Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated stress conditions

  1. [Autonomic regulation at emotional stress under hypoxic conditions in the elderly with physiological and accelerated aging: effect of hypoxic training].

    PubMed

    Os'mak, E D; Asanov, É O

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hypoxic training on autonomic regulation in psycho-emotional stress conditions in hypoxic conditions in older people with physiological (25 people) and accelerated (28 people) aging respiratory system. It is shown that hypoxic training leads to an increase in vagal activity indicators (HF) and reduced simpatovagal index (LF/HF), have a normalizing effect on the autonomic balance during stress loads in older people with different types of aging respiratory system.

  2. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  3. Membrane Degradation Accelerated Stress Test

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.

    2015-01-21

    These are a set of slides that deal with membrane degradation accelerated stress test. Specifically, the following topics are covered: membrane degradation FCTT drive cycle; membrane ASTs; current membrane ASTs damage mechanisms; proposed membrane AST, RH cycling in H2/Air; current proposed AST; 2min/2min AST damage mechanism; 30sec/45sec RH cycling at OCV.

  4. Cerebral circulation during acceleration stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirovic, Srdjan

    A mathematical model of the cerebrovascular system has been developed to examine the influence of acceleration on cerebral circulation. The objective is to distinguish the main factors that limit cerebral blood flow in pilots subjected to accelerations which exceed the gravitational acceleration of the earth (Gz > 1). The cerebrovascular system was approximated by an open-loop network of elastic tubes and the flow in blood vessels was modeled according to a one-dimensional theory of flow in collapsible tubes. Since linear analysis showed that the speed of pulse propagation in the intracranial vessels should not be modified by the skull constraint, the same governing equations were used for the intracranial vessels as for the rest of the network. The steady and pulsatile components of the cerebrospinal fluid pressure were determined from the condition that the cranial volume must be conserved. After the qualitative aspects of the model results were verified experimentally, the open-loop geometry was incorporated into a global mathematical model of the cardiovascular system. Both the mathematical models and the experiment show that cerebral blood flow diminishes for Gz > 1 due to an increase in the resistance of the large veins in the neck, which collapse as soon as the venous pressure becomes negative. In contrast, the conservation of the cranial volume requires that the cerebrospinal and venous pressure always be approximately the same, and the vessels contained in the cranial cavity do not collapse. Positive pressure breathing provides protection by elevating blood arterial and venous pressures at the heart, thus preventing the venous collapse and maintaining the normal cerebral vascular resistance.

  5. A study on task difficulty and acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Rogers, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of two experiments which relate to task difficulty and the effects of environmental stress on tracking performance are discussed and compared to subjective evaluations. The first experiment involved five different sum of sine tracking tasks which humans tracked both in a static condition and under a 5 Gz acceleration stress condition. The second experiment involved similar environmental stress conditions but in this case the tasks were constructed from deterministic functions with specially designed velocity and acceleration profiles. Phase Plane performance analysis was conducted to study potential measures of workload or tracking difficulty.

  6. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  7. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  8. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    DAMD17-98-1-8519 TITLE: Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing 5b. GRANT NUMBER...To determine the effect of capacitively coupled electric field stimulation on tibial stress fracture healing in men and women. Methods: A

  9. Evaluation of accelerated stability test conditions for medicated chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Lauretta; Conte, Ubaldo; Nhamias, Alain; Grenier, Pascal; Vergnault, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The overall stability of medicated chewing gums is investigated under different storage conditions. Active substances with different chemical stabilities in solid state are chosen as model drugs. The dosage form is a three layer tablet obtained by direct compression. The gum core contains the active ingredient while the external layers are formulated to prevent gum adhesion to the punches of the tableting machine. Two accelerated test conditions (40°C/75% RH and 30°C/65% RH) are performed for 6 months. Furthermore, a long-term stability test at room conditions is conducted to verify the predictability of the results obtained from the stress tests. Some drugs are stable in all the conditions tested, but other drugs, generally considered stable in solid dosage forms, have shown relevant stability problems particularly when stress test conditions are applied to this particular semi-solid dosage forms. For less stable drugs, the stress conditions of 40°C/75% RH are not always predictable of chewing gum stability at room temperature and may produce false negative; intermediate conditions, 30°C/65% RH, are more predictive for this purpose, the results of drug content found after 6 months at intermediate stress conditions and 12 months at room conditions are generally comparable. But the results obtained show that only long-term conditions stability tests gave consistent results. During aging, the semi solid nature of the gum base itself, may also influence the drug delivery rate during chewing and great attention should be given also to the dissolution stability.

  10. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and posttraumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sadeh, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and then identify mechanisms by which PTSD might promote OXS and accelerated aging. We review studies on OXS-related genes and the role that they may play in moderating the effects of PTSD on neural integrity and conclude with a discussion of directions for future research on antioxidant treatments and biomarkers of accelerated aging in PTSD. PMID:25245500

  11. Accelerated trace eyeblink conditioning after cortisol IV-infusion.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Linn K; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Richter, Steffen; Blumenthal, Terry D; Oitzl, Melly; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2010-11-01

    Impairing effects of cortisol on learning performance have been shown in human trace eyeblink conditioning. As the effect is observed from 30 min to hours after administration, a genomic action of cortisol is assumed. Here we report rapid cortisol effects that were observed during the first 10 min after cortisol administration in humans. Young healthy males (n=24) received the cortisol synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (1.5 g per os) to avoid interference of the endogenous pulsatile secretion of cortisol. Next, 2mg cortisol or placebo was infused intravenously, immediately before the trace conditioning task. The probability of the conditioned eyeblink responses was assessed electromyographically during the trace eyeblink conditioning task (unconditioned stimulus: corneal air puff, 10 psi, 50 ms; conditioned stimulus: binaural pure tone, 7 dB, 1000 Hz, 400 ms; empty interval between CS and US: 550 ms). Cortisol resulted in a faster increase of conditioning (p=.02), reaching a comparable level to placebo later on. This result extends the well-known effects of stress on the quality and amount of learning by showing that cortisol also affects the speed of learning. We propose that cortisol accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning via a fast, non-genomic mechanism. This fast action of cortisol is part of the adaptive strategy during the early stress response.

  12. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  13. Modeling Reliability Growth in Accelerated Stress Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    HASS and HASA Explained, Milwaukee, WI: Quality Press, 2009. [13] A. J. Porter, "Failure Mode Verification: Applying Highly Accelerated Life Testing...and Production Conference - Proceedings of the Technical Program, Des Plaines, IL, 1998. [16] M. Silverman, "Summary of HALT and HASS results at

  14. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, Giuseppe Aprile, Daniele; Agostinetti, Piero; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-15

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by “off-normal” operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the “off-normal” operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  15. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  16. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  17. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  18. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  19. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  20. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  1. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  2. Measuring Science Teachers' Stress Level Triggered by Multiple Stressful Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halim, Lilia; Samsudin, Mohd Ali; Meerah, T. Subahan M.; Osman, Kamisah

    2006-01-01

    The complexity of science teaching requires science teachers to encounter a range of tasks. Some tasks are perceived as stressful while others are not. This study aims to investigate the extent to which different teaching situations lead to different stress levels. It also aims to identify the easiest and most difficult conditions to be regarded…

  3. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  4. Transport synthetic acceleration with opposing reflecting boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme is extended to problems with opposing reflecting boundary conditions. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. A procedure is developed that allows the use of the conjugate gradient (CG) method to solve the resulting low-order system of equations. Several well-known transport iteration algorithms are cast in a linear algebraic form to show their equivalence to standard iterative techniques. Source iteration in the presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions is shown to be equivalent to a (poorly) preconditioned stationary Richardson iteration, with the preconditioner defined by the method of iterating on the incident fluxes on the reflecting boundaries. The TSA method (and any synthetic method) amounts to a further preconditioning of the Richardson iteration. The presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions requires special consideration when developing a procedure to realize the CG method for the proposed system of equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite matrices; this condition requires the algebraic elimination of the boundary angular corrections from the low-order equations. As a consequence of this elimination, evaluating the action of the resulting matrix on an arbitrary vector involves two transport sweeps and a transmission iteration. Results of applying the acceleration scheme to a simple test problem are presented.

