress electrical data for all cell types. Significant differences in the response to the various stress tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype for use in the program.

  16. Early-life stress and reproductive cost: A two-hit developmental model of accelerated aging?

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan; Belsky, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Two seemingly independent bodies of research suggest a two-hit model of accelerated aging, one highlighting early-life stress and the other reproduction. The first, informed by developmental models of early-life stress, highlights reduced longevity effects of early adversity on telomere erosion, whereas the second, informed by evolutionary theories of aging, highlights such effects with regard to reproductive cost (in females). The fact that both early-life adversity and reproductive effort are associated with shorter telomeres and increased oxidative stress raises the prospect, consistent with life-history theory, that these two theoretical frameworks currently informing much research are tapping into the same evolutionary-developmental process of increased senescence and reduced longevity. Here we propose a mechanistic view of a two-hit model of accelerated aging in human females through (a) early-life adversity and (b) early reproduction, via a process of telomere erosion, while highlighting mediating biological embedding mechanisms that might link these two developmental aging processes. PMID:27063083

  17. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The accelerated stress test results obtained on all terrestrial solar cells since the inception of the program are summarized. Tested cells were grouped according to the method used to form the conductive metallization layer: solder dipped, vacuum deposited, screen printed, and copper plated. Although metallization systems within each group were quite similar, they differed in numerous details according to the procedures employed by each manufacturer. Test results were summarized for all cells according to both electrical degradation and catastrophic mechanical changes. These results indicated a variability within each metallization category which was dependent on the manufacturer. Only one manufacturer was represented in the copper plated category and, although these showed no signs of detrimental copper diffusion during high temperature testing, their metallization was removed easily during high humidity pressure cooker testing. Preliminary testing of encapsulated cells showed no major differences between encapsulated and unencapsulated cells when subjected to accelerated testing.

  18. Key conditions for stable ion radiation pressure acceleration by circularly polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Gibbon, P.; Borghesi, M.; Schreiber, J.; Geissler, M.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) theoretically may have great potential to revolutionize the study of laserdriven ion accelerators due to its high conversion efficiency and ability to produce high-quality monoenergetic ion beams. However, the instability issue of ion acceleration has been appeared to be a fundamental limitation of the RPA scheme. To solve this issue is very important to the experimental realization and exploitation of this new scheme. In our recent work, we have identified the key condition for efficient and stable ion RPA from thin foils by CP laser pulses, in particular, at currently available moderate laser intensities. That is, the ion beam should remain accompanied with enough co-moving electrons to preserve a local "bunching" electrostatic field during the acceleration. In the realistic LS RPA, the decompression of the co-moving electron layer leads to a change of local electrostatic field from a "bunching" to a "debunching" profile, resulting in premature termination of acceleration. One possible scheme to achieve stable RPA is using a multi-species foil. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that 100 MeV/u monoenergetic C6+ and/or proton beams are produced by irradiation of a contaminated copper foil with CP lasers at intensities 5 × 1020W/cm2, achievable by current day lasers.

  19. Failure of metoclopramide to control emesis or nausea due to stressful angular or linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    1987-01-01

    Orally administered metoclopramide (REGLAN) at doses of 10 or 20 mg, 75 min prior to either stressful linear acceleration (parabolic flight) or cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation in a rotating chair was evaluated for its ability to prevent emesis or nausea II, respectively. Although metoclopramide is an effective antiemetic agent that enhances gastric emptying and prevents cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis, it was not possible to demonstrate any significant (p less than 0.05) effects of this drug on motion sickness.

  20. Do US Black Women Experience Stress-Related Accelerated Biological Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Margaret T.; Pearson, Jay A.; Seashols, Sarah J.; Brown, Kelly L.; Cruz, Tracey Dawson

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that black women experience accelerated biological aging in response to repeated or prolonged adaptation to subjective and objective stressors. Drawing on stress physiology and ethnographic, social science, and public health literature, we lay out the rationale for this hypothesis. We also perform a first population-based test of its plausibility, focusing on telomere length, a biomeasure of aging that may be shortened by stressors. Analyzing data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), we estimate that at ages 49–55, black women are 7.5 years biologically “older” than white women. Indicators of perceived stress and poverty account for 27% of this difference. Data limitations preclude assessing objective stressors and also result in imprecise estimates, limiting our ability to draw firm inferences. Further investigation of black-white differences in telomere length using large-population-based samples of broad age range and with detailed measures of environmental stressors is merited. PMID:20436780

  1. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  2. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  3. Cellular respiration: the nexus of stress, condition, and ornamentation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey E

    2014-10-01

    A fundamental hypothesis for the evolution and maintenance of ornamental traits is that ornaments convey information to choosing females about the quality of prospective mates. A diverse array of ornaments (e.g., colors, morphological features, and behaviors) has been associated with a wide range of measures of individual quality, but decades of study of such indicator traits have failed to produce general mechanisms of honest signaling. Here, I propose that efficiency of cellular respiration, as a product of mitochondrial function, underlies the associations between ornamentation and performance for a broad range of traits across taxa. A large biomedical literature documents the fundamental biochemical links between oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the process of metabolism, the function of the immune system, the synthesis of proteins, and the development and function of the nervous system. The production of virtually all ornaments whose expressions have been demonstrated to be condition-dependent is directly affected by the efficiency of cellular respiration, suggesting that the signaling of respiratory efficiency may be the primary function of such traits. Furthermore, the production of ornaments links to stress-response systems, including particularly the neuroendocrine system, through mitochondrial function, thereby makes ornamental traits effective signals of the capacity to withstand environmental perturbations. The identification of a unifying mechanism of honest signaling holds the potential to connect many heretofore-disparate fields of study related to stress and ornamentation, including neuroendocrinology, respiratory physiology, metabolic physiology, and immunology. PMID:24791751

  4. Survivability of integrated PVDF film sensors to accelerated ageing conditions in aeronautical/aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, E.; Cugnoni, J.; Gmür, T.; Bonhôte, P.; Schorderet, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work validates the use of integrated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensors for dynamic testing, even after being subjected to UV-thermo-hygro-mechanical accelerated ageing conditions. The verification of PVDF sensors’ survivability in these environmental conditions, typically confronted by civil and military aircraft, is the main concern of the study. The evaluation of survivability is made by a comparison of dynamic testing results provided by the PVDF patch sensors subjected to an accelerated ageing protocol, and those provided by neutral non-aged sensors (accelerometers). The available measurements are the time-domain response signals issued from a modal analysis procedure, and the corresponding frequency response functions (FRF). These are in turn used to identify the constitutive properties of the samples by extraction of the modal parameters, in particular the natural frequencies. The composite specimens in this study undergo different accelerated ageing processes. After several weeks of experimentation, the samples exhibit a loss of stiffness, represented by a decrease in the elastic moduli down to 10%. Despite the ageing, the integrated PVDF sensors, subjected to the same ageing conditions, are still capable of providing reliable data to carry out a close followup of these changes. This survivability is a determinant asset in order to use integrated PVDF sensors to perform structural health monitoring (SHM) in the future of full-scale composite aeronautical structures.

  5. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Three tasks were undertaken to investigate reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant; (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state-of-the-art cells; and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four block 2 type silicon cells at 78 C and 135 C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant, a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Significant differences in the response to the various tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype.

  6. Evolution of the Reynolds shear stresses in highly accelerated turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Hussain, Fazle

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration or strong Favorable Pressure Gradients (FPG) are of great fundamental and technological importance; examples of the latter include nozzle design, underwater bodies and drag reduction applications. Scientifically, they pose great interest from the point of view of scaling laws, the complex interaction between the outer and inner regions, and relaminarization phenomena. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of highly accelerated turbulent boundary layers are performed by means of the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) recently developed by [Araya et al. JFM 670, 581 (2011)]. It is shown that the Reynolds shear stress monotonically decreases and exhibits a logarithmic layer in the meso-layer region during the laminarization process. In addition, the local maxima of streamwise velocity fluctuations in wall units remain almost constant in the very strong FPG region, which prevents the flow to become completely laminar. Furthermore, the re-distribution of Reynolds shear stresses due to sweeps and ejections in the FPG region is performed and a physical mechanism is proposed.

  7. A specific group of genes respond to cold dehydration stress in cut Alstroemeria flowers whereas ambient dehydration stress accelerates developmental senescence expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Carol; Bramke, Irene; Breeze, Emily; Thornber, Sarah; Harrison, Elizabeth; Thomas, Brian; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Stead, Tony; Rogers, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Petal development and senescence entails a normally irreversible process. It starts with petal expansion and pigment production, and ends with nutrient remobilization and ultimately cell death. In many species this is accompanied by petal abscission. Post-harvest stress is an important factor in limiting petal longevity in cut flowers and accelerates some of the processes of senescence such as petal wilting and abscission. However, some of the effects of moderate stress in young flowers are reversible with appropriate treatments. Transcriptomic studies have shown that distinct gene sets are expressed during petal development and senescence. Despite this, the overlap in gene expression between developmental and stress-induced senescence in petals has not been fully investigated in any species. Here a custom-made cDNA microarray from Alstroemeria petals was used to investigate the overlap in gene expression between developmental changes (bud to first sign of senescence) and typical post-harvest stress treatments. Young flowers were stressed by cold or ambient temperatures without water followed by a recovery and rehydration period. Stressed flowers were still at the bud stage after stress treatments. Microarray analysis showed that ambient dehydration stress accelerates many of the changes in gene expression patterns that would normally occur during developmental senescence. However, a higher proportion of gene expression changes in response to cold stress were specific to this stimulus and not senescence related. The expression of 21 transcription factors was characterized, showing that overlapping sets of regulatory genes are activated during developmental senescence and by different stresses. PMID:20457576

  8. A specific group of genes respond to cold dehydration stress in cut Alstroemeria flowers whereas ambient dehydration stress accelerates developmental senescence expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Bramke, Irene; Breeze, Emily; Thornber, Sarah; Harrison, Elizabeth; Thomas, Brian; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Stead, Tony; Rogers, Hilary

    2010-06-01

    Petal development and senescence entails a normally irreversible process. It starts with petal expansion and pigment production, and ends with nutrient remobilization and ultimately cell death. In many species this is accompanied by petal abscission. Post-harvest stress is an important factor in limiting petal longevity in cut flowers and accelerates some of the processes of senescence such as petal wilting and abscission. However, some of the effects of moderate stress in young flowers are reversible with appropriate treatments. Transcriptomic studies have shown that distinct gene sets are expressed during petal development and senescence. Despite this, the overlap in gene expression between developmental and stress-induced senescence in petals has not been fully investigated in any species. Here a custom-made cDNA microarray from Alstroemeria petals was used to investigate the overlap in gene expression between developmental changes (bud to first sign of senescence) and typical post-harvest stress treatments. Young flowers were stressed by cold or ambient temperatures without water followed by a recovery and rehydration period. Stressed flowers were still at the bud stage after stress treatments. Microarray analysis showed that ambient dehydration stress accelerates many of the changes in gene expression patterns that would normally occur during developmental senescence. However, a higher proportion of gene expression changes in response to cold stress were specific to this stimulus and not senescence related. The expression of 21 transcription factors was characterized, showing that overlapping sets of regulatory genes are activated during developmental senescence and by different stresses. PMID:20457576

  9. Increased Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Accelerates Aging of the Retinal Vasculature in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lamoke, Folami; Shaw, Sean; Yuan, Jianghe; Ananth, Sudha; Duncan, Michael; Martin, Pamela; Bartoli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced retinal oxidative and nitrative stress can accelerate vascular cell aging, which may lead to vascular dysfunction as seen in diabetes. There is no information on whether this may contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we have assessed the occurrence of senescence-associated markers in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at 8 and 12 weeks of hyperglycemia as compared to normoglycemic aging (12 and 14 months) and adult (4.5 months) rat retinas. We have found that in the diabetic retinas there was an up-regulation of senescence-associated markers SA-β-Gal, p16INK4a and miR34a, which correlated with decreased expression of SIRT1, a target of miR34a. Expression of senescence-associated factors primarily found in retinal microvasculature of diabetic rats exceeded levels measured in adult and aging rat retinas. In aging rats, retinal expression of senescence associated-factors was mainly localized at the level of the retinal pigmented epithelium and only minimally in the retinal microvasculature. The expression of oxidative/nitrative stress markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine was more pronounced in the retinal vasculature of diabetic rats as compared to normoglycemic aging and adult rat retinas. Treatments of STZ-rats with the anti-nitrating drug FeTPPS (10mg/Kg/day) significantly reduced the appearance of senescence markers in the retinal microvasculature. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia accelerates retinal microvascular cell aging whereas physiological aging affects primarily cells of the retinal pigmented epithelium. In conclusion, hyperglycemia-induced retinal vessel dysfunction and DR progression involve vascular cell senescence due to increased oxidative/nitrative stress. PMID:26466127

  10. Reconstruction of Initial Beam Conditions at the Exit of the DARHT II Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    2000-02-18

    We consider a technique of determining the initial beam conditions of the DARHT II accelerator by measuring the beam size under three different magnetic transport settings. This may be time gated to resolve the parameters as a function of time within the 2000 nsec pulse. This technique leads to three equations in three unknowns with solution giving the accelerator exit beam radius, tilt, and emittance. We find that systematic errors cancel and so are not a problem in the initial beam condition unfolding. Random uncorrelated shot to shot errors can be managed by one of three strategies: (1) make the transport system optically de-magnifying; (2) average over many individual shots; or (3) make the random uncorrelated shot to shot errors sufficiently small. The high power of the DARHT II beam requires that the beam transport system leading to a radius measuring apparatus be optically magnifying. This means that the shot to shot random errors must either be made small (less than about 1%) or that we average each of the three beam radius determinations over many individual shots. We find that for the anticipated DARHT II beam parameters that 60 to 120 shots should be sufficient to determine the accelerator beam parameters.

  11. Accelerated hydration of the Earth's deep crust induced by stress perturbations.

    PubMed

    Jamtveit, B; Austrheim, H; Malthe-Sørenssen, A

    2000-11-01

    The metamorphic cycle associated with the formation of mountain belts produces a lower crust containing little or no free fluid. The introduction of external fluids to dry and impermeable volumes of the Earth's crust is thus a prerequisite for the retrogressive metamorphism later observed in such regimes. Such metamorphism can cause significant changes in the crust's physical properties, including its density, rheology and elastic properties. On a large scale, the introduction of fluids requires the presence of high-permeability channels, such as faults or fractures, which are the result of external tectonic stresses. But extensive interaction between externally derived fluids and the fractured rock requires efficient mass transport away from the initial fractures into the rock itself, and this transport often occurs over distances much longer than expected from grain-boundary diffusion. Here we present both field observations and a simple network model that demonstrate how the transport of fluids into initially dry rock can be accelerated by perturbations in the local stress field caused by reactions with fluids. We also show that the morphology of reaction fronts separating 'dry' from 'wet' rocks depends on the anisotropy of the external stress field. PMID:11081509

  12. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  13. Thermomechanical conditions and stresses on the friction stir welding tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atthipalli, Gowtam

    Friction stir welding has been commercially used as a joining process for aluminum and other soft materials. However, the use of this process in joining of hard alloys is still developing primarily because of the lack of cost effective, long lasting tools. Here I have developed numerical models to understand the thermo mechanical conditions experienced by the FSW tool and to improve its reusability. A heat transfer and visco-plastic flow model is used to calculate the torque, and traverse force on the tool during FSW. The computed values of torque and traverse force are validated using the experimental results for FSW of AA7075, AA2524, AA6061 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The computed torque components are used to determine the optimum tool shoulder diameter based on the maximum use of torque and maximum grip of the tool on the plasticized workpiece material. The estimation of the optimum tool shoulder diameter for FSW of AA6061 and AA7075 was verified with experimental results. The computed values of traverse force and torque are used to calculate the maximum shear stress on the tool pin to determine the load bearing ability of the tool pin. The load bearing ability calculations are used to explain the failure of H13 steel tool during welding of AA7075 and commercially pure tungsten during welding of L80 steel. Artificial neural network (ANN) models are developed to predict the important FSW output parameters as function of selected input parameters. These ANN consider tool shoulder radius, pin radius, pin length, welding velocity, tool rotational speed and axial pressure as input parameters. The total torque, sliding torque, sticking torque, peak temperature, traverse force, maximum shear stress and bending stress are considered as the output for ANN models. These output parameters are selected since they define the thermomechanical conditions around the tool during FSW. The developed ANN models are used to understand the effect of various input parameters on the total

  14. TUSC3 Loss Alters the ER Stress Response and Accelerates Prostate Cancer Growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Peter; Tomasich, Erwin; Vaňhara, Petr; Kratochvílová, Kateřina; Anees, Mariam; Marhold, Maximilian; Lemberger, Christof E.; Gerschpacher, Marion; Horvat, Reinhard; Sibilia, Maria; Pils, Dietmar; Krainer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in developed countries. Tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, though its function has not been characterized. TUSC3 shares homologies with the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex subunit Ost3p, suggesting a role in protein glycosylation. We provide evidence that TUSC3 is part of the OST complex and affects N-linked glycosylation in mammalian cells. Loss of TUSC3 expression in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines leads to increased proliferation, migration and invasion as well as accelerated xenograft growth in a PTEN negative background. TUSC3 downregulation also affects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structure and stress response, which results in increased Akt signaling. Together, our findings provide first mechanistic insight in TUSC3 function in prostate carcinogenesis in general and N-glycosylation in particular.

  15. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the reliability of terrestrial solar cells was performed to identify failure/degradation modes affecting solar cells and to relate these to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Particular concerns addressed were the reliability attributes of individual single crystalline, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin film silicon cells. Results of subjecting different types of crystalline cells to the Clemson accelerated test schedule are given. Preliminary step stress results on one type of thin film amorphous silicon (a:Si) cell indicated that extraneous degradation modes were introduced above 140 C. Also described is development of measurement procedures which are applicable to the reliability testing of a:Si solar cells as well as an approach to achieving the necessary repeatability of fabricating a simulated a:Si reference cell from crystalline silicon photodiodes.

  16. Pivotal role of oxidative stress in tumor metastasis under diabetic conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Mai; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kusamori, Kosuke; Fukuoka, Miho; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2013-09-10

    Diabetic patients are reported to have a high incidence and mortality of cancer, but little is known about the linkage. In this study, we investigated whether high oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis in diabetic mice. Murine melanoma B16-BL6 cells stably labeled with firefly luciferase (B16-BL6/Luc) were inoculated into the tail vein of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated or untreated mice. A luciferase assay demonstrated that tumor cells were present largely in the lung of untreated mice, whereas large numbers of tumor cells were detected in both the lung and liver of STZ-treated mice. Repeated injections of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase), a long-circulating derivative, reduced the elevated fasting blood glucose levels and plasma lipoperoxide levels of STZ-treated mice, but had no significant effects on these parameters in untreated mice. In addition, the injections significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the lung and liver in both untreated and STZ-treated mice. Culture of B16-BL6/Luc cells in medium containing over 45 mg/dl glucose hardly affected the proliferation of the cells, whereas the addition of plasma of STZ-treated mice to the medium significantly increased the number of cells. Plasma samples of STZ-treated mice receiving PEG-catalase exhibited no such effect on proliferation. These findings indicate that a hyperglycemia-induced increase in oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis, and the removal of systemic hydrogen peroxide by PEG-catalase can inhibit the progression of diabetic conditions and tumor metastasis in diabetes. PMID:23735571

  17. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-30

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-01

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  20. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells. Third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.W.; Hartman, R.A.; Saylor, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The third year of the accelerated reliability testing program concentrated on electrical measurement instrumentation and in modeling cell behavior in the second quadrant. In addition, some preliminary work was done on correlating cell color changes with electrical degradation. Not reported are results of continuing accelerated stress tests on state of the art cells. A number of new cells were added to the program, but not in time for sufficient data to be obtained, while the older cells are undergoing extended test periods and new data are not yet available on them. The all-digital, microprocessor controlled, short interval tester, which was designed and fabricated, has replaced the manual measurement procedure formerly used. This has improved measurement accuracy and repeatability, reduced measurement time, and through coordinated data management procedures, eliminated data errors. A complete description of the tester including schematics and software is given and its operating procedures described. A computer model, based on the thermal and electrical properties of the cells and encapsulating materials, was developed to relate cell temperature to electrical characteristics in the second quadrant. This model adequately predicted the behavior of both encapsulated and unencapsulated cells, although accurate temperature measurements on encapsulated cells were difficult to obtain. In addition, only cells of one type were used for comparison and other cell types may require different parameter values for fitting. Use of the model should permit the prediction of a cell's sensitivity to degradation in the second quadrant. The computer program is listed together with a description of its operation.

  1. Potential Therapeutic Role of L-Carnitine in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress and Atrophy Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Anna; Senesi, Pamela; Luzi, Livio; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN) is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging. PMID:25838869

  2. Stress-responsive expression patterns and functional characterization of cold shock domain proteins in cabbage (Brassica rapa) under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Ji; Park, Ye Rin; Park, Su Jung; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-11-01

    Although the functional roles of cold shock domain proteins (CSDPs) have been demonstrated during the growth, development, and stress adaptation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), the functions of CSDPs in other plants species, including cabbage (Brassica rapa), are largely unknown. To gain insight into the roles of CSDPs in cabbage under stress conditions, the genes encoding CSDPs in cabbage were isolated, and the functional roles of CSDPs in response to environmental stresses were analyzed. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the levels of BrCSDP transcripts increased during cold, salt, or drought stress, as well as upon ABA treatment. Among the five BrCSDP genes found in the cabbage genome, one CSDP (BRU12051), named BrCSDP3, was unique in that it is localized to the chloroplast as well as to the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BrCSDP3 in Arabidopsis resulted in accelerated seed germination and better seedling growth compared to the wild-type plants under high salt or dehydration stress conditions, and in response to ABA treatment. BrCSDP3 did not affect the splicing of intron-containing genes and processing of rRNAs in the chloroplast. BrCSDP3 had the ability to complement RNA chaperone-deficient Escherichia coli mutant cells under low temperatures as well as DNA- and RNA-melting abilities, suggesting that it possesses RNA chaperone activity. Taken together, these results suggest that BrCSDP3, harboring RNA chaperone activity, plays a role as a positive regulator in seed germination and seedling growth under stress conditions. PMID:26263516

  3. Effects of Swim Stress on Neophobia and Reconditioning Using a Conditioned Taste Aversion Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jennifer M.; Ramsey, Ashley K.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has found that swim stress during a classical conditioning trial attenuates conditioned taste aversion (CTA). In the current study, rats were used to examine the effects of inescapable swim stress on the habituation of neophobia to a flavored solution and reacquisition of an extinguished conditioned taste aversion. In Experiment…

  4. Reconstruction of Initial Beam Conditions at the Exit of the DARHT II Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Arthur

    We consider a technique to determine the initial beam conditions of the DARHT II Accelerator by measuring the beam size under three different magnetic transport settings. This may be time gated to resolve the parameters as a function of time within the 2000 nsec pulse. This technique leads to three equations in three unknowns with solution giving the accelerator exit beam radius, tilt and emittance. We find that systematic errors cancel and so are not a problem in unfolding the initial beam conditions. Random uncorrelated shot to shot errors can be managed by one of three strategies: 1) make the transport system optically de-magnifying; 2) average over many individual shots; or 3) make the random uncorrelated shot to shot errors sufficiently small. The high power of the DARHT II beam requires that the beam transport system leading to a radius measuring apparatus be optically magnifying. This means that the shot to shot random errors must either be made small (less than about 1%) or that we average each of the three beam radius determinations over many individual shots.

  5. High stress hormone levels accelerate the onset of memory deficits in male Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Pang, Terence Y; Ransome, Mark I; Hill, Rachel A; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a tandem repeat mutation in the huntingtin gene. Lifestyle factors, such as lack of activity may contribute to the variability in the age of disease onset. Therefore, better understanding of environmental modifiers may uncover potential therapeutic approaches to delay disease onset and progression. Recent data suggest that HD patients and transgenic mouse models show a dysregulated stress response. In this present study, we elevated stress hormone levels through oral corticosterone (CORT) treatment and assessed its impact on the development of motor impairment and cognitive deficits using the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD. We found that CORT consumption did not alter rotarod performance of R6/1 HD or wild-type (WT) littermates. However, the onset of hippocampal-dependent Y-maze deficits was accelerated in male R6/1 mice by 5days of CORT treatment, whereas short term memory of WT and female R6/1 mice was unaffected. We then further investigated the male HD susceptibility to CORT by measuring TrkB activation, BDNF and glucocorticoid receptor expression as well as the level of cell proliferation in the hippocampus. CORT treatment increased the levels of phosphorylated TrkB in male R6/1 mice only. There were no effects of CORT on hippocampal BDNF protein or mRNA levels; nor on expression of the glucocorticoid receptors in any group. Hippocampal cell proliferation was decreased in male R6/1 mice and this was further reduced in CORT-drinking male R6/1 mice. Female mice (WT and R6/1) appeared to be protected from the impacts of CORT treatment in all our hippocampal measures. Overall, our data demonstrate that treatment with corticosterone is able to modulate the onset of HD symptomatology. We present the first evidence of a male-specific vulnerability to stress impacting on the development of short-term memory deficits in HD. More generally, we found that female mice were protected from the

  6. Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation Material Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.

    2007-09-16

    To predict the long-term fate of low- and high-level waste forms in the subsurface over geologic time scales, it is important to understand the behavior of the corroding waste forms under conditions the mimic to the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository. Fluidized bed steam reformation (FBSR), a supplemental treatment technology option, is being considered as a waste form for the immobilization of low-activity tank waste. To obtain the fundamental information needed to evaluate the behavior of the FBSR waste form under repository relevant conditions and to monitor the long-term behavior of this material, an accelerated weathering experiment is being conducted with the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus. Unlike other accelerated weathering test methods (product consistency test, vapor hydration test, and drip test), PUF experiments are conducted under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. These experiments are unique because they mimic the vadose zone environment and allow the corroding waste form to achieve its final reaction state. Results from this on-going experiment suggest the volumetric water content varied as a function of time and reached steady state after 160 days of testing. Unlike the volumetric water content, periodic excursions in the solution pH and electrical conductivity have been occurring consistently during the test. Release of elements from the column illustrates a general trend of decreasing concentration with increasing reaction time. Normalized concentrations of K, Na, P, Re (a chemical analogue for 99Tc), and S are as much as 1 × 104 times greater than Al, Cr, Si, and Ti. After more than 600 days of testing, the solution chemistry data collected to-date illustrate the importance of understanding the long-term behavior of the FBSR product under conditions that mimic the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository.

  7. Historic Seismicity, Computed Peak Ground Accelerations, and Seismic Site Conditions for Northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo-Arriet, J. C.; Galván-Ramírez, I. N.; Ramos-Zuñiga, L. G.; Navarro de León, I.; Ramírez-Fernández, J. A.; Quintanilla-López, Y.; Cavazos-Tovar, N. P.

    2007-05-01

    In this study we present the historic seismicity, computed peak ground accelerations, and mapping of seismic site conditions for northeast Mexico. We start with a compilation of the regional seismicity in northeast Mexico (24- 31°N, 87-106°W) for the 1787-2006 period. Our study area lies within three morphotectonic provinces: Basin and Range and Rio Grande rift, Sierra Madre Oriental and Gulf Coastal Plain. Peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps were computed for three different scenarios: 1928 Parral, Chihuahua (MW = 6.5); 1931 Valentine, Texas (MW = 6.4); and a hypothetical earthquake located in central Coahuila (MW = 6.5). Ground acceleration values were computed using attenuation relations developed for central and eastern North America and the Basin and Range province. The hypothetical earthquake in central Coahuila is considered a critical scenario for the main cities of northeast Mexico. The damage associated with this hypothetical earthquake could be severe because the majority of the buildings were constructed without allowance for seismic accelerations. The expected PGA values in Monterrey, Saltillo and Monclova range from 30 to 70 cm/s2 (0.03 to 0.07g). This earthquake might also produce or trigger significant landslides and rock falls in the Sierra Madre Oriental, where several cities are located (e.g. suburbs of Monterrey). Additionally, the Vs30 distribution for the state of Nuevo Leon and the cities of Linares and Monterrey are presented. The Vs30 data was obtained using seismic refraction profiling correlated with borehole information. According to NEHRP soil classification, sites classes A, B and C are dominant. Sites with class D occupy minor areas in both cities. Due to the semi-arid conditions in northeast Mexico, we obtained the highest values of Vs30 in Quaternary deposits (alluvium) cemented by caliche. Similar values of Vs30 were obtained in Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada. This work constitutes the first attempt at understanding and

  8. Changes in Stress and Psychological Adjustment during the Transition to High School among Freshmen in an Accelerated Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This study determined whether participation in an accelerated curriculum (specifically, the International Baccalaureate [IB] program) upon entry to high school is associated with increases in stress and/or associated with psychological problems. Data from self-report questionnaires were collected at two time points (summer after eighth grade, fall…

  9. Stability of β-Lapachone upon Exposure to Various Stress Conditions: Resultant Efficacy and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, So-Hyun; Adhikary, Pratik; Cho, Jin Hun; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Even though β-lapachone is a promising compound with antitumor, antiinflammatory, antineoplastic, and wound-healing effects, there are still issues concerning its chemical stability and degradation mechanisms. The objective of this study was to obtain degradation profiles of β-lapachone and evaluate its chemical stability under various stress conditions. Moreover, the correlation between stability and efficacy was evaluated. The degradation study of β-lapachone was performed using heat, acid, base, oxidation, and light conditions. Kinetics and degradation profiles were investigated with HPLC and LC-MS. The stability indicated in the LC method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were cultured with the standard and its degraded samples in the cellular activity and cytotoxicity test. β-Lapachone was relatively unstable upon exposure to light, and its photodegradation was accelerated with high relative humidity. Three degradants were identified, and their degradation followed zero-order kinetics. It was shown to degrade to phthalic acid under oxidative conditions, and the degradation kinetics were dependent on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Two degradation products were identified upon exposure to basic conditions, which followed first-order kinetics. β-Lapachone was relatively stable under acidic and thermal conditions. It increased the synthesis of collagen compared with the control. However, as the contents decreased, the synthesis of collagen also decreased in the photodegraded samples. β-Lapachone did not exert cytotoxic effects at the effective concentration in the cytotoxicity test. Therefore, in order to ensure efficacy and safety, the chemical stability of β-lapachone needs to be controlled carefully while considering instability mechanisms. PMID:27150470

  10. Conditioning nerve crush accelerates cytoskeletal protein transport in sprouts that form after a subsequent crush

    SciTech Connect

    McQuarrie, I.G.; Jacob, J.M. )

    1991-03-01

    To examine the relationship between axonal outgrowth and the delivery of cytoskeletal proteins to the growing axon tip, outgrowth was accelerated by using a conditioning nerve crush. Because slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport is the most rapid vehicle for carrying cytoskeletal proteins to the axon tip, the rate of SCb was measured in conditioned vs. sham-conditioned sprouts. In young Sprague-Dawley rats, the conditioning crush was made to sciatic nerve branches at the knee; 14 days later, the test crush was made where the L4 and L5 spinal nerves join to form the sciatic nerve in the flank. Newly synthesized proteins were labeled in motor neurons by injecting {sup 35}S-methionine into the lumbar spinal cord 7 days before the test crush. The wave of pulse-labeled SCb proteins reached the crush by the time it was made and subsequently entered sprouts. The nerve was removed and sectioned for SDS-PAGE and fluorography 4-12 days after the crush. Tubulins, neurofilament proteins, and representative 'cytomatrix' proteins (actin, calmodulin, and putative microtubule-associated proteins) were removed from gels for liquid scintillation counting. Labeled SCb proteins entered sprouts without first accumulating in parent axon stumps, presumably because sprouts begin to grow within hours after axotomy. The peak of SCb moved 11% faster in conditioned than in sham-conditioned sprouts: 3.0 vs. 2.7 mm/d (p less than 0.05). To confirm that sprouts elongate more rapidly when a test crush is preceded by a conditioning crush, outgrowth distances were measured in a separate group of rats by labeling fast axonal transport with {sup 3}H-proline 24 hours before nerve retrieval.

  11. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS. PMID:27012709

  12. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS. PMID:27012709

  13. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity conditions offer an environment in which convection in a nonisothermal gas could be driven primarily by thermal stress. A direct examination of thermal stress flows would be invaluable in assessing the accuracy of the Burnett terms in the fluid stress tensor. We present a preliminary numerical investigation of the competing effects of thermal stress, thermal creep at the side walls, and buoyancy on gas convection in nonuniformly heated containers under normal and reduced gravity levels. Conditions in which thermal stress convection becomes dominant are identified, and issues regarding the experimental measurement of the flows are discussed.

  14. Solar/Stellar Granulation as the Key Lower Boundary Condition for Coronal Heating and Wind Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Much of the hot plasma that eventually becomes the supersonic solar wind appears to have its origin in small (100 km diameter) magnetic flux tubes that sit in the downflowing lanes between convective granules in the Sun's photosphere. Convective overturning motions jostle these flux tubes and induce kink-mode oscillations that can grow into Alfven waves in the corona. A great deal of recent work has been done to explore how these Alfvenic fluctuations may drive a turbulent cascade, heat the plasma by gradual dissipation, and provide direct acceleration to a wind via wave pressure gradients. This presentation will outline this work and show how an accurate description of granulation is a key input to self-consistent models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. These self-consistent models have also been applied successfully to predicting: (1) high-energy emission from accreting T Tauri stars, (2) the mass loss rates of cool dwarfs and red giants, and (3) the combined X-ray, radio, and submillimeter emission from a young nearby M dwarf. In addition, a recent analysis of stellar granulation with Kepler photometry has shown that our understanding of the shallow convection zones of F-type stars still requires additional refinement. In all cases, the combination of multiple types of observational data has been crucial to improving our understanding. For the Sun, the next-generation capabilities of ATST/DKIST are expected to provide much more precise knowledge about this important lower boundary condition to the heliosphere.

  15. Bioreactor Conditioning for Accelerated Remodeling of Fibrin-Based Tissue Engineered Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jillian Beth

    Fibrin is a promising scaffold material for tissue engineered heart valves, as it is completely biological, allows for engineered matrix alignment, and is able to be degraded and replaced with collagen by entrapped cells. However, the initial fibrin matrix is mechanically weak, and extensive in vitro culture is required to create valves with sufficient mechanical strength and stiffness for in vivo function. Culture in bioreactor systems, which provide cyclic stretching and enhance nutrient transport, has been shown to increase collagen production by cells entrapped in a fibrin scaffold, accelerating strengthening of the tissue and reducing the required culture time. In the present work, steps were taken to improve bioreactor culture conditions with the goal of accelerating collagen production in fibrin-based tissue engineered heart valves using two approaches: (i) optimizing the cyclic stretching protocol and (ii) developing a novel bioreactor system that permits transmural and lumenal flow of culture medium for improved nutrient transport. The results indicated that incrementally increasing strain amplitude cyclic stretching with small, frequent increments in strain amplitude was optimal for collagen production in our system. In addition, proof of concept studies were performed in the novel bioreactor system and increased cellularity and collagen deposition near the lumenal surface of the tissue were observed.

  16. A study of 192Ir production conditions at an electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbnya, A. N.; Rogov, Yu. V.; Shevchenko, V. A.; Shramenko, B. I.; Tenishev, A. Eh.; Torgovkin, A. V.; Uvarov, V. L.

    2014-09-01

    This communication deals with the conditions of 192Ir isotope production under a nonreactor technology via the 193Ir(γ, n)192Ir reaction. It can be carried out by irradiation of a target from natural iridium with the high-energy X-ray of an electron accelerator. The possibility of increasing the photonuclear yield of the target isotope by addition of the 191Ir( n, γ)192Ir reaction induced by moderated photoneutrons has been shown. For this, an X-ray converter and a target were placed inside a neutron moderator. Data on the 192Ir and admixture yields for the techniques using the moderator and without it have been obtained by computer simulation and experimentally.

  17. Accelerated wastage of the Monte Perdido Glacier in the Spanish Pyrenees during recent stationary climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moreno, J. I.; Revuelto, J.; Rico, I.; Chueca-Cía, J.; Julián, A.; Serreta, A.; Serrano, E.; Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; Azorín-Molina, C.; Alonso-González, E.; García-Ruiz, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution of the Monte Perdido Glacier, the third largest glacier of the Pyrenees, from 1981 to the present. We assessed the evolution of the glacier's surface area by use of aerial photographs from 1981, 1999, and 2006, and changes in ice volume by geodetic methods with digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from topographic maps (1981 and 1999), airborne LIDAR (2010) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014). We interpreted the changes in the glacier based on climate data from a nearby meteorological station. The results indicate an accelerated degradation of this glacier after 2000, with a rate of ice surface loss that was almost three-times greater from 2000 to 2006 than for earlier periods, and a doubling of the rate of ice volume loss from 1999 to 2010 (the ice depth decreased 8.98 ± 1.8 m, -0.72 ± 0.14 m w.e. yr-1) compared to 1981 to 1999 (the ice depth decreased 8.35 ± 2.12 m, -0.39 ± 0.1 m w.e. yr-1). This loss of glacial ice has continued from 2011 to 2014 (the ice depth decreased 2.1 ± 0.4 m, -0.64 ± 0.36 m w.e. yr-1). Local climatic changes during the study period cannot explain the acceleration in wastage rate of this glacier, because local precipitation and snow accumulation increased slightly, and local air temperature during the ablation period did not significantly increase. The accelerated degradation of this glacier in recent years can be explained by the lack of equilibrium between the glacier and the current climatic conditions. In particular, the average air temperature increased by at least 0.9 °C in this region since the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the mid-1800s. Thus, this glacier shrinks dramatically during years with low accumulation or high air temperatures during the ablation season, but cannot recover during years with high accumulation or low air temperatures during the ablation season. The most recent TLS data support this interpretation. These data indicated that two

  18. Development and Use of Mark Sense Record Cards for Recording Medical Data on Pilots Subjected to Acceleration Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Havill, C. Dewey

    1962-01-01

    A TIME-HONORED system of recording medical histories and the data obtained on physical and laboratory examination has been that of writing the information on record sheets that go into a folder for each patient. In order to have information which would be more readily retrieved, 'a program was initiated in 1952 by the U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in connection with their "Care of the Flyer" study to place this information on machine record cards. In 1958, a machine record card method was developed for recording medical data in connection with the astronaut selection program. Machine record cards were also developed by the Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania, for use in connection with a variety of tests including acceleration stress.1 Therefore, a variety of systems resulted in which data of a medical nature could easily be recalled. During the NASA, Ames Research Center centrifuge studies/'S the pilot subjects were interviewed after each centrifuge run, or series of runs, and subjective information was recorded in a log book by the usual history taking methods referred to above. After the methods Were reviewed, it' was recognized that a card system would be very useful in recording data from our pilots after they had been exposed to acceleration stress. Since the acceleration stress cards already developed did not meet our requirements, it was decided a different card was needed.

  19. Recovery mechanisms in proton exchange membrane fuel cells after accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of performance recovery after accelerated stress test (AST) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are systematically studied. Experiments are carried out by incorporating a well-designed performance recovery procedure right after the AST protocol. The experiment results show that the cell performance recovers significantly from the degraded state after the AST procedure. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements further show that the performance recovery can be divided into kinetic and mass transport recoveries. It is further determined that the kinetic recovery, i.e. the recovery of electrochemical active area (ECA), is due to two distinct mechanisms: the reduction of platinum oxide and the re-attachment of detached platinum nanoparticles onto the carbon surface. The mass transport resistance is probably due to reduction of hydrophilic oxide groups on the carbon surface and the microstructure change that alleviates flooding. Performance comparisons show that the recovery procedure is highly effective, indicating the results of AST significantly over-estimate the true degradation in a PEM fuel cell. Therefore, a recovery procedure is highly recommended when an AST protocol is used to evaluate cell degradations to avoid over-estimating true performance degradations in PEMFCs.

  20. Further study of the effect of the downstream plasma condition on accelerator grid erosion in an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Further numerical results are presented of earlier particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo calculations of accelerator grid erosion in an ion thruster. A comparison between numerical and experimental results suggests that the accelerator grid impingement is primarily due to ions created far downstream from the accelerator grid. In particular, for the same experimental conditions as those of Monheiser and Wilbur at Colorado State University, it is found that a downstream plasma density of 2 x 10 exp 14/cu m is required to give the same ratio of accelerator grid impingement current to beam current (5 percent). For this condition, a potential hill is found in the downstream region of 2.5 V.

  1. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut. PMID:25365864

  2. Correlates and consequences of morale versus depression under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Britt, Thomas W; Dickinson, James M; Moore, DeWayne; Castro, Carl A; Adler, Amy B

    2007-01-01

    The role of morale as a positive psychological construct distinct from the construct of depression was examined using data from a longitudinal study of 1,685 U.S. soldiers on a peacekeeping mission to Kosovo. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed morale was best predicted by indices of engagement in meaningful work and confidence in unit functioning and leadership, whereas depression was best predicted by deployment stressors and negative events. Morale assessed during the deployment was related to perceiving benefits from deploying six months later, whereas depression was related to posttraumatic stress disorder and negative perceptions of deploying. The relationship between morale and benefits was a function of engagement in meaningful work. Discussion focuses on the importance of longitudinal research in specifying the antecedents of positive and negative outcomes of a stressful work environment. PMID:17257065

  3. [Conditions for initiating heat stress in Pseudomonas geniculata].

    PubMed

    Elisashvili, V I; Soshnikova, M V

    1984-01-01

    The heating of Pseudomonas geniculata 338 at an elevated temperature causes a heat stress in the culture. The extent of the stress depends on the temperature and duration of heating. The incubation of the bacterium at 40 and 45 degrees C did not inhibit its growth after 30 min of heating, and no essential quantities of intracellular compounds absorbing at 260 nm were lost (E260 increased by 12-19%). When the bacterium was heated at 50 degrees C for the same period of time, a three-hour lag-phase appeared during the subsequent cultivation of the bacterium whereas. E260 rose by a factor of 1.7. The resistance of the bacterium to heating depended on the physiological state of the culture: cells at the logarithmic growth phase were most susceptible to heating while the bacterium became more resistant to heating in the course of aging. The addition of NaCl at a concentration of 1.5% or of 10(-3)-10(-4) M EDTA to the reparation medium makes it possible to estimate the population of bacterial cells in the state of stress. PMID:6431240

  4. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  5. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  6. Accelerated Biodegradation of Agriculture Film Based on Aromatic-Aliphatic Copolyester in Soil under Mesophilic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Šerá, Jana; Stloukal, Petr; Jančová, Petra; Verney, Vincent; Pekařová, Silvie; Koutný, Marek

    2016-07-20

    A study was conducted on the biodegradation of aromatic-aliphatic copolyester-based agricultural film in soil at 25 °C. The polymer is known to be biodegradable under composting conditions although rather recalcitrant under mesophilic conditions. The material investigated comprised of the copolyester filled with approximately 25% of starch containing biodegradable plasticizers, and its behavior was compared to the corresponding material without the filler. Mineralization followed by CO2 production merely reached the point of about 6% after 100 days of incubation in the pure copolyester film, whereas the value of around 53% was recorded for the filled copolyester film, which exceeded the readily biodegradable starch filler content in the material by more than 20% and could be accounted for biodegradation of the copolyester. It was suggested that the accelerated copolyester biodegradation in the starch-filled material was most likely explained by the increase in the active surface area of the material available for the microbial attack after biodegradation of the filler. The results were supported by changes in molecular weight distributions of the copolyester and observations made by several microscopic techniques. These findings encourage further development of biodegradable agricultural films based on this material. PMID:27367168

  7. Characterizing drought stress and trait influence on maize yield under current and future conditions.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Matthew T; Tardieu, François; Dong, Zhanshan; Messina, Carlos D; Hammer, Graeme L

    2014-03-01

    Global climate change is predicted to increase temperatures, alter geographical patterns of rainfall and increase the frequency of extreme climatic events. Such changes are likely to alter the timing and magnitude of drought stresses experienced by crops. This study used new developments in the classification of crop water stress to first characterize the typology and frequency of drought-stress patterns experienced by European maize crops and their associated distributions of grain yield, and second determine the influence of the breeding traits anthesis-silking synchrony, maturity and kernel number on yield in different drought-stress scenarios, under current and future climates. Under historical conditions, a low-stress scenario occurred most frequently (ca. 40%), and three other stress types exposing crops to late-season stresses each occurred in ca. 20% of cases. A key revelation shown was that the four patterns will also be the most dominant stress patterns under 2050 conditions. Future frequencies of low drought stress were reduced by ca. 15%, and those of severe water deficit during grain filling increased from 18% to 25%. Despite this, effects of elevated CO2 on crop growth moderated detrimental effects of climate change on yield. Increasing anthesis-silking synchrony had the greatest effect on yield in low drought-stress seasonal patterns, whereas earlier maturity had the greatest effect in crops exposed to severe early-terminal drought stress. Segregating drought-stress patterns into key groups allowed greater insight into the effects of trait perturbation on crop yield under different weather conditions. We demonstrate that for crops exposed to the same drought-stress pattern, trait perturbation under current climates will have a similar impact on yield as that expected in future, even though the frequencies of severe drought stress will increase in future. These results have important ramifications for breeding of maize and have implications for

  8. Effect of certain psychopharmacological preparations on adaptation under stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanishevskaya, A. V.; Mezentseva, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments staged on rats demonstrated that the formation of pathological states caused by stress and accompanied by the development of ulcerative lesion of the gastric mucosa are associated with the degree of the catecholamines level drop in the mesencephalon and hypothalamus. The application of seduxen and also of combinations consisting of L-DOPA with seduxen, or with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan tends to reduce the frequency of developing alcerative lesions of the stomach. The protective effect produced by the combination of L-DOPA with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan is barred by an additional administration of an B-adrenoblocking agent, inderal.

  9. Properties of the shear stress peak radiated ahead of rapidly accelerating rupture fronts that mediate frictional slip

    PubMed Central

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Pino Muñoz, Daniel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S.; Molinari, Jean-François; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We study rapidly accelerating rupture fronts at the onset of frictional motion by performing high-temporal-resolution measurements of both the real contact area and the strain fields surrounding the propagating rupture tip. We observe large-amplitude and localized shear stress peaks that precede rupture fronts and propagate at the shear-wave speed. These localized stress waves, which retain a well-defined form, are initiated during the rapid rupture acceleration phase. They transport considerable energy and are capable of nucleating a secondary supershear rupture. The amplitude of these localized waves roughly scales with the dynamic stress drop and does not decrease as long as the rupture front driving it continues to propagate. Only upon rupture arrest does decay initiate, although the stress wave both continues to propagate and retains its characteristic form. These experimental results are qualitatively described by a self-similar model: a simplified analytical solution of a suddenly expanding shear crack. Quantitative agreement with experiment is provided by realistic finite-element simulations that demonstrate that the radiated stress waves are strongly focused in the direction of the rupture front propagation and describe both their amplitude growth and spatial scaling. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of brittle fracture theory to fundamental understanding of friction. Implications for earthquake dynamics are discussed. PMID:26729877

  10. Properties of the shear stress peak radiated ahead of rapidly accelerating rupture fronts that mediate frictional slip.

    PubMed

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Pino Muñoz, Daniel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S; Molinari, Jean-François; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-19

    We study rapidly accelerating rupture fronts at the onset of frictional motion by performing high-temporal-resolution measurements of both the real contact area and the strain fields surrounding the propagating rupture tip. We observe large-amplitude and localized shear stress peaks that precede rupture fronts and propagate at the shear-wave speed. These localized stress waves, which retain a well-defined form, are initiated during the rapid rupture acceleration phase. They transport considerable energy and are capable of nucleating a secondary supershear rupture. The amplitude of these localized waves roughly scales with the dynamic stress drop and does not decrease as long as the rupture front driving it continues to propagate. Only upon rupture arrest does decay initiate, although the stress wave both continues to propagate and retains its characteristic form. These experimental results are qualitatively described by a self-similar model: a simplified analytical solution of a suddenly expanding shear crack. Quantitative agreement with experiment is provided by realistic finite-element simulations that demonstrate that the radiated stress waves are strongly focused in the direction of the rupture front propagation and describe both their amplitude growth and spatial scaling. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of brittle fracture theory to fundamental understanding of friction. Implications for earthquake dynamics are discussed. PMID:26729877

  11. Early Fasting Is Long Lasting: Differences in Early Nutritional Conditions Reappear under Stressful Conditions in Adult Female Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Krause, E. Tobias; Honarmand, Mariam; Wetzel, Jennifer; Naguib, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Conditions experienced during early life can have profound effects on individual development and condition in adulthood. Differences in nutritional provisioning in birds during the first month of life can lead to differences in growth, reproductive success and survival. Yet, under natural conditions shorter periods of nutritional stress will be more prevalent. Individuals may respond differently, depending on the period of development during which nutritional stress was experienced. Such differences may surface specifically when poor environmental conditions challenge individuals again as adults. Here, we investigated long term consequences of differences in nutritional conditions experienced during different periods of early development by female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) on measures of management and acquisition of body reserves. As nestlings or fledglings, subjects were raised under different nutritional conditions, a low or high quality diet. After subjects reached sexual maturity, we measured their sensitivity to periods of food restriction, their exploration and foraging behaviour as well as adult resting metabolic rate (RMR). During a short period of food restriction, subjects from the poor nutritional conditions had a higher body mass loss than those raised under qualitatively superior nutritional conditions. Moreover, subjects that were raised under poor nutritional conditions were faster to engage in exploratory and foraging behaviour. But RMR did not differ among treatments. These results reveal that early nutritional conditions affect adult exploratory behaviour, a representative personality trait, foraging and adult's physiological condition. As early nutritional conditions are reflected in adult phenotypic plasticity specifically when stressful situations reappear, the results suggest that costs for poor developmental conditions are paid when environmental conditions deteriorate. PMID:19325706

  12. Optical diagnostic test of stress conditions of aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Gurkov, Anton N; Shakhtanova, Nadezhda S; Bedulina, Daria S; Timofeyev, Maxim A; Meglinski, Igor

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change has become a dire reality and its impact is expected to rise dramatically in the near future. Combined with the day-to-day human activities the climatic changes heavily affect the environment. In particular, a global temperature increase accompanied by a number of anthropogenic chemicals falling within the freshwater ecosystem results in a dramatic enhancement of the overall stress for most aquatic organisms. This leads to a significant shift in the species inventory and potential breakdown of the water ecosystem with severe consequences for local economies and water supply. In order to understand and predict the influence of climatic changes on the physiological and biochemical processes that take place in living aquatic organisms we explore the application of optical spectroscopy for monitoring and quantitative assessment of antioxidant enzymes activity in benthic amphipods of Lake Baikal. We demonstrate that the changes of the enzymes activity in Baikal amphipods undergoing thermal and/or hypoxia stress can be observed and documented by UV and optical spectroscopy both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:21548104

  13. Infection of Vascular Endothelial Cells with Human Cytomegalovirus under Fluid Shear Stress Reveals Preferential Entry and Spread of Virus in Flow Conditions Simulating Atheroprone Regions of the Artery

    PubMed Central

    DuRose, Jenny B.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major pathogenic factor in cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of mortality in developed countries. While risk factors for atherosclerosis tend to be systemic, the distribution of atherosclerotic plaques within the vasculature is preferentially located at branch points and curves where blood flow is disturbed and shear stress is low. It is now widely accepted that hemodynamic factors can modulate endothelial gene expression and function and influence the pathophysiological changes associated with atherosclerosis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous pathogen, has long been proposed as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. To date, the role of HCMV in atherogenesis has been explored only in static conditions, and it is not known how HCMV infection is influenced by the physiological context of flow. In this study, we utilized a parallel-plate flow system to simulate the effects of shear stresses in different regions of the vasculature in vitro. We found that endothelial cells cultured under low shear stress, which simulates the flow condition of atheroprone regions in vivo, are more permissive to HCMV infection than cells experiencing high shear stress or static conditions. Cells exposed to low shear stress show increased entry of HCMV compared to cells exposed to high shear stress or static conditions. Viral structural gene expression, viral titers, and viral spread are also enhanced in endothelial cells exposed to low shear stress. These results suggest that hemodynamic factors modulate HCMV infection of endothelial cells, thus providing new insights into the induction/acceleration of atherosclerosis by HCMV. PMID:23055562

  14. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 2: Delimitation of conditions for charge transfert establishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions for establishment of charge transfer during acceleration of nuclei up to Fe, for typical conditions of solar flare regions T = 5 x 10 to the 3rd power to 2.5 x 10 to the 8th power degrees K were explored. Results show that such conditions are widely assorted, depending on the acceleration mechanism, the kind of projections and their velocity, the target elements, the source temperature and consequently on the degree of ionization of matter and the local charge state of the accelerated ions. Nevertheless, in spite of that assorted behavior, there are some general tendencies that can be summarized as follows. In atomic H electron capture is systematically established from thermal energies up to high energies, whatever the element and for both acceleration process. For a given element and fixed temperature (T), the probability and energy domain of electron capture and loss with Fermi are higher than with Betatron acceleration. For a given acceleration process the heavier the ion the higher the probability and the wider the energy range for electron capture and loss. For given acceleration mechanism and fixed element the importance and energy domain of capture and loss increase with T: for those reasons, the energy range of charge equilibrium (illustrated with solid lines on the next figs.) is wider with Fermi and increases with temperature and atomic number of projectiles. For the same reasons, electron loss is smaller while the lighter the element, the lower the temperature and the Betatron process, such that there are conditions for which electron loss is not allowed at low energies, but only electron capture is established.

  15. Influence of stress on fear memory processes in an aversive differential conditioning paradigm in humans.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Wilhelm, Frank H; Hartmann, Francina R; Kunz, Sabrina; von Rohr, Isabelle R Rudolf; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-07-01

    It is widely assumed that learning and memory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis, expression, maintenance and therapy of anxiety disorders, such as phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Memory retrieval is involved in symptom expression and maintenance of these disorders, while memory extinction is believed to be the underlying mechanism of behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders. There is abundant evidence that stress and stress hormones can reduce memory retrieval of emotional information, whereas they enhance memory consolidation of extinction training. In this study we aimed at investigating if stress affects these memory processes in a fear conditioning paradigm in healthy human subjects. On day 1, fear memory was acquired through a standard differential fear conditioning procedure. On day 2 (24h after fear acquisition), participants either underwent a stressful cold pressor test (CPT) or a control condition, 20 min before memory retrieval testing and extinction training. Possible prolonged effects of the stress manipulation were investigated on day 3 (48 h after fear acquisition), when memory retrieval and extinction were tested again. On day 2, men in the stress group showed a robust cortisol response to stress and showed lower unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy ratings than men in the control group. This reduction in fear memory retrieval was maintained on day 3. In women, who showed a significantly smaller cortisol response to stress than men, no stress effects on fear memory retrieval were observed. No group differences were observed with respect to extinction. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that stress can reduce memory retrieval of conditioned fear in men. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of stress and glucocorticoids on fear symptoms in anxiety disorders and suggest that such effects may be sex-specific. PMID:23333200

  16. The Effectiveness of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) Extract in Stabilization of Sunflower Oil under Accelerated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Winne Sia Chiaw; Ismail, Amin; Mohd. Esa, Norhaizan; Akowuah, Gabriel Akyirem; Wai, Ho Chun; Seng, Yim Hip

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative properties of sunflower oil supplemented with rambutan extract, (crude extract and its fractionated fraction, SF II) in comparison with synthetic antioxidant were investigated. The supplemented sunflower oils were stored under accelerated conditions for 24 days at 60 °C. For every 6-day interval, the oxidative properties of the supplemented sunflower oil were evaluated based on the following tests, namely peroxide value, p-anisidine value, Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay, iodine value and free fatty acids. The total oxidation (TOTOX) values were also calculated based on the peroxide values and p-anisidine values. Rambutan extract is a potential source of antioxidant. The oxidative activities of the extracts at all concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the control. Generally, the partially fractionated fraction was more effective than the crude extract. With a 2-year storage period at ambient temperature, the fractionated fraction of the extract, SF II at 300 ppm, was observed to work more effectively than the synthetic antioxidant, t-Tocopherol, and it possessed a protective effect comparable with butylatedhydrioxynanisole (BHA). Therefore, rambutan extract could be used as a potential alternative source of antioxidant in the oil industry or other fat-based products to delay lipid oxidation. PMID:26784877

  17. Estimation of stress conditions in the Chelung-pu Fault, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yeh, E.; Shiu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Stress changes spatially and temporally in seismic cycles. Detailed waveforms of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake were taken along the Chelung-pu fault. In the aftermath of the earthquake, Taiwan Chelungu-pu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) was conducted. Detailed structural data was obtained from the drilled core. Present stress state of post-seismic period was revealed in TCDP. To understand the stress state of pre-earthquake or coseisemic stages, we have to use geological signature in the Chelungu-pu Fault. In this study, we estimated paleo-stress from micro-faults and absolute stress using stress polygon. Then we discuss the relationship between spatial and temporal changes of stress with seismic cycles. TCDP core: Deformation structures such as micro-fault and cataclasite were described from TCDP core. Slip data for those structures were obtained from slicken lines and slicken steps. Number of slip data is 195. Micro-fault inversion method: We used Multiple inversion method (MIM) (Yamaji , 2000) and k-means clustering (Otsubo et al., 2006) to estimate paleo-stress. Result: We obtained the three solutions of stress state, s1-s3 from TCDP core. Directions of the maximum compressional axis for s1 and s2 are WNW-ESE, and for s3 is NNE-SSW. Stress ratios (phi) defined as (sigma2-sigma3)/(sigma1-sigma3) for s1, s2, and s3 were 0.17, 0.23, and 0.45, respectively. Discussion: We used stress polygons on the basis of the Anderson theory of faulting as used in Lin et al. (2007) to estimate the range of stress conditions. Lin et al. (2007) reported that the azimuth of the SHmax is 119-133 degree above and below the fault zone at TCDP Hole B and 209-223 degree in the fault zone observed at about 1133m in depth. We projected our paleo-stress orientations to the directions of SHmax and Shmin. In addition to that, using stress ratio we estimated, we can restricted the stress conditions for the paleo-stress in the stress polygons. In the result, the ranges of stress

  18. Systolic Peak Detection in Acceleration Photoplethysmograms Measured from Emergency Responders in Tropical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Abbott, Derek; Schuurmans, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Photoplethysmogram (PPG) monitoring is not only essential for critically ill patients in hospitals or at home, but also for those undergoing exercise testing. However, processing PPG signals measured after exercise is challenging, especially if the environment is hot and humid. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that can detect systolic peaks under challenging conditions, as in the case of emergency responders in tropical conditions. Accurate systolic-peak detection is an important first step for the analysis of heart rate variability. Algorithms based on local maxima-minima, first-derivative, and slope sum are evaluated, and a new algorithm is introduced to improve the detection rate. With 40 healthy subjects, the new algorithm demonstrates the highest overall detection accuracy (99.84% sensitivity, 99.89% positive predictivity). Existing algorithms, such as Billauer's, Li's and Zong's, have comparable although lower accuracy. However, the proposed algorithm presents an advantage for real-time applications by avoiding human intervention in threshold determination. For best performance, we show that a combination of two event-related moving averages with an offset threshold has an advantage in detecting systolic peaks, even in heat-stressed PPG signals. PMID:24167546

  19. Stress and Self-Perceived Parenting Behaviors of Parents of Children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Lisa A.; Reed, Phil

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between parenting stress and self-perceived parenting behaviors in 138 parents of children with autistic spectrum conditions were studied over 9-10 months. Apart from perceived communication being attenuated, there were no major areas of self-perceived parenting weakness. Parenting stress closely interacted with self-perceived…

  20. Stress-related hormones and glycinebetaine interplay in protection of photosynthesis under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Zaman, Mohammad; Pharis, Richard P; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-12-01

    Plants subjected to abiotic stresses such as extreme high and low temperatures, drought or salinity, often exhibit decreased vegetative growth and reduced reproductive capabilities. This is often associated with decreased photosynthesis via an increase in photoinhibition, and accompanied by rapid changes in endogenous levels of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene. However, certain plant species and/or genotypes exhibit greater tolerance to abiotic stress because they are capable of accumulating endogenous levels of the zwitterionic osmolyte-glycinebetaine (GB). The accumulation of GB via natural production, exogenous application or genetic engineering, enhances plant osmoregulation and thus increases abiotic stress tolerance. The final steps of GB biosynthesis occur in chloroplasts where GB has been shown to play a key role in increasing the protection of soluble stromal and lumenal enzymes, lipids and proteins, of the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition, we suggest that the stress-induced GB biosynthesis pathway may well serve as an additional or alternative biochemical sink, one which consumes excess photosynthesis-generated electrons, thus protecting photosynthetic apparatus from overreduction. Glycinebetaine biosynthesis in chloroplasts is up-regulated by increases in endogenous ABA or SA levels. In this review, we propose and discuss a model describing the close interaction and synergistic physiological effects of GB and ABA in the process of cold acclimation of higher plants. PMID:25823797

  1. Measurement of heat stress conditions at cow level and comparison to climate conditions at stationary locations inside a dairy barn.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Laura K; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine heat stress conditions at cow level and to investigate the relationship to the climate conditions at 5 different stationary locations inside a dairy barn. In addition, we compared the climate conditions at cow level between primiparous and multiparous cows for a period of 1 week after regrouping. The temperature-humidity index (THI) differed significantly between all stationary loggers. The lowest THI was measured at the window logger in the experimental stall and the highest THI was measured at the central logger in the experimental stall. The THI at the mobile cow loggers was 2·33 THI points higher than at the stationary loggers. Furthermore, the mean daily THI was higher at the mobile cow loggers than at the stationary loggers on all experimental days. The THI in the experimental pen was 0·44 THI points lower when the experimental cow group was located inside the milking parlour. The THI measured at the mobile cow loggers was 1·63 THI points higher when the experimental cow group was located inside the milking parlour. However, there was no significant difference for all climate variables between primiparous and multiparous cows. These results indicate, there is a wide range of climate conditions inside a dairy barn and especially areas with a great distance to a fresh air supply have an increased risk for the occurrence of heat stress conditions. Furthermore, the heat stress conditions are even higher at cow level and cows not only influence their climatic environment, but also generate microclimates within different locations inside the barn. Therefore climate conditions should be obtained at cow level to evaluate the heat stress conditions that dairy cows are actually exposed to. PMID:27600964

  2. The Photoelastic Investigation of Three-dimensional Stress and Strain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppel, G

    1937-01-01

    The present report contains the description and typical application of two photoelastic methods which are suitable for the study of stress and strain conditions in three dimensions, namely: the fixation method and the immersion method.

  3. [Role of micro-organisms in adapting plants to environmental stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Heribert

    2012-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants have always been confronted to various abiotic and biotic stresses in their immediate environment. As a consequence, the survival of plants depended on their ability to adjust rapidly their physiology, development and growth to escape or mitigate the impacts of stress. All plants are known to perceive and respond to stress signals such as drought, heat, salinity, attacks by herbivores and pathogens. Some biochemical processes are common to all plant stress responses including the production of certain stress proteins and metabolites, as well as the modification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Although there has been extensive research in the plant stress response field, it is not yet known which factors are responsible for conferring to some plant species the capacity to colonize extreme habitats. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of plant stress physiology, the contribution of the plant-associated microbial community in the soil, commonly called the rhizosphere, has only recently received enhanced attention. Recent studies showed that some plant species in natural habitats require microbial associations for stress tolerance and survival. Since plants have colonized land, they have evolved mechanisms to respond to changing environmental conditions and settle in extreme habitats. Although many plants lack the adaptive capability to adapt to stress conditions, the ability of a variety of plants to adapt to stress conditions appears to depend on the association with microbes, raising a number of questions: can all plants improve stress tolerance when associated with their appropriate microbial partners? Did we miss identifying the right partners for a given plant species or variety? What distinguishes the microbes and plants that are adapted to extreme environmental conditions from those living in temperate zones? Answers to these questions are likely to revolutionize plant biology

  4. The influence of acute stress on the regulation of conditioned fear

    PubMed Central

    Raio, Candace M.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Fear learning and regulation is a prominent model for describing the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders and stress-related psychopathology. Fear expression can be modulated using a number of regulatory strategies, including extinction, cognitive emotion regulation, avoidance strategies and reconsolidation. In this review, we examine research investigating the effects of acute stress and stress hormones on these regulatory techniques. We focus on what is known about the impact of stress on the ability to flexibly regulate fear responses that are acquired through Pavlovian fear conditioning. Our primary aim is to explore the impact of stress on fear regulation in humans. Given this, we focus on techniques where stress has been linked to alterations of fear regulation in humans (extinction and emotion regulation), and briefly discuss other techniques (avoidance and reconsolidation) where the impact of stress or stress hormones have been mainly explored in animal models. These investigations reveal that acute stress may impair the persistent inhibition of fear, presumably by altering prefrontal cortex function. Characterizing the effects of stress on fear regulation is critical for understanding the boundaries within which existing regulation strategies are viable in everyday life and can better inform treatment options for those who suffer from anxiety and stress-related psychopathology. PMID:25530986

  5. Changes in striatal dopamine release in stress-induced conditioned suppression of motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Nabeshima, T; Kuno, A; Wada, M; Ukai, R; Kameyama, T

    1996-05-01

    Rats received a footshock for 10 min in a chamber with a metallic grid floor, and then placed into the chamber for 30 min after 6 days. The motility of the shocked rats showed a significant decrease (conditioned suppression of motility). In addition, the extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum were also reduced significantly in in vivo microdialysis study. Thus, dysfunction in the striatal DAergic neuronal systems is responsible for mental stress responses such as conditioned fear stress. PMID:8762174

  6. The Stress-Strain Condition Estimation of Detail in Crack Tip by Integral Strain Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzrantsev, V.; Syzrantseva, K.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers the task of stress-strain condition calculation of experimental sample in fatigue crack tip on weld boundary at its cyclic deforming. For this task decision authors use the information obtained by original means of cyclic strains measurement: Integral Strain Gauges. The results of carried experimental researches are compared with data of stress-strain condition estimation of detail in crack tip calculated by Finish Element Method.

  7. Stress and opioids: role of opioids in modulating stress-related behavior and effect of stress on morphine conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-04-01

    Research studies have defined the important role of endogenous opioids in modulating stress-associated behavior. The release of β-endorphins in the amygdala in response to stress helps to cope with a stressor by inhibiting the over-activation of HPA axis. Administration of mu opioid agonists reduces the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a traumatic event by inhibiting fear-related memory consolidation. Similarly, the release of endogenous enkephalin and nociceptin in the basolateral amygdala and the nucleus accumbens tends to produce the anti-stress effects. An increase in dynorphin levels during prolonged exposure to stress may produce learned helplessness, dysphoria and depression. Stress also influences morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) depending upon the intensity and duration of the stressor. Acute stress inhibits morphine CPP, while chronic stress potentiates CPP. The development of dysphoria due to increased dynorphin levels may contribute to chronic stress-induced potentiation of morphine CPP. The activation of ERK/cyclic AMP responsive element-binding (CREB) signaling in the mesocorticolimbic area, glucocorticoid receptors in the basolateral amygdala, and norepinephrine and galanin system in the nucleus accumbens may decrease the acute stress-induced inhibition of morphine CPP. The increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and augmentation of GABAergic transmission in the median prefrontal cortex may contribute in potentiating morphine CPP. Stress exposure reinstates the extinct morphine CPP by activating the orexin receptors in the nucleus accumbens, decreasing the oxytocin levels in the lateral septum and amygdala, and altering the GABAergic transmission (activation of GABAA and inactivation of GABAB receptors). The present review describes these varied interactions between opioids and stress along with the possible mechanism. PMID:25636946

  8. Condition dependent intra-individual repeatability of stress-induced cortisol in a freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Cook, K V; O'Connor, C M; McConnachie, S H; Gilmour, K M; Cooke, S J

    2012-03-01

    The glucocorticoid (GC) stress response is thought to be an individual trait associated with behaviour and life history strategies. Studies exploring such relationships typically assume measured hormone values to be repeatable within an individual. However, repeatability of GCs has proven variable in wild animals and underlying reasons remain unknown. We assessed individual repeatability of circulating stress-induced cortisol, the primary GC in teleost fish, and glucose concentrations in a wild teleost fish held under consistent laboratory conditions. We also tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of intra-individual variability in stress-induced cortisol concentrations ("cortisol variability") is influenced by body condition. Wild-caught bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were subjected to repeated standardized stressors and blood sampled (3 times over 6 days) once cortisol concentrations peaked. Various indicators of fish condition, both whole body and physiological, were also measured. Overall, stress-induced circulating cortisol concentrations were repeatable but stress-induced glucose was not. Cortisol variability was related to Fulton's condition factor and size (eviscerated mass) where smaller fish in poor condition exhibited increased cortisol variability. The findings have implications for the interpretation of studies that examine correlates of GC concentrations as they suggest consistency in stress responsiveness is influenced by factors such as size and condition. PMID:22179071

  9. Effectiveness of Dry Eye Therapy Under Conditions of Environmental Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Louise C.; Simmons, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dry eye is often characterized by increased tear evaporation due to poor tear film quality, especially of the lipid component of the tear film. Using an environmental chamber to induce environmental stress, this study compared the effect of three lubricant eye drops on various aspects of tear physiology in a crossover design (evaporation was the principal outcome measure). Methods: Three eye drop formulas were tested: 0.5% carmellose sodium (Drop C), 0.5% carmellose sodium with added lipid (Drop C-L) and 1.0% glycerine with added lipid (Drop G-L). Nineteen control and 18 dry eye subjects used each product for 2 weeks, three times per day, in a random order, with a minimum 1-week washout between treatment periods. Tear evaporation, break up time, osmolarity, tear structure (by interferometry) and patient symptoms were assessed with the subjects adapted for 10 min in an environmental chamber controlled at 20% relative humidity and 22 °C. The treatment effects were analyzed using general linear model repeated measures analyses of variance. Results: In dry eye subjects, evaporation, break up time, osmolarity and symptoms improved for all formulas (p < 0.05). Normal subjects showed some improvements: evaporation with C-L, osmolarity with C and symptoms with C-L and G-L. Change in evaporation was greater for both C-L and G-L versus C (p < 0.05), and there was a trend for C-L to reduce evaporation more than G-L (p < 0.11). There were no significant treatment effects on tear film structure. Conclusion: Overall, the eye drop formula containing both carmellose sodium and lipid (C-L) produced a greater treatment effect on tear evaporation than the other formulations containing only one of these ingredients. This study also demonstrates the utility of a controlled environmental chamber in showing the difference in performance between dry eye treatments. PMID:23294168

  10. Nonlinear stability of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in magnetic fluids stressed by a time-dependent acceleration and a tangential magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dib, Yusry O.

    1996-04-01

    The nonlinear stability of surface waves propagating between two superposed streaming magnetic fluids is investigated. The fluids are stressed by a constant tangential magnetic field and a vertical periodic acceleration. The solution employs the method of multiple scales. Owing to the periodicity, resonant cases appear. Two parametrically nonlinear Schrödinger equations are derived for the resonant cases to describe the elevation of weakly nonlinear capillary waves. The standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation is satisfied for the non resonant cases. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability are obtained. A formula for the surface elevation is obtained in each case. It is found that the magnetic field, the velocities and the frequency of the applied periodic force play dual roles in the resonant region. Investigation of the stability criterion by nonlinear perturbation shows that an increase in the acceleration frequency has a stabilizing effect. The stabilizing role of the frequency is due to the destabilizing effect of the amplitude of the periodic acceleration.

  11. Impact of bias conditions on electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects in Si-based TFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lili; Gnani, Elena; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Driussi, Francesco; Selmi, Luca; Royer, Cyrille Le; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects is experimentally investigated in Si-based Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (TFETs). In particular, the impact of bias conditions on the performance degradation is discussed. We found that the electrical stress effects in TFETs could not be ignored in radiation tests, since they can possibly overwhelm the radiation-induced degradation. Under this circumstance, the worst-case bias condition for studying radiation effects is not straightforward to be determined when there is an interplay between electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects.

  12. Free vibrations of thermally stressed orthotropic plates with various boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.; Greetham, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical investigation of the vibrations of thermally stressed orthotropic plates in the prebuckled region is presented. The investigation covers the broad class of trapezoidal plates with two opposite sides parallel. Each edge of the plate may be subjected to different uniform boundary conditions. variable thickness and arbitrary temperature distributions (analytical or experimental) for any desired combination of boundary conditions may be prescribed. Results obtained using this analysis are compared to experimental results obtained for isotropic plates with thermal stress, and to results contained in the literature for orthotropic plates without thermal stress. Good agreement exists for both sets of comparisons.

  13. Conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulate lipid droplet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fei, Weihua; Wang, Han; Fu, Xin; Bielby, Christopher; Yang, Hongyuan

    2009-11-15

    LDs (lipid droplets) are cellular organelles which can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Despite their importance in cell biology, the mechanism underlying LD biogenesis remains largely unknown. In the present study we report that conditions of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress stimulate LD formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LDs accumulated in yeast mutants with compromised protein glycosylation or ER-associated protein degradation. Moreover, tunicamycin and Brefeldin A, agents which induce ER stress, were found to stimulate LD formation. In contrast, the restoration of protein glycosylation reduced LD accumulation. Interestingly, enhanced neutral lipids synthesis and LD formation under conditions of ER stress was not dependent on Ire1p. Lastly, we demonstrated that the absence of LDs did not compromise cell viability under ER stress. Our results suggest that although more LDs are produced, LDs are not essential to cell survival under ER stress. PMID:19708857

  14. Regulation of grain yield in rice under well-watered and drought stress conditions by GUDK

    PubMed Central

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Basu, Supratim; Gupta, Chirag; Pereira, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the grain yield of cereals, which is stable under unfavorable environmental stress, is a major objective to sustain production and feed the growing world population. Recently, we functionally characterized a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, named GROWTH UNDER DROUGHT KINASE (GUDK), revealing its role in regulating grain yield under well-watered and drought stress conditions by transphosphorylating the OsAP37 transcription factor. GUDK is induced under several stresses and its loss-of-function increased the sensitivity of rice seedlings to salinity, osmotic stress, and abscisic acid treatment. In addition to reduced tolerance of gudk mutant plants to drought stress at vegetative stage, a significant reduction in grain yield was observed under well-watered and drought stress conditions at reproductive stage. Gene co-expression analysis supports the role of GUDK in regulating important biological processes both under control and stress conditions. Thus, our results suggest that GUDK has the potential to regulate grain yield both under favorable and unfavorable conditions. PMID:26633564

  15. Life prediction of 808nm high power semiconductor laser by accelerated life test of constant current stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Nan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yihao; Zhong, Li; Liu, Suping; Ma, Xiaoyu

    2015-10-01

    High power semiconductor laser is widely used because of its high transformation efficiency, good working stability, compact volume and simple driving requirements. Laser's lifetime is very long, but tests at high levels of stress can speed up the failure process and shorten the times to failure significantly. So accelerated life test is used here for forecasting the lifetime of 808nm CW GaAs/AlGaAs high power semiconductor laser that has an output power of 1W under 1.04A. Accelerated life test of constant current stress based on the Inverse Power Law Relationship was designed. Tests were conducted under 1.3A, 1.6A and 1.9A at room temperature. It is the first time that this method is used in the domestic research of laser's lifetime prediction. Applying Weibull Distribution to describe the lifetime distribution and analyzing the data of times to failure, characteristics lifetime's functional relationship model with current is achieved. Then the characteristics lifetime under normal current is extrapolated, which is 9473h. Besides, to confirm the validity of the functional relationship model, we conduct an additional accelerated life test under 1.75A. Based on this experimental data we calculated the characteristics lifetime corresponding to 1.75A that is 171h, while the extrapolated characteristics lifetime from the former functional relationship model is 162h. The two results shows 5% deviation that is very low and acceptable, which indicates that the test design is reasonable and authentic.

  16. Understanding How Kurtosis Is Transferred from Input Acceleration to Stress Response and Its Influence on Fatigue Llife

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kihm, Frederic; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Ferguson, Neil S.; Halfpenny, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    High cycle fatigue of metals typically occurs through long term exposure to time varying loads which, although modest in amplitude, give rise to microscopic cracks that can ultimately propagate to failure. The fatigue life of a component is primarily dependent on the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations. For most vibration tests, it is common to assume a Gaussian distribution of both the input acceleration and stress response. In real life, however, it is common to experience non-Gaussian acceleration input, and this can cause the response to be non-Gaussian. Examples of non-Gaussian loads include road irregularities such as potholes in the automotive world or turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations for the aerospace sector or more generally wind, wave or high amplitude acoustic loads. The paper first reviews some of the methods used to generate non-Gaussian excitation signals with a given power spectral density and kurtosis. The kurtosis of the response is examined once the signal is passed through a linear time invariant system. Finally an algorithm is presented that determines the output kurtosis based upon the input kurtosis, the input power spectral density and the frequency response function of the system. The algorithm is validated using numerical simulations. Direct applications of these results include improved fatigue life estimations and a method to accelerate shaker tests by generating high kurtosis, non-Gaussian drive signals.

  17. Physical conditions for conducting radiobiological experiments in beams of accelerated particles with high linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, Y. I.; Marennyy, A. M.; Popov, V. I.; Aykhorn, K.; Ertsgreber, G.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of an accelerator to conduct radiobiological experiments is reported that uses aluminum filters to control the accelerated ion beam while preserving its stability, and a vacuum chamber to conduct the ion beam with the help of a collector through a lavsan exit port to the target. Depth distribution of the absorbed dose from a monodirectional ion beam is practically completely represented by the change in the energy spectrum of the biological object.

  18. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  19. Accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Plans for the development of amorphous cell accelerated test measurement instrumentation are outlined. Diagrams for an 11-lamp ELH solar simulator and ac light source instrumentation are given. Examples of ac and dc analysis graphs are also provided.

  20. Conditioned stress prevents cue-primed cocaine reinstatement only in stress-responsive rats.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Natalie A; Wu, Lizhen; Hiller, Helmut; Krause, Eric G; Schwendt, Marek; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Neurobiological mechanisms underlying comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cocaine use disorder (CUD) are unknown. We aimed to develop an animal model of PTSD + CUD to examine the neurobiology underlying cocaine-seeking in the presence of PTSD comorbidity. Rats were exposed to cat urine once for 10-minutes and tested for anxiety-like behaviors one week later. Subsequently, rats underwent long-access (LgA) cocaine self-administration and extinction training. Rats were re-exposed to the trauma context and then immediately tested for cue-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Plasma and brains were collected afterwards for corticosterone assays and real-time qPCR analysis. Urine-exposed (UE; n = 23) and controls not exposed to urine (Ctrl; n = 11) did not differ in elevated plus maze behavior, but UE rats displayed significantly reduced habituation of the acoustic startle response (ASR) relative to Ctrl rats. A median split of ASR habituation scores was used to classify stress-responsive rats. UE rats (n = 10) self-administered more cocaine on Day 1 of LgA than control rats (Ctrl + Coc; n = 8). Re-exposure to the trauma context prevented cocaine reinstatement only in stress-responsive rats. Ctrl + Coc rats had lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than Ctrls, and decreased gene expression of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and Glcci1 in the hippocampus. Rats that self-administered cocaine displayed greater CRH expression in the amygdala that was independent of urine exposure. While we did not find that cat urine exposure induced a PTSD-like phenotype in our rats, the present study underscores the need to separate stressed rats into cohorts based on anxiety-like behavior in order to study individual vulnerability to PTSD + CUD. PMID:27181613

  1. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  2. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    PubMed Central

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients. PMID:27095931

  3. Occupational stress, working condition and nutritional status of military police officers.

    PubMed

    Santana, Angela Maria C; Gomes, Josiane Keila V; De Marchi, Dione; Girondoli, Yassana M; Rosado, Lina E F P de Lima; Rosado, Gilberto Paixão; de Andrade, Isabel Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between stress, working conditions and the nutritional status of 53 military police officers in a Southeast city of Brazil. In order to evaluate the symptomatology and the stress phase, the Inventory of Stress Symptoms Lipp for Adults - ISSL was utilized. The assessment of the working conditions was performed by means of socio-demographic questionnaire, direct observation and interviews. The nutritional and health conditions were assessed through anthropometric measures, biochemical tests, blood pressure measurements and cardiovascular disease risk calculator. The sample is of the male gender (92.5%) and aging below 40 years old (73.6%). From these, 35.8% showed stress and 68.4% were in the resistance phase, with 31.6% almost burned out. Through the calculation of Chi-square we could find positive association between the BMI and tiredness (P = 0.0188), between the BMI and irritation (P = 0.0005) and the BMI and the appearance of nervous system problems or emotional problems (P = 0.0304), indicating that these statuses or problems could be related to work. We can conclude then, the stress is present among military police officers. No case of critical stress was found, and the stress phases identified are still susceptible to intervention. PMID:22317161

  4. Effects of Stress and Sex on Acquisition and Consolidation of Human Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Cynthia M.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Zorawski, Michael; Blanding, Nineequa Q.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the relationship between stress hormone (cortisol) release and acquisition and consolidation of conditioned fear learning in healthy adults. Participants underwent acquisition of differential fear conditioning, and consolidation was assessed in a 24-h delayed extinction test. The acquisition phase was immediately followed by an 11-min…

  5. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Luderer, Ulrike

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm(-/-) mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm(-/-) and Gclm(+/+) mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm(-/-) mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm(-/-) ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm(-/-) mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  6. Hsc70 Contributes to Cancer Cell Survival by Preventing Rab1A Degradation under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masako; Mun, Saya; Harada, Akihito; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Azusa; Sano, Soichi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Yamagata, Masayo; Yukimura, Tokihito; Miura, Katsuyuki; Shiota, Masayuki; Iwao, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) acts as a molecular chaperone for the maintenance of intracellular proteins, which allows cancer cells to survive under proteotoxic stress. We attempted to use Hsc70 to identify key molecules in cancer cell survival. Here, we performed mass-spectrometry-based proteomics analysis utilizing affinity purification with anti-Hsc70 antibodies; as a result, 83 differentially expressed proteins were identified under stress conditions. This result implies that there was a change in the proteins with which Hsc70 interacted in response to stress. Among the proteins identified under both serum-depleted and 5-fluorouracil-treated conditions, Rab1A was identified as an essential molecule for cancer cell survival. Hsc70 interacted with Rab1A in a chaperone-dependent manner. In addition, Hsc70 knockdown decreased the level of Rab1A and increased the level of its ubiquitination under stress conditions, suggesting that Hsc70 prevented the degradation of Rab1A denatured by stress exposure. We also found that Rab1A knockdown induced cell death by inhibition of autophagosome formation. Rab1A may therefore contribute to overcoming proteotoxic insults, which allows cancer cells to survive under stress conditions. Analysis of Hsc70 interactors provided insight into changes of intracellular status. We expect further study of the Hsc70 interactome to provide a more comprehensive understanding of cancer cell physiology. PMID:24801886

  7. Stress analysis in thermal barrier coatings subjected to long-term exposure in simulated turbine conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.; Ceramatec, Inc.

    2004-03-15

    In recent years, ruby fluorescence spectroscopy has been demonstrated as a powerful technique for monitoring residual stress evolution in the thermally grown oxide scale in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. The measured residual stresses, in turn, can be used to monitor evolution of damage in the coatings. Effective use of this technology for real-time damage monitoring requires the identification of trends in measured stresses that can be used as indicators of damage evolution. The present work focuses on studying the evolution of residual stresses in TBC systems during long-term exposure to turbine operating conditions. The coatings are electron beam physical vapor deposited (EBPVD) and atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) zirconia. The stress evolution in both EBPVD and APS coatings is analytically modeled by an approach that takes into consideration contributions due to both thermal mismatch and oxide growth. Microstructural changes in the TBC system are correlated with measured stress trends through comparison with the modeled stresses. The stress measurements and modeling provide insight into failure modes and mechanisms, and to identify critical features in the measured stress data that can be used as indicators of failure in TBCs.

  8. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  9. The effects of acceleration stress on human workload and manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. T.; Albery, W. B.; Ward, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of +Gz stress on operator task performance and workload were assessed. Subjects were presented a two dimensional maze and were required to solve it as rapidly as possible (by moving a light dot through it via a trim switch on a control stick) while under G-stress at levels from +1 Gz to +6 Gz. The G-stress was provided by a human centrifuge. The effects of this stress were assessed by two techniques; (1) objective performance measures on the primary maze-solving task, and (2) subjective workload measures obtained using the subjective workload assessment technique (SWAT). It was found that while neither moderate (+3 Gz) nor high (+5 Gz and +6 Gz) levels of G-stress affected maze solving performance, the high G levels did increase significantly the subjective workload of the maze task.

  10. A Flight Evaluation of an Airborne Physiological Instrumentation System, Including Preliminary Results Under Conditions of Varying Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Holden, George R.; Smith, Joseph R., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    A physiological instrumentation system capable of recording the electrocardiogram, pulse rate, respiration rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures during flight has been developed. This instrumentation system was designed for use during control studies at varied levels of acceleration in order to monitor the well-being of the pilot and at the same time to obtain data for study of the relationships between his various physiological functions and his performance capability. Flights, made in a T-33 aircraft, demonstrated the ability of the system to obtain the desired physiological data in flight. The data obtained in these flights, although limited in nature, indicate a slowing of the pulse rate under the subgravity conditions of brief duration. There appeared to be a proportional nearly in-phase relationship between pulse rate and acceleration. A decrease in diastolic blood pressure together with an increase in pulse pressure was noted during subgravity conditions and an elevation of the diastolic pressure together with a decrease in pulse pressure du-ring increased accelerations. No change worthy of note was seen in the records of the systolic blood pressure, the respiration rate, or the electrocardiogram over the range of acceleration studied (0 to 3 g).

  11. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngoc H; Voronov, Roman S; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone. PMID:24730946

  12. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Voronov, Roman S.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone.