  5. Dimethoate accelerates the extinction of eyeblink conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Harrington, Mauricio; Castillo, Irene; Díaz, Corín; Alés, Inés; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In agriculture, organophosphates are frequently used as insecticides and pesticides. These compounds decrease acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, thereby provoking an accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at synapses and resulting in the over-stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. Using trace paradigms, we investigated the effects of dimethoate, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, on the classical conditioning of eyelid responses, a hippocampal-dependent mouse model of associative learning. Mice were conditioned with a trace shock-SHOCK paradigm having first implanted stimulating electrodes in the supraorbitary nerve and recording electrodes in the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi muscle. When these mice were injected with dimethoate (5, 20, 50mg/kg/day) they were capable of acquiring associative learning, and the latency and amplitude of their unconditioned eyelid responses were unaffected by the administration of the pesticide. However, dimethoate administration led to the rapid extinction of conditioned responses, suggesting that this organophosphate accelerates the extinction of this form of associative learning. Analysis of the motor function of these mice using the rotarod performance test revealed that motor function and performance clearly deteriorated following dimethoate administration, with no improvements over the following 4 days. Together these findings indicate that dimethoate accelerates the extinction of acquired conditioned responses, affecting associative learning and memory, and it impairs motor function and performance in mice.

  6. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  7. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  8. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to {minus}2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO{sub 2} exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO{sub 2}. This CO{sub 2}-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO{sub 2} recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations.

  9. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL PARTICLES UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Zhang, M. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2013-02-10

    The acceleration of suprathermal charged particles in the heliosphere under pressure balance conditions including for the first time the radial spatial particle diffusion and convection in the solar wind is investigated. The physical conditions are derived for which the stationary phase space distribution of suprathermal particles approaches the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5}, which is often seen in spacecraft observations. For separable source distributions in momentum and position we analytically solve the stationary particle transport equation for a radially constant solar wind speed V {sub 0} and a momentum-independent radial spatial diffusion coefficient. The resulting stationary solution at any position within the finite heliosphere is the superposition of an infinite sum of power laws in momentum below and above the (assumed mono-momentum) injection momentum p{sub I} . The smallest spatial eigenvalue determines the flattest power law, to which the full stationary solution approaches at large and small enough momenta. Only for the case of a reflecting inner and a free-escape outer spatial boundary, does one small eigenvalue exist, yielding the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5} at sufficiently large momentum values. The other three spatial boundary conditions imply steeper momentum spectra. Momentum spectra and radial profiles of suprathermal particles are calculated by adopting a uniform outer ring spatial source distribution.

  10. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clint J; Søvik, Eirik; Myerscough, Mary R; Barron, Andrew B

    2015-03-17

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience.

  11. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Clint J.; Myerscough, Mary R.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience. PMID:25675508

  12. Early life stress accelerates behavioral and neural maturation of the hippocampus in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Bath, K.G.; Manzano-Nieves, G.; Goodwill, H.

    2017-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) increases the risk for later cognitive and emotional dysfunction. ELS is known to truncate neural development through effects on suppressing cell birth, increasing cell death, and altering neuronal morphology, effects that have been associated with behavioral profiles indicative of precocious maturation. However, how earlier silencing of growth drives accelerated behavioral maturation has remained puzzling. Here, we test the novel hypothesis that, ELS drives a switch from growth to maturation to accelerate neural and behavioral development. To test this, we used a mouse model of ELS, fragmented maternal care, and a cross-sectional dense sampling approach focusing on hippocampus and measured effects of ELS on the ontogeny of behavioral development and biomarkers of neural maturation. Consistent with previous work, ELS was associated with an earlier developmental decline in expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and differentiation (doublecortin). However, ELS also led to a precocious arrival of Parvalbumin-positive cells, led to an earlier switch in NMDA receptor subunit expression (marker of synaptic maturity), and was associated with an earlier rise in myelin basic protein expression (key component of the myelin sheath). In addition, in a contextual fear-conditioning task, ELS accelerated the timed developmental suppression of contextual fear. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that ELS serves to switch neurodevelopment from processes of growth to maturation and promotes accelerated development of some forms of emotional learning. PMID:27155103

  13. Early life stress accelerates behavioral and neural maturation of the hippocampus in male mice.

    PubMed

    Bath, K; Manzano-Nieves, G; Goodwill, H

    2016-06-01

    Early life stress (ELS) increases the risk for later cognitive and emotional dysfunction. ELS is known to truncate neural development through effects on suppressing cell birth, increasing cell death, and altering neuronal morphology, effects that have been associated with behavioral profiles indicative of precocious maturation. However, how earlier silencing of growth drives accelerated behavioral maturation has remained puzzling. Here, we test the novel hypothesis that, ELS drives a switch from growth to maturation to accelerate neural and behavioral development. To test this, we used a mouse model of ELS, fragmented maternal care, and a cross-sectional dense sampling approach focusing on hippocampus and measured effects of ELS on the ontogeny of behavioral development and biomarkers of neural maturation. Consistent with previous work, ELS was associated with an earlier developmental decline in expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and differentiation (doublecortin). However, ELS also led to a precocious arrival of Parvalbumin-positive cells, led to an earlier switch in NMDA receptor subunit expression (marker of synaptic maturity), and was associated with an earlier rise in myelin basic protein expression (key component of the myelin sheath). In addition, in a contextual fear-conditioning task, ELS accelerated the timed developmental suppression of contextual fear. Together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that ELS serves to switch neurodevelopment from processes of growth to maturation and promotes accelerated development of some forms of emotional learning.

  14. The behavior of Kevlar fibers under environmental-stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark Charles

    There are a myriad of mechanisms by which polymers can degrade and fail. It is therefore important to understand the physical mechanics, chemistry, their interactions, and kinetics. This pursuit becomes more than just "academic" because these mechanisms might just change with service conditions (i.e. environment and loading). If one does not understand these processes from the molecular to macroscopic scale it would be exceedingly difficult to gain information from accelerated testing because the mechanisms just might change from one condition to another. The purpose of this study was to probe these processes on scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic in environmental stress conditions. This study reports the results of environmental-stress degradation of Kevlar 49 fibers. The environmental agent of focus was the ubiquitous air pollutant complex NOsb{x}. Other materials and environments were investigated to a lesser extent for purposes of comparison. Mechanical property (i.e., short-term strength, modulus, and creep lifetime) degradation was examined using single fiber, yarn, and epoxy coated yarn (composite) specimens under environmental-stress conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were employed to examine and compare the appearance of fracture features resulting from the various testing conditions. Atomic force microscopy augmented these studies with detailed topographical mappings and measures of the fracture surface frictional and modulus properties. Molecular processes (i.e., chain scission and other mechanical-chemical reactions) were probed by measures of changes in viscosity average molecular weight and the infrared spectra. It was demonstrated that environmental-stress degradation effects do occur in the Kevlar-NOsb{x} gas system. Strength decay in environmentally exposed unloaded fibers was demonstrated and a synergistic response in creep reduced fiber lifetimes by three orders of magnitude at moderate loadings. That is to say, the

  15. Temperature and current accelerated lifetime conditions and testing of laser diodes for ESA BepiColombo space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Cohen, Shalom; Rech, Markus; Weidlich, Kai