  13. Conditional Induction of Oxidative Stress in RPE: A Mouse Model of Progressive Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Mao, Haoyu; Seo, Soo Jung; Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Hong; Le, Yun Z; Lewin, Alfred S

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate animal model is essential to screening drugs or designing a treatment strategy for geographic atrophy. Since oxidative stress contributes to the pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), we are reporting a new mouse AMD model of retinal degeneration by inducing mitochondrial oxidative stress in RPE. Sod2 the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was deleted in RPE layer using conditional knockout strategy. Fundus microscopy, SD-OCT and electroretinography were used to monitor retinal structure and function in living animals and microscopy was used to assess pathology post mortem. Tissue specific deletion of Sod2 caused elevated signs of oxidative stress, RPE dysfunction and showed some key features of AMD. Due to induction of oxidative stress, the conditional knockout mice show progressive reduction in ERG responses and thinning of outer nuclear layer (ONL) compared to non-induced littermates. PMID:26427390

  14. FERTILITY INTENTIONS AND EARLY LIFE HEALTH STRESS AMONG WOMEN IN EIGHT INDIAN CITIES: TESTING THE REPRODUCTIVE ACCELERATION HYPOTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Kulathinal, Sangita; Säävälä, Minna

    2015-09-01

    In life history theory, early life adversity is associated with an accelerated reproductive tempo. In harsh and unpredictable conditions in developing societies fertility is generally higher and the reproductive tempo faster than in more secure environments. This paper examines whether differences in female anthropometry, particularly adult height, are associated with fertility intentions of women in urban environments in India. The study population consists of women aged 15-29 (N=4485) in slums and non-slums of eight Indian cities in the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) of 2005-2006. Adult height is taken as a proxy for early childhood health and nutritional condition. Fertility intentions are examined by using two variables: the desire to have a child or another child, and to have it relatively soon, as indicative of accelerated reproductive scheduling. Evidence supporting the acceleration hypothesis is found in two urban frames out of 26 examined in a two-staged multinomial logistic model. In three cases, the relationship between fertility intentions and height is the opposite than expected by the acceleration hypothesis: taller women have a higher predictive probability of desiring a(nother) child and/or narrower birth spacing. Potential explanations for the partly contradictory relationship between the childhood health indicator and fertility intentions are discussed. PMID:25115228

  15. Accelerated Growth Rate and Increased Drought Stress Resilience of the Model Grass Brachypodium distachyon Colonized by Bacillus subtilis B26

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Jean-Benoit; Vali, Hojatollah; Bertrand, Annick; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGB) induce positive effects in plants, for instance, increased growth and reduced abiotic stresses susceptibility. The mechanisms by which these bacteria impact the host plant are numerous, diverse and often specific. Here, we studied the agronomical, molecular and biochemical effects of the endophytic PGB Bacillus subtilis B26 on the full life cycle of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21, an established model species for functional genomics in cereal crops and temperate grasses. Inoculation of Brachypodium with B. subtilis strain B26 increased root and shoot weights, accelerated growth rate and seed yield as compared to control plants. B. subtilis strain B26 efficiently colonized the plant and was recovered from roots, stems and blades as well as seeds of Brachypodium, indicating that the bacterium is able to migrate, spread systemically inside the plant, establish itself in the aerial plant tissues and organs, and is vertically transmitted to seeds. The presence of B. subtilis strain B26 in the seed led to systemic colonization of the next generation of Brachypodium plants. Inoculated Brachypodium seedlings and mature plants exposed to acute and chronic drought stress minimized the phenotypic effect of drought compared to plants not harbouring the bacterium. Protection from the inhibitory effects of drought by the bacterium was linked to upregulation of the drought-response genes, DREB2B-like, DHN3-like and LEA-14-A-like and modulation of the DNA methylation genes, MET1B-like, CMT3-like and DRM2-like, that regulate the process. Additionally, total soluble sugars and starch contents increased in stressed inoculated plants, a biochemical indication of drought tolerance. In conclusion, we show a single inoculation of Brachypodium with a PGB affected the whole growth cycle of the plant, accelerating its growth rates, shortening its vegetative period, and alleviating drought stress effects. These effects are relevant to grasses and cereal

  16. Proteomic study of a tolerant genotype of durum wheat under salt-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Borrelli, Grazia Maria; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Papa, Roberto; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stress conditions limiting crop growth and productivity. Duilio is a wheat genotype that shows tolerant behavior in both salt-stress and drought-stress conditions. Toward better understanding of the biochemical response to salinity in this genotype of durum wheat, a comparative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis based on normalized spectral abundance factors was conducted on wheat leaf samples subjected to increasing salt-stress levels (100 and 200 mmol L(-1) NaCl) with respect to untreated samples. We found significant changes in 71 proteins for the first stress level, in 83 proteins at the higher salinity level, and in 88 proteins when comparing salt-stress levels with each other. The major changes concerned the proteins involved in primary metabolism and production of energy, followed by those involved in protein metabolism and cellular defense mechanisms. Some indications of different specific physiological and defense mechanisms implicated in increasing tolerance were obtained. The enhanced salinity tolerance in Duilio appeared to be governed by a higher capacity for osmotic homeostasis, a more efficient defense, and an improvement of protection from mechanical stress by increased cell wall lignifications, allowing a better potential for growth recovery. PMID:24337188

  17. In Search of Concomitant Alterations of Dopaminergic and Neurotensinergic Systems in Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina; Antonelli, Marta C

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present article is to review experimental evidence which suggest joint involvement of both the dopaminergic and neurotensinergic systems in stress conditions. At present, the concept of stress refers to an environmental demand exceeding the normal regulatory ability of an organism, particularly during unpredictable and uncontrollable situations. Chronic stress yields devastating effects including cognitive and working memory dysfunctions, for which neurotransmission mediated by the catecholamines dopamine and noradrenaline is crucial. Catecholamine synthesis depends on the rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, whose expression is associated with working memory and the response to chronic stress. Neurotensin is a tridecapeptide widely distributed in the nervous system, at both central and peripheral levels, which behaves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. It mediates diverse biological actions including reward, locomotion, pain modulation and stress. Neurotensin and its high affinity NTS1 receptor are densely localized in areas that process emotion (amygdala nucleus), cognition (such as hippocampal nuclei and cortical areas) and the response to stress (hypothalamic nucleus). Experimental evidence indicates a crosstalk between the dopaminergic and the neurotensinergic systems either from an anatomical or a biochemical point of view. It is suggested that a concomitant alteration of dopaminergic and neurotensinergic systems takes place in diverse stress conditions. PMID:26869038

  18. Dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone under different physiological or stressful conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuai; Miao, Yi-Long; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Sun, Ming-Ju; Li, Hong; Lin, Juan; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Although plasma corticosterone is considered the main glucocorticoid involved in regulation of stress responses in rodents, the presence of plasma cortisol and whether its level can be used as an indicator for rodent activation of stress remain to be determined. In this study, effects of estrous cycle stage, circadian rhythm, and acute and chronic (repeated or unpredictable) stressors of various severities on dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone were examined in mice. A strong (r = 0.6-0.85) correlation between serum cortisol and corticosterone was observed throughout the estrous cycle, all day long, and during acute or repeated restraints, chronic unpredictable stress and acute forced swimming or heat stress. Both hormones increased to the highest level on day 1 of repeated-restraint or unpredictable stresses, but after that, whereas the concentration of cortisol did not change, that of corticosterone showed different dynamics. Thus, whereas corticosterone declined dramatically during repeated restraints, it remained at the high level during unpredictable stress. During forced swimming or heat stress, whereas cortisol increased to the highest level within 3 min., corticosterone did not reach maximum until 40 min. of stress. Analysis with HPLC and HPLC-MS further confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum. Taken together, results (i) confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum and (ii) suggested that mouse serum cortisol and corticosterone are closely correlated in dynamics under different physiological or stressful conditions, but, whereas corticosterone was a more adaptation-related biomarker than cortisol during chronic stress, cortisol was a quicker responder than corticosterone during severe acute stress. PMID:25699675

  19. Dynamics and Correlation of Serum Cortisol and Corticosterone under Different Physiological or Stressful Conditions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shuai; Miao, Yi-Long; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Sun, Ming-Ju; Li, Hong; Lin, Juan; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Although plasma corticosterone is considered the main glucocorticoid involved in regulation of stress responses in rodents, the presence of plasma cortisol and whether its level can be used as an indicator for rodent activation of stress remain to be determined. In this study, effects of estrous cycle stage, circadian rhythm, and acute and chronic (repeated or unpredictable) stressors of various severities on dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone were examined in mice. A strong (r = 0.6–0.85) correlation between serum cortisol and corticosterone was observed throughout the estrous cycle, all day long, and during acute or repeated restraints, chronic unpredictable stress and acute forced swimming or heat stress. Both hormones increased to the highest level on day 1 of repeated-restraint or unpredictable stresses, but after that, whereas the concentration of cortisol did not change, that of corticosterone showed different dynamics. Thus, whereas corticosterone declined dramatically during repeated restraints, it remained at the high level during unpredictable stress. During forced swimming or heat stress, whereas cortisol increased to the highest level within 3 min., corticosterone did not reach maximum until 40 min. of stress. Analysis with HPLC and HPLC-MS further confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum. Taken together, results (i) confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum and (ii) suggested that mouse serum cortisol and corticosterone are closely correlated in dynamics under different physiological or stressful conditions, but, whereas corticosterone was a more adaptation-related biomarker than cortisol during chronic stress, cortisol was a quicker responder than corticosterone during severe acute stress. PMID:25699675

  20. Stress concentration in the vicinity of a hole defect under conditions of Hertzian contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Eguchi, M.; Murayama, K.

    1981-01-01

    Two dimensional photoelastic stress analyses were conducted for epoxy resin models containing a hole defect under the conditions of Hertzian contact. Stress concentrations around the defect were determined as a function of several parameters. The effect of tangential traction on the stress concentration was also determined. Sharp stress concentrations occur in the vicinity of both the left and the right side of the hole. The stress concentration becomes more distinct the larger the hole diameter and the smaller distance between the hole and the contact surface. The stress concentration is greatest when the disk imposing a normal load is located at the contact surface directly over the hole. The magnitude and the location of stress concentration varies with the distance between the Hertzian contact area and the hole. The area involved in a process of rolling contact fatigue is confined to a shallow region at both sides of the hole. It was found that the effect of tangential traction is comparatively small on the stress concentration around the hole.

  1. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  2. Cellular accumulation of Cys326-OGG1 protein complexes under conditions of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, M.P.; Guggenheim, E.J.; Pulisciano, C.; Akbar, S.; Kershaw, R.M.; Hodges, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    The common Ser326Cys polymorphism in the base excision repair protein 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 is associated with a reduced capacity to repair oxidative DNA damage particularly under conditions of intracellular oxidative stress and there is evidence that Cys326-OGG1 homozygous individuals have increased susceptibility to specific cancer types. Indirect biochemical studies have shown that reduced repair capacity is related to OGG1 redox modification and also possibly OGG1 dimer formation. In the current study we have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation to study for the first time a component of the base excision repair pathway and applied it to visualise accumulation of Cys326-OGG1 protein complexes in the native cellular environment. Fluorescence was observed both within and around the cell nucleus, was shown to be specific to cells expressing Cys326-OGG1 and only occurred in cells under conditions of cellular oxidative stress following depletion of intracellular glutathione levels by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine. Furthermore, OGG1 complex formation was inhibited by incubation of cells with the thiol reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol and the antioxidant dimethylsulfoxide indicating a causative role for oxidative stress in the formation of OGG1 cellular complexes. In conclusion, this study has provided for the first time evidence of redox sensitive Cys326-OGG1 protein accumulation in cells under conditions of intracellular oxidative stress that may be related to the previously reported reduced repair capacity of Cys326-OGG1 specifically under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:24680828

  3. Changes in oxidative stress parameters and neurodegeneration markers in the brain of the senescence-accelerated mice SAMP-8.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Francesc X; Gutierrez-Cuesta, Javier; Romeu, Marta; Mulero, Miquel; Canudas, Anna Maria; Camins, Antoni; Mallol, Jordi; Pallàs, Mercè

    2006-04-01

    The senescence-accelerated strains of mice (SAMP) are well-characterized animal models of senescence. Senescence may be related to enhanced production or defective control of reactive oxygen species, which lead to neuronal damage. Therefore, the activity of various oxidative-stress related enzymes was determined in the cortex of 5 months-old senescence-accelerated mice prone-8 (SAMP-8) of both sexes and compared with senescence-accelerated mice-resistant-1 (SAMR-1). Glutathione reductase and peroxidase activities in SAMP-8 male mice were lower than in male SAMR-1, and a decreased catalase activity was found in both male and female SAMP-8 mice, which correlates with the lower catalase expression found by Western blotting. Nissl staining showed marked loss of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of five month-old SAMP-8 mice. SAMP-8 mice also had marked astrogliosis and microgliosis. We also found an increase in caspase-3 and calpain activity in the cortex. In addition, we observed morphological changes in the immunostaining of tau protein in SAMP-8, indicative of a loss of their structural function. Altogether, these results show that, at as early as 5 months of age, SAMP-8 mice have cytological and molecular alterations indicative of neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex and suggestive of altered control of the production of oxidative species and hyper-activation of calcium-dependent enzymes. PMID:16542809

  4. Analysis of extinction acquisition to attenuated tones in prenatally stressed and non-stressed offspring following auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Salm, A K; Lally, B E; Borysiewicz, E; Fil, D; Konat, G

    2015-02-01

    Stimulus generalization occurs when stimuli with characteristics similar to a previously conditioned stimulus (CS) become able to evoke a previously conditioned response. Experimental data (Lissek et al., 2005) indicate that patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), more often show stimulus generalization following fear conditioning when tested under laboratory conditions. Factors surrounding this observation may contribute to two common features of PTSD: 1) hyper-responsiveness to sensory stimuli reminiscent of those associated with the original trauma, and 2) resistance of PTSD to extinction-based therapies. Adverse early experience is considered a risk factor for the later development of PTSD and in the present experiments we hypothesized that stimulus generalization would occur in an animal model of adverse early experience, the prenatally stressed (PS) rat. Adult PS and control (CON) rats underwent extensive pre-habituation to a conditioning chamber followed by conventional auditory fear conditioning. The next day both groups began an extinction regimen where a series of quieter (attenuated), CSs were administered prior to the full 75 dB training CS. When tested in this manner, PS rats froze at significantly lower tone amplitudes than did CON offspring on the first day of extinction training. This suggests that the PS rats had stimulus-generalized the CS to lower decibel tones. In addition to this finding, we also observed that PS rats froze more often and longer during three ensuing days of extinction training to attenuated tones. Group differences vanished when PS and CON rats were extinguished under conventional conditions. Thus, it appears that the two extinction regimens differed in their aversive cue saliency for the PS vs. CON rats. Follow-up prefrontal cortex transcriptome probing suggests that cholinergic and dopaminergic alterations may be involved. PMID:25449394

  5. Condition-adapted stress and longevity gene regulation by Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1/Nrf

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Riva P.; Porter Abate, Jess; Dilks, Kieran; Landis, Jessica; Ashraf, Jasmine; Murphy, Coleen T.; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Summary Studies in model organisms have identified regulatory processes that profoundly influence aging, many of which modulate resistance against environmental or metabolic stresses. In C. elegans the transcription regulator SKN-1 is important for oxidative stress resistance and acts in multiple longevity pathways. SKN-1 is the ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins, which induce Phase 2 detoxification genes in response to stress. Phase 2 enzymes defend against oxygen radicals and conjugate electrophiles that are produced by Phase 1 detoxification enzymes, which metabolize lipophilic compounds. Here we have used expression profiling to identify genes and processes that are regulated by SKN-1 under normal and stress-response conditions. Under non-stressed conditions SKN-1 upregulates numerous genes involved in detoxification, cellular repair, and other functions, and downregulates a set of genes that reduce stress resistance and lifespan. Many of these genes appear to be direct SKN-1 targets, based upon presence of predicted SKN-binding sites in their promoters. The metalloid sodium arsenite induces skn-1-dependent activation of certain detoxification gene groups, including some that were not SKN-1-upregulated under normal conditions. An organic peroxide also triggers induction of a discrete Phase 2 gene set, but additionally stimulates a broad SKN-1-independent response. We conclude that under normal conditions SKN-1 has a wide range of functions in detoxification and other processes, including modulating mechanisms that reduce lifespan. In response to stress, SKN-1 and other regulators tailor transcription programs to meet the challenge at hand. Our findings reveal striking complexity in SKN-1 functions and the regulation of systemic detoxification defenses. PMID:19575768

  6. Bisecting GlcNAc modification stabilizes BACE1 protein under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Miyako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a protease essential for amyloid-β (Aβ) production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 protein is known to be up-regulated by oxidative stress-inducing stimuli but the mechanism for this up-regulation still needs to be clarified. We have recently found that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-III (GnT-III, encoded by the Mgat3 gene) and that GnT-III deficiency reduces Aβ-plaque formation in the brain by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Therefore, we hypothesized that bisecting GlcNAc would stabilize BACE1 protein on oxidative stress. In the present study, we first show that Aβ deposition in the mouse brain induces oxidative stress, together with an increase in levels of BACE1 and bisecting GlcNAc. Furthermore, prooxidant treatment induces expression of BACE1 protein in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), whereas it reduces BACE1 protein in GnT-III (Mgat3) knock-out MEFs by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. We purified BACE1 from Neuro2A cells and performed LC/ESI/MS analysis for BACE1-derived glycopeptides and mapped bisecting GlcNAc-modified sites on BACE1. Point mutations at two N-glycosylation sites (Asn(153) and Asn(223)) abolish the bisecting GlcNAc modification on BACE1. These mutations almost cancelled the enhanced BACE1 degradation seen in Mgat3(-/-) MEFs, indicating that bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 indeed regulates its degradation. Finally, we show that traumatic brain injury-induced BACE1 up-regulation is significantly suppressed in the Mgat3(-/-) brain. These results highlight the role of bisecting GlcNAc in oxidative stress-induced BACE1 expression and offer a novel glycan-targeted strategy for suppressing Aβ generation. PMID:26467158

  7. Oxidative Stress and Low Glutathione in Common Ear, Nose, and Throat Conditions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Asher, Benjamin Finkelhor; Guilford, Frederick Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Context • Oxidative stress and tissue-damaging, oxygen (O2)-related, free-radical formation is inherent in human metabolism, and the tissues of the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) have an increased exposure to injury from those substances. Because glutathione (GSH) is a major component in an antioxidant defense against oxidative damage in ENT tissues, a review of the impact of lowered GSH and oxidative stress in conditions associated with the upper respiratory tract is warranted. Objective • The review intended to summarize the role that oxidative stress and GSH play. Design • The research team performed a literature review from 1980 to the present that was based on the following keywords: oxidative stress, oxidation, antioxidant, and GSH in common ENT conditions. The review found the following conditions: (1) rhinitis, (2) allergic rhinitis, (3) chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), (4) CRS with polyps, (5) otitis media with effusion, (6) chronic otitis media (COM), (7) COM and cholesteatoma, (8) tympanic membrane sclerosis, (9) tonsillitis, (10) Meniere's disease, (11) laryngeal conditions, and (12) chronic cough. Results • ENT conditions have been found to be associated with oxidative stress and with low GSH. A limited number of the reviewed studies discussed antioxidant use or repletion of GSH. Although only a few reports support the use of GSH or antioxidants as adjuncts in the management of ENT conditions, no reports of side effects were found related to their use. Conclusions • Many ENT conditions are associated with oxidative stress and decreased GSH, both locally in the affected tissues and systemically. The oxidative stress of those conditions may be related to depletion of GSH, which is increased by the higher levels of O2 in the upper respiratory tract. A small number of studies have reported clinical benefits from the use of an antioxidant or GSH support. The findings of benefits and the lack of reports of side effects suggest that the clinical use of

  8. Application of in situ stress estimation methods in wellbore stability analysis under isotropic and anisotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of in situ stresses is a key step in many petroleum engineering applications, ranging from wellbore stability to sanding analysis and hydraulic fracturing design. Direct techniques conventionally used to determine in situ stresses are indeed very time consuming and expensive. These measurements would also be restricted as to the depth of acquisition, and generalization of the results to entire rock masses may not yield representative results. In this paper, applications of three indirect methods-Zoback’s polygon, shear moduli, and poroelastic-are studied to assess their applicability in providing reliable stress estimation under isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Determination of elastic, strength, and in situ stress parameters according to the assumption of each method for one of the vertical wells drilled in south Iran indicated that the shear moduli method is an appropriate approach for prediction of maximum horizontal stress within an interval where sufficient field data including leak-off tests are acquired. However, the poroelastic method seems to be a better method in prediction of in situ stresses under anisotropic conditions. This might be due to the presence of excessive shale formations in subsurface layers, causing structural or intrinsic anisotropy-based methods such as poroelastic equations to deliver more accurate results. However, making general conclusions based on studying a single vertical wellbore may not be sufficient, and therefore further studies are required.

  9. Does cyclic stress and accelerated ageing influence the wear behavior of highly crosslinked polyethylene?

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; De Mattia, Jonathan Salvatore; Bracco, Pierangiola; Pavoni, Eleonora; Taddei, Paola

    2016-06-01

    First-generation (irradiated and remelted or annealed) and second-generation (irradiated and vitamin E blended or doped) highly crosslinked polyethylenes were introduced in the last decade to solve the problems of wear and osteolysis. In this study, the influence of the Vitamin-E addition on crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE_VE) was evaluated by comparing the in vitro wear behavior of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) versus Vitamin-E blended polyethylene XLPE and conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (STD_PE) acetabular cups, after accelerated ageing according to ASTM F2003-02 (70.0±0.1°C, pure oxygen at 5bar for 14 days). The test was performed using a hip joint simulator run for two millions cycles, under bovine calf serum as lubricant. Mass loss was found to decrease along the series XLPE_VE>STD_PE>XLPE, although no statistically significant differences were found between the mass losses of the three sets of cups. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate at a molecular level the morphology changes induced by wear. The spectroscopic analyses showed that the accelerated ageing determined different wear mechanisms and molecular rearrangements during testing with regards to the changes in both the chain orientation and the distribution of the all-trans sequences within the orthorhombic, amorphous and third phases. The results of the present study showed that the addition of vitamin E was not effective to improve the gravimetric wear of PE after accelerated ageing. However, from a molecular point of view, the XLPE_VE acetabular cups tested after accelerated ageing appeared definitely less damaged than the STD_PE ones and comparable to XLPE samples. PMID:26970299

  10. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  11. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  12. Determination of critical stress triaxiality along yield locus of isotropic ductile materials under plane strain condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, S. S.; Pathak, K. K.; Hora, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    It is widely accepted that failure due to plastic deformation in metals greatly depends on the stress triaxiality factor (TF). This article investigates the variation of stress triaxiality along the yield locus of ductile materials. Von Mises yield criteria and triaxiality factor have been used to determine the critical limits of stress triaxiality for the materials under plane strain condition. A generalized mathematical model for triaxiality factor has been formulated and a constrained optimization has been carried out using genetic algorithm. Finite element analysis of a two dimensional square plate has been carried out to verify the results obtained by the mathematical model. It is found that the set of values of the first and the second principal stresses on the yield locus, which results in maximum stress triaxiality, can be used to determine the location at which crack initiation may occur. Thus, the results indicate that while designing a certain component, such combination of stresses which leads the stress triaxiality to its critical value, should be avoided.

  13. Chronic stress enhances microglia activation and exacerbates death of nigral dopaminergic neurons under conditions of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease linked to progressive movement disorders and is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction that is believed to contribute to its pathogenesis. Since sensitivity to inflammation is not the same in all brain structures, the aim of this work was to test whether physiological conditions as stress could enhance susceptibility to inflammation in the substantia nigra, where death of dopaminergic neurons takes place in Parkinson’s disease. Methods To achieve our aim, we induced an inflammatory process in nonstressed and stressed rats (subject to a chronic variate stress) by a single intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide, a potent proinflammogen. The effect of this treatment was evaluated on inflammatory markers as well as on neuronal and glial populations. Results Data showed a synergistic effect between inflammation and stress, thus resulting in higher microglial activation and expression of proinflammatory markers. More important, the higher inflammatory response seen in stressed animals was associated with a higher rate of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, the most characteristic feature seen in Parkinson’s disease. This effect was dependent on glucocorticoids. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that stress sensitises midbrain microglia to further inflammatory stimulus. This suggests that stress may be an important risk factor in the degenerative processes and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24565378

  14. Information on stress conditions in the oceanic crust from oval fractures in a deep borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Oval images etched into the wall of a deep borehole were detected in DSDP Hole 504B, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, from analysis of an acoustic televiewer log. A systematic inspection of these ovals has identified intriguing consistencies in appearance that cannot be explained satisfactorily by a random, coincidental distribution of pillow lavas. As an alternative hypothesis, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is used to account for the generation and orientation of similarly curved, stress-induced fractures. Consequently, these oval features can be interpreted as fractures and related directly to stress conditions in the oceanic crust at this site. The azimuth of the oval center corresponds to the orientation of maximum horizontal principal stress (SH), and the oval width, which spans approximately 180?? of the borehole, is aligned with the azimuth of minimum horizontal principal stress (Sh). The oval height is controlled by the fracture angle and thus is a function of the coefficient of internal friction of the rock. -from Author

  15. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  16. HPLC and HPLC/MS/MS Studies on Stress, Accelerated and Intermediate Degradation Tests of Antivirally Active Tricyclic Analog of Acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Monika A; Dereziński, Paweł; Klupczyńska, Agnieszka; Kokot, Zenon J; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Zeidler, Joanna; Muszalska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of a tricyclic analog of acyclovir [6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV] was determined in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines for good clinical practice under different stress conditions (neutral hydrolysis, strong acid/base degradation, oxidative decomposition, photodegradation, and thermal degradation). Accelerated [40±2°C/75%±5% relative humidity (RH)] and intermediate (30±2°C/65%±5% RH) stability tests were also performed. For observation of the degradation of the tested compound the RP-HPLC was used, whereas for the analysis of its degradation products HPLC/MS/MS was used. Degradation of the tested substance allowed its classification as unstable in neutral environment, acidic/alkaline medium, and in the presence of oxidizing agent. The tested compound was also light sensitive and was classified as photolabile both in solution and in the solid phase. However, the observed photodegradation in the solid phase was at a much lower level than in the case of photodegradation in solution. The study showed that both air temperature and RH had no significant effect on the stability of the tested substance during storage for 1 month at 100°C (dry heat) as well as during accelerated and intermediate tests. Based on the HPLC/MS/MS analysis, it can be concluded that acyclovir was formed as a degradation product of 6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV. PMID:26525242

  17. Reference Genes Selection and Normalization of Oxidative Stress Responsive Genes upon Different Temperature Stress Conditions in Hypericum perforatum L

    PubMed Central

    Velada, Isabel; Ragonezi, Carla; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Cardoso, Hélia

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a widely used technique for gene expression analysis. The reliability of this method depends largely on the suitable selection of stable reference genes for accurate data normalization. Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is a field growing plant that is frequently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental stresses that can negatively affect its productivity. This widely known medicinal plant with broad pharmacological properties (anti-depressant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-cancer, and antibacterial) has been overlooked with respect to the identification of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR data normalization. In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were analyzed in H. perforatum plants subjected to cold and heat stresses. The expression stability of these genes was assessed using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The results revealed that the ranking of stability among the three algorithms showed only minor differences within each treatment. The best-ranked reference genes differed between cold- and heat-treated samples; nevertheless, TUB was the most stable gene in both experimental conditions. GSA and GAPDH were found to be reliable reference genes in cold-treated samples, while GAPDH showed low expression stability in heat-treated samples. 26SrRNA and H2A had the highest stabilities in the heat assay, whereas H2A was less stable in the cold assay. Finally, AOX1, AOX2, CAT1 and CHS genes, associated with plant stress responses and oxidative stress, were used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. These target genes showed differential expression profiles over time in treated samples. This study not only is the first systematic analysis for the selection of suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in H. perforatum subjected to temperature stress conditions, but may also provide valuable information

  18. Surface Deformation of Sandstone during Stress Relaxation under Water-Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, A.; Choi, J. H.; Ichikawa, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Surface deformation characteristics of sandstone were evaluated during stress relaxation using newly developed equipment connected with a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Use of CLSM could provide the micro-scale measurement of surface deformation where the image was obtained pixel by pixel and line by line. Two types of sandstone according to their bedding plane were used for the uni-axial stress relaxation experiment under water saturated condition. Applied stress level was taken as 55-70% of the water saturated uni-axial strength of the sandstone considering that the maximum surface deformation may occur in this zone of loading. Relaxed stress and constant strain data were collected continuously by a strain gauge data recording system. Microphotographs of a selected grain contact point and several grain surfaces were obtained everyday using CLSM during the stress relaxation period. The grain contact deformation and inter-granular surface deformation were analyzed using a triangulation method drawn on the microphotographs. The strains of each triangle drawn on the surface were calculated through the B-matrix of a constant strain finite element approximation. Results revealed that vigorous grain contact and inter-granular surface deformation occurred during the stress relaxation. B-matrix results showed that the straining occurred higher near the grain boundary than the inter-granular surface. Surface deformation was found higher in the samples where the applied loads were parallel to the bedding plane indicating that the deformation characteristics depend on the internal energy and the stress concentration occurring on the inter-granular surface or the grain contact boundary. Internal energy may change under high stress and temperature condition offering so called dissolution process of rock forming minerals such as quartz and feldspar. However, these experiments were carried out under room temperature and we are currently planning to study this topic

  19. Exploring valid internal-control genes in Porphyra yezoensis (Bangiaceae) during stress response conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlei; Wu, Xiaojie; Wang, Chao; Jia, Zhaojun; He, Linwen; Wei, Yifan; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2014-07-01

    To screen the stable expression genes related to the stress (strong light, dehydration and temperature shock) we applied Absolute real-time PCR technology to determine the transcription numbers of the selected test genes in P orphyra yezoensis, which has been regarded as a potential model species responding the stress conditions in the intertidal. Absolute real-time PCR technology was applied to determine the transcription numbers of the selected test genes in P orphyra yezoensis, which has been regarded as a potential model species in stress responding. According to the results of photosynthesis parameters, we observed that Y(II) and F v/ F m were significantly affected when stress was imposed on the thalli of P orphyra yezoensis, but underwent almost completely recovered under normal conditions, which were collected for the following experiments. Then three samples, which were treated with different grade stresses combined with salinity, irradiation and temperature, were collected. The transcription numbers of seven constitutive expression genes in above samples were determined after RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Finally, a general insight into the selection of internal control genes during stress response was obtained. We found that there were no obvious effects in terms of salinity stress (at salinity 90) on transcription of most genes used in the study. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene had the highest expression level, varying remarkably among different tested groups. RPS8 expression showed a high irregular variance between samples. GAPDH presented comparatively stable expression and could thus be selected as the internal control. EF-1α showed stable expression during the series of multiple-stress tests. Our research provided available references for the selection of internal control genes for transcripts determination of P. yezoensis.

  20. Low intensity red laser action on Escherichia coli cultures submitted to stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. N.; Roos, C.; Barboza, L. L.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Clinical applications of low intensity lasers are based on the biostimulation effect and considered to occur mainly at cells under stressful conditions. Also, although the cytochrome is a chromophore to red and near infrared radiations, there are doubts whether indirect effects of these radiations could occur on the DNA molecule by oxidative mechanisms. Thus, this work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cultures proficient and deficient in oxidative DNA damage repair exposed to low intensity red laser under stress conditions. Wild type and endonuclease III deficient E. coli cells were exposed to laser (658 nm, 1 and 8 J cm-2) under hyposmotic stress and bacterial survival, filamentation and cell morphology were evaluated. Laser exposure: (i) does not alter the bacterial survival in 0.9% NaCl, but increases the survival of wild type and decreases the survival of endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress; (ii) increases filamentation in 0.9% NaCl but decreases in wild type and increases in endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress; (iii) decreases the area and perimeter of wild type, does not alter these parameters in endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress but increases the area of these in 0.9% NaCl. Low intensity red laser exposure has different effects on survival, filamentation phenotype and morphology of wild type and endonuclease III deficient cells under hyposmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that therapies based on low intensity red lasers could take into account physiologic conditions and genetic characteristics of cells.

  1. [Emigration in hard conditions: the Immigrant Syndrome with chronic and multiple stress (Ulysses' Syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Achotegui, Joseba

    2005-01-01

    During the latest years, immigrant populations have been living in very hard conditions. To million people, migration is becoming a process with a high level of stress surpassing the human being capacity of adaptation. This people are prone to suffer the Immigrant Syndrome with chronic and multiple stress and the so called Ulysses Syndrome, what is becoming a serious health problem in the countries that receive the immigrants. This situation is the by-product of the unjust globalization and of the worsening of the living and health conditions of those undergoing such a displacement. In this article, the author postulates a relationship between the high level of stress suffered by the immigrants and their presentation of psychopathological symptoms. PMID:15912217

  2. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hartman, R. A.; Saylor, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Major effort during this reporting period was devoted to two tasks: improvement of the electrical measurement instrumentation through the design and construction of a microcomputer controlled short interval tester, and better understanding of second quadrant behavior by developing a mathematical model relating cell temperature to electrical characteristics. In addition, some preliminary work is reported on an investigation into color changes observed after stressing.

  3. Polar 5 - An electron accelerator experiment within an aurora. I - Instrumentation and geophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehlum, B. N.; Grandal, B.; Jacobsen, T. A.; Maseide, K.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Soraas, F.; Aarsnes, K.; Stadsnes, J.; Maynard, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    A mother-daughter rocket was launched over two auroral structures, which included a 10 keV electron accelerator and a series of diagnostic instruments for monitoring optical and wave effects generated through beam-atmospheric interactions and production of secondary electrons. The instrumentation, the ground and rocket background measurements obtained, and some of the beam effects on various geophysical parameters are presented. Attention is given to the rocket geometry, capacitance probe, particle counters, photometers, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray detector. Observations on the plasma environment, auroral particle precipitation, d.c. electric field, optical emissions, and auroral background HF and VLF emissions are also discussed.

  4. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  5. Common reed accumulates starch in its stem by metabolic adaptation under Cd stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Kyoko; Kanai, Masatake; Tsuchiya, Masahisa; Ishii, Haruka; Shibuya, Naofumi; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori; Suzui, Nobuo; Fujimaki, Shu; Miwa, Eitaro

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the common reed accumulates water-soluble Cd complexed with an α-glucan-like molecule, and that the synthesis of this molecule is induced in the stem of the common reed under Cd stress. We studied the metabolic background to ensure α-glucan accumulation under the Cd stress conditions that generally inhibit photosynthesis. We found that the common reed maintained an adequate CO2 assimilation rate, tended to allocate more assimilated 11C to the stem, and accumulated starch granules in its stem under Cd stress conditions. AGPase activity, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for starch synthesis, increased in the stem of common reed grown in the presence of Cd. Starch accumulation in the stem of common reed was not obvious under other excess metal conditions. Common reed may preferentially allocate assimilated carbon as the carbon source for the formation of Cd and α-glucan complexes in its stem followed by prevention of Cd transfer to leaves acting as the photosynthetic organ. These responses may allow the common reed to grow even under severe Cd stress conditions. PMID:25806040

  6. TEMPERATURE CONDITIONING ALTERS TRANSCRIPT ABUNDANCE OF GENES RELATED TO CHILLING STRESS IN GRAPEFRUIT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) are susceptible to chilling injury (CI) if held at temperatures below about 10C. Changes in transcript abundance for a number of genes have been correlated with chilling stress in citrus fruit. We tested the hypothesis that conditioning affects transcript abundance of ...

  7. Failure Engineering Study and Accelerated Stress Test Results for the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft's Power Shunt Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Larson, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    An Engineering-of-Failure approach to designing and executing an accelerated product qualification test was performed to support a risk assessment of a "work-around" necessitated by an on-orbit failure of another piece of hardware on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The proposed work-around involved exceeding the previous qualification experience both in terms of extreme cold exposure level and in terms of demonstrated low cycle fatigue life for the power shunt assemblies. An analysis was performed to identify potential failure sites, modes and associated failure mechanisms consistent with the new use conditions. A test was then designed and executed which accelerated the failure mechanisms identified by analysis. Verification of the resulting failure mechanism concluded the effort.

  8. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A.; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health. PMID:23878734

  9. Phenotypic characterization of Corynebacterium glutamicum under osmotic stress conditions using elementary mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajvanshi, Meghna; Venkatesh, K V

    2011-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil bacterium, is used to produce amino acids such as lysine and glutamate. C. glutamicum is often exposed to osmolality changes in its medium, and the bacterium has therefore evolved several adaptive response mechanisms to overcome them. In this study we quantify the metabolic response of C. glutamicum under osmotic stress using elementary mode analysis (EMA). Further, we obtain the optimal phenotypic space for the synthesis of lysine and formation of biomass. The analysis demonstrated that with increasing osmotic stress, the flux towards trehalose formation and energy-generating pathways increased, while the flux of anabolic reactions diminished. Nodal analysis indicated that glucose-6-phosphate, phosphoenol pyruvate, and pyruvate nodes were capable of adapting to osmotic stress, whereas the oxaloacetic acid node was relatively unresponsive. Fewer elementary modes were active under stress indicating the rigid behavior of the metabolism in response to high osmolality. Optimal phenotypic space analysis revealed that under normal conditions the organism optimized growth during the initial log phase and lysine and trehalose formation during the stationary phase. However, under osmotic stress, the analysis demonstrated that the organism operates under suboptimal conditions for growth, and lysine and trehalose formation. PMID:21132515

  10. Boundary conditions in the research of stress-strain state by optical tomography method

    SciTech Connect

    Patrikeyev, I.; Shakhurdin, V.

    1994-12-31

    Mechanical stresses appear in the elastic body under the influence of external loading. In these conditions optical isotropic medium becomes optical anisotropic and behaves itself as a crystal. In photoelasticity on the analogy with a classification of natural crystal anisotropy three problems of the stress strain state can be distinguished. The tasks in which the stress strain state is caused by a uniform compression or expansion belong to the first problem. It is the most common case. The plane problems belong to the second group of problems. In this case stress strain state is described by the tensor of the second order with three or four components not equal to zero. All the rest problems belong to the third group. The stress strain state of the medium is described by the second order tensor with six components different from zero. The investigation of such problems required new transillumination schemes and algorithms for the treatment of experimental results which radically differ from the classical tomography schemes and methods. The role of boundary conditions for the correct formulation photoelasticity problems based on the restoration of tensor fields by means of optical tomography is presented in this article.

  11. Effects of city expansion on heat stress under climate change conditions.

    PubMed

    Argüeso, Daniel; Evans, Jason P; Pitman, Andrew J; Di Luca, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We examine the joint contribution of urban expansion and climate change on heat stress over the Sydney region. A Regional Climate Model was used to downscale present (1990-2009) and future (2040-2059) simulations from a Global Climate Model. The effects of urban surfaces on local temperature and vapor pressure were included. The role of urban expansion in modulating the climate change signal at local scales was investigated using a human heat-stress index combining temperature and vapor pressure. Urban expansion and climate change leads to increased risk of heat-stress conditions in the Sydney region, with substantially more frequent adverse conditions in urban areas. Impacts are particularly obvious in extreme values; daytime heat-stress impacts are more noticeable in the higher percentiles than in the mean values and the impact at night is more obvious in the lower percentiles than in the mean. Urban expansion enhances heat-stress increases due to climate change at night, but partly compensates its effects during the day. These differences are due to a stronger contribution from vapor pressure deficit during the day and from temperature increases during the night induced by urban surfaces. Our results highlight the inappropriateness of assessing human comfort determined using temperature changes alone and point to the likelihood that impacts of climate change assessed using models that lack urban surfaces probably underestimate future changes in terms of human comfort. PMID:25668390

  12. Effects of City Expansion on Heat Stress under Climate Change Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Argüeso, Daniel; Evans, Jason P.; Pitman, Andrew J.; Di Luca, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We examine the joint contribution of urban expansion and climate change on heat stress over the Sydney region. A Regional Climate Model was used to downscale present (1990–2009) and future (2040–2059) simulations from a Global Climate Model. The effects of urban surfaces on local temperature and vapor pressure were included. The role of urban expansion in modulating the climate change signal at local scales was investigated using a human heat-stress index combining temperature and vapor pressure. Urban expansion and climate change leads to increased risk of heat-stress conditions in the Sydney region, with substantially more frequent adverse conditions in urban areas. Impacts are particularly obvious in extreme values; daytime heat-stress impacts are more noticeable in the higher percentiles than in the mean values and the impact at night is more obvious in the lower percentiles than in the mean. Urban expansion enhances heat-stress increases due to climate change at night, but partly compensates its effects during the day. These differences are due to a stronger contribution from vapor pressure deficit during the day and from temperature increases during the night induced by urban surfaces. Our results highlight the inappropriateness of assessing human comfort determined using temperature changes alone and point to the likelihood that impacts of climate change assessed using models that lack urban surfaces probably underestimate future changes in terms of human comfort. PMID:25668390

  13. Improvements of tolerance to stress conditions by genetic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2014-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, industrial yeast isolate, has been of great interest in recent years for fuel ethanol production. The ethanol yield and productivity depend on many inhibitory factors during the fermentation process such as temperature, ethanol, compounds released as the result of pretreatment procedures, and osmotic stress. An ideal strain should be able to grow under different stress conditions occurred at different fermentation steps. Development of tolerant yeast strains can be achieved by reprogramming pathways supporting the ethanol metabolism by regulating the energy balance and detoxicification processes. Complex gene interactions should be solved for an in-depth comprehension of the yeast stress tolerance mechanism. Genetic engineering as a powerful biotechnological tool is required to design new strategies for increasing the ethanol fermentation performance. Upregulation of stress tolerance genes by recombinant DNA technology can be a useful approach to overcome inhibitory situations. This review presents the application of several genetic engineering strategies to increase ethanol yield under different stress conditions including inhibitor tolerance, ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, and osmotolerance. PMID:24908051

  14. Expression of stress-related proteins in Sediminibacterium sp. growing under planktonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, Joaquín M; Mazzella, María Agustina; Erijman, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Aggregation is a common trait of bacteria in natural and engineered biological systems. Microbial aggregates, such as flocs, granules, and biofilms, are spatially heterogeneous environments. It is generally observed that by growing under aggregated conditions bacteria respond and adapt to environmental stress better than free-swimming bacteria of the same species. We performed a proteomic analysis of a strain of Sediminibacterium, isolated from activated sludge, which grew planktonically in diluted culture media and in an aggregated form in media containing a high concentration of organic substrate. Auto-aggregation was also observed in the presence of pyruvate in dilute media. Expression of a number of stress-related proteins significantly increased under planktonic growth in comparison to aggregate growth. The upregulated proteins, identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, were two isoforms of a protein belonging to the universal stress family (UspA), a thioredoxin-disulfide reductase, the Campylobacter jejuni orthologue transcriptional regulator (Cj1172c), and the CocE/NonD hydrolase. We conclude that Sediminibaterium sp. C3 growth is stressed under planktonic conditions and that aggregation induced by pyruvate protects the bacteria against oxidative stress. PMID:25847231

  15. The effects of extrinsic stress on somatic markers and behavior are dependent on animal housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Huzard, Damien; Mumby, Dave G; Sandi, Carmen; Poirier, Guillaume L; van der Kooij, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Properties of the environment play an important role in animal wellbeing and may modulate the effects of external threats. Whereas stressors can affect emotion and impair cognition, environmental enrichment may prevent the occurrence of such negative sequelae. Animals exposed to semi-natural group-housing experience a complex environment; whereas environmental enrichment might protect against stressors, a socially-enriched environment(SEE) could entail aggressive inter-male encounters with additive stress effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exposure to external stressors, footshocks and forced swimming, on adrenal gland and body weights as well as on behavior in rats housed under SEE or standard, non-enriched environment (NEE), conditions. We found that SEEs reduced the anxiogenic effects of stress. Moreover, SEEs improved the performance in an operant task and prevented the increase in impulsive behavior produced by external stressors on NEE animals. Whereas these findings are indicative of stress-buffering effects of SEEs, adrenal gland weights were increased while total body weights were decreased in SEE rats, suggesting that SEEs may simultaneously exacerbate physiological measurements of stress. Finally, in the SEE, total aggressive behaviors and body wounds were paradoxically reduced in animals that received external stressors in comparison to non-stressed controls. The consequences of the external stressors applied here are not uniform, varying according to the housing condition and the outcome considered. PMID:26220463

  16. Histone acetylation rescues contextual fear conditioning in nNOS KO mice and accelerates extinction of cued fear conditioning in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Yossef; Anderson, Karen L; Kelley, Jonathan B; Petkov, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure is an essential molecular mechanism that contributes to the formation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM). An important regulatory process of chromatin structure is acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) increases acetylation of histone proteins and facilitate learning and memory. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway has a role in synaptic plasticity, LTM and regulation of histone acetylation. We have previously shown that NO signaling pathway is required for contextual fear conditioning. The present study investigated the effects of systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB) on fear conditioning in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. The effect of single administration of NaB on total H3 and H4 histone acetylation in hippocampus and amygdala was also investigated. A single administration of NaB prior to fear conditioning (a) rescued contextual fear conditioning of nNOS KO mice and (b) had long-term (weeks) facilitatory effect on the extinction of cued fear memory of WT mice. The facilitatory effect of NaB on extinction of cued fear memory of WT mice was confirmed in a study whereupon NaB was administered during extinction. Results suggest that (a) the rescue of contextual fear conditioning in nNOS KO mice is associated with NaB-induced increase in H3 histone acetylation and (b) the accelerated extinction of cued fear memory in WT mice is associated with NaB-induced increase in H4 histone acetylation. Hence, a single administration of HDAC inhibitor may rescue NO-dependent cognitive deficits and afford a long-term accelerating effect on extinction of fear memory of WT mice. PMID:22452925

  17. Repeated social defeat stress enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the VTA and cocaine place conditioning.

    PubMed

    Stelly, Claire E; Pomrenze, Matthew B; Cook, Jason B; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enduring memories of sensory cues associated with drug intake drive addiction. It is well known that stressful experiences increase addiction vulnerability. However, it is not clear how repeated stress promotes learning of cue-drug associations, as repeated stress generally impairs learning and memory processes unrelated to stressful experiences. Here, we show that repeated social defeat stress in rats causes persistent enhancement of long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Protein kinase A-dependent increase in the potency of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-induced Ca(2+) signaling underlies LTP facilitation. Notably, defeated rats display enhanced learning of contextual cues paired with cocaine experience assessed using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Enhancement of LTP in the VTA and cocaine CPP in behaving rats both require glucocorticoid receptor activation during defeat episodes. These findings suggest that enhanced glutamatergic plasticity in the VTA may contribute, at least partially, to increased addiction vulnerability following repeated stressful experiences. PMID:27374604

  18. Repeated social defeat stress enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the VTA and cocaine place conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Stelly, Claire E; Pomrenze, Matthew B; Cook, Jason B; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enduring memories of sensory cues associated with drug intake drive addiction. It is well known that stressful experiences increase addiction vulnerability. However, it is not clear how repeated stress promotes learning of cue-drug associations, as repeated stress generally impairs learning and memory processes unrelated to stressful experiences. Here, we show that repeated social defeat stress in rats causes persistent enhancement of long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Protein kinase A-dependent increase in the potency of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-induced Ca2+ signaling underlies LTP facilitation. Notably, defeated rats display enhanced learning of contextual cues paired with cocaine experience assessed using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Enhancement of LTP in the VTA and cocaine CPP in behaving rats both require glucocorticoid receptor activation during defeat episodes. These findings suggest that enhanced glutamatergic plasticity in the VTA may contribute, at least partially, to increased addiction vulnerability following repeated stressful experiences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15448.001 PMID:27374604

  19. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  20. Calculation for optimization of the experimental conditions for RBS analysis at the HUS 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phong, Le Hong Khiem Ho, Vi; Nghia, Nguyen The

    2015-06-01

    The dependences of the depth and mass resolutions of analysis using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) on some experimental conditions (such as the beam energy, the target tilting angle, etc.) have been investigated. A computer program for simulating the RBS spectra and for calculating the depth and mass resolution under different experimental conditions was developed. The results of calculation were experimentally checked by using some reference samples. The good agreements between calculated and experimental values have been found. The optimum analysis conditions over a wide range of RBS applications based on our calculation can be chosen. This investigation was conducted by using the RBS system at HUS 5SDH-2 Tandem accelerator at the Hanoi University of Science.

  1. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario

    2014-02-28

    Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100-1100mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15mg/gh were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum YX/S of 0.5g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16g/m(2). PMID:24413046

  2. Conditioned Observation of Books and Accelerated Acquisition of Textual Responding by Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Hshin-hui; Greer, R. Douglas

    2006-01-01

    We report an experiment investigating the effects of conditioning books as reinforcers for observing responses on the learning of textual responses by pre-school children. The independent variable was the acquisition of conditioned reinforcement of observing responses and choice of book stimuli in free play settings where children could choose to…

  3. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Camila; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-01-01

    Poor sleep quality due to sleep disorders and sleep loss is highly prevalent in the modern society. Underlying mechanisms show that stress is involved in the relationship between sleep and metabolism through hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activation. Sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are associated with maladaptive changes in the HPA axis, leading to neuroendocrine dysregulation. Excess of glucocorticoids increase glucose and insulin and decrease adiponectin levels. Thus, this review provides overall view of the relationship between sleep, stress, and metabolism from basic physiology to pathological conditions, highlighting effective treatments for metabolic disturbances. PMID:26779321

  4. Long-term effects of neonatal stress on adult conditioned place preference (CPP) and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hays, Sarah L; McPherson, Ronald J; Juul, Sandra E; Wallace, Gerard; Schindler, Abigail G; Chavkin, Charles; Gleason, Christine A

    2012-02-01

    Critically ill preterm infants are often exposed to stressors that may affect neurodevelopment and behavior. We reported that exposure of neonatal mice to stressors or morphine produced impairment of adult morphine-rewarded conditioned place preference (CPP) and altered hippocampal gene expression. We now further this line of inquiry by examining both short- and long-term effects of neonatal stress and morphine treatment. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice were treated twice daily from postnatal day (P) 5 to P9 using different combinations of factors. Subsets received saline or morphine injections (2mg/kgs.c.) or were exposed to our neonatal stress protocol (maternal separation 8h/d × 5d+gavage feedings ± hypoxia/hyperoxia). Short-term measures examined on P9 were neuronal fluorojade B and bromodeoxyuridine staining, along with urine corticosterone concentrations. Long-term measures examined in adult mice (>P60) included CPP learning to cocaine reward (± the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist U50,488 injection), and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (PCNA immunolabeling). Neonatal stress (but not morphine) decreased the cocaine-CPP response and this effect was reversed by KOR stimulation. Both neonatal stress or morphine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice. We conclude that reduced learning and increased hippocampal neurogenesis are both indicators that neonatal stress desensitized mice and reduced their arousal and stress responsiveness during adult CPP testing. Reconciled with other findings, these data collectively support the stress inoculation hypothesis whereby early life stressors prepare animals to tolerate future stress. PMID:22061798

  5. Long-term Effects of Neonatal Stress on Adult Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) and Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Sarah L; McPherson, Ronald J; Juul, Sandra E; Wallace, Gerard; Schindler, Abigail G; Chavkin, Charles; Gleason, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    Critically ill preterm infants are often exposed to stressors that may affect neurodevelopment and behavior. We reported that exposure of neonatal mice to stressors or morphine produced impairment of adult morphine-rewarded conditioned place preference (CPP) and altered hippocampal gene expression. We now further this line of inquiry by examining both short- and long-term effects of neonatal stress and morphine treatment. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice were treated twice daily from postnatal day (P) 5 to P9 using different combinations of factors. Subsets received saline or morphine injections (2 mg/kg s.c.) or were exposed to our neonatal stress protocol (maternal separation 8 h/d ×5d + gavage feedings ± hypoxia/hyperoxia). Short-term measures examined on P9 were neuronal fluorojade B and bromodeoxyuridine staining, along with urine corticosterone concentrations. Long-term measures examined in adult mice (>P60) included CPP learning to cocaine reward (± the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist U50,488 injection), and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (PCNA immunolabeling). Neonatal stress (but not morphine) decreased the cocaine-CPP response and this effect was reversed by KOR stimulation. Both neonatal stress or morphine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice. We conclude that reduced learning and increased hippocampal neurogenesis are both indicators that neonatal stress desensitized mice and reduced their arousal and stress responsiveness during adult CPP testing. Reconciled with other findings, these data collectively support the stress inoculation hypothesis whereby early life stressors prepare animals to tolerate future stress. PMID:22061798

  6. Proteomic changes in rice leaves grown under open field high temperature stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Das, Smruti; Krishnan, P; Mishra, Vagish; Kumar, Ritesh; Ramakrishnan, B; Singh, N K

    2015-11-01

    The interactive effect of temperature with other climatic and soil factors has profound influences on the growth and development of rice. The responses of rice to high temperatures under field conditions are more important than those under the controlled conditions. To understand the genes associated with high temperature stress response in general and tolerance in particular, the expression of all those genes associated with adaptation and tolerance in rice requires proteomic analysis. High temperature stress-tolerant cv. N22 was subjected to 28/18 °C (control) and 42/32 °C (high temperature stress) at flowering stage. The plants were grown in the field under the free air temperature increment condition. The proteomic changes in rice leaves due to high temperature stress were discussed. The proteomes of leaves had about 3000 protein spots, reproducibly detected on 2-dimensional electrophoretic gels with 573 proteins differentially expressed between the control and the high temperature treatments. Putative physiological functions suggested five categories such as growth (15.4%), heat shock proteins (7.7%), regulatory proteins (26.9%), redox homeostasis proteins (11.5%) and energy and metabolism (38.5%) related proteins. The results of the present study suggest that cv. N22, an agronomically recognized temperature tolerant rice cultivar copes with high temperature stress in a complex manner. Several functional proteins play important roles in its responses. The predicted climate change events necessitate more studies using this cultivar under different simulated ecological conditions to identify proteomic changes and the associated genes to be used as biomarkers and to gain a better understanding on the biochemical pathways involved in tolerance. PMID:26323334

  7. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  8. Rearing conditions differently affect the motor performance and cerebellar morphology of prenatally stressed juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Ulupinar, Emel; Erol, Kevser; Ay, Hakan; Yucel, Ferruh

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most vulnerable parts of the brain to environmental changes. In this study, the effect of diverse environmental rearing conditions on the motor performances of prenatally stressed juvenile rats and its reflection to the cerebellar morphology were investigated. Prenatally stressed Wistar rats were grouped according to different rearing conditions (Enriched=EC, Standard=SC and Isolated=IC) after weaning. Six weeks later, male and female offspring from different litters were tested behaviorally. In rotarod and string suspension tests, females gained better scores than males. Significant gender and housing effects were observed especially on the motor functions requiring fine skills with the best performance by enriched females, but the worst by enriched males. The susceptibility of cerebellar macro- and micro-neurons to environmental conditions was compared using stereological methods. In female groups, no differences were observed in the volume proportions of cerebellar layers, soma sizes and the numerical densities of granule or Purkinje cells. However, a significant interaction between housing and gender was observed in the granule to Purkinje cell ratio of males, due to the increased numerical densities of the granule cells in enriched males. These data imply that proper functioning of the cerebellum relies on its well organized and evolutionarily conserved structure and circuitry. Although early life stress leads to long term behavioral and neurobiological consequences in the offspring, diverse rearing conditions can alter the motor skills of animals and synaptic connectivity between Purkinje and granular cells in a gender dependent manner. PMID:25315128

  9. Hedgehog pathway maintains cell survival under stress conditions, and drives drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Erh-Hsuan; Kao, Yu-Rung; Lin, Chih-An; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Ping; Hsu, Chiung-Fang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Cheng-Wen

    2016-04-26

    Hedgehog (HH) pathway plays an important role in embryonic development, but is largely inactive in adult except for tissue repair. Aberrant activation of HH pathway has been found in a variety of cancer types. In non-small cell lung cancer, however, the role and importance of HH pathway remain controversial. In the current study, we found that HH pathway was maintained in low activity in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) cells under normal culture condition, but was highly induced in response to stress conditions. Activation of HH pathway promoted cell survival, growth, and invasion partially through HGF and MET signaling. Hedgehog-Interacting Protein (HHIP), a cell-surface negative regulator of HH pathway, was epigenetically silenced in LAC. Overexpression of HHIP blocked the activation of HH and HGF/MET pathways, and made cells significantly more susceptible to stress conditions. In LAC cells with acquired resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosin Kinase Inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), we found that a part of tumor cells were much more sensitive to HH or HGF/MET inhibitors, suggesting an oncogenic addiction shift from EGFR to HH and HGF/MET pathways. In conclusion, this study showed that HH pathway is a survival signaling that drives LAC cell growth under stress conditions, and HHIP is a key regulator to block the induction of HH pathway. Targeting the HH pathway through inhibitors or HHIP thus holds promise to address EGFR-TKI resistance in LAC in clinic. PMID:27015549

  10. Stress and body condition are associated with climate and demography in Asian elephants

    PubMed Central

    Mumby, Hannah S.; Mar, Khyne U.; Thitaram, Chatchote; Courtiol, Alexandre; Towiboon, Patcharapa; Min-Oo, Zaw; Htut-Aung, Ye; Brown, Janine L.; Lummaa, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Establishing links between ecological variation, physiological markers of stress and demography is crucial for understanding how and why changes in environmental conditions affect population dynamics, and may also play a key role for conservation efforts of endangered species. However, detailed longitudinal studies of long-lived species are rarely available. We test how two markers of stress and body condition vary through the year and are associated with climatic conditions and large-scale mortality and fertility variation in the world's largest semi-captive population of Asian elephants employed in the timber industry in Myanmar. Glucocorticoid metabolites (used as a proxy for stress levels in 75 elephants) and body weight (used as a proxy for condition in 116 elephants) were monitored monthly across a typical monsoon cycle and compared with birth and death patterns of the entire elephant population over half a century (n = 2350). Our results show seasonal variation in both markers of stress and condition. In addition, this variation is correlated with population-level demographic variables. Weight is inversely correlated with population mortality rates 1 month later, and glucocorticoid metabolites are negatively associated with birth rates. Weight shows a highly positive correlation with rainfall 1 month earlier. Determining the factors associated with demography may be key to species conservation by providing information about the correlates of mortality and fertility patterns. The unsustainability of the studied captive population has meant that wild elephants have been captured and tamed for work. By elucidating the correlates of demography in captive elephants, our results offer management solutions that could reduce the pressure on the wild elephant population in Myanmar. PMID:27293715

  11. Stress-induced activation of brown adipose tissue prevents obesity in conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Razzoli, Maria; Frontini, Andrea; Gurney, Allison; Mondini, Eleonora; Cubuk, Cankut; Katz, Liora S.; Cero, Cheryl; Bolan, Patrick J.; Dopazo, Joaquin; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Cinti, Saverio; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Stress-associated conditions such as psychoemotional reactivity and depression have been paradoxically linked to either weight gain or weight loss. This bi-directional effect of stress is not understood at the functional level. Here we tested the hypothesis that pre-stress level of adaptive thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue (BAT) functions explain the vulnerability or resilience to stress-induced obesity. Methods We used wt and triple β1,β2,β3−Adrenergic Receptors knockout (β-less) mice exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress (CSS) at either room temperature (22 °C) or murine thermoneutrality (30 °C). A combined behavioral, physiological, molecular, and immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to determine stress-induced modulation of energy balance and BAT structure and function. Immortalized brown adipocytes were used for in vitro assays. Results Departing from our initial observation that βARs are dispensable for cold-induced BAT browning, we demonstrated that under physiological conditions promoting low adaptive thermogenesis and BAT activity (e.g. thermoneutrality or genetic deletion of the βARs), exposure to CSS acted as a stimulus for BAT activation and thermogenesis, resulting in resistance to diet-induced obesity despite the presence of hyperphagia. Conversely, in wt mice acclimatized to room temperature, and therefore characterized by sustained BAT function, exposure to CSS increased vulnerability to obesity. Exposure to CSS enhanced the sympathetic innervation of BAT in wt acclimatized to thermoneutrality and in β-less mice. Despite increased sympathetic innervation suggesting adrenergic-mediated browning, norepinephrine did not promote browning in βARs knockout brown adipocytes, which led us to identify an alternative sympathetic/brown adipocytes purinergic pathway in the BAT. This pathway is downregulated under conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis requirements, is induced by stress, and elicits activation

  12. Evaluation of viability and growth of Acetobacter senegalensis under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Rasoul; Delvigne, Frank; Babanezhad, Manoochehr; Thonart, Philippe

    2013-05-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are used in production of vinegars. During acetic acid fermentation, AAB encounter various aggressive conditions which may lead to a variety of cellular disorders. Previous researches mainly studied the influences of different carbon sources on tolerance of AAB to ethanol and acetic acid. In this study, different techniques were used comparatively to investigate the effects of preadaptation on the ability of A. senegalensis to tolerate ethanol and acetic acid. In general, the carbon sources used for preadaptation of A. senegalensis exhibited significant effects on the tolerance of cells to stressors. Flow-cytometric assessments of preadapted cells in ethanol showed that 87.3% of the cells perform respiration after exposure to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. However, 58.4% of these preadapted cells could keep their envelope integrity under the stress condition. They could also grow rapidly (μmax=0.39/h) in the stress medium (E5A3) with a high yield (>80%). A. senegalensis grown in glucose exhibited a low tolerance to acetic acid. Analysis of their respiration capacity, membrane integrity and culturability revealed that almost all the population were dead after exposure to 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. In contrast, exposure of A. senegalensis preadapted in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid, exhibited an intact respiration system and cellular membrane integrity in 80.3% and 50.01% of cells, respectively. Moreover, just 24% of these cells could keep their culturability under that stress condition. In summary, cell envelope integrity, growth and culturability are more susceptible to pH and acetic acid stresses whereas respiration system is less subjected to damages under stress condition. In addition, preadaptation of A. senegalensis in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid enables it to tolerate and grow in ethanol and

  13. Stress relaxation experiments of olivine under conditions of subducted slab in Earth's deep upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Yu; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Higo, Yuji; Tsujino, Noriyoshi; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Shimojuku, Akira; Terasaki, Hidenori; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas; Jellinek, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Stress relaxation experiments of olivine were conducted under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions up to 10 GPa and 1273 K using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. A pre-sintered San Carlos olivine sample rod was inserted between two dense Al2O3 pistons to yield high stress at high-pressure within an octahedral pressure medium. Stress was determined from the two-dimensional diffraction pattern taken using monochromatic X-rays and an imaging-plate, and sample length was determined from an X-ray radiograph. In these experiments, pressure was first increased at room temperature, and then the temperature was increased and kept at 673, 873, 1073, and 1273 K. Four relaxation cycles, in total, were carried out in two experimental runs. The magnitude of deviatoric stress was calculated from five diffraction peaks with the following hkls: 0 2 1, 1 0 1, 1 3 0, 1 3 1, and 1 1 2. The calculated deviatoric stress was significantly different depending on which diffraction peak was used (up to a factor of ∼2) due to plastic deformation within the polycrystalline sample. The deviatoric stress decreased with increasing temperature in all of relaxation cycles. At given temperatures, the final-state value of deviatoric stress increased with increasing pressure. The upper bound for the plastic strain rate in the final-state was determined to be 10-7 s-1 based on a comparison between the total sample length determined from the radiograph and the d-spacings along the piston direction determined from X-ray diffraction. Present results suggest a positive activation volume for the low-temperature rheology of olivine.

  14. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M.; Vega, José M.; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J.; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  15. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  16. Repeated exposure to stressful conditions can have beneficial effects on survival.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Valeria; Boner, Winnie; Heidinger, Britt; Griffiths, Kate; Monaghan, Pat

    2015-09-01

    Repeated exposure to stressful circumstances is generally thought to be associated with increased pathology and reduced longevity. However, growing lines of evidence suggest that the effects of environmental stressors on survival and longevity depend on a multitude of factors and, under some circumstances, might be positive rather than negative. Here, using the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), we show that repeated exposure to stressful conditions (i.e. unpredictable food availability), which induced no changes in body mass, was associated with a decrease in mortality rate and an increase in the age of death. As expected, the treated birds responded to the unpredictable food supply by increasing baseline glucocorticoid stress hormone secretion and there were no signs of habituation of this hormonal response to the treatment across time. Importantly, and consistent with previous literature, the magnitude of hormone increase induced by the treatment was significant, but relatively mild, since the baseline glucocorticoid concentrations in the treated birds were substantially lower than the peak levels that occur during an acute stress response in this species. Taken together, these data demonstrate that protracted exposure to relatively mild stressful circumstances can have beneficial lifespan effects. PMID:26093051

  17. High-Shear Stress Sensitizes Platelets to Subsequent Low-Shear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Girdhar, Gaurav; Jesty, Jolyon

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with mechanical heart valve implants are plagued by flow-induced thromboembolic complications, which are undoubtedly caused by platelet activation. Flow fields in or around the affected regions involve brief exposure to pathologically high-shear stresses on the order of 100 to 1000 dyne/cm2. Although high shear is known to activate platelets directly, their subsequent behavior is not known. We hypothesize that the post-high-shear activation behavior of platelets is particularly relevant in understanding the increased thrombotic risk associated with blood-recirculating prosthetic cardiovascular devices. Purified platelets were exposed to brief (5–40 s) periods of high-shear stress, and then exposed to longer periods (15–60 min) of low shear. Their activation state was measured using a prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets briefly exposed to an initial high-shear stress (e.g., 60 dyne/cm2 for 40 s) activate a little, but this study shows that they are now sensitized, and when exposed to subsequent low shear stress, they activate at least 20-fold faster than platelets not initially exposed to high shear. The results show that platelets in vitro exposed beyond a threshold of high-shear stress are primed for subsequent activation under normal cardiovascular circulation conditions, and they do not recover from the initial high-shear insult. PMID:20135353

  18. Short photoperiod condition increases susceptibility to stress in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling-Zhi; Liu, Li-Jing; Yuan, Ming; Li, Su-Xia; Yue, Xiao-Dong; Lai, Ju-Lian; Lu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    The seasonality of depressive symptoms is prevalent in children and adolescents. However, the mechanisms that underlie such susceptibility to seasonal influences on mood disorders are unclear. We examined the effects of a short photoperiod condition on the susceptibility to subchronic unpredictable mild stress (SCUS) and rhythmic alterations of plasma corticosterone (CORT), melatonin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in adolescent male rats. Compared with the 12h/12h light/dark photoperiod control (CON) rats, the 8h/16h photoperiod SCUS rats exhibited significant anhedonia, a core symptom of human depression, together with a blunted diurnal rhythm and elevation of 24h CORT, melatonin, and NPY levels. The 8h/16h photoperiod condition also blunted the rhythmicity of CORT, caused a phase inversion of melatonin, and caused a phase delay of NPY compared with 12h/12h CON rats. Such abnormalities of plasma CORT, NPY, and melatonin might cause adolescent individuals to present higher stress reactivity and greater vulnerability to stress over their lifetimes. The present study provides evidence of the susceptibility to the seasonality of stress-related disorders in adolescence. PMID:26655789

  19. Tolerance of Mycorrhiza infected pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) seedling to drought stress under glasshouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, H; Saeidi-Sar, S; Afshari, H; Abdel-Wahhab, M A

    2012-05-01

    The influence of Glomus etunicatum colonization on plant growth and drought tolerance of 3-month-old Pistacia vera seedlings in potted culture was studied in two different water treatments. The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) inoculation and plant growth (including plant shoot and root weight, leaf area, and total chlorophyll) were higher for well-watered than for water-stressed plants. The growth of AM-treated seedlings was higher than non-AM-treatment regardless of water status. P, K, Zn and Cu contents in AM-treated shoots were greater than those in non-AM shoots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. N and Ca content were higher under drought stress, while AM symbiosis did not affect the Mg content. The contents of soluble sugars, proteins, flavonoid and proline were higher in mycorrhizal than non-mycorrhizal-treated plants under the whole water regime. AM colonization increased the activities of peroxidase enzyme in treatments, but did not affect the catalase activity in shoots and roots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. We conclude that AM colonization improved the drought tolerance of P. vera seedlings by increasing the accumulation of osmotic adjustment compounds, nutritional and antioxidant enzyme activity. It appears that AM formation enhanced the drought tolerance of pistachio plants, which increased host biomass and plant growth. PMID:22418429

  20. Unsteady heat dissipation in accelerator superconducting coils insulated with porous ceramic insulation in normal and supercritical helium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrowicz, S.; Four, A.; Baudouy, B.; Kimura, N.; Yamamoto, A.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the unsteady heat dissipation in accelerator superconducting coils insulated with porous ceramic insulation, two experimental mock-ups reproducing the thermal and the mechanical conditions of a superconducting coils were produced. The mock-ups with compressive load of 10 MPa and 20 MPa were tested at normal (T = 4.23 K and p = 1 bar) and supercritical helium conditions (T = 4.23 K and p = 2.0 to 3.75 bar) during unsteady heat dissipation. The paper presents the experimental results of temperature rise in both superconducting coils as a function of time for a wide range of a localized heat load varying from 0.1 kJ/m3 up to 12.8 MJ m-3 per pulse. A numerical model of the transient process in these coils has been developed and the computations are compared with the experimental results.

  1. Unsteady heat dissipation in accelerator superconducting coils insulated with porous ceramic insulation in normal and supercritical helium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrowicz, S.; Four, A.; Baudouy, B.

    2014-01-29

    To investigate the unsteady heat dissipation in accelerator superconducting coils insulated with porous ceramic insulation, two experimental mock-ups reproducing the thermal and the mechanical conditions of a superconducting coils were produced. The mock-ups with compressive load of 10 MPa and 20 MPa were tested at normal (T = 4.23 K and p = 1 bar) and supercritical helium conditions (T = 4.23 K and p = 2.0 to 3.75 bar) during unsteady heat dissipation. The paper presents the experimental results of temperature rise in both superconducting coils as a function of time for a wide range of a localized heat load varying from 0.1 kJ/m{sup 3} up to 12.8 MJ m{sup −3} per pulse. A numerical model of the transient process in these coils has been developed and the computations are compared with the experimental results.

  2. A QR accelerated volume-to-surface boundary condition for finite element solution of eddy current problems

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Fasenfest, B; Rieben, R; Stowell, M

    2006-09-08

    We are concerned with the solution of time-dependent electromagnetic eddy current problems using a finite element formulation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes. We allow for multiple conducting regions, and our goal is to develop an efficient computational method that does not require a computational mesh of the air/vacuum regions. This requires a sophisticated global boundary condition specifying the total fields on the conductor boundaries. We propose a Biot-Savart law based volume-to-surface boundary condition to meet this requirement. This Biot-Savart approach is demonstrated to be very accurate. In addition, this approach can be accelerated via a low-rank QR approximation of the discretized Biot-Savart law.

  3. Comparison of online and offline tests in LED accelerated reliability tests under temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hong-Liang; Jing, Lei; Gao, Qun; Wang, Yao; Hao, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-20

    Accelerated aging tests are the main method used in the evaluation of LED reliability, and can be performed in either online or offline modes. The goal of this study is to provide the difference between the two test modes. In the experiments, the sample is attached to different heat sinks to acquire the optical parameters under different junction temperatures of LEDs. By measuring the junction temperature in the aging process (Tj1), and the junction temperature in the testing process (Tj2), we achieve consistency with an online test of Tj1 and Tj2 and a difference with an offline test of Tj1 and Tj2. Experimental results show that the degradation rate of the luminous flux rises as Tj2 increases, which yields a difference of projected life L(70%) of 8% to 13%. For color shifts over 5000 h of aging, the online test shows a larger variation of the distance from the Planckian locus, about 40% to 50% more than the normal test at an ambient temperature of 25°C. PMID:26836556

  4. Effect of electrode force condition on nugget diameter and residual stress in resistance spot welded high-strength steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyota, M.; Mikami, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Ikeda, R.; Mochizuki, M.

    2012-08-01

    This study examines the effect of the electrode force condition on the nugget diameter and residual stress in spot welded high-strength steel sheets. Numerical simulations of spot welding were performed to examine the nugget diameter and residual stress. The results indicate that adjusting the force profile changes the current density and stress state at the spot welds. Therefore, choosing an appropriate force profile extends the nugget diameter and reduces the residual stress.

  5. Curcumin Mitigates Accelerated Aging after Irradiation in Drosophila by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mira; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Min, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, belonging to a class of natural phenol compounds, has been extensively studied due to its antioxidative, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antineurodegenerative effects. Recently, it has been shown to exert dual activities after irradiation, radioprotection, and radiosensitization. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin against radiation damage using D. melanogaster. Pretreatment with curcumin (100 μM) recovered the shortened lifespan caused by irradiation and increased eclosion rate. Flies subjected to high-dose irradiation showed a mutant phenotype of outstretched wings, whereas curcumin pretreatment reduced incidence of the mutant phenotype. Protein carbonylation and formation of γH2Ax foci both increased following high-dose irradiation most likely due to generation of reactive oxygen species. Curcumin pretreatment reduced the amount of protein carbonylation as well as formation of γH2Ax foci. Therefore, we suggest that curcumin acts as an oxidative stress reducer as well as an effective protective agent against radiation damage. PMID:25815315

  6. Aluminum ions accelerated the oxidative stress of copper-mediated melanin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Junwei; Bi, Shuping

    2003-11-01

    A comparison between the effects of aluminum and cupric ions on the dopachrome (DC) conversion and the cooperation effect of the both ions in the DOPA oxidation to melanin pathway has been studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. Both aluminum and cupric ions catalyze the DC conversion reaction, which is an important step in the melanin synthesis pathway. However, cupric ions catalyze the conversion of DC to yield 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) but the product of DC conversion catalyzed by aluminum is 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI). DOPA oxidation catalyzed by aluminum and cupric ions is studied in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The results from our experiments provide evidence that aluminum can markedly increase the oxidative stress of copper-mediated the melanin formation and influence the properties of the melanin by means of changing the ratio of DHICA/DHI in the acidic environment (pH 5.5).

  7. Curcumin mitigates accelerated aging after irradiation in Drosophila by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Seong, Ki Moon; Yu, Mira; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Min, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, belonging to a class of natural phenol compounds, has been extensively studied due to its antioxidative, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antineurodegenerative effects. Recently, it has been shown to exert dual activities after irradiation, radioprotection, and radiosensitization. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin against radiation damage using D. melanogaster. Pretreatment with curcumin (100 μM) recovered the shortened lifespan caused by irradiation and increased eclosion rate. Flies subjected to high-dose irradiation showed a mutant phenotype of outstretched wings, whereas curcumin pretreatment reduced incidence of the mutant phenotype. Protein carbonylation and formation of γH2Ax foci both increased following high-dose irradiation most likely due to generation of reactive oxygen species. Curcumin pretreatment reduced the amount of protein carbonylation as well as formation of γH2Ax foci. Therefore, we suggest that curcumin acts as an oxidative stress reducer as well as an effective protective agent against radiation damage. PMID:25815315

  8. High-Salt Stress Conditions Increase the pAW63 Transfer Frequency in Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Beuls, Elise; Modrie, Pauline; Deserranno, Cédric

    2012-01-01

    Conjugation experiments with Bacillus thuringiensis and transfer kinetics demonstrated that salt stress has a positive impact on plasmid transfer efficiency. Compared to standard osmotic conditions (0.5% NaCl), plasmid transfer occurred more rapidly, and at higher frequencies (>100-fold), when bacteria were exposed to a high-salt stress (5% NaCl) in liquid brain heart infusion (BHI). Under milder salt conditions (2.5% NaCl), only a 10-fold effect was observed in Luria-Bertani broth and no difference was detected in BHI. These observations are particularly relevant in the scope of potential gene exchanges among members of the Bacillus cereus group, which includes food-borne contaminants and pathogens. PMID:22820331

  9. Jasmonic acid interacts with abscisic acid to regulate plant responses to water stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    de Ollas, Carlos; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are key players in signaling environmental stress conditions. Hormone profiling together with proline accumulation were studied in leaves and roots of different mutant lines of Arabidopsis. Regulation of proline accumulation in this system seems complex and JA-deficient (jar1-1) and JA-insensitive (jai1) lines accumulating high levels of proline despite their very low ABA levels seems to discard an ABA-dependent response. However, the pattern of proline accumulation in jai1 seedlings parallels that of ABA. Under stress conditions, there is an opposite pattern of ABA accumulation in roots of jar1-1/coi1-16 (in which ABA only slightly increase) and jai1 (in which ABA increase is even higher than in WT plants). This also makes JA-ABA crosstalk complex and discards any lineal pathway that could explain this hormonal interaction. PMID:26340066

  10. Micro-mechanical study of stress path and initial conditions in granular materials using DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Mirghasemi, Ali Asghar

    2016-03-01

    The macroscale response of granular materials under different loading conditions stems from the alteration of micromechanical properties during loading. Previous studies have used either physical experiments or discrete element method simulations to explore the effect of initial conditions and stress path on granular materials. However, microscale studies are not sufficient, especially for various loading paths. We study micromechanics of granular materials using the stress-force-fabric (SFF) relationship for a better understanding of the behavior of granular materials. Triaxial compression and extension tests are conducted on samples containing 1000 spherical particles, with periodic boundaries, and the effect of initial porosity is studied. In the next step, using the SFF relationship, we study the effect of anisotropic consolidation ratio. In addition to providing an appropriate explanation for shear strength out of evolution of anisotropy coefficients, our results show that anisotropic consolidation does not affect the micromechanical properties of granular materials in a way to change mobilized friction angle of sample at failure point.

  11. RSS1 regulates the cell cycle and maintains meristematic activity under stress conditions in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Abe, Kiyomi; Miyao, Akio; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Megumi; Morita, Haruka; Toda, Yosuke; Hobo, Tokunori; Sato, Yutaka; Hattori, Tsukaho; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takeda, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth and development are sustained by continuous cell division in the meristems, which is perturbed by various environmental stresses. For the maintenance of meristematic functions, it is essential that cell division be coordinated with cell differentiation. However, it is unknown how the proliferative activities of the meristems and the coordination between cell division and differentiation are maintained under stressful conditions. Here we show that a rice protein, RSS1, whose stability is controlled by cell cycle phases, contributes to the vigour of meristematic cells and viability under salinity conditions. These effects of RSS1 are exerted by regulating the G1–S transition, possibly through an interaction of RSS1 with protein phosphatase 1, and are mediated by the phytohormone, cytokinin. RSS1 is conserved widely in plant lineages, except eudicots, suggesting that RSS1-dependent mechanisms might have been adopted in specific lineages during the evolutionary radiation of angiosperms. PMID:21505434

  12. Jasmonic acid interacts with abscisic acid to regulate plant responses to water stress conditions.

    PubMed

    de Ollas, Carlos; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are key players in signaling environmental stress conditions. Hormone profiling together with proline accumulation were studied in leaves and roots of different mutant lines of Arabidopsis. Regulation of proline accumulation in this system seems complex and JA-deficient (jar1-1) and JA-insensitive (jai1) lines accumulating high levels of proline despite their very low ABA levels seems to discard an ABA-dependent response. However, the pattern of proline accumulation in jai1 seedlings parallels that of ABA. Under stress conditions, there is an opposite pattern of ABA accumulation in roots of jar1-1/coi1-16 (in which ABA only slightly increase) and jai1 (in which ABA increase is even higher than in WT plants). This also makes JA-ABA crosstalk complex and discards any lineal pathway that could explain this hormonal interaction. PMID:26340066

  13. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis – based on cellular components and biological process GO terms – was performed for these proteins through the SGD Gene Ontology Slim Mapper tool. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in “Stress responsive proteins of a flor yeast strain during the early stages of biofilm formation” [1]. PMID:27104213

  14. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis - based on cellular components and biological process GO terms - was performed for these proteins through the SGD Gene Ontology Slim Mapper tool. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in "Stress responsive proteins of a flor yeast strain during the early stages of biofilm formation" [1]. PMID:27104213

  15. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-2 cladding under near plane strain and localized stress-strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The segmented expanding mandrel test (SEMT) method is generally regarded as a good laboratory simulator of pellet-cladding interactions (PCI) in LWR fuel rods. Yet it does not reproduce the low strain failures in Zircaloy cladding typical of PCI-failed fuel elements and commonly observed in other types of laboratory specimens. This investigation addressed this apparent inconsistency. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) of cold worked, unirradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding was induced in three different types of tubing specimens (known as regular, thin-wall, and chamfered) in a modified SEMT apparatus designed to test mechanical conditions that could lead to slow strain failures. Only the chamfered sample, which has been shown to be subjected to more nearly plane strain conditions than either of the other two specimen types, failed consistently at low (0.8%) total diametral strains in good agreement with in-reactor failure data. Such conditions were numerically and experimentally quantified by means of finite element calculational models and local strain measurements. The numerical analyses and strain measurements provide valuable insight into the PCI simulating power of the segmented expanding mandrel test and its experimental limitations. Failure-strain results for chamfered barrier claddings were obtained and compared with available literature data. The improved I-SCC resistance of this type of cladding was confirmed but the failure strains were significantly lower than reported for regular barrier tubes.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Stress Convention in Nonisothermal Gases Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Reported here are our results of our numerical/theoretical investigation into the effects of thermal stress in nonisothermal gases under microgravity conditions. The first part of the report consists of a brief summary of the accomplishments and conclusions of our work. The second part consists of two manuscripts, one being a paper presented at the 1998 MSAD Fluid Physics workshop, and the other to appear in Physics of Fluids.

  17. Influence of temper condition on the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Herakovich, E. T.; Tenney, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of temper condition on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior for six boron-aluminum laminates was investigated. In addition to monotonic tension and compression tests, tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension--compression tests were conducted to study the effects of cyclic loading. Tensile strength results are a function of the laminate configuration; unidirectional laminates were affected considerably more than other laminates with some strength values increasing and others decreasing.

  18. Accelerated Stress Testing and Diagnostic Analysis of Degradation in CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S.

    2008-11-01

    The primary goal of this study was to ascertain the presence and types of mechanisms affecting CdS/CdTe device stability in the temperature range of 60 to 120 ..deg..C. It should be noted that the results presented were specific to cells made using the specific growth conditions described.

  19. Damage and Plastic Deformation Modeling of Beishan Granite Under Compressive Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, J. F.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Based on experimental investigations, we propose a coupled elastoplastic damage model to simulate the mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. The granite is taken from the Beishan area, a preferable region for China's high-level radioactive waste repository. Using a 3D acoustic emission monitoring system in mechanical tests, we focus on the cracking process and its influence on the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the granite samples. It is verified that the crack propagation coupled with fractional sliding along the cracks is the principal mechanism controlling the failure process and nonlinear mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. Based on this understanding, the coupled elastoplastic damage model is formulated in the framework of the thermodynamics theory. In the model, the coupling between damage and plastic deformation is simulated by introducing the independent damage variable in the plastic yield surface. As a preliminary validation of the model, a series of numerical simulations are performed for compressive tests conducted under different confining pressures. Comparisons between the numerical and simulated results show that the proposed model can reproduce the main features of the mechanical behavior of Beishan granite, particularly the damage evolution under compressive stress conditions.

  20. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  1. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-04-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from vegetation directly, but will also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOC. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOA in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions, respectively, from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold resulting in 200-1000 fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10% of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480%) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45%). Satellite observations indicated a two-fold increase in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  2. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to not only increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation directly but also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOCs. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOAs in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global-scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions respectively from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold, resulting in 200-1000-fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global-scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10 % of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480 %) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45 %). Satellite observations indicated a 2-fold increase in aerosol optical depth over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  3. Frictional behavior and microstructures of calcite fault gouges deformed under extreme conditions of normal stress and sliding velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Billi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Violay, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years several experimental studies have been performed using rotary-shear apparatus to investigate the frictional behavior of gouge materials at seismic slip rates. However, because of technical difficulties confining gouge layers, a majority of these experiments were conducted at normal stresses <2-3MPa, making extrapolation to natural conditions challenging. Here, we present results from an experimental study on calcite gouges (<250μm grain size) deformed in a purpose-built sample holder and using a rotary-shear apparatus at INGV, Rome. Ring-shaped (25/45mm int./ext. diameter), 2.8mm-thick layers of gouge were deformed up to 34MPa normal stress, at slip rates of 10μm/s - 3m/s, in both room-dry and water-present conditions. A peak slip rate of 3m/s was achieved after 0.5s, and total displacements were 1-3m. CO2 emissions were monitored using a mass spectrometer connected to a capillary tube positioned approximately 1cm from the gouge sample holder. Samples were preserved in ultra-low viscosity resin for optical and Field-Emission SEM observations. At slip rates >0.3m/s frictional strength, μ, increases to a peak value of 0.6-1.0 followed by a rapid decay to a lower steady-state value, μss, before finally undergoing dynamic strength recovery during decelerating slip. CO2 starts to be liberated almost instantaneously (within 500μm of slip) during acceleration and reaches a peak value during steady-state sliding of up to 10,000ppm, before decreasing to 380-420ppm within a few seconds following the experiment. μss decreases with increasing slip rate, but in contrast to previous experiments we find that extremely low values of μss<0.2 are only achieved at a slip rate of 1m/s for normal stresses >22MPa. An unexpected result is that steady-state shear stress at slip rates >1m/s does not increase monotonically (either linearly or not, e.g. in the presence of lubrication) with normal stress, but begins to decrease above a normal stress of 15-20MPa, a

  4. WASHOUT CONDITION OF CLUMP-TYPE GRASS CONSIDERING THE CHANGE OF THE REFERENCE VELOCITY AND SHEAR STRESS IN THE VEGETATED AREA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Tatsuaki; Tanaka, Norio

    Threshold shear stress for removing grasses by flood is important but is not well understood quantitatively for clump-type vegetation, Eragrostis curvula. New model for calculating the velocities in the vegetated layer and the surface layer was proposed and the model was validated with flume experiments. The bed shear stress in vegetation was calculated by the momentum balance in the vegetated layer, and was applied for evaluating the wash-out conditions of the grass. The threshold value for removing the clump-type vegetation was evaluated as a rate of shear stress of d90, grain diameter at which 90% volume passed through the sieve, and the critical shear stress of d90, WOI. The critical WOI for removing the grass is 1.9-2.1, and 1.8-1.9 for one layer analysis, and two layer analysis, respectively. The critical shear stress inside the vegetated region does not decrease much because there is bare land between each clump-type grass, and the flow is accelerated in the region by the momentum exchange.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of Pseudomonas and Serratia sp. containing ACC-deaminase for improving growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under salt-stressed conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Ghani, Usman; Naveed, Muhammad; Nadeem, Sajid Mahmood; Asghar, Hafiz Naeem

    2009-05-01

    Ethylene synthesis is accelerated in response to various environmental stresses like salinity. Ten rhizobacterial strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere taken from different salt affected areas were screened for growth promotion of wheat under axenic conditions at 1, 5, 10 and 15 dS m(-1). Three strains, i.e., Pseudomonas putida (N21), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (N39) and Serratia proteamaculans (M35) showing promising performance under axenic conditions were selected for a pot trial at 1.63 (original), 5, 10 and 15 dS m(-1). Results showed that inoculation was effective even in the presence of higher salinity levels. P. putida was the most efficient strain compared to the other strains and significantly increased the plant height, root length, grain yield, 100-grain weight and straw yield up to 52, 60, 76, 19 and 67%, respectively, over uninoculated control at 15 dS m(-1). Similarly, chlorophyll content and K(+)/Na(+) of leaves also increased by P. putida over control. It is highly likely that under salinity stress, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-deaminase activity of these microbial strains might have caused reduction in the synthesis of stress (salt)-induced inhibitory levels of ethylene. The results suggested that these strains could be employed for salinity tolerance in wheat; however, P. putida may have better prospects in stress alleviation/reduction. PMID:19255743

  6. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Interactions with Micro- and Nanoparticles: Adsorption, Aggregation and Accelerated Stress Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Chiu, David; Sawicki, Suzanne; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Chatterjee, Koustuv; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are exposed to various wetted surfaces that could shed sub-visible particles. In this work we measured the adsorption of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to various microparticles, characterized the adsorbed mAb secondary structure, and determined the reversibility of adsorption. We also developed and used a front-face fluorescence quenching method to determine that the mAb tertiary structure was near-native when adsorbed to glass, cellulose and silica. Initial adsorption to each of the materials tested was rapid. During incubation studies, exposure to the air-water interface was a significant cause of aggregation but acted independently of the effects of microparticles. Incubations with glass, cellulose, stainless steel or Fe2O3 microparticles gave very different results. Cellulose preferentially adsorbed aggregates from solution. Glass and Fe2O3 adsorbed the mAb but did not cause aggregation. Adsorption to stainless steel microparticles was irreversible, and caused appearance of soluble aggregates upon incubation. The secondary structure of mAb adsorbed to glass and cellulose was near-native. We suggest that the protocol described in this work could be a useful preformulation stress screening tool to determine the sensitivity of a therapeutic protein to exposure to common surfaces encountered during processing and storage. PMID:19492408

  8. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-09-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  9. Genotoxic stress accelerates age-associated degenerative changes in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Nasto, Luigi A; Wang, Dong; Robinson, Andria R; Clauson, Cheryl L; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Roughley, Peter; Epperly, Michael; Huq, Saiful M; Pola, Enrico; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Robbins, Paul D; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Vo, Nam V

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the leading cause of debilitating spinal disorders such as chronic lower back pain. Aging is the greatest risk factor for IDD. Previously, we demonstrated IDD in a murine model of a progeroid syndrome caused by reduced expression of a key DNA repair enzyme. This led us to hypothesize that DNA damage promotes IDD. To test our hypothesis, we chronically exposed adult wild-type (Wt) and DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mice to the cancer therapeutic agent mechlorethamine (MEC) or ionization radiation (IR) to induce DNA damage and measured the impact on disc structure. Proteoglycan, a major structural matrix constituent of the disc, was reduced 3-5× in the discs of MEC- and IR-exposed animals compared to untreated controls. Expression of the protease ADAMTS4 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments was significantly increased. Additionally, new PG synthesis was reduced 2-3× in MEC- and IR-treated discs compared to untreated controls. Both cellular senescence and apoptosis were increased in discs of treated animals. The effects were more severe in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mice than in Wt littermates. Local irradiation of the vertebra in Wt mice elicited a similar reduction in PG. These data demonstrate that genotoxic stress drives degenerative changes associated with IDD. PMID:23262094

  10. Genotoxic stress accelerates age-associated degenerative changes in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Wang, Dong; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Roughley, Peter; Epperly, Michael; Huq, Saiful M.; Pola, Enrico; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Robbins, Paul D.; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Vo, Nam V.