    2011-03-01

    System designers and end users of diode pumped solid state lasers often require knowledge of the operability limits of QCW laser diode pump sources and their predicted reliability performance as a function of operating conditions. Accelerated ageing at elevated temperatures, duty cycles and/or currents allows extended lifetime testing of diode stacks to be executed on compressed timescales with high confidence. We present a novel, time-efficient technique for the determination of accelerated lifetime test conditions using degradation rate data, rather than the traditionally used failures against time data. To assess the effect of thermally accelerated ageing, 4 groups of 4 stacks each were operated for 60 million pulses at different temperature stress levels by varying the pulse repetition rate from 100Hz to 250Hz. The measured power degradation rates fitted to an Arrhenius type model, result in activation energy of 0.47- 0.74eV, apparently indicating two thermally activated degradation modes with different activation energies. Similarly, for current accelerated ageing, another 4 groups of 4 stacks were tested at operation currents from 120A to 150A. The optical power degradation rates due to current stress follow a power law behavior with a current acceleration factor of 1.7. The obtained acceleration parameters allowed considerable reduction of the lifetime test duration, which would have otherwise taken an unacceptably long time under nominal operating conditions. The successful results of the accelerated lifetime have been a major milestone enabling qualification of SCD stacks as pump sources for the laser altimeter in ESA Bepi-Colombo space mission. The presented reliability analysis allows life test qualification programs to be accelerated for generic QCW stacks and their lifetime to be predicted in various operating environments.

  16. MICROWAVE-ACCELERATED MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of microwave-accelerated solventless synthetic protocols in multicomponent (MCC) reactions will be exemplified by several condensation and cyclization reactions including the rapid one-pot assembly of valuable heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated intermed...

  17. Control over stress accelerates extinction of drug seeking via prefrontal cortical activation

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Michael V.; Pomrenze, Matthew B.; Nakamura, Shinya; Dolzani, Samuel D.; Cooper, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction is a form of inhibitory learning viewed as an essential process in suppressing conditioned responses to drug cues, yet there is little information concerning experiential variables that modulate its formation. Coping factors play an instrumental role in determining how adverse life events impact the transition from casual drug use to addiction. Here we provide evidence in rat that prior exposure to controllable stress accelerates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior relative to uncontrollable or no stress exposure. Subsequent experimentation using high-speed optogenetic tools determined if the infralimbic region (IL) of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex mediates the impact of controllable stress on cocaine-seeking behavior. Photoinhibition of pyramidal neurons in the IL during coping behavior did not interfere with subject's ability to control the stressor, but prevented the later control-induced facilitation of extinction. These results provide strong evidence that the degree of behavioral control over adverse events, rather than adverse events per se, potently modulates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior, and that controllable stress engages prefrontal circuitry that primes future extinction learning. PMID:25954765

  18. Control Over Stress Accelerates Extinction of Drug Seeking Via Prefrontal Cortical Activation.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Michael V; Pomrenze, Matthew B; Nakamura, Shinya; Dolzani, Samuel D; Cooper, Donald C

    Extinction is a form of inhibitory learning viewed as an essential process in suppressing conditioned responses to drug cues, yet there is little information concerning experiential variables that modulate its formation. Coping factors play an instrumental role in determining how adverse life events impact the transition from casual drug use to addiction. Here we provide evidence in rat that prior exposure to controllable stress accelerates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior relative to uncontrollable or no stress exposure. Subsequent experimentation using high-speed optogenetic tools determined if the infralimbic region (IL) of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex mediates the impact of controllable stress on cocaine-seeking behavior. Photoinhibition of pyramidal neurons in the IL during coping behavior did not interfere with subject's ability to control the stressor, but prevented the later control-induced facilitation of extinction. These results provide strong evidence that the degree of behavioral control over adverse events, rather than adverse events per se, potently modulates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior, and that controllable stress engages prefrontal circuitry that primes future extinction learning.

  19. Membrane degradation during combined chemical and mechanical accelerated stress testing of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C.; Ghassemzadeh, L.; Van Hove, F.; Lauritzen, M.; Kolodziej, J.; Wang, G. G.; Holdcroft, S.; Kjeang, E.

    2014-07-01

    A cyclic open circuit voltage (COCV) accelerated stress test (AST) is designed to screen the simultaneous effect of chemical and mechanical membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The AST consists of a steady state OCV phase to accelerate chemical degradation and periodic wet/dry cycles to provide mechanical degradation. The membrane degradation process induced by COCV AST operation is analyzed using a standard MEA with PFSA ionomer membrane. The OCV shows an initially mild decay rate followed by a higher decay rate in the later stages of the experiment. Membrane failure, defined by a threshold convective hydrogen leak rate, is obtained after 160 h of operation. Uniform membrane thinning is observed with pinhole formation being the primary cause of failure. Mechanical tensile tests reveal that the membrane becomes stiffer and more brittle during AST operation, which contributes to mechanical failure upon cyclic humidity induced stress. Solid state 19F NMR spectroscopy and fluoride emission measurements demonstrate fluorine loss from both side chain and main chain upon membrane exposure to high temperature and low humidity OCV condition.

  20. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1986-09-01

    This is the final report of a reliability research program to study the response of amorphous silicon colar cells to accelerated temperature testing. The goal of the research was to utilize accelerated testing to identify failure/degradation modes and to relate them to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Four types of single junction commercial modules were subjected to 140 C testing, both in the dark and under illuminated conditions. The before and after electrical characteristics of individual cells were measured and compared and correlated with physical evidence. A fifth module type could not be tested because of poor adherence of the films to the glass superstrate. A short term effect of stressing was noted which dramatically improved cells with low Voc on one type of construction. All cells eventually showed long term irreversible degradation, but the time to 50% Pm reduction varied by as much as two orders of magnitude depending on construction. No basic difference could be detected between degradation under illuminated or non-illuminated conditions, when cells were either open or short circuited. Comparison with one type of tendem cell and with published results of Japanese cell testing indicated the marked superiority of the tandem cell to all other types. Cells were examined physically by optical, IR, and scanning electron microscopy and by Auger spectroscopy, spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The long term degradation was felt to be due to localized penetration of aluminum through the amorphous film.

  1. Calculation of structural dynamic forces and stresses using mode acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul

    1989-01-01

    While the standard mode acceleration formulation in structural dynamics has often been interpreted to suggest that the reason for improved convergence obtainable is that the dynamic correction factor is divided by the modal frequencies-squared, an alternative formulation is presented which clearly indicates that the only difference between mode acceleration and mode displacement data recovery is the addition of a static correction term. Attention is given to the advantages in numerical implementation associated with this alternative, as well as to an illustrative example.

  2. Long-term moderate exercise accelerates the recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yuan-Chang; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Yu, Lung; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Wu, Fong-Sen; Jen, Chauying J; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an important global health problem. It is well documented that stress increases the incidences of various cardiovascular disorders. Regular exercise is known to reduce resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). This study was designed to clarify the effects of long-term exercise on stress-evoked cardiovascular responses and to emphasize post-stress recovery effects. Male Wistar rats underwent 8 weeks of moderate treadmill training, with cardiovascular responses, autonomic nervous system activities and local Fos reactivity changes in the cardiovascular regulation center were monitored before, during and after immobilization stress. A spectral analysis of cardiovascular parameters was used to examine autonomic nervous activities. We found that long-term exercise (i) lowered resting BP, HR and sympathetic activity, but increased resting parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS); (ii) accelerated post-stress recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular and sympathetic responses along with increased BRS and (iii) accelerated post-stress recovery of stress-evoked neuron activations in the paraventricular nucleus, but delayed it in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius. We conclude that, in rats, long-term exercise accelerated recovery of stress-evoked cardiovascular responses differentially altering hypothalamic and medullar neuron activities.