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the leading cause of debilitating spinal disorders such as chronic lower back pain. Aging is the greatest risk factor for IDD. Previously, we demonstrated IDD in a murine model of a progeroid syndrome caused by reduced expression of a key DNA repair enzyme. This led us to hypothesize that DNA damage promotes IDD. To test our hypothesis, we chronically exposed adult wild-type (Wt) and DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice to the cancer therapeutic agent mechlorethamine (MEC) or ionization radiation (IR) to induce DNA damage and measured the impact on disc structure. Proteoglycan, a major structural matrix constituent of the disc, was reduced 3-5x in the discs of MEC- and IR-exposed animals compared to untreated controls. Expression of the protease ADAMTS4 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments were significantly increased. Additionally, new PG synthesis was reduced 2-3x in MEC- and IR-treated discs compared to untreated controls. Both cellular senescence and apoptosis were increased in discs of treated animals. The effects were more severe in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice than in Wt littermates. Local irradiation of the vertebra in Wt mice elicited a similar reduction in PG. These data demonstrate that genotoxic stress drives degenerative changes associated with IDD. PMID:23262094

  11. Wearable ECG recorder with acceleration sensors for monitoring daily stress: office work simulation study.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Yoto, T Y; Suzuki, T; Sakuragawa, S; Sugiura, T

    2013-01-01

    A small and light-weight wearable electrocardiograph (ECG) equipment with a tri-axis accelerometer (x, y and z-axis) was developed for prolonged monitoring of everyday stress. It consists of an amplifier, a microcomputer with an AD converter, a triaxial accelerometer, and a memory card. Four parameters can be sampled at 1 kHz for more than 24 h and a maximum of 27 h with a default battery and a memory card of one giga byte (1 GB). Off-line data processing includes motion information along three axes and autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity bispectral analysis and the tone-entropy method (T-E method) from HRV data. The availability of the system was tested through simulated office work and three-day monitoring by replacing the battery and the memory card every 24 h. Both short-term and circadian rhythms of ANS activity were clearly observed. In addition, sympathetic nervous activities gradually increased from the second to the third day. The experimental data presented verifies the functionality of the proposed system. PMID:24110788

  12. Herbal Supplement Extends Life Span Under Some Environmental Conditions and Boosts Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Villeponteau, Bryant; Matsagas, Kennedy; Nobles, Amber C.; Rizza, Cristina; Horwitz, Marc; Benford, Gregory; Mockett, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate that aging is modulated by a great number of genetic pathways. We have used Drosophila longevity and stress assays to test a multipath intervention strategy. To carry out this strategy, we supplemented the flies with herbal extracts (SC100) that are predicted to modulate the expression of many genes involved in aging and stress resistance, such as mTOR, NOS, NF-KappaB, and VEGF. When flies were housed in large cages with SC100 added, daily mortality rates of both male and female flies were greatly diminished in mid to late life. Surprisingly, SC100 also stabilized midlife mortality rate increases so as to extend the maximum life span substantially beyond the limits previously reported for D. melanogaster. Under these conditions, SC100 also promoted robust resistance to partial starvation stress and to heat stress. Fertility was the same initially in both treated and control flies, but it became significantly higher in treated flies at older ages as the fertility of control flies declined. Mean and maximum life spans of flies in vials at the same test site were also extended by SC100, but the life spans were short in absolute terms. In contrast, at an independent test site where stress was minimized, the flies exhibited much longer mean life spans, but the survival curves became highly rectangular and the effects of SC100 on both mean and maximum life spans declined greatly or were abolished. The data indicate that SC100 is a novel herbal mix with striking effects on enhancing Drosophila stress resistance and life span in some environments, while minimizing mid to late life mortality rates. They also show that the environment and other factors can have transformative effects on both the length and distribution of survivorship, and on the ability of SC100 to extend the life span. PMID:25879540

  13. Early postnatal stress alters place conditioning to both mu- and kappa-opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Clifford C; Holtzman, Stephen G

    2008-04-01

    Clinical literature has established a link between early childhood incidents of neglect and trauma and adult problems with substance abuse. In rats, such early life stress has been modeled using a maternal separation (MS) paradigm in which rat pups were removed from their mothers for a few hours daily during the first two postnatal weeks. In this study, we used the MS model to investigate the effects of early postnatal stress on place conditioning to both mu- and kappa-opioid agonists in male and female Long-Evans rats. Offspring of both rearing conditions [MS or nonhandled (NH)] were conditioned using a biased procedure to saline, the mu-opioid agonist morphine (3.0, 5.6, and 10 mg/kg s.c.), or the kappa-opioid agonist spiradoline (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg) for 3 days, followed by a drug-free place-conditioning test 24 h later. Saline was administered in the morning, 30 min before confinement in one compartment, whereas morphine or spiradoline was administered in a similar manner 6 h later in the opposite compartment. MS offspring spent significantly more time in the morphine-paired compartment than NH offspring, indicating a greater place preference for the mu-opioid agonist. In the case of spiradoline, NH offspring spent significantly less time in the spiradoline-paired compartment, indicating a greater aversion to the kappa-opioid agonist in these animals than in MS offspring. These findings indicate that early postnatal stress can significantly alter the rewarding or aversive value of mu- and kappa-opioid agonists when measured using place conditioning. PMID:18203949

  14. New potent accelerator of neurite outgrowth from Lawsonia inermis flower under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Souichi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yano, Mamiko; Akiyama, Masanori; Imai, Kayo; Kimura, Tomohito; Nakata, Akiko; Tani, Miyuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed accelerative effects on nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells under non-fasting conditions. To elucidate the active constituents responsible for the neuronal differentiation, we conducted a search of the constituents and examined their accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. We isolated a new acetophenone glycoside, inermioside A, which exerted a significant accelerative effect on neurite outgrowth. We also confirmed the activities of nine known compounds, including quercetin and lalioside. In addition, we found that quercetin, one of the active constituents, increased Vav3 mRNA expression. PMID:26936787

  15. Formulation of boundary conditions for the multigrid acceleration of the Euler and Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Thomas Neil; Usab, William J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An explicit, Multigrid algorithm was written to solve the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with special consideration given to the coarse mesh boundary conditions. These are formulated in a manner consistent with the interior solution, utilizing forcing terms to prevent coarse-mesh truncation error from affecting the fine-mesh solution. A 4-Stage Hybrid Runge-Kutta Scheme is used to advance the solution in time, and Multigrid convergence is further enhanced by using local time-stepping and implicit residual smoothing. Details of the algorithm are presented along with a description of Jameson's standard Multigrid method and a new approach to formulating the Multigrid equations.

  16. Changes in seed water status as characterized by NMR in developing soybean seed grown under moisture stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, P. Singh, Ravender; Verma, A.P.S.; Joshi, D.K.; Singh, Sheoraj

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • In developing soybean seeds, moisture stress resulted in more proportion of water to bound state. • These changes are further corroborated by concomitant changes in seed metabolites. • Thus there exists a moisture stress and development stage dependence of seed tissue water status. - Abstract: Changes in water status of developing seeds of Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill.) grown under different moisture stress conditions were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)- spin–spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}). A comparison of the seed development characteristics, composition and physical properties indicated that, characteristics like seed weight, seed number/ear, rate of seed filling increased with development stages but decreased with moisture stress conditions. The NMR- spin–spin relaxation (T{sub 2}) component like bound water increased with seed maturation (40–50%) but decreased with moisture stress conditions (30–40%). The changes in seed water status to increasing levels of moisture stress and seed maturity indicates that moisture stress resulted in more proportion of water to bound state and intermediate state and less proportion of water in free-state. These changes are further corroborated by significant changes in protein and starch contents in seeds under high moisture stress treatments. Thus seed water status during its development is not only affected by development processes but also by moisture stress conditions. This study strongly indicated a clear moisture stress and development stage dependence of seed tissue water status in developing soybean seeds.

  17. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  18. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  19. Metabolomic and network analysis of astaxanthin-producing Haematococcus pluvialis under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingxue; Wang, Jiangxin; Shi, Mengliang; Niu, Xiangfeng; Yu, Xinheng; Gao, Lianju; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-10-01

    Various combinations of acetate (Ac), Fe(2+) and high light (HL) stress conditions were evaluated to maximize astaxanthin accumulation and biomass production in Haematococcus pluvialis, and then GC-MS and LC-MS based metabolomics were applied to determine molecular mechanisms responsible for enhancing astaxanthin accumulation under the stress conditions. With the optimized analytical protocols, the GC-MS and LC-MS analyses allowed identification of 93 stable and 24 unstable intracellular metabolites from H. pluvialis, respectively. In addition, a metabolic network was constructed based on GC-MS metabolomic datasets using a weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) approach. The network analysis uncovered 2, 1 and 1 distinguished metabolic modules highly associated with HL, Fe(2+) & HL, and Ac & Fe(2+) & HL conditions, respectively. Finally, LC-MS analysis found that AKG, Glu and R5P may be metabolites associated with the Fe(2+) & HL condition. The study provided the first metabolomic view of cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. PMID:25164345

  20. Numerical Simulation of Rock Fracturing under Laboratory True-Triaxial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Hazzard, Jim; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    simulated at the final stages of the experiment at higher effective stresses where an M-shaped form of through-going fractures was developed and their spatial orientations and angles were measured under various polyaxial loading conditions. This study enhances our understanding about the nature of initiation and propagation of fractures under true-triaxial stress states.

  1. Response to different environmental stress conditions of industrial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Garay-Arroyo, A; Covarrubias, A A; Clark, I; Niño, I; Gosset, G; Martinez, A

    2004-02-01

    Two sets of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were compared for their physiological responses to different stress conditions. One group is composed of three strains adapted to controlled laboratory conditions (CEN.PK, LR88 and RS58), whereas the other consisted of five industrial strains (IND1101, SuperStart, LO24, LO41 and Azteca). Most industrial strains showed higher tolerance to heat shock and to an oxidative environment than laboratory strains. Excluding CEN.PK, a similar behavior was observed regarding ethanol production in high sugar concentrations (180 g/l glucose). Addition of acetate (10 g/l) or furfural (2 g/l), in concentrations similar to those found in sugar cane bagasse hydrolysates, decreased cell mass formation and growth rate in almost all strains. CEN.PK and SuperStart showed the highest sensitivity when grown in furfural-containing medium. Acetic acid treatment severely affected cell mass formation and reduced growth rate in all strains; CEN.PK and LO24 were the most resistant. The specific ethanol production rate was not affected by furfural addition. However, specific ethanol production rates decreased in response to acetic acid in four industrial strains, and increased in all laboratory strains and in LO24. No significant correlation was found between the stress tolerance of the strains tested and the transcript accumulation of genes selected by their involvement in the response to each of the stressful environments applied. PMID:12910327

  2. Proteomic analysis of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells grown under physiologically relevant fluid shear stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biofilm forming bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for maladies ranging from severe skin infection to major diseases such as bacteremia, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. A flow displacement system was used to grow S. aureus biofilms in four physiologically relevant fluid shear rates (50, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1) to identify proteins that are associated with biofilm. Results Global protein expressions from the membrane and cytosolic fractions of S. aureus biofilm cells grown under the above shear rate conditions are reported. Sixteen proteins in the membrane-enriched fraction and eight proteins in the cytosolic fraction showed significantly altered expression (p < 0.05) under increasing fluid shear. These 24 proteins were identified using nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS. They were found to be associated with various metabolic functions such as glycolysis / TCA pathways, protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Increased fluid shear stress did not influence the expression of two important surface binding proteins: fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding proteins. Conclusions The reported data suggest that while the general metabolic function of the sessile bacteria is minimal under high fluid shear stress conditions, they seem to retain the binding capacity to initiate new infections. PMID:24855455

  3. Association between oxidative stress and contextual fear conditioning in Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Gomes, Vitor de Castro; Pinton, Simone; Batista Teixeira da Rocha, Joao; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2013-05-28

    We recently reported two novel breeding lines of rats known as Carioca high-and low-conditioned freezing (CHF and CLF), based on defensive freezing responses to contextual cues previously associated with electric footshock. The anxiety-like profile of these animals from the 7th generation was tested in the elevated plus maze. The results indicated that CHF animals presented a significantly more "anxious" phenotype compared with CLF animals. Animals from the 12th generation were used to evaluate the oxidative stress status of the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were evaluated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA; a sensor of reactive oxygen species [ROS]), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), an early marker of lipid peroxidation, were assessed. The results indicated that free radical concentrations and MDA levels were significantly higher in all three brain structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. Our data also showed that the hippocampus had the highest reactive species and MDA concentrations compared with the cortex and cerebellum in CHF rats. Animals from the 16th generation were used to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) within these three brain structures. The results indicated that CAT activity was lower in the cortex and hippocampus in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. No significant difference was observed in the cerebellum. The enzymatic activity of GPx was significantly decreased in all three structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. The hippocampus exhibited the highest GPx activity compared with the other two brain structures. These findings suggest the involvement of a redox system in these two bidirectional lines, and the hippocampus might be one of the prime brain structures involved in this state of oxidative stress imbalance. PMID:23566816

  4. Transglutaminase type 2-dependent selective recruitment of proteins into exosomes under stressful cellular conditions.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; D'Eletto, Manuela; Marsella, Claudia; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Falasca, Laura; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies are revealing a role of exosomes in intercellular communication, and growing evidence indicates an important function for these vesicles in the progression and pathogenesis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the biogenesis process of exosomes is still unclear. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional enzyme with different subcellular localizations. Particularly, under stressful conditions, the enzyme has been also detected in the extracellular matrix, but the mechanism(s) by which TG2 is released outside the cells requires further investigation. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to determine whether exosomes might be a vehicle for TG2 to reach the extracellular space, and whether TG2 could be involved in exosomes biogenesis. To address this issue, we isolated and characterized exosomes derived from cells either expressing or not TG2, under stressful conditions (i.e. proteasome impairment or expressing a mutated form of huntingtin (mHtt) containing 84 polyglutamine repeats). Our results show that TG2 is present in the exosomes only upon proteasome blockade, a condition in which TG2 interacts with TSG101 and ALIX, two key proteins involved in exosome biogenesis. Interestingly, we found that TG2 favours the assembly of a protein complex including mHtt, ALIX, TSG101 and BAG3, a co-chaperone involved in the clearance of mHtt. The formation of this complex is paralleled by the selective recruitment of mHtt and BAG3 in the exosomes derived from TG2 proficient cells only. Overall, our data indicate that TG2 is an important player in the biogenesis of exosomes controlling the selectivity of their cargo under stressful cellular conditions. In addition, these vesicles represent the way by which cells can release TG2 into the extracellular space under proteostasis impairment. PMID:27169926

  5. Translucent tissue defect in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is associated with oxidative stress accompanying an accelerated aging phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zommick, Daniel H; Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2013-12-01

    Translucent tissue defect (TTD) is an undesirable postharvest disorder of potato tubers characterized by the development of random pockets of semi-transparent tissue containing high concentrations of reducing sugars. Translucent areas turn dark during frying due to the Maillard reaction. The newly released cultivar, Premier Russet, is highly resistant to low temperature sweetening, but susceptible to TTD. Symptoms appeared as early as 170 days after harvest and worsened with time in storage (4-9 °C, 95 % RH). In addition to higher concentrations of glucose, fructose and sucrose, TTD resulted in lower dry matter, higher specific activities of starch phosphorylase and glc-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, higher protease activity, loss of protein, and increased concentrations of free amino acids (esp. asparagine and glutamine). The mechanism of TTD is unknown; however, the disorder has similarities with the irreversible senescent sweetening that occurs in tubers during long-term storage, where much of the decline in quality is a consequence of progressive increases in oxidative stress with advancing age. The respiration rate of non-TTD 'Premier Russet' tubers was inherently higher (ca. 40 %) than that of 'Russet Burbank' tubers (a non-TTD cultivar). Moreover, translucent tissue from 'Premier Russet' tubers had a 1.9-fold higher respiration rate than the average of non-translucent tissue and tissue from non-TTD tubers. Peroxidation of membrane lipids during TTD development resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde and likely contributed to a measurable increase in membrane permeability. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione were substantially higher in translucent tissue. TTD tubers also contained twofold less ascorbate than non-TTD tubers. TTD appears to be a consequence of oxidative stress associated with accelerated aging of 'Premier Russet' tubers. PMID:24037414

  6. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors. PMID:18672684

  7. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization. PMID:20597368

  8. Accelerated mRNA decay in conditional mutants of yeast mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, B; Mao, X; Shuman, S

    1998-01-01

    Current models of mRNA decay in yeast posit that 3' deadenylation precedes enzymatic removal of the 5' cap, which then exposes the naked end to 5' exonuclease action. Here, we analyzed gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells bearing conditional mutations of Ceg1 (capping enzyme), a 52 kDa protein that transfers GMP from GTP to the 5' end of mRNA to form the GpppN cap structure. Shift of ceg1 mutants to restrictive temperature elicited a rapid decline in the rate of protein synthesis, which correlated with a sharp reduction in the steady-state levels of multiple individual mRNAs. ceg1 mutations prevented the accumulation of SSA1 and SSA4 mRNAs that were newly synthesized at the restrictive temperature. Uncapped poly(A)+ SSA4 mRNA accumulated in cells lacking the 5' exoribonuclease Xrn1. These findings provide genetic evidence for the long-held idea that the cap guanylate is critical for mRNA stability. The deadenylation-decapping-degradation pathway appears to be short-circuited when Ceg1 is inactivated. PMID:9547258

  9. Dorsal light response and changes of its responses under varying acceleration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Takabayashi, A.; Takagi, S.; von Baumgarten, R.; Wetzig, J.

    In order to improve our understanding about functions of the gravity sensors, we have conducted four experiments in goldfish: 1) To define the effect of visual information influx on the static labyrinthine response, the dorsal light response (DLR) which had been proposed by von Holst as a model for postural adjustment in fish was reexamined with a newly designed, rotatory illumination device. The fish responded to illumination from the upper half of the visual field and a narrow range around 180 degrees of the lower half visual field. The maximal tilting angle of normal fish was about 40 degrees under horizontal illumination. 2) Under the changes of the gravito-inertial force level produced by a linear sled, the threshold of the gravity sensors was determined from postural adjustment responses. 3) Under hypogravic conditions during the parabolic flight of an airplane, the light-dependent behavior was investigated in intact and labyrinthectomized goldfish. 4) As one of the most likely candidates of the neural centers for the DLR, the valvula cerebelli, which receives its visual information not through the optic tectum but through the pretectal areas, is confirmed by the brain lesion experiments.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  11. Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis dampens the neuroendocrine response to stress in neonatal rats subjected to suboptimal rearing conditions.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Ryan Joseph; Verlezza, Silvanna; Gray, Jennifer Megan; Hill, Matthew Nicholas; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress during early development can exert profound effects on the maturation of the neuroendocrine stress axis. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has recently surfaced as a fundamental component of the neuroendocrine stress response; however, the effect of early-life stress on neonatal ECB signaling and the capacity to which ECB enhancement may modulate neonatal stress responses is relatively unknown. The present study assessed whether exposure to early-life stress in the form of limited access to nesting/bedding material (LB) from postnatal (PND) day 2 to 9 alters neuroendocrine activity and hypothalamic ECB content in neonatal rats challenged with a novel immobilization stressor. Furthermore, we examined whether inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for the degradation of anandamide (AEA) affects neuroendocrine responses in PND10 pups as a function of rearing conditions. Neonatal rats showed a robust increase in corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) secretion in response to immobilization stress, which was significantly blunted in pups reared in LB conditions. Accordingly, LB pups exhibited reduced stress-induced Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, with no significant differences in hypothalamic ECB content. Administration of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, ip) 90 min prior to immobilization stress significantly dampened stress-induced CORT release, but only in pups reared in LB conditions. These results suggest that rearing in restricted bedding conditions dampens the neuroendocrine response to stress, while augmenting AEA mitigates stress-induced alterations in glucocorticoid secretion preferentially in pups subjected to early-life stress. PMID:26552023

  12. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  13. Prognostics of Power Mosfets Under Thermal Stress Accelerated Aging Using Data-Driven and Model-Based Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Saxena, Abhinav; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai F.

    2011-01-01

    An approach for predicting remaining useful life of power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor) devices has been developed. Power MOSFETs are semiconductor switching devices that are instrumental in electronics equipment such as those used in operation and control of modern aircraft and spacecraft. The MOSFETs examined here were aged under thermal overstress in a controlled experiment and continuous performance degradation data were collected from the accelerated aging experiment. Dieattach degradation was determined to be the primary failure mode. The collected run-to-failure data were analyzed and it was revealed that ON-state resistance increased as die-attach degraded under high thermal stresses. Results from finite element simulation analysis support the observations from the experimental data. Data-driven and model based prognostics algorithms were investigated where ON-state resistance was used as the primary precursor of failure feature. A Gaussian process regression algorithm was explored as an example for a data-driven technique and an extended Kalman filter and a particle filter were used as examples for model-based techniques. Both methods were able to provide valid results. Prognostic performance metrics were employed to evaluate and compare the algorithms.

  14. Cannabinoid modulation of chronic mild stress-induced selective enhancement of trace fear conditioning in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Reich, Christian G; Iskander, Anthony N; Weiss, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    History of stress is considered a major risk factor for the development of major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Elucidating the neurobiological mechanisms of Pavlovian fear conditioning may provide insight into the etiology of PTSD. In the current study, adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 3 weeks of a chronic-mild-unpredictable stress (CMS) protocol. Immediately following the CMS, the animals were subjected to hippocampal-dependent (trace and contextual) and hippocampal-independent (delay) fear conditioning. CMS exposure enhanced trace freezing behavior compared to non-stress controls. This effect was not observed in contextual or delay conditioned animals. Given that the endocannabinoid system is negatively affected by CMS procedures, separate groups of stressed rats were administered the CB1 receptor agonist, ACEA (0.1 mg/kg), prior to trace fear conditioning or a memory-recall test. Regardless of administration time, ACEA significantly reduced freezing behavior in stressed animals. Furthermore, when administered during the first memory recall test, ACEA enhanced long-term extinction in both stress and non-stress groups. The results demonstrate that chronic unpredictable stress selectively enhances hippocampal-dependent episodic fear memories. Pathologies of the episodic memory and fear response may increase the susceptibility of developing PTSD. Reduction in fear responses via exogenous activation of the CB1 receptor suggests that a deficiency in the endocannabinoid system contributes to this pathology. PMID:23926242

  15. Rice Root Architectural Plasticity Traits and Genetic Regions for Adaptability to Variable Cultivation and Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Nitika; Raman, K Anitha; Torres, Rolando O; Audebert, Alain; Dardou, Audrey; Kumar, Arvind; Henry, Amelia

    2016-08-01

    Future rice (Oryza sativa) crops will likely experience a range of growth conditions, and root architectural plasticity will be an important characteristic to confer adaptability across variable environments. In this study, the relationship between root architectural plasticity and adaptability (i.e. yield stability) was evaluated in two traditional × improved rice populations (Aus 276 × MTU1010 and Kali Aus × MTU1010). Forty contrasting genotypes were grown in direct-seeded upland and transplanted lowland conditions with drought and drought + rewatered stress treatments in lysimeter and field studies and a low-phosphorus stress treatment in a Rhizoscope study. Relationships among root architectural plasticity for root dry weight, root length density, and percentage lateral roots with yield stability were identified. Selected genotypes that showed high yield stability also showed a high degree of root plasticity in response to both drought and low phosphorus. The two populations varied in the soil depth effect on root architectural plasticity traits, none of which resulted in reduced grain yield. Root architectural plasticity traits were related to 13 (Aus 276 population) and 21 (Kali Aus population) genetic loci, which were contributed by both the traditional donor parents and MTU1010. Three genomic loci were identified as hot spots with multiple root architectural plasticity traits in both populations, and one locus for both root architectural plasticity and grain yield was detected. These results suggest an important role of root architectural plasticity across future rice crop conditions and provide a starting point for marker-assisted selection for plasticity. PMID:27342311

  16. Dynamics of food availability, body condition and physiological stress response in breeding Black-legged Kittiwakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    1. The seasonal dynamics of body condition (BC), circulating corticosterone levels (baseline, BL) and the adrenocortical response to acute stress (SR) were examined in long-lived Black-legged Kittiwakes, Rissa tridactyla, breeding at Duck (food-poor colony) and Gull (food-rich colony) Islands in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska. It was tested whether the dynamics of corticosterone levels reflect a seasonal change in bird physiological condition due to reproduction and/or variation in foraging conditions. 2. BC declined seasonally, and the decline was more pronounced in birds at the food-poor colony. BL and SR levels of corticosterone rose steadily through the reproductive season, and BL levels were significantly higher in birds on Duck island compared with those on Gull Island. During the egg-laying and chick-rearing stages, birds had lower SR on Duck Island than on Gull Island. 3. The results suggest that, in addition to a seasonal change in bird physiology during reproduction, local ecological factors such as food availability affect circulating levels of corticosterone and adrenal response to acute stress.

  17. S-Glutathionylation Enhances Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Activity Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei-Ning; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Adamec, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the two-step trans-sulfuration pathway that converts homocysteine to cysteine. It is also one of three major enzymes responsible for the biogenesis of H2S, a signaling molecule. We have previously demonstrated that CBS is activated in cells challenged by oxidative stress, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this regulation has remained unclear. Results: Here, we demonstrate that S-glutathionylation of CBS enhances its activity ∼2-fold in vitro. Loss of this post-translational modification in the presence of dithiothreitol results in reversal to basal activity. Cys346 was identified as the site for S-glutathionylation by a combination of mass spectrometric, mutagenesis, and activity analyses. To test the physiological relevance of S-glutathionylation-dependent regulation of CBS, HEK293 cells were oxidatively challenged with peroxide, which is known to enhance the trans-sulfuration flux. Under these conditions, CBS glutathionylation levels increased and were correlated with a ∼3-fold increase in CBS activity. Innovation: Collectively, our results reveal a novel post-translational modification of CBS, that is, glutathionylation, which functions as an allosteric activator under oxidative stress conditions permitting enhanced synthesis of both cysteine and H2S. Conclusions: Our study elucidates a molecular mechanism for increased cysteine and therefore glutathione, synthesis via glutathionylation of CBS. They also demonstrate the potential for increased H2S production under oxidative stress conditions, particularly in tissues where CBS is a major source of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 350–361. PMID:24893130

  18. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  19. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Fear Conditioning, and The Uncinate Fasciculus: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hölzel, Britta K.; Brunsch, Vincent; Gard, Tim; Greve, Douglas N.; Koch, Kathrin; Sorg, Christian; Lazar, Sara W.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness has been suggested to impact emotional learning, but research on these processes is scarce. The classical fear conditioning/extinction/extinction retention paradigm is a well-known method for assessing emotional learning. The present study tested the impact of mindfulness training on fear conditioning and extinction memory and further investigated whether changes in white matter fiber tracts might support such changes. The uncinate fasciculus (UNC) was of particular interest in the context of emotional learning. In this pilot study, 46 healthy participants were quasi-randomized to a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR, N = 23) or waitlist control (N = 23) group and underwent a two-day fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction memory protocol before and after the course or control period. Skin conductance response (SCR) data served to measure the physiological response during conditioning and extinction memory phases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were analyzed with probabilistic tractography and analyzed for changes of fractional anisotropy in the UNC. During conditioning, participants were able to maintain a differential response to conditioned vs. not conditioned stimuli following the MBSR course (i.e., higher sensitivity to the conditioned stimuli), while controls dropped the response. Extinction memory results were not interpretable due to baseline differences. MBSR participants showed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy in the UNC, while controls did not (group by time interaction missed significance). Pre-post changes in UNC were correlated with changes in the response to the conditioned stimuli. The findings suggest effects of mindfulness practice on the maintenance of sensitivity of emotional responses and suggest underlying neural plasticity. (ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT01320969, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01320969). PMID:27378875

  20. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Fear Conditioning, and The Uncinate Fasciculus: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Britta K; Brunsch, Vincent; Gard, Tim; Greve, Douglas N; Koch, Kathrin; Sorg, Christian; Lazar, Sara W; Milad, Mohammed R

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness has been suggested to impact emotional learning, but research on these processes is scarce. The classical fear conditioning/extinction/extinction retention paradigm is a well-known method for assessing emotional learning. The present study tested the impact of mindfulness training on fear conditioning and extinction memory and further investigated whether changes in white matter fiber tracts might support such changes. The uncinate fasciculus (UNC) was of particular interest in the context of emotional learning. In this pilot study, 46 healthy participants were quasi-randomized to a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR, N = 23) or waitlist control (N = 23) group and underwent a two-day fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction memory protocol before and after the course or control period. Skin conductance response (SCR) data served to measure the physiological response during conditioning and extinction memory phases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were analyzed with probabilistic tractography and analyzed for changes of fractional anisotropy in the UNC. During conditioning, participants were able to maintain a differential response to conditioned vs. not conditioned stimuli following the MBSR course (i.e., higher sensitivity to the conditioned stimuli), while controls dropped the response. Extinction memory results were not interpretable due to baseline differences. MBSR participants showed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy in the UNC, while controls did not (group by time interaction missed significance). Pre-post changes in UNC were correlated with changes in the response to the conditioned stimuli. The findings suggest effects of mindfulness practice on the maintenance of sensitivity of emotional responses and suggest underlying neural plasticity. (ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT01320969, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01320969). PMID:27378875

  1. The weight gain response to stress during adulthood is conditioned by both sex and prenatal stress exposure.

    PubMed

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2010-04-01

    Food intake and weight gain are known to be affected by stress. However, the type and duration of the stress may have variable effects, with males and females responding differently. We report the short-term and long-term effects of prenatal and adult immobilization stress, as well as the combination of these two stresses, on weight gain and food intake in male and female rats and the role of post-pubertal gonadal hormones in this process. No long-term effect of prenatal stress on food intake or weight gain was found in either sex. However, during the period of adult stress [at postnatal day (P) 90; 10 days duration] stressed male rats gained significantly less weight than controls and previous exposure to prenatal stress attenuated this effect (control: 31.2+/-2.1g; prenatal stress: 24.6+/-3.8g; adult stress: 8.1+/-3.4g; prenatal and adult stress: 18.2+/-3.3g; p<0.0001). There was no change in food intake in response to either prenatal or adult stress. Adult stress increased circulating corticosterone levels during the initial part of the stress period, in both male and female rats with this rise being greater in male rats. No effect on corticosterone levels was observed on the last day of stress in either sex. No effect on weight gain or food intake was observed in female rats. Following adult stress, male rats increased their weight gain, with no change in food intake, such that 1 month later they reached control levels. At the time of sacrifice (P180), there were no differences in weight or circulating metabolic hormone levels between any of the male groups. Although castration alone modulated body weight in both male and female rats, it did not affect their weight gain response to adult stress. These results indicate that the weight gain response to adult stress is sexually dimorphic and that this is not dependent on post-pubertal gonadal steroids. Furthermore, the outcome of this response closely depends on the time at which the change in weight is analyzed

  2. Velocity and stress jump conditions between a porous medium and a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Aguilar-Madera, Carlos G.; Ochoa-Tapia, J. Alberto; Goyeau, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    Modeling transport phenomena in hierarchical systems can be carried out by either a one domain approach or a two domain approach. The first one involves assuming the system as a pseudo-continuum and is expressed in terms of position-dependent effective medium coefficients. In the two domain approach, the differential equations have position-independent coefficients but require accounting for the corresponding boundary conditions that couple the equations between each homogeneous region. For momentum transport between a porous medium and a fluid, stress boundary conditions have been derived in terms of a jump coefficient that needs to be predicted within a two-domain approach formulation. However, continuity of the velocity is postulated at the dividing surface. In this work, we propose a methodology for the derivation of boundary conditions for both the velocity and the stress. These conditions are expressed in terms of jump coefficients that are computed from the solution of an ancillary macroscopic closure problem. This problem accounts for the deviations from the one and two domain approaches. From the closure problem solution we were also able to determine the position at which the jump conditions should be applied, i.e., the dividing surface position. In addition, we used this methodology adopting the assumptions proposed by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker as well as those by Beavers and Joseph. We found that any version of the two domain approach was in agreement with the one domain approach in the bulk of the porous medium and the fluid. However, the same is not true for the process of capturing the essential information of the inter-region.

  3. Migratory management and environmental conditions affect lifespan and oxidative stress in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming H; Strand, Micheline K; Rueppell, Olav; Tarpy, David R

    2016-01-01

    Most pollination in large-scale agriculture is dependent on managed colonies of a single species, the honey bee Apis mellifera. More than 1 million hives are transported to California each year just to pollinate the almonds, and bees are trucked across the country for various cropping systems. Concerns have been raised about whether such "migratory management" causes bees undue stress; however to date there have been no longer-term studies rigorously addressing whether migratory management is detrimental to bee health. To address this issue, we conducted field experiments comparing bees from commercial and experimental migratory beekeeping operations to those from stationary colonies to quantify effects on lifespan, colony health and productivity, and levels of oxidative damage for individual bees. We detected a significant decrease in lifespan of migratory adult bees relative to stationary bees. We also found that migration affected oxidative stress levels in honey bees, but that food scarcity had an even larger impact; some detrimental effects of migration may be alleviated by a greater abundance of forage. In addition, rearing conditions affect levels of oxidative damage incurred as adults. This is the first comprehensive study on impacts of migratory management on the health and oxidative stress of honey bees. PMID:27554200

  4. Floridoside production by the red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria under different conditions of growth and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-12-01

    Floridoside is a compatible solute synthesized by red algae that has attracted considerable attention due to its promising antifouling and therapeutic properties. However, research on industrial applications of floridoside is hampered by limited compound availability and the development of a production process yielding high amounts of this glycoside has not been explored yet. In the present work, floridoside accumulation by the red microalgae Galdieria sulphuraria under different conditions was investigated in order to optimize the production of this glycoside in this microalgae. G. sulphuraria shows consider advantages over other red algae as potential industrial producer of floridoside due to its unicellular nature, its ability to grow heterotrophically in complete darkness and its acidophilic lifestyle. The main compatible solute accumulated by G. sulphuraria under salt stress was purified, identified as floridoside by (1)H-NMR and used as standard for quantification. Our results showed that applying the osmotic stress after the cells had grown first in medium with no salt resulted in higher floridoside yields compared to those obtained in cells growing under osmotic stress from the beginning. Among several parameters tested, the use of glycerol as carbon source for cell growth showed the most significant impact on floridoside accumulation, which reached a maximum of 56.8 mg/g dry biomass. PMID:27620735

  5. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  6. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K.; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D.; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L.; Hill, Richard P.; Jones, Russell G.; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O.; Thompson, Craig B.; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  7. Migratory management and environmental conditions affect lifespan and oxidative stress in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming H.; Strand, Micheline K.; Rueppell, Olav; Tarpy, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Most pollination in large-scale agriculture is dependent on managed colonies of a single species, the honey bee Apis mellifera. More than 1 million hives are transported to California each year just to pollinate the almonds, and bees are trucked across the country for various cropping systems. Concerns have been raised about whether such “migratory management” causes bees undue stress; however to date there have been no longer-term studies rigorously addressing whether migratory management is detrimental to bee health. To address this issue, we conducted field experiments comparing bees from commercial and experimental migratory beekeeping operations to those from stationary colonies to quantify effects on lifespan, colony health and productivity, and levels of oxidative damage for individual bees. We detected a significant decrease in lifespan of migratory adult bees relative to stationary bees. We also found that migration affected oxidative stress levels in honey bees, but that food scarcity had an even larger impact; some detrimental effects of migration may be alleviated by a greater abundance of forage. In addition, rearing conditions affect levels of oxidative damage incurred as adults. This is the first comprehensive study on impacts of migratory management on the health and oxidative stress of honey bees. PMID:27554200

  8. Two-way shape memory behavior of semi-crystalline elastomer under stress-free condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Chen; Dong, Yubing; Zhu, Yaofeng; Fu, Yaqin

    2016-08-01

    Semi-crystalline shape memory polymers exhibit two-way shape memory effect (2W-SME) under constant stresses through crystallization-induced elongation upon cooling and melting-induced constriction upon heating. The applied constant stress influenced the prediction and usability of 2W-SME in practical applications without any external force. Here the reversible shape transition in EVA-shaped memory polymer was quantitative analyzed under a suitable temperature range and external stress-free condition. The fraction of reversible strain increased with increasing upper temperature (T high) within the temperature range and reached the maximum value of 13.62% at 70 °C. However, reversible strain transition was almost lost when T high exceeded 80 °C because of complete melting of crystalline scaffold, known as the latent recrystallization template. The non-isothermal annealing of EVA 2W-SMP under changing circulating temperatures was confirmed. Moreover, the orientation of crystallization was retained at high temperatures. These findings may contribute to design an appropriate shape memory protocol based on application-specific requirements.

  9. Fast screening of Bifidobacterium longum sublethal stress conditions in a novel two-stage continuous culture strategy.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2013-06-01

    A central issue in the application of probiotics as food additives is their fastidious production and their sensitivity to many environmental stresses. The importance of inducible cell-protective mechanisms triggered by application of sublethal stresses for survival under stress conditions has been demonstrated. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test stress factors on one culture instead of several repeated batch cultures. In this study, the application of a two-stage continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was investigated. The first reactor was operated under fixed conditions at 37 °C and pH 6.0 and used to produce cells with controlled physiology, mimicking cells in the late exponential growth phase. Stress pretreatment combinations of pH (6.0, 5.0 and 4.0), temperature (37, 45 and 47 °C) and NaCl (0, 5 and 10%) were tested in the second reactor. Of all tested combinations, only those of pH 4.0 significantly decreased cell viability in the second reactor compared to control conditions (37 °C, pH 6.0, 0% NaCl) and, therefore, could not be considered as sublethal stresses. Pretreatments with 5 or 10% NaCl had a negative effect on cell viability after gastric lethal stress. A significant improvement in cell resistance to heat lethal stress (56 °C, 5 min) was observed for cells pretreated at 47 °C. In contrast, heat pretreatment negatively affected cell viability after freeze drying and osmotic lethal stresses. The two-stage continuous culture allowed for efficient screening of several stress pretreatments during the same experiment with up to four different conditions tested per day. Optimal sublethal stress conditions can also be applied for producing cells with traditional batch cultures. PMID:23443949

  10. Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in maize under field drought-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Habben, Jeffrey E; Bao, Xiaoming; Bate, Nicholas J; DeBruin, Jason L; Dolan, Dennis; Hasegawa, Darren; Helentjaris, Timothy G; Lafitte, Renee H; Lovan, Nina; Mo, Hua; Reimann, Kellie; Schussler, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    A transgenic gene-silencing approach was used to modulate the levels of ethylene biosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) and determine its effect on grain yield under drought stress in a comprehensive set of field trials. Commercially relevant transgenic events were created with down-regulated ACC synthases (ACSs), enzymes that catalyse the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis. These events had ethylene emission levels reduced approximately 50% compared with nontransgenic nulls. Multiple, independent transgenic hybrids and controls were tested in field trials at managed drought-stress and rain-fed locations throughout the US. Analysis of yield data indicated that transgenic events had significantly increased grain yield over the null comparators, with the best event having a 0.58 Mg/ha (9.3 bushel/acre) increase after a flowering period drought stress. A (genotype × transgene) × environment interaction existed among the events, highlighting the need to better understand the context in which the down-regulation of ACSs functions in maize. Analysis of secondary traits showed that there was a consistent decrease in the anthesis-silking interval and a concomitant increase in kernel number/ear in transgene-positive events versus nulls. Selected events were also field tested under a low-nitrogen treatment, and the best event was found to have a significant 0.44 Mg/ha (7.1 bushel/acre) yield increase. This set of extensive field evaluations demonstrated that down-regulating the ethylene biosynthetic pathway can improve the grain yield of maize under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:24618117

  11. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  12. Emerging role of angiogenin in stress response and cell survival under adverse conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Guo-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG), also known as ribonuclease (RNASE) 5, is a member of the vertebrate-specific, secreted RNASE superfamily. ANG was originally identified as a tumor angiogenic factor, but its biological activity has been extended from inducing angiogenesis to stimulating cell proliferation and more recently, to promoting cell survival. Under growth conditions, ANG is translocated to nucleus where it accumulates in nucleolus and stimulates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, thus facilitating cell growth and proliferation. Under stress conditions, ANG is accumulated in cytoplasmic compartments and modulates the production of tiRNA, a novel class of small RNA that is derived from tRNA and is induced by stress. tiRNA suppress global protein translation by inhibiting both cap-dependent and -independent translation including that mediated by weak IRESes. However, strong IRES-mediated translation, a mechanism often used by genes involved in pro-survival and anti-apoptosis, is not affected. Thus, ANG-mediated tiRNA reprogram protein translation, save anabolic energy, and promote cell survival. This recently uncovered function of ANG presents a novel mechanism of action in regulating cell growth and survival. PMID:22021078

  13. Adolescent traumatic stress experience results in less robust conditioned fear and post-extinction fear cue responses in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole L T; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2014-05-01

    Early exposure to a traumatic event may produce lasting effects throughout the lifespan. Traumatic stress during adolescence may deliver a distinct developmental insult compared with more-often studied neonatal or juvenile traumatic stress paradigms. The present study describes the lasting effects of adolescent traumatic stress upon adulthood fear conditioning. Adolescent rats were exposed to a traumatic stressor (underwater trauma, UWT), then underwent fear conditioning during adulthood. Fear extinction was tested over five conditioned suppression extinction sessions three weeks later. The efficacies of two potential extinction-enhancing compounds, endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor AM404 (10mg/kg) and M1 muscarinic positive allosteric modulator BQCA (10mg/kg), were also assessed. Finally, post-extinction fear responses were examined using a fear cue (light) as a prepulse stimulus. Rats traumatically stressed during adolescence showed blunted conditioned suppression on day 1 of extinction training, and AM404 reversed this effect. Post-extinction startle testing showed that fear conditioning eliminates prepulse inhibition to the light cue. Startle potentiation was observed only in rats without adolescent UWT exposure. AM404 and BQCA both ameliorated this startle potentiation, while BQCA increased startle in the UWT group. These results suggest that exposure to a traumatic stressor during adolescence alters developmental outcomes related to stress response and fear extinction compared to rats without adolescent traumatic stress exposure, blunting the adulthood fear response and reducing residual post-extinction fear expression. Efficacy of pharmacological interventions may also vary as a factor of developmental traumatic stress exposure. PMID:24491436

  14. Stress of Kindergarten teachers: How we tried to detect and to reduce it by using a small and wearable ECG and acceleration measuring device?

    PubMed

    Shirouzu, Shigenori; Seno, Yumeka; Tobioka, Ken; Masaki, Takeo; Yasumatsu, Kiyotaka; Mishima, Norio; Sugano, Hisanobu

    2015-08-01

    In 2014 school year, four female teachers of Nazareth Kindergarten decided to resign (DRT) due to workplace stress caused by human relationships between themselves. Our preliminary interview investigation revealed there was a stressor (STR), a certain elder female teacher and her less polite words and attitude. Using small and wearable ECG and acceleration measuring device, we measured 24 hour's autonomic nervous system's activity (ASNA) and sleep behavior of the STR and surrounding teachers, and tried to evaluate their stress objectively and to understand the reason of STR's less polite behaviors. For comparison, we also measured female Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) patients suffering adjustment disorder and clinical depression. PMID:26737766

  15. Overexpression of AtGRDP2, a novel glycine-rich domain protein, accelerates plant growth and improves stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Amaro, María A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Hernández-Lucero, Eloísa; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins with glycine-rich signatures have been reported in a wide variety of organisms including plants, mammalians, fungi, and bacteria. Plant glycine-rich protein genes exhibit developmental and tissue-specific expression patterns. Herein, we present the characterization of the AtGRDP2 gene using Arabidopsis null and knockdown mutants and, Arabidopsis and lettuce over-expression lines. AtGRDP2 encodes a short glycine-rich domain protein, containing a DUF1399 domain and a putative RNA recognition motif (RRM). AtGRDP2 transcript is mainly expressed in Arabidopsis floral organs, and its deregulation in Arabidopsis Atgrdp2 mutants and 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines produces alterations in development. The 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines grow faster than the WT, while the Atgrdp2 mutants have a delay in growth and development. The over-expression lines accumulate higher levels of indole-3-acetic acid and, have alterations in the expression pattern of ARF6, ARF8, and miR167 regulators of floral development and auxin signaling. Under salt stress conditions, 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines displayed higher tolerance and increased expression of stress marker genes. Likewise, transgenic lettuce plants over-expressing the AtGRDP2 gene manifest increased growth rate and early flowering time. Our data reveal an important role for AtGRDP2 in Arabidopsis development and stress response, and suggest a connection between AtGRDP2 and auxin signaling. PMID:25653657

  16. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®)

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Kevin E.; Elk, Carrie A.; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Long, Christopher J.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F.; Street, Jennifer D.; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1–5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21–60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants’ mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p < 0.0001 for all pre-ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD. PMID:25379218

  17. Accelerated Resolution Therapy for treatment of pain secondary to symptoms of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Kevin E.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Hernandez, Diego F.; Shuman, Amy; Diamond, David M.; Girling, Sue Ann; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Wittenberg, Trudy; Witt, Ann M.; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Anderson, Brian; McMillan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background As many as 70% of veterans with chronic pain treated within the US Veterans Administration (VA) system may have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and conversely, up to 80% of those with PTSD may have pain. We describe pain experienced by US service members and veterans with symptoms of PTSD, and report on the effect of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), a new, brief exposure-based therapy, on acute pain reduction secondary to treatment of symptoms of PTSD. Methods A randomized controlled trial of ART versus an attention control (AC) regimen was conducted among 45 US service members/veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD. Participants received a mean of 3.7 sessions of ART. Results Mean age was 41.0 + 12.4 years and 20% were female. Most veterans (93%) reported pain. The majority (78%) used descriptive terms indicative of neuropathic pain, with 29% reporting symptoms of a concussion or feeling dazed. Mean pre-/post-change on the Pain Outcomes Questionnaire (POQ) was −16.9±16.6 in the ART group versus −0.7±14.2 in the AC group (p=0.0006). Among POQ subscales, treatment effects with ART were reported for pain intensity (effect size = 1.81, p=0.006), pain-related impairment in mobility (effect size = 0.69, p=0.01), and negative affect (effect size = 1.01, p=0.001). Conclusions Veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD have a high prevalence of significant pain, including neuropathic pain. Brief treatment of symptoms of combat-related PTSD among veterans by use of ART appears to acutely reduce concomitant pain. PMID:24959325

  18. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Model Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.; Burhans, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment. PMID:25904874

  19. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  20. Preoperative Stress Conditioning in Humans: Is Oxygen the Drug of Choice?

    PubMed

    Perdrizet, G A

    2016-01-01

    Complications following invasive medical and surgical procedures are common and costly. No clinical protocols exist to actively condition patients prior to these high risk interventions. Effective preconditioning algorithms have been repeatedly demonstrated in animal models for more than a quarter century, where brief exposures to hyperthermia (heat shock), ischemia (ischemic preconditioning) or hypoxia have been employed. Heat shock pretreatment confers protection against experimental acute ischemia-reperfusion, endotoxin challenge and other stressors. The resulting state of protection is short lived (hours) and is associated with new gene expression, typical of a cell stress response (CSR). We aim to use the CSR to actively precondition patients before surgery, a process termed stress conditioning (SC). SC is a procedure in which tissues are briefly exposed to a conditioning stressor and recovered to permit the development of a transient state of resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Successful SC of humans prior to surgery may reduce postoperative complications related to periods of hypotension, hypoxia, or ischemia. Stressors such as heat shock, acute ischemia, endotoxin, heavy metals or hypoxia can induce this protected state but are themselves harmful and of limited clinical utility. The identification of a stressor that could induce the CSR in a non-harmful manner seemed unlikely, until high dose oxygen was considered. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) exposed to high dose oxygen at 2.4 ATA × 60-90 min developed increased resistance to an oxidant challenge in vitro (peroxide). The molecular changes described here, together with our understanding of the CSR and SC phenomena, suggest high dose oxygen may be the drug of choice for clinical preconditioning protocols and should be systematically tested in clinical trials. Oxygen dosing includes the following ranges: room air exposure is 0.21 ATA, clinical oxygen therapy 0.3-1.0 ATA (normobaric

  1. Influence of conditioned psychological stress on immunological recovery in mice exposed to low-dose x irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Flood, J.F.; Makinodan, T.

    1984-05-01

    A study was initiated to determine the effects of psychological stress on the immune response in BALB/c mice recovering from exposure to a low dose of ionizing radiation. Mice were first subjected to conditioning training for 12 days, then exposed to 200 R, subjected to psychological stress for 14 days, and assessed for peak anti-sheep RBC response. The seven treatment groups included two unirradiated groups and five irradiated groups. Mice exposed to 200 R and then subjected to conditioned psychological stress responded less vigorously to antigenic stimulation than those of the other irradiated groups. The psychological stress imposed upon these mice did not influence the antibody-forming capacity of unirradiated mice. These results indicate that a psychological stress which did not affect the immunological activity of unirradiated mice can curtail the immunological recovery of mice exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  2. Acid back-diffusion and mucosal H+ handling in the rat stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S

    1983-02-01

    We determined acid back-diffusion and pepsin output simultaneously in vagotomized rats after instillation of HCl into the stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions. With exposure to 6 ml of 100 mM HCl, spontaneous acid back-diffusion increased with the duration of the experiment under both conditions, and the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was decreased significantly by stress. There was no change in the output of pepsin. While disappearance of luminal acid caused by aspirin or taurocholic acid was not altered by stress, the pepsin output in response to H+ increased significantly in the stressed rats. With exposure to various concentrations of HCl for 3 hr, disappearance of the luminal acid increased linearly with the grade of HCl under both conditions. Except for the concentration of 300 mM, the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was triple in the normal condition, and the ratio of pepsin output/net flux of H+ was significantly increased by stress. Thus, (1) spontaneous acid back-diffusion decreased with stress, while diffusion induced by chemical barrier breakers remained the same; (2) the action of H+ diffused back into the mucosa did not always parallel the amount of diffusion determined from the loss of H+ in the lumen; (3) intramucosal H+ may be largely dissipated in normal mucosa; and (4) the initiation or aggravation of drug-induced mucosal damages by stress may be related to insufficiency of the H+ dissipating mechanisms. PMID:6410110

  3. An accelerated stress testing program for determining the reliability sensitivity of silicon solar cells to encapsulation and metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Davis, C. W.; Royal, E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of accelerated testing methods in a program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial silicon solar cells is discussed. Different failure modes are to be expected when cells with and without encapsulation are subjected to accelerated testing and separate test schedules for each are described. Unencapsulated test cells having slight variations in metallization are used to illustrate how accelerated testing can highlight different diffusion related failure mechanisms. The usefulness of accelerated testing when applied to encapsulated cells is illustrated by results showing that moisture related degradation may be many times worse with some forms of encapsulation than with no encapsulation at all.

  4. The mRNAs associated to a zinc finger protein from Trypanosoma cruzi shift during stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Oliveira, Camila; Mörking, Patrícia Alves; Kessler, Rafael Luis; Martins, Sharon Toledo; Romagnoli, Bruno Accioly Alves; Marchini, Fabricio Kerrynton; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosome gene expression is regulated almost exclusively at the posttranscriptional level, through mRNA stability, storage and degradation. Here, we characterize the ribonucleoprotein complex (mRNPs) corresponding to the zinc finger protein TcZC3H39 from T. cruzi comparing cells growing in normal conditions and under nutritional stress. The nutritional stress is a key step during T. cruzi differentiation from epimastigote form to human infective metacyclic trypomastigote form. The mechanisms by which the stress, altogether with other stimuli, triggers differentiation is not well understood. This work aims to characterize the TcZC3H39 protein during stress response. Using cells cultured in normal and stress conditions, we observed a dynamic change in TcZC3H39 granule distribution, which appeared broader in stressed epimastigotes. The protein core of the TcZC3H39-mRNP is composed of ribosomes, translation factors and RBPs. The TcZC3H39-mRNP could act sequestering highly expressed mRNAs and their associated ribosomes, potentially slowing translation in stress conditions. A shift were observed in the mRNAs associated with TcZC3H39: the number of targets in unstressed epimastigotes was smaller than that in stressed parasites, with no clear functional clustering in normal conditions. By contrast, in stressed parasites, the targets of TcZC3H39 were mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins and a remarkable enrichment in mRNAs for the cytochrome c complex (COX), highly expressed mRNAs in the replicative form. This identification of a new component of RNA granules in T. cruzi, the TcZC3H39 protein, provides new insight into the mechanisms involved in parasite stress responses and the regulation of gene expression during T. cruzi differentiation. PMID:25180711

  5. Transgene Expression and Bt Protein Content in Transgenic Bt Maize (MON810) under Optimal and Stressful Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Trtikova, Miluse; Wikmark, Odd Gunnar; Zemp, Niklaus; Widmer, Alex; Hilbeck, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Bt protein content in transgenic insect resistant (Bt) maize may vary between tissues within plants and between plants growing under different environmental conditions. However, it is unknown whether and how Bt protein content correlates with transgene expression, and whether this relationship is influenced by stressful environmental conditions. Two Bt maize varieties containing the same transgene cassette (MON 810) were grown under optimal and stressful conditions. Before and during stress exposure, the upper leaves were analysed for transgene expression using quantitative RT-PCR and for Bt content using ELISA. Under optimal conditions there was no significant difference in the transgene expression between the two investigated Bt maize varieties whereas Bt protein content differed significantly. Transgene expression was correlated with Bt protein content in only one of the varieties. Under stressful environmental conditions we found similar transgene expressions as under optimal conditions but Bt content responded differently. These results suggest that Bt content is not only controlled by the transgene expression but is also dependent on the genetic background of the maize variety. Under stressful conditions the concentration of Bt protein is even more difficult to predict. PMID:25853814

  6. Transgene expression and Bt protein content in transgenic Bt maize (MON810) under optimal and stressful environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Trtikova, Miluse; Wikmark, Odd Gunnar; Zemp, Niklaus; Widmer, Alex; Hilbeck, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Bt protein content in transgenic insect resistant (Bt) maize may vary between tissues within plants and between plants growing under different environmental conditions. However, it is unknown whether and how Bt protein content correlates with transgene expression, and whether this relationship is influenced by stressful environmental conditions. Two Bt maize varieties containing the same transgene cassette (MON 810) were grown under optimal and stressful conditions. Before and during stress exposure, the upper leaves were analysed for transgene expression using quantitative RT-PCR and for Bt content using ELISA. Under optimal conditions there was no significant difference in the transgene expression between the two investigated Bt maize varieties whereas Bt protein content differed significantly. Transgene expression was correlated with Bt protein content in only one of the varieties. Under stressful environmental conditions we found similar transgene expressions as under optimal conditions but Bt content responded differently. These results suggest that Bt content is not only controlled by the transgene expression but is also dependent on the genetic background of the maize variety. Under stressful conditions the concentration of Bt protein is even more difficult to predict. PMID:25853814

  7. Repeated Exposure to Conditioned Fear Stress Increases Anxiety and Delays Sleep Recovery Following Exposure to an Acute Traumatic Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Thompson, Robert S.; Opp, Mark R.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep–wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by human beings, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to no, mild (10), or severe (100) acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep/wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep/wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders. PMID

  8. Timing of favorable conditions, competition and fertility interact to govern recruitment of invasive Chinese tallow tree in stressful environments.

    PubMed

    Gabler, Christopher A; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    The rate of new exotic recruitment following removal of adult invaders (reinvasion pressure) influences restoration outcomes and costs but is highly variable and poorly understood. We hypothesize that broad variation in average reinvasion pressure of Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree, a major invader) arises from differences among habitats in spatiotemporal availability of realized recruitment windows. These windows are periods of variable duration long enough to permit establishment given local environmental conditions. We tested this hypothesis via a greenhouse mesocosm experiment that quantified how the duration of favorable moisture conditions prior to flood or drought stress (window duration), competition and nutrient availability influenced Triadica success in high stress environments. Window duration influenced pre-stress seedling abundance and size, growth during stress and final abundance; it interacted with other factors to affect final biomass and germination during stress. Stress type and competition impacted final size and biomass, plus germination, mortality and changes in size during stress. Final abundance also depended on competition and the interaction of window duration, stress type and competition. Fertilization interacted with competition and stress to influence biomass and changes in height, respectively, but did not affect Triadica abundance. Overall, longer window durations promoted Triadica establishment, competition and drought (relative to flood) suppressed establishment, and fertilization had weak effects. Interactions among factors frequently produced different effects in specific contexts. Results support our 'outgrow the stress' hypothesis and show that temporal availability of abiotic windows and factors that influence growth rates govern Triadica recruitment in stressful environments. These findings suggest that native seed addition can effectively suppress superior competitors in stressful environments. We also describe

  9. Optimizing Leaf Stomatal Conductance for Maximum Carbon Gain Under Salt Stressed and Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how plants adapt to different stresses such as droughts, hypoxic or hyper-saline conditions is necessary to progress on the broader problem of how carbon and water exchange rates between the biosphere and atmosphere react to a changing climate. In this work, the effects of increased salinity on photosynthesis, stomatal and mesophyll conductances under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions are explored. A model based on stomatal optimization principles, according to which plants maximize carbon gain at a given water loss at the leaf scale, is generalized to include mesophyll conductance and its dependence on water salinity. The optimization problem is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function and both approaches are consistent with reported gas-exchange measurements in fresh water and in salt stressed conditions. It is shown here that an increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water (and reduced stomatal conductance) for the plant as it does under water stress conditions. However, these reductions in photosynthetic rates observed under increased salt stress conditions cannot be attributed to limitation of CO2 diffusion alone since salt stress did reduce the photosynthetic capacity of plants by 30-40%.

  10. The stress response resolution assay. I. Quantitative assessment of environmental agent/condition effects on cellular stress resolution outcomes in epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Dale M; Patrick O'Neill, J; Tyson, Frederick L; Walker, Vernon E

    2013-05-01

    The events or factors that lead from normal cell function to conditions and diseases such as aging or cancer reflect complex interactions between cells and their environment. Cellular stress responses, a group of processes involved in homeostasis and adaptation to environmental change, contribute to cell survival under stress and can be resolved with damage avoidance or damage tolerance outcomes. To investigate the impact of environmental agents/conditions upon cellular stress response outcomes in epithelium, a novel quantitative assay, the "stress response resolution" (SRR) assay, was developed. The SRR assay consists of pretreatment with a test agent or vehicle followed later by a calibrated stress conditions exposure step (here, using 6-thioguanine). Pilot studies conducted with a spontaneously-immortalized murine mammary epithelial cell line pretreated with vehicle or 20 µg N-ethyl-N-nitrososurea/ml medium for 1 hr, or two hTERT-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell lines pretreated with vehicle or 100 µM zidovudine/lamivudine for 12 days, found minimal alterations in cell morphology, survival, or cell function through 2 weeks post-exposure. However, when these pretreatments were followed 2 weeks later by exposure to calibrated stress conditions of limited duration (for 4 days), significant alterations in stress resolution were observed in pretreated cells compared with vehicle-treated control cells, with decreased damage avoidance survival outcomes in all cell lines and increased damage tolerance outcomes in two of three cell lines. These pilot study results suggest that sub-cytotoxic pretreatments with chemical mutagens have long-term adverse impact upon the ability of cells to resolve subsequent exposure to environmental stressors. PMID:23554083

  11. Influence of Third Invariant of Deviatoric Stress and Intermediate Principal Stress on Constitutive Models and Localization Conditions for High Porosity Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, V.

    2015-12-01

    High porosity sandstone (HPS) is observed to fail, in field and laboratory settings, by the formation of localized bands. Bands perpendicular to the direction of the minimum principal stress (σIII), with pure compactant strain, are defined as compaction bands. Dilation bands form parallel to the σIII direction, with pure dilatant strain. Shear bands form at an angle to the σIII direction and have shear strain, with either compactant or dilatant strain normal to the band. Recent experimental evidence indicates that the behavior of HPS depends on the third stress invariant (J3) since it yields at a lower stress in extension, compared to loading under compression. In this work, existing constitutive models, which depend only on two stress invariants, were modified and new constitutive models, which incorporate the J3 dependence, were developed. Band orientation predictions were determined using the Rudnicki and Rice (1975) bifurcation theory. While HPS are typically tested under axisymmetric (AS) stress states in the laboratory, in the field non-AS states are more likely. The stress state is characterized by the intermediate principal stress (σII). Therefore, to investigate the influence of σIII on band orientation predictions, localization conditions were determined for non-AS stress states. The AS stress states are specialized cases where the dependence on J3 is inconsequential. Incorporating the J3 dependence significantly influenced localization conditions for stress states perturbed from AS compression, while the influence was small for stress states perturbed from AS extension. Under non-AS stress states, when a single yield surface constitutive model is appropriate, including the J3 dependence typically inhibits band formation, due to strongly negative critical hardening modulus (hcr). For load paths where a two yield surface constitutive model is applicable, with J3 dependence, shear bands were predicted. Compaction bands and dilation bands were predicted

  12. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning and sensitization facilitates extinction-resistant and habituation-resistant fear behaviors in a novel animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Caruso, Michael J; Takahashi, Lorey K

    2012-01-18

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by stress-induced symptoms including exaggerated fear memories, hypervigilance and hyperarousal. However, we are unaware of an animal model that investigates these hallmarks of PTSD especially in relation to fear extinction and habituation. Therefore, to develop a valid animal model of PTSD, we exposed rats to different intensities of footshock stress to determine their effects on either auditory predator odor fear extinction or habituation of fear sensitization. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to acute footshock stress (no shock control, 0.4 mA, or 0.8 mA) immediately prior to auditory fear conditioning training involving the pairing of auditory clicks with a cloth containing cat odor. When presented to the conditioned auditory clicks in the next 5 days of extinction testing conducted in a runway apparatus with a hide box, rats in the two shock groups engaged in higher levels of freezing and head out vigilance-like behavior from the hide box than the no shock control group. This increase in fear behavior during extinction testing was likely due to auditory activation of the conditioned fear state because Experiment 2 demonstrated that conditioned fear behavior was not broadly increased in the absence of the conditioned auditory stimulus. Experiment 3 was then conducted to determine whether acute exposure to stress induces a habituation resistant sensitized fear state. We found that rats exposed to 0.8 mA footshock stress and subsequently tested for 5 days in the runway hide box apparatus with presentations of nonassociative auditory clicks exhibited high initial levels of freezing, followed by head out behavior and culminating in the occurrence of locomotor hyperactivity. In addition, Experiment 4 indicated that without delivery of nonassociative auditory clicks, 0.8 mA footshock stressed rats did not exhibit robust increases in sensitized freezing and locomotor hyperactivity, albeit head out vigilance

  13. Job-Related Stress and Chronic Health Conditions Among Filipino Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A. B.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Takeuchi, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We investigate how duration in the US impacts the relationship between job-related stress and health conditions among Filipino immigrants. Methods Using data from the Filipino American Community Epidemiologic Study, a cross-sectional sample of 1,381 immigrant Filipinos was obtained. Negative binomial regression was used to examine the interaction between years residing in the US and job concerns on number of self-reported health conditions. Results Job concern is positively associated with health conditions for all immigrants no matter what length of time they have spent in the US. This association is strongest for recent immigrants and the strength of the association weakened with increasing time spent in the US. Conclusions Findings suggest that job-related stressors are associated with adverse health outcomes among Filipino immigrants and that this relationship is strongest for newer immigrants. New immigrants should be recognized as a vulnerable group with regard to the impact of work on their well-being. PMID:18373275

  14. Trauma and Conditional Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annjeanette; Garroutte, Eva M.; Croy, Calvin; Jervis, Lori L.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities. Method Data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project, a cross-sectional population-based survey completed between 1997 and 2000. This study focused on 1,967 participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for trauma exposure. Traumas were grouped into interpersonal, non-interpersonal, witnessed, and “trauma to close others” categories. Analyses examined distribution of worst traumas, conditional rates of PTSD following exposure, and distributions of PTSD cases deriving from these events. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations of lifetime PTSD with trauma type. Results Overall, 15.9% of those exposed to DSM-IV trauma qualified for lifetime PTSD, a rate comparable to similar U.S. studies. Women were more likely to develop PTSD than were men. The majority (60%) of cases of PTSD among women derived from interpersonal trauma exposure (in particular, sexual and physical abuse); among men, cases were more evenly distributed across trauma categories. Conclusions Previous research has demonstrated higher rates of both trauma exposure and PTSD in American Indian samples compared to other Americans. This study shows that conditional rates of PTSD are similar to those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the elevated prevalence of this disorder in American Indian populations is largely due to higher rates of trauma exposure. PMID:23135256

  15. S-layer production by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under environmental stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Grosu-Tudor, Silvia-Simona; Brown, Lucia; Hebert, Elvira M; Brezeanu, Aurelia; Brinzan, Alexandru; Fadda, Silvina; Mozzi, Fernanda; Zamfir, Medana

    2016-05-01

    The ability of microorganisms to synthesize S-layer, the outermost structure of the microbial cell envelope composed of non-covalently bound proteins, has been ascribed to help microorganisms to exert their probiotic properties in the host. In this work, formation of S-layer by the potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under different stress culture conditions (high incubation temperatures, presence of bile salts or NaCl, and acidic pH) was assayed. A marked S-layer synthesis by L. acidophilus IBB 801 was detected when the strain was grown at 42 °C and in the presence of 0.05 % bile salts or 2.0 % NaCl. The presence of S-layer proteins was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and protein identification by MS/MS. The differential expression of the proteome of this strain at 42 °C, when a marked formation of S-layer was detected, revealed the overexpression of six proteins mainly related to general stress and protein biosynthesis and translation, while four proteins detected in lower amounts were involved in DNA repair and energy metabolism. As L. acidophilus IBB 801 produces both a bacteriocin and S-layer proteins, the strain could be of interest to be used in the formulation of functional food products with specific properties. PMID:26910041

  16. Microcystin Production and Regulation under Nutrient Stress Conditions in Toxic Microcystis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Juliana S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin is a common and well-known cyanobacterial toxin whose intracellular role is still under investigation. Increasing knowledge on microcystin gene expression and regulation can contribute to the understanding of its putative cellular function. In this work, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the transcriptional response of the mcyD gene to nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) and phosphorus limitation in two toxic Microcystis strains. The existence of a direct correlation between transcripts of mcyD and ntcA genes was also identified. In previous studies, NtcA (global nitrogen regulator) has been described as a potential component in the control of microcystin biosynthesis. This research showed that stress agents linked to nutrient deprivation could lead to a significant increase of microcystin production in both strains studied. The more toxic strain proved to be more resistant to nutrient limitation. The similar outcomes of mcyD regulation observed for all nutrients suggest that this response can be linked to oxidative stress of cells undergoing adverse growth conditions. PMID:25038094

  17. Stress and body condition in a population of largemouth bass: implications for red-sore disease

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1980-09-01

    The body conditions, K = 10/sup 5/(weight, g)/(standard length)/sup 3/, and various hematological characters were examined for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from Par Pond, a reservoir heated by effluent from a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Largemouth bass with K less than 2.0 had significantly lower (P < 0.05) hematocrits, hemoglobin concentrations, total red blood cell counts, total white blood cell counts, and lymphocyte fractions, and significantly higher granulocyte fractions and cortisol concentrations, than those with K greater than 2.0; monocyte, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte fractions were not different between the two K-factor groupings. When data were pooled, all blood variables except the reticulocyte fraction were significantly correlated with K. Hematocrit, the lymphocyte fraction, and cortisol concentration account for 20.5% of the variation in K. These data support a previous hypothesis that elevated water temperature promotes stress. Stress within the Par Pond largemouth bass population may play an important role in the epizootiology of red-sore disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila.

  18. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  19. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  20. Photosynthesis and transpiration of loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by moisture-stress conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, J.R.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    One-yr-old seedlings were exposed to 8 wk of moisture stress conditioning (MSC); seedlings were watered only when pre-dawn needle water potential fell below -1.4 MPa. Water was then withheld and photosynthesis and transpiration rates recorded. Photosynthesis in well-watered controls and MSC seedlings was reduced to zero in 12 and 17 days respectively. Seedlings were harvested and water use efficiency calculated using photosynthesis and transpiration data; it was expressed as mg of CO/sub 2/ fixed per g of water lost. Seedlings exposed to MSC continued to photosynthesize to much lower needle water potentials. This response is at least partly attributed to the significant decrease (0.45 MPa) in needle osmotic potential found in MSC seedlings, which were able to maintain turgor to lower needle water potentials. Transpiration rate decreased 30% and water use efficiency increased 67% as a result of MSC. 26 references.

  1. A uniaxial stress capacitive dilatometer for high-resolution thermal expansion and magnetostriction under multiextreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Küchler, R; Stingl, C; Gegenwart, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction are directional dependent thermodynamic quantities. For the characterization of novel quantum phases of matter, it is required to study materials under multi-extreme conditions, in particular, down to very low temperatures, in very high magnetic fields or under high pressure. We developed a miniaturized capacitive dilatometer suitable for temperatures down to 20 mK and usage in high magnetic fields, which exerts a large spring force between 40 to 75 N on the sample. This corresponds to a uniaxial stress up to 3 kbar for a sample with cross section of (0.5 mm)(2). We describe design and performance test of the dilatometer which resolves length changes with high resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The miniaturized device can be utilized in any standard cryostat, including dilution refrigerators or the commercial physical property measurement system. PMID:27475567

  2. A uniaxial stress capacitive dilatometer for high-resolution thermal expansion and magnetostriction under multiextreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, R.; Stingl, C.; Gegenwart, P.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction are directional dependent thermodynamic quantities. For the characterization of novel quantum phases of matter, it is required to study materials under multi-extreme conditions, in particular, down to very low temperatures, in very high magnetic fields or under high pressure. We developed a miniaturized capacitive dilatometer suitable for temperatures down to 20 mK and usage in high magnetic fields, which exerts a large spring force between 40 to 75 N on the sample. This corresponds to a uniaxial stress up to 3 kbar for a sample with cross section of (0.5 mm)2. We describe design and performance test of the dilatometer which resolves length changes with high resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The miniaturized device can be utilized in any standard cryostat, including dilution refrigerators or the commercial physical property measurement system.

  3. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  4. Stress responses of Calluna vulgaris to reduced and oxidised N applied under 'real world conditions'.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Lucy J; Leith, Ian D; Crossley, A; Van Dijk, N; Fowler, D; Sutton, M A; Woods, C

    2008-08-01

    Effects and implications of reduced and oxidised N, applied under 'real world' conditions, since May 2002, are reported for Calluna growing on an ombrotrophic bog. Ammonia has been released from a 10 m line source generating monthly concentrations of 180-6 microg m(-3), while ammonium chloride and sodium nitrate are applied in rainwater at nitrate and ammonium concentrations below 4mM and providing up to 56 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) above a background deposition of 10 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). Ammonia concentrations, >8 microg m(-3) have significantly enhanced foliar N concentrations, increased sensitivity to drought, frost and winter desiccation, spring frost damage and increased the incidence of pathogen outbreaks. The mature Calluna bushes nearest the NH3 source have turned bleached and moribund. By comparison the Calluna receiving reduced and oxidised N in rain has shown no significant visible or stress related effects with no significant increase in N status. PMID:18177985

  5. Influence of the slip conditions on the stress corrosion cracking microprocesses in fcc materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Chateau, J.P.; Magnin, T.

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to carefully analyze the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) microprocesses of f.c.c. single crystals, not only for the influence of the tensile axis orientation but also for the influence of the cracking direction (imposed or not). 316L (in MgCl{sub 2}) and copper (in nitrites) single crystals of well defined tensile axis will be strained using the slow strain rate technique. The authors focus on the influence of the relative orientations of the cracking direction and the slip planes on the crystallography of fracture. The effect of slip conditions on the corrosion-deformation interactions leading to fracture are then emphasized, which gives major information relevant to the micromodelling of SCC.

  6. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  7. Severe early life stress hampers spatial learning and neurogenesis, but improves hippocampal synaptic plasticity and emotional learning under high-stress conditions in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Charlotte A; Soeters, Heleen; Audureau, Nathalie; Vermunt, Lisa; van Hasselt, Felisa N; Manders, Erik M M; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J; Krugers, Harm

    2010-05-12

    Early life stress increases the risk for developing stress-related pathologies later in life. Recent studies in rats suggest that mild early life stress, rather than being overall unfavorable, may program the hippocampus such that it is optimally adapted to a stressful context later in life. Here, we tested whether this principle of "adaptive programming" also holds under severely adverse early life conditions, i.e., 24 h of maternal deprivation (MD), a model for maternal neglect. In young adult male rats subjected to MD on postnatal day 3, we observed reduced levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis as measured by cell proliferation, cell survival, and neuronal differentiation. Also, mature dentate granule cells showed a change in their dendritic morphology that was most noticeable in the proximal part of the dendritic tree. Lasting structural changes due to MD were paralleled by impaired water maze acquisition but did not affect long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus. Importantly, in the presence of high levels of the stress hormone corticosterone, even long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of MD animals was facilitated. In addition to this, contextual learning in a high-stress environment was enhanced in MD rats. These morphological, electrophysiological, and behavioral observations show that even a severely adverse early life environment does not evolve into overall impaired hippocampal functionality later in life. Rather, adversity early in life can prepare the organism to perform optimally under conditions associated with high corticosteroid levels in adulthood. PMID:20463226

  8. Alkaline phosphatase activity related to phosphorus stress of microphytoplankton in different trophic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivančić, Ingrid; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Godrijan, Jelena; Djakovac, Tamara; Marić Pfannkuchen, Daniela; Korlević, Marino; Gašparović, Blaženka; Najdek, Mirjana

    2016-08-01

    The northern Adriatic (NA) is a favorable basin for studying the adaptive strategies of plankton to a variety of conditions along the steep gradients of environmental parameters over the year. Earlier studies identified phosphorus (P)-limitation as one of the key stresses within the NA that shape the biological response in terms of biodiversity and metabolic adjustments. A wide range of reports supports the notion that P-limitation is a globally important phenomenon in aquatic ecosystems. In this study P stress of marine microphytoplankton was determined at species level along a trophic gradient in the NA. In P-limitation all species with considerable contributions to the diatom community expressed alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), compared to only a few marginal dinoflagellate species. Nevertheless, APA expressing species did not always dominate the phytoplankton community, suggesting that APA is also an important strategy for species to survive and maintain active metabolism outside of their mass abundances. A symbiotic relationship could be supposed for diatoms that did not express APA themselves and probably benefited from APA expressed by attached bacteria. APA was not expressed by any microphytoplankton species during the autumn when P was not limiting, while most of the species did express APA during the P-limitation. This suggests that APA expression is regulated by orthophosphate availability. The methods employed in this study allowed the microscopic detection of APA for each microphytoplankton cell with simultaneous morphologic/taxonomic analysis. This approach uncovered a set of strategies to compete in P-limited conditions within the marine microphytoplankton community. This study confirms the role of P-limitation as a shaping factor in marine ecosystems.

  9. Dynamic crack propagation in elastic-perfectly plastic solids under plane stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaomin; Rosakis, Ares J.

    THE phenomenon of steady-state dynamic crack propagation in elastic-perfectly plastic solids under mode I plane stress, small-scale yielding conditions is investigated numerically. An Eulerian finite element scheme is employed. The materials are assumed to obey the von Mises yield criterion and the associated flow rule. The ratio of the crack tip plastic zone size to that of the element nearest to the crack tip is of the order of 1.6 × 10 4. Two subjects of general interest are discussed. These are the asymptotic structure of the crack tip stress and deformation fields, and the appropriateness of a crack growth fracture criterion based on the far-field dynamic stress intensity factor. The crack-line solution by ACHENBACH and LI (Report NU-SML-TR-No. 84-1, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201, 1984a; in Fundamentals of Deformation and Fracture (edited by B.A. Brilby et al.). Cambridge University Press, 1984b) is discussed and compared to the numerical solution. The results of this study strongly indicate that the crack tip strain and velocity fields possess logarithmic singularities, which is consistent with the assumptions in the asymptotic analysis by Gao ( Int. J. Fracture34, 111, 1987). However, it is revealed that the crack tip field variations in Gao's solution present features often contrary to the numerical findings. To this end, a preliminary asymptotic analysis is performed in an effort to resolve certain issues. Finally, the critical plastic strain criterion ( MCCLINTOCK and IRWIN, in Fracture Toughness Testing and Its Applications, ASTM STP 381, p. 84, 1964) is adopted to obtain theoretical relations between the critical dynamic stress intensity factor and the crack propagation speed. These relations are found to agree well with experimental measurements by Rosakis et al. ( J. Mech. Phys. Solids32, 443, 1984) and by ZEHNDER and ROSAKIS ( Int. J. Fracture, to appear 1990), performed on thin 4340 steel plates whose

  10. Abscisic acid regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin.

    PubMed

    Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating root development under drought conditions is an important question for plant biology and world agriculture. We examine the effect of osmotic stress on abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinin and ethylene responses and how they mediate auxin transport, distribution and root growth through effects on PIN proteins. We integrate experimental data to construct hormonal crosstalk networks to formulate a systems view of root growth regulation by multiple hormones. Experimental analysis shows: that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress responses increase under osmotic stress, but cytokinin responses are only slightly reduced; inhibition of root growth under osmotic stress does not require ethylene signalling, but auxin can rescue root growth and meristem size; osmotic stress modulates auxin transporter levels and localization, reducing root auxin concentrations; PIN1 levels are reduced under stress in an ABA-dependent manner, overriding ethylene effects; and the interplay among ABA, ethylene, cytokinin and auxin is tissue-specific, as evidenced by differential responses of PIN1 and PIN2 to osmotic stress. Combining experimental analysis with network construction reveals that ABA regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin. PMID:26889752

  11. Oxidative stress in limpets exposed to different environmental conditions in the Beagle Channel.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gabriela; Estevez, Maria Susana; Calvo, Jorge; Puntarulo, Susana

    2004-09-20

    The aim of this work was to study the oxidative profile of digestive glands of two limpets species (Nacella (Patinigera) magellanica and Nacella (Patinigera) deaurata) exposed to different environmental conditions. The intertidal population of N. (P.) magellanica is subjected to a wide variety of stresses not experienced by N. (P.) deaurata. Although a typical electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of ascorbyl radical in digestive gland from both limpets was observed, neither ascorbyl radical content nor the ascorbyl radical content/ascorbate content ratio was significantly different, suggesting that the difference in the environmental conditions did not appear to be responsible for developing alterations in the oxidative status of both organisms at the hydrophilic level (e.g. cytosol). Lipid peroxidation in the digestive glands was estimated, both as the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and as the content of lipid radicals assessed by EPR, in both organisms. TBARS and lipid radical content were 34.8 and 36.5%, respectively, lower in N. (P.) magellanica as compared to N. (P.) deaurata. On the other hand, total iron content and the rate of generation of superoxide anion were 47.9 and 51.4%, respectively, lower in N. (P.) magellanica as compared to N. (P.) deaurata. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was 35.3 and 128.6% higher in N. (P.) magellanica as compared to N. (P.) deaurata, respectively. No significant differences were determined between the digestive glands of both molluscs regarding the content of total thiols. alpha-Tocopherol and beta-carotene content were significantly lower in N. (P.) magellanica as compared to N. (P.) deaurata. A distinctive EPR signal for the adduct Fe--MGD--NO (g = 2.03 and a(N) = 12.5 G) was detected in the homogenates of digestive glands of both limpets. A significant difference in the content of the Fe-MGD-NO adduct in digestive glands from N. (P.) magellanica and N. (P

  12. Stress-induced hyperthermia depends on both time of day and light condition.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Elizabeth; Wachulec, Maciej; Satinoff, Evelyn

    2002-04-01

    Rats placed in an environment other than their home cage increase their body temperature (Tb) by more than 1 degree C. This stress-induced hyperthermia is considered to be a fever, in the sense that the Tb rise seems to reflect an upward shift in the level of regulated Tb (set point). The circadian rhythm of Tb also reflects changes in set point. One might therefore expect to see differences in response to such stress during various phases of the light-dark (LD) cycle as Tb fluctuates between L and D. To test this, 3- to 6-month-old male Long-Evans rats were taken from their home cages (12:12 LD) and placed individually in a Plexiglas container for 30 min. Tb and activity were measured via telemetry. In the first experiment, rats were placed in the container during day (from 1 to 3 h after lights on) and night (from 1 to 3 h after lights off), with light on or off during the test. There was a significant Tb rise in response to placement in the container at all times except when the rats were tested during the night with light on in the container; in that condition there was no Tb rise. In the second experiment, the authors determined that 30 min of light in the home cage before the test did not affect Tb: If the light was on in the test situation, hyperthermia was inhibited, and if it was off, hyperthermia was as high as control levels. In the third experiment, to determine whether this effect was time dependent, the test was performed at 4-h intervals, with light on or off during the test. The strongest inhibiting effect of light was in early night. In the fourth experiment, the authors turned the lights on during early night while the rats were in their home cages. This reduced their Tb significantly by less than 0.3 degrees C. The authors conclude that both clock time and light condition during testing are factors affecting the Tb rise in response to stress. PMID:12002163

  13. Timing of Favorable Conditions, Competition and Fertility Interact to Govern Recruitment of Invasive Chinese Tallow Tree in Stressful Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Christopher A.; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    The rate of new exotic recruitment following removal of adult invaders (reinvasion pressure) influences restoration outcomes and costs but is highly variable and poorly understood. We hypothesize that broad variation in average reinvasion pressure of Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree, a major invader) arises from differences among habitats in spatiotemporal availability of realized recruitment windows. These windows are periods of variable duration long enough to permit establishment given local environmental conditions. We tested this hypothesis via a greenhouse mesocosm experiment that quantified how the duration of favorable moisture conditions prior to flood or drought stress (window duration), competition and nutrient availability influenced Triadica success in high stress environments. Window duration influenced pre-stress seedling abundance and size, growth during stress and final abundance; it interacted with other factors to affect final biomass and germination during stress. Stress type and competition impacted final size and biomass, plus germination, mortality and changes in size during stress. Final abundance also depended on competition and the interaction of window duration, stress type and competition. Fertilization interacted with competition and stress to influence biomass and changes in height, respectively, but did not affect Triadica abundance. Overall, longer window durations promoted Triadica establishment, competition and drought (relative to flood) suppressed establishment, and fertilization had weak effects. Interactions among factors frequently produced different effects in specific contexts. Results support our ‘outgrow the stress’ hypothesis and show that temporal availability of abiotic windows and factors that influence growth rates govern Triadica recruitment in stressful environments. These findings suggest that native seed addition can effectively suppress superior competitors in stressful environments. We also describe

  14. The impact of scaled boundary conditions on wall shear stress computations in atherosclerotic human coronary bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Schwarz, Janina C V; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Siebes, Maria; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine if reliable patient-specific wall shear stress (WSS) can be computed when diameter-based scaling laws are used to impose the boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics. This study focused on mildly diseased human coronary bifurcations since they are predilection sites for atherosclerosis. Eight patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were imaged with angiography. The velocity proximal and distal of a bifurcation was acquired with intravascular Doppler measurements. These measurements were used for inflow and outflow boundary conditions for the first set of WSS computations. For the second set of computations, absolute inflow and outflow ratios were derived from geometry-based scaling laws based on angiography data. Normalized WSS maps per segment were obtained by dividing the absolute WSS by the mean WSS value. Absolute and normalized WSS maps from the measured-approach and the scaled-approach were compared. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured and scaled inflows, with a median difference of 0.08 ml/s [-0.01; 0.20]. The measured and the scaled outflow ratios showed a good agreement: 1.5 percentage points [-19.0; 4.5]. Absolute WSS maps were sensitive to the inflow and outflow variations, and relatively large differences between the two approaches were observed. For normalized WSS maps, the results for the two approaches were equivalent. This study showed that normalized WSS can be obtained from angiography data alone by applying diameter-based scaling laws to define the boundary conditions. Caution should be taken when absolute WSS is assessed from computations using scaled boundary conditions. PMID:26945083

  15. Vitamin E deficiency accelerates nitrate tolerance via a decrease in cardiac P450 expression and increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Minamiyama, Yukiko; Takemura, Shigekazu; Hai, Seikan; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Okada, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    accelerate nitrate tolerance via an increase in oxidative stress, the reduced bioconversion because of decreased P450 expression, and impairment of the NO/cGMP pathway in tolerant heart tissues. PMID:16520233

  16. Captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in breeding condition show an increased cardiovascular stress response to intruders.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Molly J; Nephew, Benjamin C; Romero, L Michael

    2006-01-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) alter their physiology and behavior between seasons, becoming territorial during the spring/summer and flocking during the fall/winter. We used captive male starlings in breeding (photostimulated to 18L : 6D) and nonbreeding (11L : 13D) conditions to determine whether changing physiology and behavior alters their reaction to crowding. One or five intruders entered a resident's cage without human disturbance. A subcutaneous heart rate transmitter recorded cardiovascular output in residents. Corticosterone and testosterone were measured in plasma samples taken before and after the intrusion. While corticosterone concentrations did not change, heart rate changed significantly, indicating that these responses can be regulated independently. Long-day birds showed a significantly elevated heart rate response to the single-bird intrusion compared to short-day birds. Whereas five intruders elicited an identical peak response in both groups, long-day birds also demonstrated an equivalent response to one intruder. In addition, one intruder induced longer elevation in heart rate for long-day birds. Male starlings in breeding condition, therefore, demonstrate an increased sensitivity to additional conspecifics. This seasonal shift in response suggests that a higher tolerance for intrusion (i.e., considering a nearby starling as less stressful) may facilitate flocking behavior, while a lower tolerance may aid in territoriality. PMID:16927240

  17. Breath alkanes as a marker of oxidative stress in different clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, E; Allard, J P

    2000-03-15

    We assessed oxidative stress in three different clinical conditions: smoking, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and inflammatory bowel disease, using breath alkane output and other lipid peroxidation parameters such as plasma lipid peroxides (LPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Antioxidant micronutrients such as selenium, vitamin E, C, beta-carotene and carotenoids were also measured. Lipid peroxidation was significantly higher and antioxidant vitamins significantly lower in smokers compared to nonsmokers. Beta-carotene or vitamin E supplementation significantly reduced lipid peroxidation in that population. However, vitamin C supplementation had no effect. In HIV-infected subjects, lipid peroxidation parameters were also elevated and antioxidant vitamins reduced compared to seronegative controls. Vitamin E and C supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation with a trend toward a reduction in viral load. In patients with inflammatory bowel disease, breath alkane output was also significantly elevated when compared to healthy controls. A trial with vitamin E and C is underway. In conclusion, breath alkane output, plasma LPO and MDA are elevated in certain clinical conditions such as smoking, HIV infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. This is associated with lower levels of antioxidant micronutrients. Supplementation with antioxidant vitamins significantly reduced these lipid peroxidation parameters. The results suggest that these measures are good markers for lipid peroxidation. PMID:10802218

  18. Hypoxic conditions increases H₂S-induced ER stress in A2870 cells.

    PubMed

    Lencesova, Lubomira; Vlcek, Miroslav; Krizanova, Olga; Hudecova, Sona

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia - a state of lower oxygen demand-is responsible for a higher aggressiveness of tumors and therefore a worse prognosis. During hypoxia, several metabolic pathways are re-organized, e.g., energetic metabolism, modulation of pH, and calcium transport. Calcium is an important second messenger that regulates variety of processes in the cell. Thus, aim of this work was to compare H2S modulation of the intracellular calcium transport systems in hypoxia and in cells grown in standard culture conditions. For all experiments, we used ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). H2S is a novel gasotransmitter, known to be involved in a modulation of several calcium transport systems, thus resulting in altered calcium signaling. Two models of hypoxia were used in our study-chemical (induced by dimethyloxallyl glycine) and 2 % O2 hypoxia, both combined with a treatment using a slow H2S donor GYY4137. In hypoxia, we observed rapid changes in cytosolic and reticular calcium levels compared to cells grown in standard culture conditions, and these changes were even more exagerrated when combined with the GYY4137. Changes in a calcium homeostasis result from IP3 receptor´s up-regulation and down-regulation of the SERCA 2, which leads to a development of the endoplasmic reticulum stress. Based on our results, we propose a higher vulnerability of calcium transport systems to H2S regulation under hypoxia. PMID:26868821

  19. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  20. Effects of environmental stress on the condition of Littorina littorea along the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands).