  3. Stress conditioning: a novel approach to organ preservation.

    PubMed

    Perdrizet, G A; Heffron, T G; Buckingham, F C; Salciunas, P J; Gaber, A O; Stuart, F P; Thistlethwaite, J R

    1989-01-01

    Effective stress conditioning can extend the safe cold storage time of rat kidneys to 48 hours. We demonstrated that planned induction of the stress response, by heat shock, can be used to stress condition the transplant organ and protect it against the damages of cold storage. A powerful and useful protective mechanism exists in a latent form in all cells. This mechanism can be rapidly activated in a controlled and planned way to allow tissues temporarily to resist injury. Through stress conditioning it is possible to provide a high level of protection in situations in which stress can be anticipated and planned for.

  4. Conditioning of high gradient H sup - accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.

    1991-02-01

    Three prototype cavities for the side-coupled accelerating structure of Fermilab's Linac Upgrade have been powered. The cavities operate at a nominal maximum surface electric field of 37--42 MV/m and have been run at close to 60 MV/m at 805 MHz. This paper will present the experience accumulated on x-ray production and RF breakdown frequency. We will try to compare our data with others' experiences with high surface electric fields. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Estimation of Attitude and External Acceleration Using Inertial Sensor Measurement During Various Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Keun; Park, Edward J.; Robinovitch, Stephen N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a Kalman filter-based attitude (i.e., roll and pitch) estimation algorithm using an inertial sensor composed of a triaxial accelerometer and a triaxial gyroscope. In particular, the proposed algorithm has been developed for accurate attitude estimation during dynamic conditions, in which external acceleration is present. Although external acceleration is the main source of the attitude estimation error and despite the need for its accurate estimation in many applications, this problem that can be critical for the attitude estimation has not been addressed explicitly in the literature. Accordingly, this paper addresses the combined estimation problem of the attitude and external acceleration. Experimental tests were conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm in various dynamic condition settings and to provide further insight into the variations in the estimation accuracy. Furthermore, two different approaches for dealing with the estimation problem during dynamic conditions were compared, i.e., threshold-based switching approach versus acceleration model-based approach. Based on an external acceleration model, the proposed algorithm was capable of estimating accurate attitudes and external accelerations for short accelerated periods, showing its high effectiveness during short-term fast dynamic conditions. Contrariwise, when the testing condition involved prolonged high external accelerations, the proposed algorithm exhibited gradually increasing errors. However, as soon as the condition returned to static or quasi-static conditions, the algorithm was able to stabilize the estimation error, regaining its high estimation accuracy. PMID:22977288

  6. Maximum von Mises Stress in the Loading Environment of Mass Acceleration Curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Robert J.; Chen, Long Y.

    2006-01-01

    Method for calculating stress due to acceleration loading: 1) Part has been designed by FEA and hand calculation in one critical loading direction judged by the analyst; 2) Maximum stress can be due to loading in another direction; 3) Analysis procedure to be presented determines: a) The maximum Mises stress at any point; and b) The direction of maximum loading associated with the "stress". Concept of Mass Acceleration Curves (MAC): 1) Developed by JPL to perform preliminary structural sizing (i.e. Mariners, Voyager, Galileo, Pathfinder, MER,...MSL); 2) Acceleration of physical masses are bounded by a curve; 3) G-levels of vibro-acoustic and transient environments; 4) Convergent process before the couple loads cycle; and 5) Semi-empirical method to effectively bound the loads, not a simulation of the actual response.

  7. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  8. Power-conditioning system for the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Smith, M.E.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, D.R.; Cook, E.G.; Copp, R.L.; Lee, F.D.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D.; Speckert, G.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed, linear induction, electron accelerator currently under construction and nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 near Livermore, California. The ATA is a 50 MeV, 10 kA machine capable of generating electron beam pulses at a 1 kHz rate in a 10 pulse burst, 5 pps average, with a pulse width of 70 ns FWHM. Ten 18 kV power supplies are used to charge 25 capacitor banks with a total energy storage of 8 megajoules. Energy is transferred from the capacitor banks in 500 microsecond pulses through 25 Command Resonant Charge units (CRC) to 233 Thyratron Switch Chassis. Each Thyratron Switch Chassis contains a 2.5 microfarad capacitor and is charged to 25 kV (780 joules) with voltage regulation of +- .05%. These capacitors are switched into 10:1 step-up resonant transformers to charge 233 Blumleins to 250 kV in 20 microseconds. A magnetic modulator is used instead of a Blumlein to drive the grid of the injector.

  9. Fault stability under conditions of variable normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Linker, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of fault slip under conditions of varying normal stress is modelled as a spring and slider system with rate- and state-dependent friction. Coupling of normal stress to shear stress is achieved by inclining the spring at an angle, ??, to the sliding surface. Linear analysis yields two conditions for unstable slip. The first, of a type previously identified for constant normal stress systems, results in instability if stiffness is below a critical value. Critical stiffness depends on normal stress, constitutive parameters, characteristic sliding distance and the spring angle. Instability of the first type is possible only for velocity-weakening friction. The second condition yields instability if spring angle ?? <-cot-1??ss, where ??ss is steady-state sliding friction. The second condition can arise under conditions of velocity strengthening or weakening. Stability fields for finite perturbations are investigated by numerical simulation. -Authors

  10. Stress differentially affects fear conditioning in men and women.

    PubMed

    Merz, Christian Josef; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Schweckendiek, Jan; Klucken, Tim; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2013-11-01

    Stress and fear conditioning processes are both important vulnerability factors in the development of psychiatric disorders. In behavioral studies considerable sex differences in fear learning have been observed after increases of the stress hormone cortisol. But neuroimaging experiments, which give insights into the neurobiological correlates of stress × sex interactions in fear conditioning, are lacking so far. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether a psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test) compared to a control condition influenced subsequent fear conditioning in 48 men and 48 women taking oral contraceptives (OCs). One of two pictures of a geometrical figure was always paired (conditioned stimulus, CS+) or never paired (CS-) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus). BOLD responses as well as skin conductance responses were assessed. Sex-independently, stress enhanced the CS+/CS- differentiation in the hippocampus in early acquisition but attenuated conditioned responses in the medial frontal cortex in late acquisition. In early acquisition, stress reduced the CS+/CS- differentiation in the nucleus accumbens in men, but enhanced it in OC women. In late acquisition, the same pattern (reduction in men, enhancement in OC women) was found in the amygdala as well as in the anterior cingulate. Thus, psychosocial stress impaired the neuronal correlates of fear learning and expression in men, but facilitated them in OC women. A sex-specific modulation of fear conditioning after stress might contribute to the divergent prevalence of men and women in developing psychiatric disorders.

  11. FEM Techniques for High Stress Detection in Accelerated Fatigue Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, M.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the theory and a numerical validation study in support to a novel method for a priori identification of fatigue critical regions, with the aim to accelerate durability design in large FEM problems. The investigation is placed in the context of modern full-body structural durability analysis, where a computationally intensive dynamic solution could be required to identify areas with potential for fatigue damage initiation. The early detection of fatigue critical areas can drive a simplification of the problem size, leading to sensible improvement in solution time and model handling while allowing processing of the critical areas in higher detail. The proposed technique is applied to a real life industrial case in a comparative assessment with established practices. Synthetic damage prediction quantification and visualization techniques allow for a quick and efficient comparison between methods, outlining potential application benefits and boundaries.

  12. Bayesian Analysis of Step-Stress Accelerated Life Test with Exponential Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Pan, R.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we propose a general Bayesian inference approach to the step-stress accelerated life test with type II censoring. We assume that the failure times at each stress level are exponentially distributed and the test units are tested in an increasing order of stress levels. We formulate the prior distribution of the parameters of life-stress function and integrate the engineering knowledge of product failure rate and acceleration factor into the prior. The posterior distribution and the point estimates for the parameters of interest are provided. Through the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrate a nonconjugate prior case using an industrial example. It is shown that with the Bayesian approach, the statistical precision of parameter estimation is improved and, consequently, the required number of failures could be reduced.

  13. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Simon, Terrence W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong streamwise acceleration. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. Mean flow characteristics as well as turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Spectral analysis was applied to describe the effects of turbulence scales of different sizes during transition. To the authors'knowledge, this is the first detailed documentation of boundary layer transition under such high free-stream turbulence conditions.

  14. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  15. Inhibitory effect of oxytocin on accelerated colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, M; Konagaya, T; Nogimori, T; Yoneda, M; Kasugai, K; Ohira, H; Kaneko, H

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have indicated that brain and gut activities are interrelated and exposure to several stressors, such as water-avoidance stress, stimulates the motor function of the gut through corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-signalling pathways in the brain. Central oxytocin is known to attenuate stress responses, including CRF expression in the brain. Here, we examined whether central oxytocin attenuated the acceleration of colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress. A force transducer was attached to the distal colon of male rat, and the colonic motility and faecal pellet output were recorded while the rats were exposed to water-avoidance stress. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of oxytocin (5, 50 and 500 pmol) and the oxytocin receptor antagonist tocinoic acid (25 microg) were administered before exposure to water-avoidance stress, and the effect of oxytocin on colonic motor function was determined. Centrally administered oxytocin inhibited the accelerated colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress. The effective dose ranged between 5 and 50 pmol on i.c.v. injection. Oxytocin also decreased the number of CRF-positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus and corticosterone release. The inhibitory effect of oxytocin on accelerated colonic motility was blocked by pretreatment with oxytocin receptor antagonist. Furthermore, centrally administered tocinoic acid enhanced the acceleration of colonic motility. These results suggested that endogenous central oxytocin may contribute to the regulation of colonic function and inhibit the brain CRF-signalling pathways targeting the gut, resulting in the inhibition of stress-induced colonic contractions.

  16. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  17. Chronic stress impairs learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in senescence-accelerated prone mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weihong; Zhang, Ting; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Xiaojiang; Liu, Xueyuan

    2011-02-25

    Chronic stress can induce cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether a higher susceptibility to chronic stress is associated with the progression of pathological brain aging. Senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is a naturally occurring animal model of accelerated brain aging. Senescence-accelerated resistant mouse 1 (SAMR1) is usually used as the normal control. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS) on learning in the Y-maze, hippocampal cell proliferation, and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of 4-month-old SAMP8 and SAMR1. The results showed that exposure to CRS impaired learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in SAMP8 and SAMR1 but to a much greater extent in SAMP8. Furthermore, CRS significantly decreased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. These data indicated that SAMP8 is more sensitive to the deleterious effects of CRS on learning than SAMR1. A greater decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation caused by chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for the more severe learning deficit observed in SAMP8. In addition, our findings suggested a role of BDNF in the stress-induced impairment of learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in both strains.

  18. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of accelerated stress testing of four different types of silicon terrestrial solar cells are discussed. The accelerated stress tests used included bias-temperature tests, bias-temperature-humidity tests, thermal cycle and thermal shock tests, and power cycle tests. Characterization of the cells was performed before stress testing and at periodic down-times, using electrical measurement, visual inspection, and metal adherence pull tests. Electrical parameters measured included short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and output power, voltage, and current at the maximum power point. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of the prestress electrical data for all cell types. Data were also obtained on cell series and shunt resistance.

  19. Setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, J.; Karlis, G.F.; Malinowski, L.J.; Beer, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a methodology for setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models is proposed. The developed algorithm is applicable to discrete or coupled discrete/continuum modeling of underground excavation employing the discrete element method (DEM). Since the DEM works with contact forces rather than stresses there is a need for the conversion of pre-excavation stresses to contact forces for the DEM model. Different possibilities of setting up virgin stress conditions in the DEM model are reviewed and critically assessed. Finally, a new method to obtain a discrete element model with contact forces equivalent to given macroscopic virgin stresses is proposed. The test examples presented show that good results may be obtained regardless of the shape of the DEM domain. PMID:27087731

  20. Emotional memory formation under lower versus higher stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Inna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2010-01-01

    An exposure to stress can enhance memory for emotionally arousing experiences. The phenomenon is suggested to be amygdala-dependent and in accordance with that view the amygdala was found to modulate mnemonic processes in other brain regions. Previously, we illustrated increased amygdala activation and reduced activation of CA1 following spatial learning under higher versus lower stress conditions. When spatial learning was followed by reversal training interference, impaired retention was detected only under higher stress condition. Here we further evaluate the potential implications of the difference in the level of amygdala activation on the quality of the memory formed under these stress conditions. We attempted to affect spatial memory consolidation under lower or higher stress conditions by either introducing a foot shock interference following massed training in the water maze; by manipulating the threshold for acquisition employing either brief (3 trials) or full (12 trials) training sessions; or by employing a spaced training (over 3 days) rather than massed training protocol. The current findings reveal that under heightened emotionality, the process of consolidation seems to become less effective and more vulnerable to interference; however, when memory consolidation is not interrupted, retention is improved. These differential effects might underlie the complex interactions of stress, and, particularly, of traumatic stress with memory formation processes.

  1. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  2. Accelerated resolution therapy: an innovative mental health intervention to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Kip, K; Hernandez, D; McGhee, S; Rosenzweig, L; Hynes, C; Thomas, M

    2016-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling trauma and stress-related disorder that may occur after a person experiences a traumatic event, and evokes a combination of intrusion and avoidance symptoms, negative alterations in cognitions and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. Accelerated resolution therapy (ART) is an emerging psychotherapy that provides fast and lasting resolution for mental health problems such as PTSD. ART has been shown to achieve a positive result in one to five sessions, typically over a 2-week period, and requires no homework, skills practice or repeated exposure to targeted events. Initial research, including one randomised control trial, has demonstrated that ART interventions can significantly reduce symptoms of psychological trauma in both civilians and US service members and veterans. These results suggest that ART be considered as either a primary treatment option or for refractory PTSD in those with a suboptimal response to endorsed first-line therapies. Conservative estimates indicate substantial potential cost savings in PTSD treatment. Despite the need for more definitive clinical trials, there is increasing interest in ART in the USA, including in the US Army. The growing positive empirical evidence is compelling, and there appears to be sufficient evidence to warrant UK researchers undertaking ART research. The armed forces offer the potential for comparative international trials. However, equally important are veterans, emergency services personnel and those subjected to violence. ART appears to also have application in other conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, and alcohol or drug misuse. ART can potentially help personnel traumatised by the unique challenges of war and conflict zones by providing brief psychotherapy in a readily accessible and culturally competent manner. ART facilitates the provision of interventions and resolutions in theatre, thus enhancing forces' fighting capability.

  3. Accelerated aging in schizophrenia patients: the potential role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2014-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia.

  4. Accelerated Aging in Schizophrenia Patients: The Potential Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25110609

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of the Off-Normal Conditions of the SPIDER Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2011-09-26

    In the context of the development of the 1 MV neutral beam injector for the ITER tokamak, the study on beam formation and acceleration has considerable importance. This effort includes the ion source and accelerator SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an Rf plasma) ion source, planned to be built in Padova, and designed to extract and accelerate a 355 A/m{sup 2} current of H{sup -}(or 285 A/m{sup 2} D{sup -}) up to 100 kV. Exhaustive simulations were already carried out during the accelerator optimization leading to the present design. However, as it is expected that the accelerator shall operate also in case of pre-programmed or undesired off-normal conditions, the investigation of a large set of off-normal scenarios is necessary. These analyses will also be useful for the evaluation of the real performances of the machine, and should help in interpreting experimental results, or in identifying dangerous operating conditions.The present contribution offers an overview of the results obtained during the investigation of these off-normal conditions, by means of different modeling tools and codes. The results, showed a good flexibility of the device in different operating conditions. Where the consequences of the abnormalities appeared to be problematic further analysis were addressed.