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Heidi; De Wolf, Hans; Backeljau, Thierry; Blust, Ronny

    2007-04-15

    The condition of the periwinkle Littorina littorea, expressed in terms of its shell morphology, reproductive impairment (i.e. female sterility/intersex, male penis shedding), trematode infestation load, lipid reserves and dry/wet weight ratio, was determined in function of environmental stress along the polluted Western and relatively clean Eastern Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands). The upstream increasing pollution and decreasing salinity levels along the Western Scheldt estuary (Fig. 1) are reflected in the dry/wet weight ratio and lipid content of the periwinkles. Compared to the Eastern Scheldt, female intersex (i.e. indicator of TBT pollution) and sterility occurred more frequently in the Western Scheldt estuary, while male penis shedding was even restricted to the latter estuary. The highest population intersex and sterility incidence was found near the harbour of Vlissingen and reflects potential nautical activities. The number of trematode infested periwinkles did not differ between both estuaries, although local sampling site differences were detected within each estuary, reflecting the complex interactions that exist among parasites, hosts and the local environment. Finally, both estuaries were maximally discriminated from each other based on the shell weight of the periwinkles using a canonical discriminant analysis. Periwinkles with the heaviest shells were found in the Western Scheldt estuary and may reflect growth rate or structural population differences caused by the less favourable living conditions in the Western Scheldt estuary. PMID:17343899

  1. Progestins influence motivation, reward, conditioning, stress, and/or response to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A

    2007-02-01

    Progesterone (pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione; P) and its metabolite 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP) are secreted by ovaries, adrenals, and glial cells. 3alpha,5alpha-THP in the midbrain ventral tegmental area mediates sexual receptivity of rodents through its actions at GABA(A), NMDA, and/or D(1) receptors. The extent to which 3alpha,5alpha-THP may influence anti-anxiety/anti-stress effects, conditioning and/or reward through these substrates and/or by altering hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis function is discussed. Biosynthesis of 3alpha,5alpha-THP occurs in responses to mating and may underlie some of the rewarding aspects of sexual behavior. Recent findings from our laboratory which demonstrate that progestins can enhance approach to novel stimuli, conditioning, and reinforcement are reviewed. How progestins' effects on these processes may underlie response to drugs of abuse is considered and new findings which demonstrate interactions between progestins and cocaine are presented. PMID:16979750

  2. Stress-relaxation response of human menisci under confined compression conditions.

    PubMed

    Martin Seitz, Andreas; Galbusera, Fabio; Krais, Carina; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the viscoelastic properties of human meniscal tissue during stress-relaxation under confined compression conditions. Lateral and medial longitudinal meniscus plugs of 25 donor knees (ntotal=150) were exposed to stress-relaxation tests under confined compression conditions at three compression levels (ε=0.1; 0.15; 0.2). Mathematical modelling using an exponential 1D-diffusion equation was used to predict the viscoelastic properties. Subsequently, finite element (FE) models were created using identical geometry, properties and test conditions as used for the in-vitro tests. Two constitutively different underlying mathematical formulations were applied to the FE models to reveal possible differences in their predictions for the relaxation response. While the first FE model mimicked the analytical model (FE1), the second FE model used a different biphasic, non-linear approach (FE2). Regression analyses showed promising coefficients of determination (R(2)>0.73) between the experimental data and the predictions obtained from the diffusion equation and the two FE models. Mean aggregate modulus, predicted with the diffusion equation (HA=64.0 kPa) was lower than those obtained with the two FE analyses (HA,FE1=91.9 kPa; HA,FE2=81.5 kPa). Mean hydraulic permeability (kFE2=1.5×10(-15)m(4)/Ns) of the second FE2 approach was statistically lower (p<0.01) than the other permeability values (k=3.9×10(-15)m(4)/Ns; kFE1=3.4×10(-15)m(4)/Ns). These differences are mainly due to the different underlying mathematical models used. However, when compared with corresponding literature, the results of the present study indicated good agreement. The results of the present study contribute to a better understanding of the complex nature of meniscal tissue and might also have an impact on the design of future meniscal substitutes. PMID:23811278

  3. Peroxisomal monodehydroascorbate reductase. Genomic clone characterization and functional analysis under environmental stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A

    2005-08-01

    In plant cells, ascorbate is a major antioxidant that is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) is the enzymatic component of this cycle involved in the regeneration of reduced ascorbate. The identification of the intron-exon organization and the promoter region of the pea (Pisum sativum) MDAR 1 gene was achieved in pea leaves using the method of walking polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA. The nuclear gene of MDAR 1 comprises nine exons and eight introns, giving a total length of 3,770 bp. The sequence of 544 bp upstream of the initiation codon, which contains the promoter and 5' untranslated region, and 190 bp downstream of the stop codon were also determined. The presence of different regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the gene might indicate distinct responses to various conditions. The expression analysis in different plant organs by northern blots showed that fruits had the highest level of MDAR. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaves transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens having the binary vectors pGD, which contain the autofluorescent proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein with the full-length cDNA for MDAR 1 and catalase, indicated that the MDAR 1 encoded the peroxisomal isoform. The functional analysis of MDAR by activity and protein expression was studied in pea plants grown under eight stress conditions, including continuous light, high light intensity, continuous dark, mechanical wounding, low and high temperature, cadmium, and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. This functional analysis is representative of all the MDAR isoforms present in the different cell compartments. Results obtained showed a significant induction by high light intensity and cadmium. On the other hand, expression studies, performed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated differential expression patterns of

  4. Peroxisomal Monodehydroascorbate Reductase. Genomic Clone Characterization and Functional Analysis under Environmental Stress Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.; Sandalio, Luisa M.; del Río, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    In plant cells, ascorbate is a major antioxidant that is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) is the enzymatic component of this cycle involved in the regeneration of reduced ascorbate. The identification of the intron-exon organization and the promoter region of the pea (Pisum sativum) MDAR 1 gene was achieved in pea leaves using the method of walking polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA. The nuclear gene of MDAR 1 comprises nine exons and eight introns, giving a total length of 3,770 bp. The sequence of 544 bp upstream of the initiation codon, which contains the promoter and 5′ untranslated region, and 190 bp downstream of the stop codon were also determined. The presence of different regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the gene might indicate distinct responses to various conditions. The expression analysis in different plant organs by northern blots showed that fruits had the highest level of MDAR. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaves transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens having the binary vectors pGD, which contain the autofluorescent proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein with the full-length cDNA for MDAR 1 and catalase, indicated that the MDAR 1 encoded the peroxisomal isoform. The functional analysis of MDAR by activity and protein expression was studied in pea plants grown under eight stress conditions, including continuous light, high light intensity, continuous dark, mechanical wounding, low and high temperature, cadmium, and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. This functional analysis is representative of all the MDAR isoforms present in the different cell compartments. Results obtained showed a significant induction by high light intensity and cadmium. On the other hand, expression studies, performed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated differential expression patterns

  5. [The role of redox-dependent signal systems in the regulation of apoptosis under oxidative stress condition].

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, N V; Novitskiĭ, V V; Chasovskikh, N Iu; Kaĭgorodova, E V; Starikova, E G; Starikov, Iu V; Radzivil, T T; Krat, N V

    2009-01-01

    Programmed death of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with acute inflammatory diseases (an acute appendicitis, a community-acquired pneumonia) was investigated under condition of oxidative stress in vitro and under effect of selective inhibitors of MAP-kinases JNK and p38. Levels of active and inactive forms of MAP-kinases, and factors of transcription were determined by immunoblotting (western blot analysis). The increase in the activity of apoptosis under condition of oxidative stress in vivo and during the acute inflammatory diseases is associated with the increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. The action of inhibitors of MAP-kinases JNK (SP600125) and p38 (ML3403) in vitro under condition of oxidative stress prevents increase in the quantity of annexin-positive mononuclear leucocytes that testifies to involving JNK and p38 MAP-kinases in apoptosis deregulation oxidative mechanisms. The appearance of NF-kappaB in the mononuclear leucocytes under condition of oxidative stress during the acute inflammatory diseases and at the experiment was shown; p53 was registered only under condition of oxidative stress in vitro. The effect of p53 and NF-kappaB results in the increase in the quantity of apoptosis annexin-positive mononuclear leucocytes that testify to inoperativeness of antiapoptotic regulation NF-kappaB. PMID:19505051

  6. Impact of Mental and Physical Stress on Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure under Normobaric versus Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Michael; Trapp, Eva-Maria; Egger, Josef W.; Domej, Wolfgang; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Avian, Alexander; Rohrer, Peter M.; Hörlesberger, Nina; Magometschnigg, Dieter; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Komericki, Peter; Velik, Rosemarie; Baulmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypobaric hypoxia, physical and psychosocial stress may influence key cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure (PP). We investigated the effects of mild hypobaric hypoxia exposure on BP and PP reactivity to mental and physical stress and to passive elevation by cable car. Methods 36 healthy volunteers participated in a defined test procedure consisting of a period of rest 1, mental stress task (KLT-R), period of rest 2, combined mental (KLT-R) and physical task (bicycle ergometry) and a last period of rest both at Graz, Austria (353 m asl) and at the top station Dachstein (2700 m asl). Beat-to-beat heart rate and BP were analysed both during the test procedures at Graz and at Dachstein and during passive 1000 m elevation by cable car (from 1702 m to 2700 m). Results A significant interaction of kind of stress (mental vs. combined mental and physical) and study location (Graz vs. Dachstein) was found in the systolic BP (p = .007) and PP (p = .002) changes indicating that during the combined mental and physical stress task sBP was significantly higher under hypoxic conditions whereas sBP and PP were similar during mental stress both under normobaric normoxia (Graz) and under hypobaric hypoxia (Dachstein). During the passive ascent in cable car less trivialization (psychological coping strategy) was associated with an increase in PP (p = .004). Conclusion Our data show that combined mental and physical stress causes a significant higher raise in sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions whereas isolated mental stress did not affect sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions. PP-reaction to ascent in healthy subjects is not uniform. BP reactions to ascent that represents an accumulation of physical (mild hypobaric hypoxia) and psychological stressors depend on predetermined psychological traits (stress coping strategies). Thus divergent cardiovascular reactions can be explained by applying the multidimensional aspects of the

  7. EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND WATER USE EFFICIENCY FOR COMMON BEAN GENOTYPES UNDER NON-STRESS AND DROUGHT STRESS CONDITIONS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought stress is the most important abiotic constraint in common bean production worldwide and results in significant yield reductions. In this study, two common bean genotypes were evaluated, including ‘Morales’, a small white cultivar, and a small red germplasm developed at CIAT (Colombia), SER 1...

  8. Selection of reference genes for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction normalization in Brassica napus under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yu; Fang, Hedi; Shi, Haifeng; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Tan, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    Data normalization is essential for reliable output of quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, as the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s), whose expression might be influenced by exogenous treatments in plant tissues, could cause misinterpretation of results. To date, no systematic studies on reference genes have been performed in stressed Brassica napus. In this study, we investigated the expression variations of nine candidate reference genes in 40 samples of B. napus leaves subjected to various exogenous treatments. Parallel analyses by geNorm and NormFinder revealed that optimal reference genes differed across the different sets of samples. The best-ranked reference genes were PP2A and TIP41 for salt stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for heavy metal (Cr(6+)) stress, PP2A and UBC21 for drought stress, F-box and SAND for cold stress, F-box and ZNF for salicylic acid stress, TIP41, ACT7, and PP2A for methyl jasmonate stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for abscisic acid stress, and TIP41, UBC21, and PP2A for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum stress. Two newly employed reference genes, TIP41 and PP2A, showed better performances, suggesting their suitability in multiple conditions. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes, the expression patterns of BnWRKY40 and BnMKS1 were studied in parallel. This study is the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in B. napus, an agriculturally important crop, under different stress conditions. The results will contribute toward more accurate and widespread use of qRT-PCR in gene analysis of the genus Brassica. PMID:24770781

  9. Medical Conditions and Symptoms Associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Low-Income Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Szanton, S.; Taylor, T.J.; Page, G.G; Campbell, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological studies have consistently reported rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women that are twice that of men. In men and women, PTSD has been associated with comorbid medical conditions, medical symptoms and lower self-rating of health. In low-income urban women, rates of PTSD are even more elevated than in suburban women and may be related to observed health disparities. Methods In this study, 250 women seeking healthcare at an urban clinic were interviewed for a PTSD diagnosis, major depressive disorder (MDD), the experience of traumatic events, the experience of current and past common medical conditions and symptoms, and subjective rating of health. A chart review was used to assess healthcare use in the past year. Results More current (5.2 vs. 3.8, p < 0.05) and past medical conditions (4.6 vs. 3.3, p < 0.05) were reported by women with a lifetime history of PTSD than by women without this history, after controlling for demographics and current depression. Women with lifetime PTSD also had more annual clinic appointments (5.9 vs. 3.8 p < 0.03) and were 2.4 times (p < 0.05) more likely to report lower appraisal of their physical health. Conclusions These findings suggest that urban health-seeking women with PTSD experience health impairments that may cause increased morbidity and that healthcare providers should consider the health ramifications of PTSD when providing medical care to women. PMID:19183098

  10. Plasma cortisol activity in rats under conditions of chronic stress supplemented with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado Salazar, Alejandro; Uribe-Velásquez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the activity of cortisol in rats treated with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and a resveratrol supplement. Methods: Forty-eight adult female rats and 16 male rats of the strain (Rattus norvegicus) that were three months old and with body weights ranging from 200 to 250 g for females and 300 to 350 g for males were used and kept in controlled environmental conditions: temperature of 20±2° C and light-dark cycles of 14 and 10 hours. They were fed a balanced diet and had free access to water. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: group 1 - was treated with 5 µg/kg of ACTH i.p. every twelve hours; group 2 - received the same treatment with ACTH plus a grape extract supplement (resveratrol) of 40 mg/kg; group 3 - only received grape extract (resveratrol); and group 4 - received a saline solution (0.9%) i.p. and oral, and served as controls. The experimental design was a 2×2 factorial with two levels ACTH and two polyphenol levels (grape extract). Results: No significant differences were found in blood cortisol concentrations, by day and gender, or by treatment effects (0.75 µg/dL ± 0.11; p <0.001). Conclusion: Results suggest that chronic stress and consumption of resveratrol did not directly alter levels of plasmatic cortisol in either stressed or unstressed rats. It was concluded that the given dosage levels of ACTH possibly did not produce sufficient stimulation of the adrenal gland for these animals. PMID:24893196

  11. Determination of Creep Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Laser Imposed High Thermal and Stress Gradient Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A laser sintering/creep technique has been established to determine the creep behavior of thermal barrier coatings under steady-state high heat flux conditions. For a plasma sprayed zirconia-8 wt. % yttria coating, a significant primary creep strain and a low apparent creep activation energy were observed. Possible creep mechanisms involved include stress induced mechanical sliding and temperature and stress enhanced cation diffusion through the splat and grain boundaries. The elastic modulus evolution, stress response, and total accumulated creep strain variation across the ceramic coating are simulated using a finite difference approach. The modeled creep response is consistent with experimental observations.

  12. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress. PMID:25582191

  13. Stress Symptoms among Adolescents: The Role of Subjective Psychosocial Conditions, Lifestyle, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraml, Karin; Perski, Aleksander; Grossi, Giorgio; Simonsson-Sarnecki, Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Stress-related problems are increasing among Swedish adolescents, especially among females. The aims of this study were to survey the incidence of stress symptoms among 16-year-olds, to investigate the related gender differences, and to understand the factors that may contribute to stress symptoms. The study is questionnaire based, and the sample…

  14. [Activation of the neuroendocrine system during changes in homeostasis during stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Jezová, D

    1996-02-01

    Neuroendocrine response to stress stimuli is aimed to maintain body homeostasis. The activation of the neuroendocrine system is accomplished mainly by two ways: by feedback regulation based on the recognition of altered metabolic homeostasis by appropriate receptors sending the signal into the CNS, and by forward regulation involving a direct stimulation of the neuroendocrine system by a central command coming from an activated brain regulatory center. With regard to mechanisms of neuroendocrine activation, the signal specificity and site of its origin are of particular importance. The significance of the signal in neuroendocrine responses has been evaluated in three different stress conditions: hypoglycemia, surgical trauma and dynamic physical exercise. The stimulus inducing neuroendocrine response during hypoglycemia is the glucopenia. The signal for the activation of the neuroendocrine response is generated in glucosensitive cells which are not located in a single brain structure (hypothetical glucostat). The signal for growth hormone, vasopressin and oxytocin release is produced in brain structures protected by the blood-brain barrier, that for ACTH release in regions both protected and unprotected by the barrier, while the signal for prolactin release is generated in tissues lacking the blood-brain barrier. The neuroendocrine response during surgical trauma is activated by a signal formed in the damaged tissue reaching the CNS by neural pathways. Moreover, cytokins may participate on endocrine stimulation in those surgical interventions in which a large amount of bacterial endotoxins is released. During a complicated surgery, e.g. during a bypass other signals and modifying factors, such as hypothermia, dilution of blood, hypoperfusion of organs, rewarming of the body and hormone degradation in the oxygenator are important. On the On the other hand, during a short-term dynamic exercise, a forward regulation by a central signal from the activated CNS motor

  15. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  16. Metabolic correlation between polyol and energy-storing carbohydrate under osmotic and oxidative stress condition in Moniliella megachiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yosuke; Iwata, Hisashi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2015-10-01

    Moniliella megachiliensis, the osmo-tolerant basidiomycetous yeast was found to accumulate intracellularly energy-storing carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) along with polyols (glycerol and erythritol) up to stationary growth phase. In trehalose-loaded cell, osmotic-stress resulted in the rapid generation of glycerol, and oxidative stress with menadione resulted in the rapid generation of erythritol. Under either of these conditions, the levels of the energy-storing carbohydrates were depleted, while little glucose uptake was observed. These results suggested that the intracellular pools of trehalose and glycogen were rapidly converted to glycerol in response to osmotic stress, and to erythritol in response to oxidative stress and altered redox balance. Expression of tps1 encoding trehalose synthetic enzymes paralleled trehalose accumulation in the cell during the culture in 2% glucose, in contrast, expression of tpp1 or tpp2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase was little increased under the same condition. Expression of tre (tre1/tre2) encoding trehalose hydrolase (trehalase) increased with time associated with depletion of trehalose during oxidative stress. From these results, we concluded that glycerol and erythritol, the compatible solutes in M. megachiliensis were metabolically interrelated to energy-storing carbohydrates such as trehalose or glycogen during conditions of osmotic or oxidative stress. PMID:25795573

  17. Determination of the stress conditions of the ductile-to-brittle regime along the Asuke Shear Zone, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Takuto; Takagi, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    The stress conditions of the ductile-to-brittle regime have been assessed along the Asuke Shear Zone (ASZ), which strikes NE-SW in the Cretaceous Ryoke granite terrain in SW Japan. Along the ASZ, pseudotachylyte and mylonitized pseudotachylyte are locally developed together with cataclasite. The simultaneous operation of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep, as indicated by the coexistence of the Z-maximum and relatively random c-axis lattice preferred orientations as well as the sizes of dynamically recrystallized quartz grains (6.40-7.79 μm) in the mylonitized pseudotachylyte, suggest differential stresses of 110-130 MPa at ∼300 °C. The e-twin morphology, twinning ratio, and distribution of the glide direction on the e-twin plane of the twinned calcite in the amygdules of the pseudotachylyte suggest the stress conditions of the σ1 and σ3 axes trend 228° and 320° and plunge 55° and 1°, respectively, and indicate differential stresses of 40-80 MPa at 150-200 °C. Based on kinematic indicators in the fault rocks, the stress conditions estimated from calcite twins, and the cooling history of the granitic protolith, the ASZ is inferred to have been activated under a stress state that caused sinistral normal movements before and after pseudotachylyte formation at 70-50 Ma.

  18. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    PubMed

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  19. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  20. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  1. Expression profiling of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia CCY9414 under light and oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Möke, Fred; Bauwe, Hermann; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hagemann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Massive blooms of toxic cyanobacteria frequently occur in the central Baltic Sea during the summer. In the surface scum, cyanobacterial cells are exposed to high light (HL) intensity, high oxygen partial pressure and other stresses. To mimic these conditions, cultures of Nodularia spumigena CCY9414, which is a strain isolated from a cyanobacterial summer bloom in the Baltic Sea, were incubated at a HL intensity of 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) or a combination of HL and increased oxygen partial pressure. Using differential RNA sequencing, we compared the global primary transcriptomes of control and stressed cells. The combination of oxidative and light stresses induced the expression of twofold more genes compared with HL stress alone. In addition to the induction of known stress-responsive genes, such as psbA, ocp and sodB, Nodularia cells activated the expression of genes coding for many previously unknown light- and oxidative stress-related proteins. In addition, the expression of non-protein-coding RNAs was found to be stimulated by these stresses. Among them was an antisense RNA to the phycocyanin-encoding mRNA cpcBAC and the trans-encoded regulator of photosystem I, PsrR1. The large genome capacity allowed Nodularia to harbor more copies of stress-relevant genes such as psbA and small chlorophyll-binding protein genes, combined with the coordinated induction of these and many additional genes for stress acclimation. Our data provide a first insight on how N. spumigena became adapted to conditions relevant for a cyanobacterial bloom in the Baltic Sea. PMID:25689027

  2. Stress Conditions at the Subduction Zone Inferred from Differential Earthquake Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, G. L.; Kirby, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    Moment magnitude MW and energy magnitude Me describe physically different aspects of the size of an earthquake. Me, being derived from radiated energy ES, is a measure of the seismic potential for damage. MW, being derived from seismic moment Mo, is a measure of the final static displacement of an earthquake. We examine the systematics of thrust earthquakes across the subduction zone environment by deriving differential magnitudes Delta M, where Delta M = Me - MW, of more than 1700 large shallow earthquakes (depth < 70km) that occurred from 1987 to 2010. Although Me may vary by as much as 1 magnitude unit for any given MW, the scatter is not random. Most subduction thrust earthquakes located within a narrow zone at the top surface of the Wadati-Benioff zone (which are interpreted as events on the slab interface) have Delta M < -0.30, a value much lower than the global average of -0.17. Of these interface events, the subset of large earthquakes (MW > 7.0) with anomalously low energy radiation (i.e., Delta M < 0.50) has been associated with the class of tsunamigenic events known as slow earthquakes. However, anomalously low radiated energy was also found for more than 308 earthquakes that had smaller magnitudes (MW < 7.0). The locations of these low-energy earthquakes do not correlate with locations of known slow tsunami earthquakes. On the other hand, anomalously high energy radiation (where Delta M>0.0) was found in 163 thrust events (only 12% of all subduction events). These earthquakes typically occur in high deformation zones that are intraslab, intracrustal or downdip of obliquely convergent plate boundaries. Of these high-energy events, a subset of intraslab events was found that caused local tsunami wave heights. Apparent stress taua can be related to differential magnitude by Delta M = (2/3) [ log(taua/mu) + 4.7] with mu being shear modulus. As specific tectonic settings seem to have characteristic differential magnitude, the relative stress conditions can

  3. DGKζ under stress conditions: “to be nuclear or cytoplasmic, that is the question”.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Topham, Matthew K; Martelli, Alberto M

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved to possess a distinct subcellular compartment, the nucleus, separated from the cytoplasm in a manner that allows the precise operation of the chromatin, thereby permitting controlled access to the regulatory elements in the DNA for transcription and replication. In the cytoplasm, genetic information contained in the DNA sequence is translated into proteins, including enzymes that catalyze various reactions, such as metabolic processes, energy control, and responses to changing environments. One mechanism that regulates these events involves phosphoinositide turnover signaling, which generates a lipid second messenger, diacylglycerol (DG). Since DG acts as a potent activator of several signaling molecules, it should be tightly regulated to keep cellular responsiveness within a physiological range. DG kinase (DGK) metabolizes DG by phosphorylating it to generate phosphatidic acid, thus serving as a critical regulator of DG signaling. Phosphoinositide turnover is employed differentially in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. A member of the DGK family, DGKζ, localizes to the nucleus in various cell types and is considered to regulate nuclear DG signaling. Recent studies have provided evidence that DGKζ shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in neurons under pathophysiological conditions. Transport of a signal regulator between the nucleus and the cytoplasm should be a critical function for maintaining basic processes in the nucleus, such as cell cycle regulation and gene expression, and to ensure communication between nuclear processes and cytoplasmic functions. In this review, a series of studies on nucleocytoplasmic translocation of DGKζ have been summarized, and the functional implications of this phenomenon in postmitotic neurons and cancer cells under stress conditions are discussed. PMID:24119575

  4. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  5. Stability of CIGS solar cells and component materials evaluated by a step-stress accelerated degradation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15°C and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40°C/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85°C/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear "stepwise" feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH >= 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and "capacitor quality" factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells' p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH >= 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  6. Leader length and secondary structure modulate mRNA function under conditions of stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, M.

    1988-07-01

    Simina virus 40-based plasmids that direct the synthesis of preproinsulin in cultured monkey cells were used to study the effects of mRNA structure on translational efficiency. Lengthening the leader sequence enhanced translation in this system. The enhancement was most obvious when an unstructured sequence (two, four, or eight copies of the oligonculeotide AGCTAAGTAAGTAAGTA) was inserted upstream from a region of deliberate secondary structure; the degree of enhancement was proportional to the number of copies of the inserted oligonucleotide. Lengthening the leader sequence on the 3' side of a stem-and-loop structure, in contrast, did not offset the potentially inhibitory effect of the hairpin structure. Both the facilitating effect of length and the inhibitory effect of secondary structure were demonstrated most easily under conditions of mRNA competition, which was brought about by an abrupt shift in the tonicity of the culture medium. These experiments suggest a simple structural basis for the long-recognized differential response of viral and cellular mRNAs to hypertonic stress. The fact that the translatability of structure-prone mRNAs varies with changes in the environment may also have general implications for gene expression in eucaryotic cells.

  7. Roles of Mitochondrial Dynamics under Stressful and Normal Conditions in Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knorre, Dmitry A.; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S.; Severin, Fedor F.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain dynamic mitochondrial filaments: they fuse and divide. Here we summarize data on the protein machinery driving mitochondrial dynamics in yeast and also discuss the factors that affect the fusion-fission balance. Fission is a general stress response of cells, and in the case of yeast this response appears to be prosurvival. At the same time, even under normal conditions yeast mitochondria undergo continuous cycles of fusion and fission. This seems to be a futile cycle and also expensive from the energy point of view. Why does it exist? Benefits might be the same as in the case of sexual reproduction. Indeed, mixing and separating of mitochondrial content allows mitochondrial DNA to segregate and recombine randomly, leading to high variation in the numbers of mutations per individual mitochondrion. This opens a possibility for effective purifying selection-elimination of mitochondria highly contaminated by deleterious mutations. The beneficial action presumes a mechanism for removal of defective mitochondria. We argue that selective mitochondrial autophagy or asymmetrical distribution of mitochondria during cell division could be at the core of such mechanism. PMID:23956814

  8. Biphasic kinetics of growth and bacteriocin production with Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 occur under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; Gevers, Dirk; Swings, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-04-01

    Micro-organisms used during the production of fermented foods are subjected to several abiotic stresses. Microbial survival during these processes strongly depends on the ability of the cells to adapt and become more tolerant to the environmental conditions. Cultivation of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, a potential strain for use during type II sourdough fermentations, at low temperatures, unfavourable pH and high salt concentrations resulted in biphasic growth patterns. In addition, two separate bacteriocin peaks, as well as a dramatic change in cellular morphology, were observed. In general, an increase of the specific bacteriocin production occurred during the second growth phase. Finally, the observed sugar consumption profiles were affected by the applied fermentation temperature. Moreover, the highest bacteriocin activity occurred during maltose consumption at a low constant temperature of 28 degrees C and a constant pH of 5.4. Plate counts from both growth phases revealed the existence of two colony types. Irregular colonies were found to outnumber smoother colonies during the first growth phase, while the second growth phase was characterized by a greater number of smooth colonies. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the observed morphological switch at the single-cell level. Single, rod-shaped cells changed into elongated cells that grew in chains. Colony and cell morphology changes coincided with the biphasic growth pattern. PMID:12686649

  9. IFNα/βR Signaling Promotes Regulatory T Cell Development and Function Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Cremer, Isabelle; Punkosdy, George A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I IFNs are a family of cytokines with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. While the antiviral effects of IFNs are well characterized, their immunomodulatory properties are less clear. To specifically address the effects of type I IFNs on Treg, we studied mixed bone morrow (BM) chimeras between wild-type (WT) and IFNα/βR (IFNAR) knockout (KO) mice, and heterozygous female mice expressing a Treg-specific deletion of the IFNAR. In these two models, IFNAR signaling promotes the development of the Treg lineage in the thymus and their survival in the periphery. IFNAR KO Treg had a higher expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bim and higher frequency of active caspase positive cells. IFNAR KO Treg from chimeric mice displayed a more naïve phenotype, accompanied by lower levels of CD25 and phosphorylated STAT5. Therefore, in Treg IFNAR signaling may directly or indirectly affect phosphorylation of STAT5. In mixed chimeras with Scurfy fetal liver, Treg derived from IFNAR KO BM were unable to control T effector cell activation and tissue inflammation. Under stress conditions or in a competitive environment, IFNAR signaling may be required to maintain Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25795758

  10. A Review on the Assessment of Stress Conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Amritpreet K.; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J.; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids) under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C) such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions. PMID:27199903

  11. Examination of the interaction of different lighting conditions and chronic mild stress in animal model.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Gal, N; Betlehem, J; Fuller, N; Acs, P; Kovacs, G L; Fusz, K; Jozsa, R; Olah, A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the effects of different shift work schedules and chronic mild stress (CMS) on mood using animal model. The most common international shift work schedules in nursing were applied by three groups of Wistar-rats and a control group with normal light-dark cycle. One subgroup from each group was subjected to CMS. Levels of anxiety and emotional life were evaluated in light-dark box. Differences between the groups according to independent and dependent variables were examined with one- and two-way analysis of variance, with a significance level defined at p < 0.05. Interaction of lighting regimen and CMS was proved to be significant according to time spent in the light compartment and the average number of changes between the light and dark compartments. Results of our examination confirm that the changes of lighting conditions evocate anxiety more prominently than CMS. No significant differences were found between the results of the low rotating group and the control group, supposing that this schedule is the least harmful to health. Our results on the association between the use of lighting regimens and the level of CMS provide evidence that the fast rotating shift work schedule puts the heaviest load on the organism of animals. PMID:26551746

  12. A Review on the Assessment of Stress Conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Amritpreet K; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids) under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C) such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions. PMID:27199903

  13. Optical stimulation of the hearing and deaf cochlea under thermal and stress confinement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M.; Baumhoff, P.; Kallweit, N.; Sato, M.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.; Lenarz, T.; Kral, A.

    2014-03-01

    There is a controversy, to which extend cochlear stimulation with near infrared laser pulses at a wavelength of 1860 nm is based on optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells or -in contrast- is based on direct stimulation of the nerve cells in absence of functional hair cells. Thermal and stress confinement conditions apply, because of the pulse duration range (5 ns, 10 μs-20 ms) of the two lasers used. The dependency of the signal characteristics on pulse peak power and pulse duration was investigated in this study. The compound action potential (CAP) was measured during stimulation of the cochlea of four anaesthetized guinea pigs, which were hearing at first and afterwards acutely deafened using intracochlear neomycin-rinsing. For comparison hydrophone measurements in a water tank were performed to investigate the optoacoustic signals at different laser interaction regimes. With rising pulse peak power CAPs of the hearing animals showed first a threshold, then a positively correlated and finally a saturating dependency. CAPs also showed distinct responses at laser onset and offset separated with the pulse duration. At pulse durations shorter than physiological response times the signals merged. Basically the same signal characteristics were observed in the optoacoustic hydrophone measurements, scaled with the sensitivity and response time of the hydrophone. Taking together the qualitative correspondence in the signal response and the absence of any CAPs in deafened animals our results speak in favor of an optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells rather than a direct stimulation of nerve cells.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  15. Proteins involved in biophoton emission and flooding-stress responses in soybean under light and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-01

    To know the molecular systems basically flooding conditions in soybean, biophoton emission measurements and proteomic analyses were carried out for flooding-stressed roots under light and dark conditions. Photon emission was analyzed using a photon counter. Gel-free quantitative proteomics were performed to identify significant changes proteins using the nano LC-MS along with SIEVE software. Biophoton emissions were significantly increased in both light and dark conditions after flooding stress, but gradually decreased with continued flooding exposure compared to the control plants. Among the 120 significantly identified proteins in the roots of soybean plants, 73 and 19 proteins were decreased and increased in the light condition, respectively, and 4 and 24 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively, in the dark condition. The proteins were mainly functionally grouped into cell organization, protein degradation/synthesis, and glycolysis. The highly abundant lactate/malate dehydrogenase proteins were decreased in flooding-stressed roots exposed to light, whereas the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme was increased in both light and dark conditions. Notably, however, specific enzyme assays revealed that the activities of these enzymes and biophoton emission were sharply increased after 3 days of flooding stress. This finding suggests that the source of biophoton emission in roots might involve the chemical excitation of electron or proton through enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation and reduction reactions. Moreover, the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme may play important roles in responses in flooding stress of soybean under the light condition and as a contributing factor to biophoton emission. PMID:26754663

  16. SUMOylation by a Stress-Specific Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier E2 Conjugase Is Essential for Survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under Stress Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Amy R.; Horken, Kempton M.; Plucinak, Thomas M.; Balassa, Eniko; Cerutti, Heriberto; Weeks, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is required for survival of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. Attachment of SUMO to target proteins is catalyzed by SUMO E2 conjugase. All haploid or diploid eukaryotes studied to date possess a single indispensable SUMO conjugase. We report here the unanticipated isolation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (mutant5 [mut5]). in which the previously identified SUMO conjugase gene C. reinhardtii ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme9 (CrUBC9) is deleted. This surprising mutant is viable and unexpectedly, displays a pattern of protein SUMOylation at 25°C that is essentially identical to wild-type cells. However, unlike wild-type cells, mut5 fails to SUMOylate a large set of proteins in response to multiple stress conditions, a failure that results in a markedly reduced tolerance or complete lack of tolerance to these stresses. Restoration of expected stress-induced protein SUMOylation patterns as well as normal stress tolerance phenotypes in mut5 cells complemented with a CrUBC9 gene shows that CrUBC9 is an authentic SUMO conjugase and, more importantly, that SUMOylation is essential for cell survival under stress conditions. The presence of bona fide SUMOylated proteins in the mut5 mutant at 25°C can only be explained by the presence of at least one additional SUMO conjugase in C. reinhardtii, a conjugase tentatively identified as CrUBC3. Together, these results suggest that, unlike all other nonpolyploid eukaryotes, there are at least two distinct and functional SUMO E2 conjugases in C. reinhardtii, with a clear division of labor between the two sets: One (CrUBC9) is involved in essential stress-induced SUMOylations, and one (CrUBC3) is involved in housekeeping SUMOylations. PMID:25614063

  17. Effects of Extinction Treatments on the Reduction of Conditioned Responding and Conditioned Hyperarousal in a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    PubMed Central

    Burhans, Lauren B.; Smith-Bell, Carrie A.; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously characterized a model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), based on classical conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane response (NMR), that focuses on 2 key PTSD-like features: conditioned responses to trauma-associated cues and hyperarousal. In addition to the development of conditioned NMRs (CRs) to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a periorbital shock unconditioned stimulus (US), we have observed that rabbits also exhibit a conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) of the NMR that manifests as an exaggerated and more complex reflexive NMR to presentations of the US by itself, particularly to intensities that elicited little response prior to conditioning. Previous work has demonstrated that unpaired presentations of the CS and US are successful at extinguishing CRs and CRM simultaneously, even when a significantly weakened version of the US is utilized. In the current study, additional extinction treatments were tested, including continued pairings of the CS with a weakened US and exposure to the training context alone, and these treatments were contrasted with the effects of unpaired extinction with a weakened US and remaining in home cages with no further treatment. Results showed that continued pairings only slightly decreased CRs and CRM, while context exposure had no effect on CRs and marginal effects on reducing CRM. Unpaired extinction was still the most effective treatment for reducing both. Findings are discussed in terms of applications to cognitive–behavioral therapies for treatment of PTSD, such as incorporating mild, innately stressful stimuli into virtual reality therapy. PMID:26348715

  18. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.

    1999-01-01

    The project has sought to ascertain the veracity of the Burnett relations, as applied to slow moving, highly nonisothermal gases, by comparison of convection and stress predictions with those generated by the DSMC method. The Burnett equations were found to provide reasonable descriptions of the pressure distribution and normal stress in stationary gases with a 1-D temperature gradient. Continuum/Burnett predictions of thermal stress convection in 2-D heated enclosures, however, are not quantitatively supported by DSMC results. For such situations, it appears that thermal creep flows, generated at the boundaries of the enclosure, will be significantly larger than the flows resulting from thermal stress in the gas.

  19. Stress-induced expression in wheat of the Arabidopsis thaliana DREB1A gene delays water stress symptoms under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Pellegrineschi, Alessandro; Reynolds, Matthew; Pacheco, Mario; Brito, Rosa Maria; Almeraya, Rosaura; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Hoisington, David

    2004-06-01

    One of the major environmental factors limiting plant productivity is lack of water. This is especially true for the major cereals maize, rice, and wheat, which demonstrate a range of susceptibility to moisture deficit. Although conventional breeding and marker-assisted selection are being used to develop varieties more tolerant to water stress, these methods are time and resource consuming and germplasm dependent. Genetic engineering is attractive because of its potential to improve abiotic stress tolerance more rapidly. Transcription factors have been shown to produce multiple phenotypic alterations, many of which are involved in stress responses. DREB1A, a transcription factor that recognizes dehydration response elements, has been shown in Arabidopsis thaliana to play a crucial role in promoting the expression of drought-tolerance genes. In our efforts to enhance drought tolerance in wheat, the A. thaliana DREB1A gene was placed under control of a stress-inducible promoter from the rd29A gene and transferred via biolistic transformation into bread wheat. Plants expressing the DREB1A gene demonstrated substantial resistance to water stress in comparison with checks under experimental greenhouse conditions, manifested by a 10-day delay in wilting when water was withheld. PMID:15190366

  20. Influence of linear profile modification and loading conditions on the dynamic tooth load and stress of high contact ratio gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chinwai; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation for the dynamic response of high-contact-ratio spur gear transmissions is presented. High contact ratio gears have the potential to produce lower dynamic tooth loads and minimum root stress but they can be sensitive to tooth profile errors. The analysis presented examines various profile modifications under realistic loading conditions. The effect of these modifications on the dynamic load (force) between mating gear teeth and the dynamic root stress is presented. Since the contact stress is dependent on the dynamic load, minimizing dynamic loads will also minimize contact stresses. It is shown that the combination of profile modification and the applied load (torque) carried by a gear system has a significant influence on gear dynamics. The ideal modification at one value of applied load will not be the best solution for a different load. High-contact-ratio gears were found to require less modification than standard low-contact-ratio gears. High-contact-ratio gears are more adversely affected by excess modification than by under modification. In addition, the optimal profile modification required to minimize the dynamic load (hence the contact stress) on a gear tooth differs from the optimal modification required to minimize the dynamic root (bending) stress. Computer simulation can help find the design tradeoffs to determine the best profile modification to satisfy the conflicting constraints of minimizing both the load and root stress in gears which must operate over a range of applied loads.

  1. Over-expression of bael quinolone synthase in tobacco improves plant vigor under favorable conditions, drought, or salt stress.

    PubMed

    Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2015-01-30

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the biosynthesis of various medicinally important secondary metabolites in plants, but their role in growth and stress response is unclear. Here, we overexpressed quinolone synthase (QNS) from bael in tobacco. QNS-overexpressing plants showed an overall increase in growth, photosynthetic efficiency and chlorophyll content compared to wild type plants. Second-generation (T2) transgenic plants grew to maturity, flowered early and set viable seeds under favorable conditions without yield penalty. An increased accumulation of flavonoids, phenols and alkaloids was associated with higher tolerance to drought and salinity stress in transgenic plants. Thus, bael QNS seems to function as a positive regulator of plant growth and stress response, and could be potentially used for engineering plants tolerant to abiotic stress. PMID:25555382

  2. Vegetative survival of some wall and soil blue-green algae under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Agrawal, S C

    2008-01-01

    Lyngbya major (a wall alga), survived throughout year, maximally to >80 % at atmospheric temperature (AT) of 17-36 degrees C and relative humidity (RH) 60-100 % in rainy and spring seasons, but the survival was 43-64 % in winter when AT decreased to 5 degrees C and RH was 65-98 %, and 15-23 % in summer when AT reached 48 degrees C and RH was 23-60 %. All soil algae (Lyngbya birgei, Aphanothece pallida, Gloeocapsa atrata, Oscillatoria subbrevis, O. animalis) survived >90 % in rainy season when soil moisture content (SMC) was 89-100 %. Lowering of SMC to a minimum of 55 % in spring and 39 % in winter led L. birgei, O. subbrevis and O. animalis to survive from 75, 66, and 65 %, respectively, in spring and 12, 14, and 20 % in winter, and A. pallida and G. atrata not at all in both seasons. All soil algae did not survive in summer when SMC was 12-30 %. Myxosarcina burmensis survived only in rainy and spring seasons when pond water temperature (PWT) was 19-25 degrees C and 18-26 degrees C, respectively, and not in winter and summer when PWT was 2-14 degrees C and 25-36 degrees C, respectively. L. major and A. pallida survived almost equally well under both submerged and air-exposed conditions for 15 d but less if submerged for more time than air-exposed on moist soil surface, while L. birgei, G. atrata, O. subbrevis, and O. animalis survived submergence in liquid medium better and longer than air-exposure on moist soil surface. Pond alga M. burmensis survived submergence better than air-exposure, true to its aquatic habitat. All algae survived less and died without forming any resistant cells when exposed to physical and physiological water stress (imposed by growing them on highly agarized media or in salinized liquid media), light stress (at 0, 2 and 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity) or following UV shock (0.96-3.84 kJ/m(2)). A. pallida and G. atrata cells did not divide on 8 % agarized solid media, in > or =0.3 mol/L salinized liquid media, and in darkness. The

  3. Dietary fat affects plasma prolactin in female F344 rats under conditions of ether stress.

    PubMed

    Bosland, M C; Bunnik, G S; Wilbrink, B; de Bie, B T; Floor, B

    1994-01-01

    The influence of amount and type of dietary fat on circulating concentrations of prolactin and estradiol-17 beta in female F344 rats from which blood was sampled by decapitation under ether anesthesia was compared with that in rats from which blood was collected without anesthesia. The animals were fed isonutrient (adjusted for differences in energy density) semipurified diets containing 5% or 20% (by weight) sunflower seed oil or lard. Blood was sampled by decapitation with or without standardized ether anesthesia during the afternoon of proestrus-estrus or the morning of metestrus-diestrus, as determined by examination of vaginal smears. Plasma hormone concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin levels were lower during proestrus-estrus in rats fed a low-fat diet than in animals fed a high-fat diet, statistically independent of the type of dietary fat, but only when blood was sampled by decapitation under ether anesthesia [p = 0.0384, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. No such difference was found in rats decapitated without anesthesia. This effect of amount of dietary fat on prolactin in proestrus-estrus animals anesthetized with ether was predominantly present in animals fed polyunsaturated fat (p < 0.05, 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's test) and was statistically not significant in rats fed saturated fat diets. During metestrus-diestrus, prolactin levels were significantly lower in animals fed a high-saturated fat diet than in those fed low-saturated fat, low-unsaturated fat, or high-unsaturated fat diets, independent of the blood sampling conditions (p < 0.05, 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test). No consistent effects on estradiol-17 beta levels were found in type or amount of dietary fat or in presence or absence of ether anesthesia before decapitation. Growth, apparent digestibility of fat, and caloric intake were similar in all four dietary groups, but food consumption was higher and food conversion efficiency was lower in animals fed low-fat diets

  4. Working conditions, self-perceived stress, anxiety, depression and quality of life: A structural equation modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Rusli, Bin Nordin; Edimansyah, Bin Abdin; Naing, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Background The relationships between working conditions [job demand, job control and social support]; stress, anxiety, and depression; and perceived quality of life factors [physical health, psychological wellbeing, social relationships and environmental conditions] were assessed using a sample of 698 male automotive assembly workers in Malaysia. Methods The validated Malay version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-BREF) were used. A structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis was applied to test the structural relationships of the model using AMOS version 6.0, with the maximum likelihood ratio as the method of estimation. Results The results of the SEM supported the hypothesized structural model (χ2 = 22.801, df = 19, p = 0.246). The final model shows that social support (JCQ) was directly related to all 4 factors of the WHOQOL-BREF and inversely related to depression and stress (DASS). Job demand (JCQ) was directly related to stress (DASS) and inversely related to the environmental conditions (WHOQOL-BREF). Job control (JCQ) was directly related to social relationships (WHOQOL-BREF). Stress (DASS) was directly related to anxiety and depression (DASS) and inversely related to physical health, environment conditions and social relationships (WHOQOL-BREF). Anxiety (DASS) was directly related to depression (DASS) and inversely related to physical health (WHOQOL-BREF). Depression (DASS) was inversely related to the psychological wellbeing (WHOQOL-BREF). Finally, stress, anxiety and depression (DASS) mediate the relationships between job demand and social support (JCQ) to the 4 factors of WHOQOL-BREF. Conclusion These findings suggest that higher social support increases the self-reported quality of life of these workers. Higher job control increases the social relationships, whilst higher job demand increases the self-perceived stress and decreases the self

  5. Influence of deposition conditions on mechanical properties of low-pressure chemical vapor deposited low-stress silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivola, Yvete; Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.; Cibuzar, Greg; Roberts, Kevin

    2003-11-01

    The effect of deposition temperature, deposition pressure, or input gas ratio (SiH2Cl2:NH3) on film stress was determined for low-pressure chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride films. Wafer curvature measurements were performed for films deposited on single crystal silicon and amorphous silica wafer substrates to determine film stress σdep, biaxial modulus Ef+, and coefficient of thermal expansion αf. Apparent plane strain film modulus Ēf' and hardness H were measured using depth-sensing indentation. Ellipsometry was used to measure film thickness tf and refractive index n. Infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), forward recoil energy spectroscopy (FReS), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) experiments were performed to determine film composition. Although film deposition stress varied from -135 MPa (compressive) to 235 MPa (tensile) Ef+, Ēf', H, and αf remained nearly constant. Infrared spectroscopy resolved only Si-N species for all films, and results from FReS on three films confirmed that the hydrogen content was negligible. RBS and XPS indicated that Si/N increased with increased compressive σdep. Ellipsometry and RBS indicated that all films were silicon-rich, to a greater extent with increased compressive σdep. As RBS indicated that atomic density decreased with increased compressive deposition stress, it was concluded that the deposition conditions changed both thermal and intrinsic deposition stress for all films. In particular, intrinsic stress was tensile, and became increasingly tensile for increased Si/N and decreased atomic density. Assuming thermal stress was similar for all films examined here, the intrinsic stress must have varied from changes dependent on the deposition conditions.