  6. In-situ diagnostics and degradation mapping of a mixed-mode accelerated stress test for proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing availability of more durable membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells, there is a need for a more stressful test that combines chemical and mechanical stressors to enable accelerated screening of promising membrane candidates. Equally important is the need for in-situ diagnostic methods with sufficient spatial resolution that can provide insights into how membranes degrade to facilitate the development of durable fuel cell systems. In this article, we report an accelerated membrane stress test and a degradation diagnostic method that satisfy both needs. By applying high-amplitude cycles of electrical load to a fuel cell fed with low-RH reactant gases, a wide range of mechanical and chemical stressful conditions can be created within the cell which leads to rapid degradation of a mechanically robust Ion Power™ N111-IP membrane. Using an in-situ shorting/crossover diagnostic method on a segmented fuel cell fixture that provides 100 local current measurements, we are able to monitor the progression and map the degradation modes of shorting, thinning, and crossover leak over the entire membrane. Results from this test method have been validated by conventional metrics of fluoride release rates, physical crossover leak rates, pinhole mapping, and cross-sectional measurements.

  7. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; ...

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  8. Engineering Area Investigation of Reliability Attributes and Accelerated Stress Factors on Terrestrial Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained include the definition of a simplified stress test schedule for terrestrial solar cells based on the work performed during the first program year, and the design and fabrication of improved jigs and fixtures for electrical measurement and stress testing. Implementation of these advanced techniques for accelerated stress testing is underway on three solar cell types. In addition, review of the literature on second quadrant phenomena was begun and some preliminary second-quadrant electrical measurements were performed. Results obtained at the first down time for 75 C B-T testing and biased and unbiased T-H pressure cooker testing of type F cells showed little or no degradation in electrical parameters. Significant physical effects (large solder bubbles) were noted for type F cells subjected to the pressure cooker stress test.

  9. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  10. Comparison between accelerated and conventional dobutamine stress protocols for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Issa, Aurora; De Lorenzo, Andrea; Oliveira, Bernardo; Pellini, Marcos; Lima, Ronaldo

    2012-10-01

    The conventional dobutamine (Dob) stress protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is long, with frequent adverse effects, and generally requires atropine injection to reach target heart rate. Atropine is usually administered at the end of the protocol, when adverse effects are more frequent. Earlier atropine injection may be useful to shorten the stress protocol and reduce adverse effects. We sought to compare a Dob stress protocol with early atropine injection to a conventional Dob stress protocol in the same patients undergoing MPS. 30 patients underwent Dob-MPS with a conventional protocol (steps of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mcg/kg/min at 3 min intervals, adding atropine to the maximal Dob dose if necessary to achieve 85% of the age-corrected maximal predicted heart rate) and with an accelerated protocol with early atropine injection (at the end of the first stage). We compared stress duration, maximal heart rate (HR), percentage of maximal predicted HR, rate-pressure product, ST changes, MPS scores and the incidence of adverse effects between the 2 protocols. The accelerated protocol was shorter than the conventional protocol (7.1 ± 3.4 min vs. 11.8 ± 1.3 min; P < 0.0001), had the same efficacy to achieve hemodynamic parameters, without increasing adverse effects. The summed stress scores obtained by automatic analysis were similar in both protocols (6.3 ± 6.3 vs. 6.8 ± 6.3; P = NS) as well as the summed difference scores (2.5 ± 3.6 vs. 2.7 ± 3.4; P = NS). Early atropine injection during dobutamine stress protocol shortens stress duration. Our results suggest that patient safety and accuracy of MPS are unaltered, when compared to the conventional protocol, but further, larger studies are still necessary.

  11. Leaf conductance and carbon gain under salt-stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of plants to salt stress is often accompanied by reductions in leaf photosynthesis and in stomatal and mesophyll conductances. To separate the effects of salt stress on these quantities, a model based on the hypothesis that carbon gain is maximized subject to a water loss cost is proposed. The optimization problem of adjusting stomatal aperture for maximizing carbon gain at a given water loss is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function. A key novel theoretical outcome of the optimality hypothesis is an explicit relationship between the stomatal and mesophyll conductances that can be evaluated against published measurements. The approaches here successfully describe gas-exchange measurements reported for olive trees (Olea europea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.) in fresh water and in salt-stressed conditions. Salt stress affected both stomatal and mesophyll conductances and photosynthetic efficiency of both species. The fresh water/salt water comparisons show that the photosynthetic capacity is directly reduced by 30%-40%, indicating that reductions in photosynthetic rates under increased salt stress are not due only to a limitation of CO2diffusion. An increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water parameter (or marginal water use efficiency) exceeding 100%, analogous in magnitude to findings from extreme drought stress studies. The proposed leaf-level approach can be incorporated into physically based models of the soil-plant-atmosphere system to assess how saline conditions and elevated atmospheric CO2 jointly impact transpiration and photosynthesis.

  12. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Oxidant Stress That Accelerates the Ageing of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Guodong; Messina, Katharine E.; Yan, Jinglian; Messina, Julia A.; Messina, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical studies suggest that hypercholesterolemia may cause ageing in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) because ageing‐associated alterations were found in peripheral blood cells and their bone marrow residing precursors in patients with advanced atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that hypercholesterolemia induces oxidant stress in hematopoietic stems cells that accelerates their ageing. Methods and Results Here we show that HSCs from ApoE−/− mice, as well as HSCs from C57Bl/6 mice fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD) accumulated oxLDL and had greater ROS levels. In accordance, the expression pattern of the genes involved in ROS metabolism changed significantly in HSCs from ApoE−/− mice. Hypercholesterolemia caused a significant reduction in phenotypically defined long‐term HSC compartment, telomere length, and repopulation capacity of KTLS cells, indicating accelerated ageing in these cells. Gene array analysis suggested abnormal cell cycle status, and the key cell cycle regulators including p19ARF, p27Kip1 and p21Waf1 were upregulated in KTLS cells from hypercholesterolemic mice. These effects were p38‐dependent and reversed in vivo by treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with antioxidant N‐acetylcysteine. The oxidant stress also caused aberrant expression of Notch1 that caused loss of quiescence and proliferation leading to the expansion of KTLS compartment in hypercholesterolemic mice. Conclusion Taken together, we provide evidence that hypercholesterolemia can cause oxidant stress that accelerates the ageing and impairs the reconstitution capacity of HSCs. PMID:24470519

  13. Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Soto, Vanessa; Liu, Yuhong; Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality leading some to suggest this represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased in high fat-fed mice as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process. PMID:25558793

  14. Association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity emerges under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Everaerd, Daphne; Klumpers, Floris; van Wingen, Guido; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-05-15

    Increased amygdala reactivity in response to salient stimuli is seen in patients with affective disorders, in healthy subjects at risk for these disorders, and in stressed individuals, making it a prime target for mechanistic studies into the pathophysiology of affective disorders. However, whereas individual differences in neuroticism are thought to modulate the effect of stress on mental health, the mechanistic link between stress, neuroticism and amygdala responsivity is unknown. Thus, we studied the relationship between experimentally induced stress, individual differences in neuroticism, and amygdala responsivity. To this end, fearful and happy faces were presented to a large cohort of young, healthy males (n=120) in two separate functional MRI sessions (stress versus control) in a randomized, controlled cross-over design. We revealed that amygdala reactivity was modulated by an interaction between the factors of stress, neuroticism, and the emotional valence of the facial stimuli. Follow-up analysis showed that neuroticism selectively enhanced amygdala responses to fearful faces in the stress condition. Thus, we show that stress unmasks an association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity to potentially threatening stimuli. This effect constitutes a possible mechanistic link within the complex pathophysiology of affective disorders, and our novel approach appears suitable for further studies targeting the underlying mechanisms.

  15. Numerical investigation of initial condition effects on Rayleigh-Taylor instability with acceleration reversals.

    PubMed

    Aslangil, Denis; Banerjee, Arindam; Lawrie, Andrew G W

    2016-11-01

    The influence of initial conditions on miscible incompressible baroclinically driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability undergoing nonuniform acceleration is explored computationally using an implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) technique. We consider the particular case of evolution during multiple reversals of acceleration direction, where the flow is alternately statically stable or unstable. In the unstable phase, the flow is driven by the baroclinic release of potential energy, whereas in the stable phase, work is done against the density stratification with the energy exchange taking place by wavelike mechanisms. These dynamics are fundamentally different; here, we track the evolution of volume-averaged turbulent statistics that are most sensitive to changes in the distribution of spectral power and bandwidth of the initial conditions as the flow alternates between dynamical regimes due to acceleration reversal.

  16. Numerical investigation of initial condition effects on Rayleigh-Taylor instability with acceleration reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslangil, Denis; Banerjee, Arindam; Lawrie, Andrew G. W.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of initial conditions on miscible incompressible baroclinically driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability undergoing nonuniform acceleration is explored computationally using an implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) technique. We consider the particular case of evolution during multiple reversals of acceleration direction, where the flow is alternately statically stable or unstable. In the unstable phase, the flow is driven by the baroclinic release of potential energy, whereas in the stable phase, work is done against the density stratification with the energy exchange taking place by wavelike mechanisms. These dynamics are fundamentally different; here, we track the evolution of volume-averaged turbulent statistics that are most sensitive to changes in the distribution of spectral power and bandwidth of the initial conditions as the flow alternates between dynamical regimes due to acceleration reversal.

  17. Development of an RF Conditioning System for Charged-Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Howlader, Mostofa; Shajedul Hasan, Dr. S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Charged-particle accelerators use various vacuum windows on their accelerating radio-frequency (RF) cavities to throughput very high RF power. Before being placed on the cavities, the windows should be cleaned, baked, and fully RF conditioned to prevent a poor vacuum from outgassing, as well as other forms of contamination. An example is the coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC) with an annular alumina ceramic window for each of the 81 superconducting RF cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator. The FPCs needed to be tested up to 650-kW peak in a traveling wave and 2.6 MW with standing wave peaks in 1.3 and 60 pulses/s at 805 MHz. In this paper, an Experimental-Physics-and-Industrial-Control-System-based RF conditioning system for the SNS RF test facility is presented. This paper summarizes the hardware and software design strategies, provides the results obtained, and describes the future research scope.

  18. Enhancement of wind stress evaluation method under storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjian; Yu, Xiping

    2016-12-01

    Wind stress is an important driving force for many meteorological and oceanographical processes. However, most of the existing methods for evaluation of the wind stress, including various bulk formulas in terms of the wind speed at a given height and formulas relating the roughness height of the sea surface with wind conditions, predict an ever-increasing tendency of the wind stress coefficient as the wind speed increases, which is inconsistent with the field observations under storm conditions. The wave boundary layer model, which is based on the momentum and energy conservation, has the advantage to take into account the physical details of the air-sea interaction process, but is still invalid under storm conditions without a modification. By including the energy dissipation due to the presence of sea spray, which is speculated to be an important aspect of the air-sea interaction under storm conditions, the wave boundary layer model is improved in this study. The improved model is employed to estimate the wind stress caused by an idealized tropical cyclone motion. The computational results show that the wind stress coefficient reaches its maximal value at a wind speed of about 40 m/s and decreases as the wind speed further increases. This is in fairly good agreement with the field data.

  19. Activation of new replication foci under conditions of replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, P; Waligórska, A; Bujnowicz, Ł; Hoang, A; Dobrucki, JW

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, binding of drugs to DNA or a shortage of nucleotides can decrease the rate or completely halt the progress of replication forks. Although the global rate of replication decreases, mammalian cells can respond to replication stress by activating new replication origins. We demonstrate that a moderate level of stress induced by inhibitors of topoisomerase I, commencing in early, mid or late S-phase, induces activation of new sites of replication located within or in the immediate vicinity of the original replication factories; only in early S some of these new sites are also activated at a distance greater than 300 nm. Under high stress levels very few new replication sites are activated; such sites are located within the original replication regions. There is a large variation in cellular response to stress – while in some cells the number of replication sites increases even threefold, it decreases almost twofold in other cells. Replication stress results in a loss of PCNA from replication factories and a twofold increase in nuclear volume. These observations suggest that activation of new replication origins from the pool of dormant origins within replication cluster under conditions of mild stress is generally restricted to the original replication clusters (factories) active at a time of stress initiation, while activation of distant origins and new replication factories is suppressed. PMID:26212617

  20. Vibration of thermally stressed plates with various boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    By discarding Lurie's (1952) assumption of mode identity, it is shown that linear theory correctly predicts the frequency of all modes of a thermally stressed cantilever plate as well as the frequency and modes of plates with other boundary conditions. The thermal stress distribution is obtained for whatever temperature distribution and boundary conditions that may be specified. Experimental results are compared to calculated results for several different plates. Boundary conditions for the plates range from a plate with edges completely clamped to a plate with edges completely free with various other combinations of mixed and uniform edge conditions. Comparison of calculated data to experimental data shows that accurate, quantitative results can be obtained from linear theory for 'as cut' real plates for a significant range of heating when the assumption of mode identity is discarded.

  1. Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization in stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caimi, Perry G; Emptage, Mark; Li, Xu; Viitanen, Paul V; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min

    2013-06-18

    Strains of xylose utilizing Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization and ethanol production during fermentation in stress conditions were obtained using an adaptation method. The adaptation involved continuously growing xylose utilizing Zymomonas in media containing high sugars, acetic acid, ammonia, and ethanol.

  2. Lifetime Prediction for Degradation of Solar Mirrors using Step-Stress Accelerated Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Kennedy, C.; Gray, M.; Jones, W.

    2011-09-01

    This research is to illustrate the use of statistical inference techniques in order to quantify the uncertainty surrounding reliability estimates in a step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) scenario. SSADT can be used when a researcher is faced with a resource-constrained environment, e.g., limits on chamber time or on the number of units to test. We apply the SSADT methodology to a degradation experiment involving concentrated solar power (CSP) mirrors and compare the results to a more traditional multiple accelerated testing paradigm. Specifically, our work includes: (1) designing a durability testing plan for solar mirrors (3M's new improved silvered acrylic "Solar Reflector Film (SFM) 1100") through the ultra-accelerated weathering system (UAWS), (2) defining degradation paths of optical performance based on the SSADT model which is accelerated by high UV-radiant exposure, and (3) developing service lifetime prediction models for solar mirrors using advanced statistical inference. We use the method of least squares to estimate the model parameters and this serves as the basis for the statistical inference in SSADT. Several quantities of interest can be estimated from this procedure, e.g., mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) and warranty time. The methods allow for the estimation of quantities that may be of interest to the domain scientists.