  6. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  7. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  8. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues. PMID:26954265

  9. Permeability of coal to CH4 under fixed volume boundary conditions: the effect of stress-strain-sorption behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Fokker, Peter; Spiers, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Permeability evolution in coal reservoirs during CO2-Enhanced Coalbed Methane (ECBM) production is strongly influenced by swelling/shrinkage effects related to sorption and desorption of CO2 and CH4, respectively. Numerous permeability models, coupling the swelling response of coal to gas sorption, have been developed to predict in-situ coal seam permeability evolution during (E)CBM. However, experimental studies, aimed at testing such models, have mainly focused on the permeability changes occurring under constant lateral stress conditions, which are inconsistent with the in-situ boundary condition of (near) zero lateral strain. We performed CH4 permeability measurements, using the steady-state method, on a cylindrical sample of high volatile bituminous coal (25mm in diameter), under (near) fixed volume versus fixed stress conditions. The sample possessed a clearly visible cleat system. To isolate the effect of sorption on permeability evolution, helium (non-sorbing gas) was used as a control fluid. The bulk sample permeability to helium, under stress control conditions, changed from 4.07×10‑17to 7.5×10‑18m2, when the effective stress increased from 19.1 to 35.2MPa. Sorption of CH4 at a constant pressure of 10MPa, under fixed volume boundary conditions, resulted in a confining pressure increase from a poroelastically supported value of 29.3MPa to a near-equilibrium value of 38.6MPa over 171 hours. This is caused by the combined effect of the sorption-induced swelling and the self-compression of the sample. The concentration of CH4 adsorbed by the sample was 0.113 mmol/gcoal. During the adsorption process, the permeability to CH4 also decreased from 2.38×10‑17 to 4.91×10‑18m2, proving a strong influence of stress-strain-sorption behavior (c.f. Hol et al., 2012) on fracture permeability evolution. The CH4 permeability subsequently measured under stress controlled conditions varied from 1.37×10‑17 to 4.33×10‑18m2, for same change in confining

  10. Maxwell-Faraday Stresses in Electromagnetic Fields and the Self-Force on a Uniformly Accelerating Point Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The physical analysis of a uniformly accelerating point charge provides a rich problem to explore in advanced courses in electrodynamics and relativity since it brings together fundamental concepts in relation to electromagnetic radiation, Einstein's equivalence principle and the inertial mass of field energy in ways that reveal subtleties in each…

  11. Stress tolerance and virulence of insect-pathogenic fungi are determined by environmental conditions during conidial formation.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L; Fernandes, Éverton K K; Keyser, Chad A; Hallsworth, John E; Roberts, Donald W

    2015-08-01

    The virulence to insects and tolerance to heat and UV-B radiation of conidia of entomopathogenic fungi are greatly influenced by physical, chemical, and nutritional conditions during mycelial growth. This is evidenced, for example, by the stress phenotypes of Metarhizium robertsii produced on various substrates. Conidia from minimal medium (Czapek's medium without sucrose), complex medium, and insect (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera) cadavers had high, moderate, and poor tolerance to UV-B radiation, respectively. Furthermore, conidia from minimal medium germinated faster and had increased heat tolerance and were more virulent to insects than those from complex medium. Low water-activity or alkaline culture conditions also resulted in production of conidia with high tolerance to heat or UV-B radiation. Conidia produced on complex media exhibited lower stress tolerance, whereas those from complex media supplemented with NaCl or KCl (to reduce water activity) were more tolerant to heat and UV-B than those from the unmodified complex medium. Osmotic and nutritive stresses resulted in production of conidia with a robust stress phenotype, but also were associated with low conidial yield. Physical conditions such as growth under illumination, hypoxic conditions, and heat shock before conidial production also induced both higher UV-B and heat tolerance; but conidial production was not decreased. In conclusion, physical and chemical parameters, as well as nutrition source, can induce great variability in conidial tolerance to stress for entomopathogenic fungi. Implications are discussed in relation to the ecology of entomopathogenic fungi in the field, and to their use for biological control. This review will cover recent technologies on improving stress tolerance of entomopathogenic fungi for biological control of insects. PMID:25791499

  12. Adaptive Coping under Conditions of Extreme Stress: Multilevel Influences on the Determinants of Resilience in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of resilience in maltreated children reveals the possibility of coping processes and resources on multiple levels of analysis as children strive to adapt under conditions of severe stress. In a maltreating context, aspects of self-organization, including self-esteem, self-reliance, emotion regulation, and adaptable yet reserved…

  13. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  14. Relationship between biomass production and nitrogen fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genoytpes with different levels of drought resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between biomass production and N2 fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genotypes with different levels of drought resistance is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation by evaluating t...

  15. Effect of citrocard on functional reserves of the heart under conditions of chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N; Lebedeva, S A; Volotova, E V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2007-07-01

    Chronic stress exposure produces a damaging effect on the myocardium and reduces its functional (inotropic) reserves. Citrocard (50 mg/kg) and fenibut (50 mg/kg) prevent stress effects: animals receiving these preparations demonstrate higher contraction and relaxation rates and higher left-ventricular pressure during functional tests (volume load and maximum isometric load). PMID:18256742

  16. Identification of differentially expressed genes in Fiskeby III under ozone stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the global climate changes, plants will be challenged by environmental stresses that are more extreme and more frequent leading to increased yield loss. Specifically, ozone stress is an increasing problem in both urban and rural areas. Soybeans are one of the plant species that are quite ozone se...

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  18. Chronic Psychological Stress Disrupted the Composition of the Murine Colonic Microbiota and Accelerated a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yohei; Arase, Sohei; Nagaoka, Noriko; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of psychological stress on the gastrointestinal microbiota is widely recognized. Chronic psychological stress may be associated with increased disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, but the relationships among psychological stress, the gastrointestinal microbiota, and the severity of colitis is not yet fully understood. Here, we examined the impact of 12-week repeated water-avoidance stress on the microbiota of two inbred strains of T cell receptor alpha chain gene knockout mouse (background, BALB/c and C57BL/6) by means of next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In both mouse strains, knockout of the T cell receptor alpha chain gene caused a loss of gastrointestinal microbial diversity and stability. Chronic exposure to repeated water-avoidance stress markedly altered the composition of the colonic microbiota of C57BL/6 mice, but not of BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the relative abundance of genus Clostridium, some members of which produce the toxin phospholipase C, was increased, which was weakly positively associated with colitis severity, suggesting that expansion of specific populations of indigenous pathogens may be involved in the exacerbation of colitis. However, we also found that colitis was not exacerbated in mice with a relatively diverse microbiota even if their colonic microbiota contained an expanded phospholipase C-producing Clostridium population. Exposure to chronic stress also altered the concentration of free immunoglobulin A in colonic contents, which may be related to both the loss of bacterial diversity in the colonic microbiota and the severity of the colitis exacerbation. Together, these results suggest that long-term exposure to psychological stress induces dysbiosis in the immunodeficient mouse in a strain-specific manner and also that alteration of microbial diversity, which may be related to an altered pattern of immunoglobulin secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, might play a crucial role in the

  19. Chronic Psychological Stress Disrupted the Composition of the Murine Colonic Microbiota and Accelerated a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yohei; Arase, Sohei; Nagaoka, Noriko; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of psychological stress on the gastrointestinal microbiota is widely recognized. Chronic psychological stress may be associated with increased disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, but the relationships among psychological stress, the gastrointestinal microbiota, and the severity of colitis is not yet fully understood. Here, we examined the impact of 12-week repeated water-avoidance stress on the microbiota of two inbred strains of T cell receptor alpha chain gene knockout mouse (background, BALB/c and C57BL/6) by means of next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In both mouse strains, knockout of the T cell receptor alpha chain gene caused a loss of gastrointestinal microbial diversity and stability. Chronic exposure to repeated water-avoidance stress markedly altered the composition of the colonic microbiota of C57BL/6 mice, but not of BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the relative abundance of genus Clostridium, some members of which produce the toxin phospholipase C, was increased, which was weakly positively associated with colitis severity, suggesting that expansion of specific populations of indigenous pathogens may be involved in the exacerbation of colitis. However, we also found that colitis was not exacerbated in mice with a relatively diverse microbiota even if their colonic microbiota contained an expanded phospholipase C-producing Clostridium population. Exposure to chronic stress also altered the concentration of free immunoglobulin A in colonic contents, which may be related to both the loss of bacterial diversity in the colonic microbiota and the severity of the colitis exacerbation. Together, these results suggest that long-term exposure to psychological stress induces dysbiosis in the immunodeficient mouse in a strain-specific manner and also that alteration of microbial diversity, which may be related to an altered pattern of immunoglobulin secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, might play a crucial role in the

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Accelerates p53 Degradation by the Cooperative Actions of Hdm2 and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Pluquet, Olivier; Qu, Li-Ke; Baltzis, Dionissios; Koromilas, Antonis E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor p53 by degradation is a mechanism utilized by cells to adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, the mechanisms of p53 destabilization by ER stress are not known. We demonstrate here that the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Hdm2 is essential for the nucleocytoplasmic transport and proteasome-dependent degradation of p53 in ER-stressed cells. We also demonstrate that p53 phosphorylation at S315 and S376 is required for its nuclear export and degradation by Hdm2 without interfering with the ubiquitylation process. Furthermore, we show that p53 destabilization in unstressed cells utilizes the cooperative action of Hdm2 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a process that is enhanced in cells exposed to ER stress. In contrast to other stress pathways that stabilize p53, our findings further substantiate a negative role of ER stress in p53 activation with important implications for the function of the tumor suppressor in cells with a dysfunctional ER. PMID:16227590

  1. Investigation of the stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel weldments in sour conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, M.J.; Bradshaw, R.; Cottis, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Duplex stainless steels are increasingly widely used in the oil and gas production industry for a variety of applications. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of wrought material is reasonably well understood, and limits of use are placed upon these alloys in NACE MR0175, for sour service. However, the SCC behavior of weldments is less well understood, and this has limited the use of welded material in H{sub 2}S-containing conditions. The SCC resistance of duplex stainless steels is influenced by their microstructure as well as their chemical composition and the objective of the research reported in this paper is to investigate the SCC behavior of welded 22%Cr and 25%Cr alloys in a simulated oilfield environment. Mechanized orbital TIG was used to butt weld 168mm outside diameter tubes. The shielding gas contained nitrogen additions of up to 10% (in the case of UNS S32760) and 7% (in the case of UNS S31803). Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was conducted on cross-weld specimens in sodium chloride solutions overpressured with varying partial pressures of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The SSRT results, in terms of ductility parameters and secondary cracking, are correlated with fractography and metallurgical examination of crack morphology in order to establish the effects of the welding process and the nitrogen content of the shielding gas. It was found that the nitrogen uptake from the shielding gas has a detrimental effect on SCC resistance of duplex stainless steel weldments. While this effect is only modes, it is in direct contrast to the beneficial effect it has on pitting corrosion resistance.

  2. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    PubMed

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis. PMID:26803706

  3. Oxidative stress responses and root lignification induced by Fe deficiency conditions in pear and quince genotypes.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Silvia; Dell'Orto, Marta; Zocchi, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    We analysed Pyrus communis cv. Conference and Cydonia oblonga BA29, differently tolerant to lime-induced chlorosis, to identify the key mechanisms involved in their different performance under Fe deficiency induced by the absence of Fe (-Fe) or by the presence of bicarbonate (+FeBic). Under our experimental conditions, a decrease in root elongation was observed in BA29 under bicarbonate supply. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities were analysed and the relative isoforms were detected by native electrophoresis. The data obtained for both genotypes under -Fe and for BA29 +FeBic suggest the occurrence of overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, at the same time, of a scarce capacity to detoxify them. The detection of ROS (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)) through histochemical localization supports these results and suggests that they could account for the modifications of mechanical properties of the cell wall during stress adaptation. On the other hand, in the cv. Conference +FeBic, an increase in non-specific POD activity was detected, confirming its higher level of protection in particular against H(2)O(2) accumulation. Peroxidases involved in lignification were assayed and histochemical analysis was performed. The results suggest that only in BA29 under bicarbonate supply can the presence of ROS in root apoplast be correlated with lignin deposits in external layers and in endodermis as a consequence of the shift of PODs towards a lignification role. We suggest that in BA29 the decrease in root growth could impair mineral nutrition, generating susceptibility to calcareous soils. In the cv. Conference, the allocation of new biomass to the root system could improve soil exploration and consequently Fe uptake. PMID:21389006

  4. Effects of reproductive condition and dominance rank on cortisol responsiveness to stress in free-ranging female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Christy L; Ayala, James E; Mas-Rivera, Adaris; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulates individuals' physiological responses to social stress, which is an inevitable aspect of the daily lives of group-living animals. Previous nonhuman primate studies have reported that sex, age, rank, and reproductive condition influence cortisol levels under stressful conditions. In this study we investigated cortisol responses to stress among 70 multiparous, free-ranging female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on the island of Cayo Santiago, PR. Plasma cortisol samples were collected in two consecutive years under similar conditions. Twenty-two females were sampled both years, and most of those females were lactating in only one of the years. Individual differences in cortisol levels were stable across years, even though reproductive condition changed for most individuals. No relationship was found between age or social rank and cortisol levels. Of the females that changed reproductive conditions, cortisol levels were higher when they were lactating than when they were cycling, and the amount of change in cortisol from cycling to lactating was greatest for low-ranking individuals. Heightened reactivity to stress during lactation may be the result of concerns about infant safety, and such concerns may be higher among low-ranking mothers than among higher ranking mothers. Psychosocial stress and hyperactivation of the HPA axis during lactation can suppress immune function and increase vulnerability to infectious diseases, thus explaining why adult females in the free-ranging rhesus macaque population on Cayo Santiago have a higher probability of mortality during the birth season than during the mating season. PMID:20039328

  5. Optimization of conditions for thermal treatment of rice bran using an accelerator including an organo-iron compound.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hikari; Tachibana, Naoya; Fukushima, Masami

    2011-02-01

    A method for thermal conversion of raw organic waste (ROW) to a compost-like material (CLM) with higher levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds was developed, in which rice bran and an organo-iron compound were employed as a model ROW and the accelerator, respectively. To evaluate the qualities of CLMs, organic substances of an acid insoluble fraction of alkaline extracts (AIAEs) from a CLM were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, and nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds in the CLM samples were increased by long-term treatment (60°C for 5 days, 170°C for 3 days). In particular, the high lipid content of the AIAEs, which was indicative of inadequate digestion of CLM components, was dramatically reduced in the presence of the accelerator. PMID:21044838

  6. Effects of surface condition on the stress corrosion cracking of line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.; Parkins, R.N.

    1988-04-01

    The relationship between surface properties of line pipe steels and external stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is reviewed. Surface factors discussed include mill scale, surface pitting, decarburization, surface residual stresses, and near-surface stress state. Recent research results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of a line pipe steel to SCC initiation is dependent on complicated interaction among these properties. However, these studies also show that relatively simple surface preparation procedures such as grit blasting can be effective in reducing the susceptibility of pipelines to crack initiation.

  7. Rate and temperature dependences of the yield stress of commercial titanium under conditions of shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves with the propagation distance has been studied in annealed titanium of commercial purity at temperatures 20 °C and 600 °C. The free surface velocity histories of the shock-loaded samples 0.25-4.0 mm in thickness have been recorded using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector. The measured decays of the elastic precursor waves have been converted into relationships between the shear stress and the initial plastic strain rate at the Hugoniot elastic limit. It has been found that the temperature practically does not influence on the resistance to high-rate plastic deformation: the plastic strain rate varies with the shear stress as γ ˙ = 2.5 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.8 s-1 at 20 °C and γ ˙ = 2.9 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.9 s-1 at 600 °C. An analysis of the rise times of the plastic shock waves has shown that for the same level of shear stress, the plastic strain rate after small compressive strain is more than by order of magnitude higher than the initial plastic strain rate at the wave's foot. Such acceleration of the plastic deformation seems to be a result of an intense multiplication of the mobile dislocations or twins.

  8. Temperature and water stress during conditioning and incubation phase affecting Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth.

    PubMed

    Moral, Juan; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche crenata is a holoparasitic plant that is potentially devastating to crop yield of legume species. Soil temperature and humidity are known to affect seed germination, however, the extent of their influence on germination and radicle growth of those of O. crenata is largely unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of temperature, water potential (Ψt) and the type of water stress (matric or osmotic) on O. crenata seeds during conditioning and incubation periods. We found that seeds germinated between 5 and 30°C during both periods, with a maximum around 20°C. Germination increased with increasing Ψt from -1.2 to 0 MPa during conditioning and incubation periods. Likewise, seed germination increased logarithmically with length of conditioning period until 40 days. The impact of the type of water stress on seed germination was similar, although the radicle growth of seeds under osmotic stress was lower than under matric stress, what could explain the lowest infestation of Orobanche sp. in regions characterized by saline soil. The data in this study will be useful to forecast infection of host roots by O. crenata. PMID:26089829

  9. Reference Gene Validation for Quantitative PCR Under Various Biotic and Abiotic Stress Conditions in Toxoptera citricida (Hemiptera, Aphidiae).

    PubMed

    Shang, Feng; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Wei, Dong; Shen, Guang-Mao; Feng, Ying-Cai; Li, Ting; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-08-01

    The regulation of mRNA expression level is critical for gene expression studies. Currently, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is commonly used to investigate mRNA expression level of genes under various experimental conditions. An important factor that determines the optimal quantification of qRT-PCR data is the choice of the reference gene for normalization. To advance gene expression studies in Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy), an important citrus pest and a main vector of the Citrus tristeza virus, we used five tools (GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, ΔCt methods, and RefFinder) to evaluate seven candidate reference genes (elongation factor-1 alpha [EF1α], beta tubulin [β-TUB], 18S ribosomal RNA [18S], RNA polymerase II large subunit (RNAP II), beta actin (β-ACT), alpha tubulin, and glyceraldhyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) under different biotic (developmental stages and wing dimorphism) and abiotic stress (thermal, starvation, and UV irradiation) conditions. The results showed that EF1α and 18S were the most stable genes under various biotic states, β-ACT and β-TUB during thermal stress, EF1α and RNAP II under starvation stress, and RNAP II, β-ACT, and EF1α under UV irradiation stress conditions. This study provides useful resources for the transcriptional profiling of genes in T. citricida and closely related aphid species. PMID:26470351

  10. Temperature and water stress during conditioning and incubation phase affecting Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Juan; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche crenata is a holoparasitic plant that is potentially devastating to crop yield of legume species. Soil temperature and humidity are known to affect seed germination, however, the extent of their influence on germination and radicle growth of those of O. crenata is largely unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of temperature, water potential (Ψt) and the type of water stress (matric or osmotic) on O. crenata seeds during conditioning and incubation periods. We found that seeds germinated between 5 and 30°C during both periods, with a maximum around 20°C. Germination increased with increasing Ψt from −1.2 to 0 MPa during conditioning and incubation periods. Likewise, seed germination increased logarithmically with length of conditioning period until 40 days. The impact of the type of water stress on seed germination was similar, although the radicle growth of seeds under osmotic stress was lower than under matric stress, what could explain the lowest infestation of Orobanche sp. in regions characterized by saline soil. The data in this study will be useful to forecast infection of host roots by O. crenata. PMID:26089829

  11. The Effect of Maternal Relaxation Training on Reactivity of Non-Stress Test, Basal Fetal Heart Rate, and Number of Fetal Heart Accelerations: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Rafiee, Bahare; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relaxation-training, as an anxiety-reducer intervention, plays an important role in fetal health. The present study aimed to analyze the effect of maternal relaxation on stress test (NST), basal fetal heart rate, and number of fetal heart accelerations. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 84 pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups of teaching relaxation and control groups in 2012. In the intervention group, 60-90 minute classes were held every week lasting for 4 weeks. Besides, home practice charts were given to the mothers and researchers controlled the home practices by phone calls every week. The control group received routine prenatal care. In the 4th week, NST was performed in the intervention group 30 minutes before and after the 4th session. In the control group, NST was done in the 4th week. The quantitative variables in the two groups were compared through ANOVA and Chi-square test. Results: The results of paired t-test showed that relaxation could improve the NST results (P=0.01). Mean and standard deviation of basal fetal heart rate was 138.95±8.18 before the intervention and 133.07±6.9 after the intervention. Paired t-test also showed that relaxation reduced the basal fetal heart rate (P=0.001). Mean and standard deviation of the number of fetal heart accelerations was 1.5±0.8 before the intervention and 2.2±0.9 after it. The results of paired t-test also showed that relaxation increased the number of fetal heart accelerations (P=0.001). Conclusions: Relaxation could improve the NST results, reduce the basal fetal heart rate, and increase the number of fetal heart accelerations. Therefore, relaxation is recommended during pregnancy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012072810418N1 PMID:25553334

  12. Effects of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative on Myocardial Contractility of Stressed Animals under Conditions of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2015-07-01

    Glufimet (glutamic acid derivative) in a dose of 28.7 mg/kg limited the reduction of the cardiac functional reserve in animals subjected to 24-h stress under conditions of nonselective NO synthase blockade with L-NAME (10 mg/kg). Adrenoreactivity and increased afterload tests showed that the increment of myocardial contraction/relaxation rates, left-ventricular pressure, and HR were significantly higher in glufimet-treated stressed animals with NO synthesis blockade than in animals which received no glufimet. The efficiency of glufimet was higher than that of phenibut (the reference drug). PMID:26205724

  13. The Stress-Producing Working Conditions of Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappa, Judith M.

    1987-01-01

    Part-time faculty members strongly believe that institutional employment policies and practices are developed for the primary benefit of the employer and contribute significantly to the job-related stress they experience. (Author)

  14. Under What Conditions is Off-The-Job Stress a Significant Determinant of Occupational Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shostak, Arthur B.

    1973-01-01

    Through new attention to role expansion, physical environment design, hostility scalebacks, and information enlargement, we can make substantial new gains against off-the-job stresses that depress on-the-job performance. (Author)

  15. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  16. CovS inactivates CovR and is required for growth under conditions of general stress in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Tracy L; Scott, June R

    2004-06-01

    The gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) causes diseases ranging from mild and often self-limiting infections of the skin or throat to invasive and life-threatening illnesses. To cause such diverse types of disease, the GAS must be able to sense adverse environments and regulate its gene expression accordingly. The CovR/S two-component signal transduction regulatory system in GAS represses about 15% of the GAS genome, including many genes involved in virulence, in response to the environment. We report that CovR is still able to repress transcription from several promoters in the absence of the putative histidine kinase sensor for this system, CovS. We also show that a phosphorylation site mutant (D53A) of CovR is unable to repress gene expression. In addition, we report that a strain with a nonpolar mutation in CovS does not grow at a low pH, elevated temperature, or high osmolarity. The stress-related phenotypes of the CovS mutant were complemented by expression of covS from a plasmid. Selection for growth of a CovS mutant under stress conditions resulted in isolation of second-site mutations that inactivated covR, indicating that CovR and CovS act in the same pathway. Also, at 40 degrees C in the wild-type strain, CovR appeared to be less active on the promoter tested, which is consistent with the hypothesis that it was partially inactivated by CovS. We suggest that under mild stress conditions, CovS inactivates CovR, either directly or indirectly, and that this inactivation relieves repression of many GAS genes, including the genes needed for growth of GAS under stress conditions and some genes that are necessary for virulence. Growth of many gram-positive bacteria under multiple-stress conditions requires alteration of promoter recognition produced by RNA polymerase association with the general stress response sigma factor, sigma(B). We provide evidence that for GAS, which lacks a sigB ortholog, growth under stress

  17. CovS Inactivates CovR and Is Required for Growth under Conditions of General Stress in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Tracy L.; Scott, June R.

    2004-01-01

    The gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) causes diseases ranging from mild and often self-limiting infections of the skin or throat to invasive and life-threatening illnesses. To cause such diverse types of disease, the GAS must be able to sense adverse environments and regulate its gene expression accordingly. The CovR/S two-component signal transduction regulatory system in GAS represses about 15% of the GAS genome, including many genes involved in virulence, in response to the environment. We report that CovR is still able to repress transcription from several promoters in the absence of the putative histidine kinase sensor for this system, CovS. We also show that a phosphorylation site mutant (D53A) of CovR is unable to repress gene expression. In addition, we report that a strain with a nonpolar mutation in CovS does not grow at a low pH, elevated temperature, or high osmolarity. The stress-related phenotypes of the CovS mutant were complemented by expression of covS from a plasmid. Selection for growth of a CovS mutant under stress conditions resulted in isolation of second-site mutations that inactivated covR, indicating that CovR and CovS act in the same pathway. Also, at 40°C in the wild-type strain, CovR appeared to be less active on the promoter tested, which is consistent with the hypothesis that it was partially inactivated by CovS. We suggest that under mild stress conditions, CovS inactivates CovR, either directly or indirectly, and that this inactivation relieves repression of many GAS genes, including the genes needed for growth of GAS under stress conditions and some genes that are necessary for virulence. Growth of many gram-positive bacteria under multiple-stress conditions requires alteration of promoter recognition produced by RNA polymerase association with the general stress response sigma factor, σB. We provide evidence that for GAS, which lacks a sigB ortholog, growth under stress conditions

  18. Relation between Coda-Q and stress loaded to an elastic body. -parameters of material conditions derived by stochastic measurement-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic coda is formed by superposed signals caused by scatterers. When heterogeneous condition is changed due to crustal deformations, coda-Q should vary reflecting the physical state if the materials. When the spatial scale of scatters in a medium becomes comparable with or smaller then the wavelength of seismic waves traveling through, it becomes very difficult to analyze the coda-wave quantitatively in terms of the location of scatterers, scattering mechanisms, etc. For inhomogeneous medium, it is natural to deal with stochastic methodologies to interpret seismic data. In this regard coda-Q has been frequently used as a stochastic measure of the medium in which seismic waves propagate. Since objectives of recent structural surveys include spatiotemporal or time-lapse variation of physical properties of underground medium, we propose a new geophysical monitoring method using the stochastic parameters if these parameters reflect changes of physical state of the medium. Several observed examples are reported that the relationship between the coda-Q and the number of earthquakes (e.g., Aki,2004). Aki (2004) said that the interrelation between the coda-Q and the number of earthquakes might be a key to understand the change in the state of crustal stress field. Here, we hypothesize that the change of the coda- Q reflects that of the stress magnitude and direction and try to focus on the relationship between the coda-Q and loaded stress which could cause earthquakes. The purpose of this study is to relate this relationship to non-stochastic quantity of the underground physical state, i.e., the stress to test our hypothesis. We employ two methods to achieve our objectives. One is Finite Difference Method (FDM), and the other is Boundary Integral Equation Method (BIEM). FDM is superior in the calculation of large field and saving calculation time. BIEM is superior in the free shape of boundaries. These two methods are applied to a numerical model of elastic body

  19. Viability and DNA damage of halobacteria under physical stress conditions, including a simulated Martian atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidler, G.; Leuko, S.; Radax, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Several viable halobacteria were isolated from Alpine rock salt of Permo-Triassic age and described as novel species (1, 2). They have apparently survived in the salt sediments over extremely long periods of time. Halobacteria could therefore be suitable model organisms for exploring the possibility of long-term survival of microorganisms on other planets. In addition, the discovery of extraterrestrial halite makes it plausible to consider a specific search for halophiles, perhaps in the planned sample return missions to Mars. We are developing experimental procedures to test the viability of halobacteria under Martian conditions. Cells of two species of haloarchaea were used: 1. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, whose whole genome sequence is already known; 2. Halococcus dombrowskii, a novel isolate from Austrian Permo-Triassic rock salt (2). Cells were grown in complex medium, containing up to 4 M NaCl, and were kept at minus 70riptsizeraisebox{1.5ex{o}}C for up to seven days, or freeze-dried in a lyophilizer. In addition, exposure experiments of halobacterial cells in a liquid nitrogen cooled Martian simulation chamber, at the Austrian Academy of Sceinces, were begun, where temperatures from about plus 5 to minus 100riptsizeraisebox{1.5ex{o}}C, pressures of 6-8 mbar, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere (or other gas mixtures) can be produced. Survival of cells was evaluated by determination of colony-forming units, microscopic examination of cellular morphology, and examination of potential strand breaks in DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results showed a reduction of viable cells, following deep freezing, or lyophilization, respectively, by a factor of about 10 to 100, depending somewhat on the presence of cations, glycerol and other protective substances. Data will be presented on the DNA from stressed halobacterial cells, following digestion by restriction enzymes and separation by PFGE. 1) Stan-Lotter H, McGenity TJ, Legat A, Denner EBM, Glaser K

  20. Gene expression profiling of Sinapis alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions with Illumina deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cai-Hua; Li, Chen; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Shun-Mou; Huang, Jin-Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Guo, Rui-Xing; Lu, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Xue-Kun; Fang, Xiao-Ping; Wei, Wen-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Sinapis alba has many desirable agronomic traits including tolerance to drought. In this investigation, we performed the genome-wide transcriptional profiling of S. alba leaves under drought stress and rewatering growth conditions in an attempt to identify candidate genes involved in drought tolerance, using the Illumina deep sequencing technology. The comparative analysis revealed numerous changes in gene expression level attributable to the drought stress, which resulted in the down-regulation of 309 genes and the up-regulation of 248 genes. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in cell division and catalytic and metabolic processes. Our results provide useful information for further analyses of the drought stress tolerance in Sinapis, and will facilitate molecular breeding for Brassica crop plants. PMID:22207172

  1. Comparative Sigma Factor-mRNA Levels in Mycobacterium marinum under Stress Conditions and during Host Infection.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Das, Sarbashis; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Jordan, Heather R; Ramesh, Malavika; Mallick, Amrita; Root, Kate M; Cheramie, Martin N; de la Cruz Melara, Irma; Small, Pamela L C; Dasgupta, Santanu; Ennis, Don G; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2015-01-01

    We have used RNASeq and qRT-PCR to study mRNA levels for all σ-factors in different Mycobacterium marinum strains under various growth and stress conditions. We also studied their levels in M. marinum from infected fish and mosquito larvae. The annotated σ-factors were expressed and transcripts varied in relation to growth and stress conditions. Some were highly abundant such as sigA, sigB, sigC, sigD, sigE and sigH while others were not. The σ-factor mRNA profiles were similar after heat stress, during infection of fish and mosquito larvae. The similarity also applies to some of the known heat shock genes such as the α-crystallin gene. Therefore, it seems probable that the physiological state of M. marinum is similar when exposed to these different conditions. Moreover, the mosquito larvae data suggest that this is the state that the fish encounter when infected, at least with respect to σ-factor mRNA levels. Comparative genomic analysis of σ-factor gene localizations in three M. marinum strains and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv revealed chromosomal rearrangements that changed the localization of especially sigA, sigB, sigD, sigE, sigF and sigJ after the divergence of these two species. This may explain the variation in species-specific expression upon exposure to different growth conditions. PMID:26445268

  2. Comparative Sigma Factor-mRNA Levels in Mycobacterium marinum under Stress Conditions and during Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Das, Sarbashis; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Jordan, Heather R.; Ramesh, Malavika; Mallick, Amrita; Root, Kate M.; Cheramie, Martin N.; de la Cruz Melara, Irma; Small, Pamela L. C.; Dasgupta, Santanu; Ennis, Don G.; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used RNASeq and qRT-PCR to study mRNA levels for all σ-factors in different Mycobacterium marinum strains under various growth and stress conditions. We also studied their levels in M. marinum from infected fish and mosquito larvae. The annotated σ-factors were expressed and transcripts varied in relation to growth and stress conditions. Some were highly abundant such as sigA, sigB, sigC, sigD, sigE and sigH while others were not. The σ-factor mRNA profiles were similar after heat stress, during infection of fish and mosquito larvae. The similarity also applies to some of the known heat shock genes such as the α-crystallin gene. Therefore, it seems probable that the physiological state of M. marinum is similar when exposed to these different conditions. Moreover, the mosquito larvae data suggest that this is the state that the fish encounter when infected, at least with respect to σ-factor mRNA levels. Comparative genomic analysis of σ-factor gene localizations in three M. marinum strains and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv revealed chromosomal rearrangements that changed the localization of especially sigA, sigB, sigD, sigE, sigF and sigJ after the divergence of these two species. This may explain the variation in species-specific expression upon exposure to different growth conditions. PMID:26445268

  3. Diversity of Survival Patterns among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genotypes Subjected to Food-Related Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Elhadidy, Mohamed; Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resistance patterns to food-related stresses of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains belonging to specific genotypes. A total of 33 E. coli O157:H7 strains were exposed to seven different stress conditions acting as potential selective pressures affecting the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 to humans through the food chain. These stress conditions included cold, oxidative, osmotic, acid, heat, freeze-thaw, and starvation stresses. The genotypes used for comparison included lineage-specific polymorphism, Shiga-toxin-encoding bacteriophage insertion sites, clade type, tir (A255T) polymorphism, Shiga toxin 2 subtype, and antiterminator Q gene allele. Bacterial resistance to different stressors was calculated by determining D-values (times required for inactivation of 90% of the bacterial population), which were then subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. In addition, a relative stress resistance value, integrating resistance values to all tested stressors, was calculated for each bacterial strain and allowed for a ranking-type classification of E. coli O157:H7 strains according to their environmental robustness. Lineage I/II strains were found to be significantly more resistant to acid, cold, and starvation stress than lineage II strains. Similarly, tir (255T) and clade 8 encoding strains were significantly more resistant to acid, heat, cold, and starvation stress than tir (255A) and non-clade 8 strains. Principal component analysis, which allows grouping of strains with similar stress survival characteristics, separated strains of lineage I and I/II from strains of lineage II, which in general showed reduced survival abilities. Results obtained suggest that lineage I/II, tir (255T), and clade 8 strains, which have been previously reported to be more frequently associated with human disease cases, have greater multiple stress resistance than strains of other genotypes. The results from this

  4. Diversity of Survival Patterns among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genotypes Subjected to Food-Related Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Elhadidy, Mohamed; Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resistance patterns to food-related stresses of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains belonging to specific genotypes. A total of 33 E. coli O157:H7 strains were exposed to seven different stress conditions acting as potential selective pressures affecting the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 to humans through the food chain. These stress conditions included cold, oxidative, osmotic, acid, heat, freeze-thaw, and starvation stresses. The genotypes used for comparison included lineage-specific polymorphism, Shiga-toxin-encoding bacteriophage insertion sites, clade type, tir (A255T) polymorphism, Shiga toxin 2 subtype, and antiterminator Q gene allele. Bacterial resistance to different stressors was calculated by determining D-values (times required for inactivation of 90% of the bacterial population), which were then subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. In addition, a relative stress resistance value, integrating resistance values to all tested stressors, was calculated for each bacterial strain and allowed for a ranking-type classification of E. coli O157:H7 strains according to their environmental robustness. Lineage I/II strains were found to be significantly more resistant to acid, cold, and starvation stress than lineage II strains. Similarly, tir (255T) and clade 8 encoding strains were significantly more resistant to acid, heat, cold, and starvation stress than tir (255A) and non-clade 8 strains. Principal component analysis, which allows grouping of strains with similar stress survival characteristics, separated strains of lineage I and I/II from strains of lineage II, which in general showed reduced survival abilities. Results obtained suggest that lineage I/II, tir (255T), and clade 8 strains, which have been previously reported to be more frequently associated with human disease cases, have greater multiple stress resistance than strains of other genotypes. The results from this

  5. STRESS CRACK TESTING OF POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes to stress cracking is evaluated under accelerated conditions at a constant stress. he test specimens are according to ASTM D-1822, and are of the dumbbell shape with a constant length in the central section. he acce...

  6. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation. PMID:22772594

  7. Objective measurement of human tolerance to +G sub z acceleration stress. Ph.D. Thesis - Univ. of N. Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rositano, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efficacy of a new objective technique using a transcutaneous Doppler flowmeter to monitor superficial temporal artery blood flow velocity during acceleration was investigated. The results were correlated with current objective and subjective G tolerance end points. In over 1300 centrifuge runs, retrograde eye level blood flow leading to total flow cessation was consistently recorded and preceded visual field deterioration leading to blackout by 3 to 23 seconds. The new method was successfully applied as an objective indication of tolerance in a variety of test situations including evaluation of g-suits, straining maneuvers, and 13 deg, 45 deg and 65 deg set back angles.

  8. Expression profile of six stress-related genes and productive performances of fast and slow growing broiler strains reared under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Simona; Lasagna, Emiliano; Sarti, Francesca Maria; Marelli, Stefano Paolo; Cozzi, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Giovanni; Terova, Genciana

    2015-12-01

    High temperature is one of the prominent environmental factors causing economic losses to the poultry industry as it negatively affects growth and production performance in broiler chickens. We used One Step TaqMan real time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) technology to study the effects of chronic heat stress on the expression of genes codifying for the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), as well as for heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP90, glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), and caspase 6 (CASP6) in the liver of two different broiler genetic strains: Red JA Cou Nu Hubbard (CN) and Ross 508 Aviagen (RO). CN is a naked neck slow growing broiler intended for the free range and/or organic markets, whereas RO is selected for fast growing. We also analysed the effect of chronic heat stress on productive performances, and plasma corticosterone levels as well as the association between transcriptomic response and specific SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in each genetic strain of broiler chickens. RO and CN broilers, 4 weeks of age, were maintained for 4 weeks at either 34 °C or 22 °C. The results demonstrated that there was a genotype and a temperature main effect on the broilers' growth from the 4th to the 8th week of age, but the interaction effect between genotype and temperature resulted not statistically significant. By considering the genotype effect, fast growing broilers (RO) grew more than the slow growing ones (CN), whereas by considering the temperature effect, broilers in unheated conditions grew more than the heat stressed ones. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in the blood of heat stressed broilers, due to the activation of the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis). Carcass yield at slaughter was of similar values in the 4 cohorts (genotype/temperature combinations or treatment groups), ranging from 86.5 to 88.6%, whereas carcass weight was negatively influenced by

  9. Expression profile of six stress-related genes and productive performances of fast and slow growing broiler strains reared under heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, Simona; Lasagna, Emiliano; Sarti, Francesca Maria; Marelli, Stefano Paolo; Cozzi, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Giovanni; Terova, Genciana

    2015-01-01

    High temperature is one of the prominent environmental factors causing economic losses to the poultry industry as it negatively affects growth and production performance in broiler chickens. We used One Step TaqMan real time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) technology to study the effects of chronic heat stress on the expression of genes codifying for the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), as well as for heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP90, glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), and caspase 6 (CASP6) in the liver of two different broiler genetic strains: Red JA Cou Nu Hubbard (CN) and Ross 508 Aviagen (RO). CN is a naked neck slow growing broiler intended for the free range and/or organic markets, whereas RO is selected for fast growing. We also analysed the effect of chronic heat stress on productive performances, and plasma corticosterone levels as well as the association between transcriptomic response and specific SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in each genetic strain of broiler chickens. RO and CN broilers, 4 weeks of age, were maintained for 4 weeks at either 34 °C or 22 °C. The results demonstrated that there was a genotype and a temperature main effect on the broilers' growth from the 4th to the 8th week of age, but the interaction effect between genotype and temperature resulted not statistically significant. By considering the genotype effect, fast growing broilers (RO) grew more than the slow growing ones (CN), whereas by considering the temperature effect, broilers in unheated conditions grew more than the heat stressed ones. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in the blood of heat stressed broilers, due to the activation of the HPA (hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical axis). Carcass yield at slaughter was of similar values in the 4 cohorts (genotype/temperature combinations or treatment groups), ranging from 86.5 to 88.6%, whereas carcass weight was negatively influenced

  10. The effects of texture and surface condition on the iodine stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of unirradiated Zircaloy-2

    SciTech Connect

    Syrett, B.C.; Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Four lots of stress-relieved Zircaloy-2 tubing were prepared from a single heat of the alloy. Tube reduction parameters were controlled so that each lot had a different crystallographic texture. The tubing with the most radial (least tangential) basal pole intensity was shown to have a Kearns texture number in the radial direction of 0.61, whereas the equivalent value for the tubing with the least radial texture was 0.48. Each lot of tubing was given one of three surface treatments: etched, etched and grit blasted, or lightly etched and shot blasted. The iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the unirradiated tubing was determined by measuring the time to failure in a standard tube pressurization test at about 593 K in which 6 mg of iodine was present for each square centimetre of exposed Zircaloy surface. The results showed that texture has a large effect on SCC susceptibility and that surface condition has a significant but lesser effect. The SCC resistance was lowest in the material with the most tangential basal pole intensity and increased as the texture became more radial. The lightly etched and shot-blasted surface resulted in times to failure that were shorter than the times for the other two surface conditions. However, it seems likely that the influence of surface treatment is quite complex and that SCC susceptibility can change significantly with a seemingly minor change in the surface treatment technique. The effect of texture was interpreted in terms of its influence on strength, on deformation characteristics, and on orientation of SCC susceptible planes with respect to the dominant tensile (hoop) stress. The effect of surface condition was interpreted in terms of its influence on residual stresses, on local texture changes, on local stress concentration, and on chemical activity.

  11. Growth, physiology and yield of durum wheat (Triticum durum) treated with sewage sludge under water stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Boudjabi, Sonia; Kribaa, Mohammed; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, low soil fertility and water deficit considerably limit crop production. The use of sewage sludge as an organic amendment could contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and hence the agronomic production. The study aims to highlight the behaviour of durum wheat to the application of sewage sludge associated with water stress. The assessment focused on morphophysiological parameters of the wheat plant and yield. Under greenhouse conditions, the variety Mohamed Ben Bachir was treated by four water stress levels (100 %, 80 %, 50 % and 30 %). Each stress level comprised five fertilizer treatments: 20, 50 and 100 t/ha of dry sludge, 35 kg/ha of urea, and a control with no fertilization. Results revealed a significant loss in water content and chlorophyll a in leaves. Water stress negatively affected the development of wheat plants by reducing significantly seed yield, leaf area and biomass produced. Plant’s responses to water stress manifested by an accumulation of proline and a decrease in total phosphorus. However, the increasing doses of sewage sludge limited the effect of water stress. Our findings showed an increase in the amount of chlorophyll pigments, leaf area, total phosphorus, biomass and yield. In addition, excessive accumulation of proline (1.11 ± 1.03 µg/g DM) was recorded as a result of the high concentration of sludge (100 t/ha DM). The application of sewage sludge is beneficial for the wheat crop, but the high accumulation of proline in plants treated with high dose of sludge suggests to properly consider this fact. The application of sludge should be used with caution in soils where water is limited. Because the combined effect of these two factors could result in a fatal osmotic stress to crop development. PMID:26417365

  12. Growth, physiology and yield of durum wheat (Triticum durum) treated with sewage sludge under water stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Boudjabi, Sonia; Kribaa, Mohammed; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, low soil fertility and water deficit considerably limit crop production. The use of sewage sludge as an organic amendment could contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and hence the agronomic production. The study aims to highlight the behaviour of durum wheat to the application of sewage sludge associated with water stress. The assessment focused on morphophysiological parameters of the wheat plant and yield. Under greenhouse conditions, the variety Mohamed Ben Bachir was treated by four water stress levels (100 %, 80 %, 50 % and 30 %). Each stress level comprised five fertilizer treatments: 20, 50 and 100 t/ha of dry sludge, 35 kg/ha of urea, and a control with no fertilization. Results revealed a significant loss in water content and chlorophyll a in leaves. Water stress negatively affected the development of wheat plants by reducing significantly seed yield, leaf area and biomass produced. Plant's responses to water stress manifested by an accumulation of proline and a decrease in total phosphorus. However, the increasing doses of sewage sludge limited the effect of water stress. Our findings showed an increase in the amount of chlorophyll pigments, leaf area, total phosphorus, biomass and yield. In addition, excessive accumulation of proline (1.11 ± 1.03 µg/g DM) was recorded as a result of the high concentration of sludge (100 t/ha DM). The application of sewage sludge is beneficial for the wheat crop, but the high accumulation of proline in plants treated with high dose of sludge suggests to properly consider this fact. The application of sludge should be used with caution in soils where water is limited. Because the combined effect of these two factors could result in a fatal osmotic stress to crop development. PMID:26417365

  13. Influence of light colours on growth and stress response of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Heydarnejad, M Saeed; Parto, M; Pilevarian, A A

    2013-02-01

    The influence of light colours on growth and stress response in rainbow trout Oncorhyncus mykiss (15.16 ± 0.29 cm; 32.27 ± 1.18 g) was studied. Fish were reared in 16 glass aquaria (140 × 30 × 80 cm) each with 12 fish under one of four different lighting spectra: yellow (546 nm), red (605 nm), blue (470 nm) and white (full spectrum, control). Experiments lasted 125 days. The stress response was evaluated by measuring cortisol levels. Body weight and total length of the fish reared under yellow l