  3. Behavior of Materials Under Conditions of Thermal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S S

    1954-01-01

    A review is presented of available information on the behavior of brittle and ductile materials under conditions of thermal stress and thermal shock. For brittle materials, a simple formula relating physical properties to thermal-shock resistance is derived and used to determine the relative significance of two indices currently in use for rating materials. For ductile materials, thermal-shock resistance depends upon the complex interrelation among several metallurgical variables which seriously affect strength and ductility. These variables are briefly discussed and illustrated from literature sources. The importance of simulating operating conditions in tests for rating materials is especially to be emphasized because of the importance of testing conditions in metallurgy. A number of practical methods that have been used to minimize the deleterious effects of thermal stress and thermal shock are outlined.

  4. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors of terrestrial solar cells. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.W.; Prince, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    The work covered in this report represents the second year's effort of a continuing program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells. Three main tasks were undertaken during the reporting period: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant, (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state of the art cells and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four Block II type silicon cells at 78/sup 0/C and 135/sup 0/C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant - a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Electrical parameters measured included I/sub SC/, V/sub OC/, P/sub M/, and I/sub M/. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of prestress electrical data for all cell types. Significant differences in the response to the various stress tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype for use in the program.

  5. Study on constant-step stress accelerated life tests in white organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J P; Liu, C; Chen, X; Cheng, G L; Zhou, A X

    2014-11-01

    In order to obtain reliability information for a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED), two constant and one step stress tests were conducted with its working current increased. The Weibull function was applied to describe the OLED life distribution, and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and its iterative flow chart were used to calculate shape and scale parameters. Furthermore, the accelerated life equation was determined using the least squares method, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed to assess if the white OLED life follows a Weibull distribution, and self-developed software was used to predict the average and the median lifetimes of the OLED. The numerical results indicate that white OLED life conforms to a Weibull distribution, and that the accelerated life equation completely satisfies the inverse power law. The estimated life of a white OLED may provide significant guidelines for its manufacturers and customers.

  6. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The accelerated stress test results obtained on all terrestrial solar cells since the inception of the program are summarized. Tested cells were grouped according to the method used to form the conductive metallization layer: solder dipped, vacuum deposited, screen printed, and copper plated. Although metallization systems within each group were quite similar, they differed in numerous details according to the procedures employed by each manufacturer. Test results were summarized for all cells according to both electrical degradation and catastrophic mechanical changes. These results indicated a variability within each metallization category which was dependent on the manufacturer. Only one manufacturer was represented in the copper plated category and, although these showed no signs of detrimental copper diffusion during high temperature testing, their metallization was removed easily during high humidity pressure cooker testing. Preliminary testing of encapsulated cells showed no major differences between encapsulated and unencapsulated cells when subjected to accelerated testing.

  7. Accelerated stress testing and diagnostic analysis of degradation in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, David S.

    2008-08-01

    Solar cell module reliability is inextricably linked to cell-level reliability. This is particularly so with thin-film technologies. In CdTe, reliability issues historically associate with back contact stability and the use of Cu as an extrinsic dopant. Using a simple approach by which identical cells are heated under open-circuit bias and 1-sun illumination, degradation activation energies of 0.63 and 2.94 eV in laboratory-scale CdS/CdTe devices were identified in the accelerated stress temperature range of 60 to 120 °C. At lower stress temperatures, cell performance changes were linearly correlated with changes in both fill factor (FF) and short-circuit current (Jsc). At higher stress temperatures, changes in efficiency were correlated with changes in FF and open-circuit voltage (Voc). The measured activation energy of 0.63 is associated with Cu-diffusion. During the early stage of stress testing, which may provide additional back contact annealing, improvements in FF were due to Cu-diffusion. Decreased performance observed at longer stress times (decreased FF and Voc), according to a two-diode Pspice model, were due to both increased space-charge recombination (near the junction) and decreased recombination in the bulk. Kirkendall void formation (S-outdiffusion) at the CdS/CdTe interface is given as responsible for the 2.9 eV degradation mechanism.

  8. Failure of metoclopramide to control emesis or nausea due to stressful angular or linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    1987-01-01

    Orally administered metoclopramide (REGLAN) at doses of 10 or 20 mg, 75 min prior to either stressful linear acceleration (parabolic flight) or cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation in a rotating chair was evaluated for its ability to prevent emesis or nausea II, respectively. Although metoclopramide is an effective antiemetic agent that enhances gastric emptying and prevents cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis, it was not possible to demonstrate any significant (p less than 0.05) effects of this drug on motion sickness.

  9. [LIFE CONDITIONS: NON-SPECIFIC STRESS INDICATORS AND DENTOALVEOLAR PATHOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Mosticone, Romina; Pescucci, Lisa; Porreca, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma, diseases, diet, daily work and environmental factors shape bodies. From birth to death, these processes leave on the skeleton markers that can be recognized and studied, thus providing an overview of the health conditions of past populations. The present work analyzes data collected in seven necropolises. During our study, we exploited nonspecific stress and dental pathologies as key indicators of health conditions. In particula; we analyzed the three most common indicators of stress: porotic hyperostosis; enamel hypoplasia; and Harris lines on shins. Additionally, we examined the most important dental alveolar pathologies, including carious lesions, periodontal diseases, antemortem tooth loss, abscesses, and calculi. The data we analyzed suggest that, despite the different urban and suburban origins, all the samples belong to a middle-range or low social class, whose living conditions were modest. The only necropolis which stands out is Casal Bertone Mausoleo, where the samples present the lowest frequencies with respect to both the stress indicators and the oral pathologies, suggesting better living conditions.

  10. Resistance of functional Lactobacillus plantarum strains against food stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Verónica; Quiberoni, Andrea; Reinhemer, Jorge; Suárez, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    The survival of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains (Lp 790, Lp 813 and Lp 998) with functional properties was studied taking into account their resistance to thermal, osmotic and oxidative stress factors. Stress treatments applied were: 52 °C-15 min (Phosphate Buffer pH 7, thermal shock), H2O2 0.1% (p/v) - 30 min (oxidative shock) and NaCl aqueous solution at 17, 25 and 30% (p/v) (room temperature - 1 h, osmotic shock). The osmotic stress was also evaluated on cell growth in MRS broth added of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% (p/v) of NaCl, during 20 h at 30 °C. The cell thermal adaptation was performed in MRS broth, selecting 45 °C for 30 min as final conditions for all strains. Two strains (Lp 813 and Lp 998) showed, in general, similar behaviour against the three stress factors, being clearly more resistant than Lp 790. An evident difference in growth kinetics in presence of NaCl was observed between Lp 998 and Lp 813, Lp998 showing a higher optical density (OD570nm) than Lp 813 at the end of the assay. Selected thermal adaptation improved by 2 log orders the thermal resistance of both strains, but cell growth in presence of NaCl was enhanced only in Lp 813. Oxidative resistance was not affected with this thermal pre-treatment. These results demonstrate the relevance of cell technological resistance when selecting presumptive "probiotic" cultures, since different stress factors might considerably affect viability or/and performance of the strains. The incidence of stress conditions on functional properties of the strains used in this work are currently under research in our group.

  11. Understanding Vocalization Might Help to Assess Stressful Conditions in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Alexandra Ferreira da Silva; Nääs, Irenilza de Alencar; Oliveira, Stanley R. M.; Violaro, Fabio; de Almeida, Andréia C. M.; Neves, Diego Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary This research aimed to analyze the possibility of assessing piglets’ welfare using the records of their vocalization. The trial was done in a pig commercial farm, and we recorded the vocal signals from piglets in several stressful exposure situations. Data mining techniques were applied to the processed signals in order to obtain a stress classification using the recorded data. We found that, using the piglets’ vocalization, it was possible to identify the most frequent stressful conditions at the farrowing phase, namely: pain, cold and hunger. Abstract Assessing pigs’ welfare is one of the most challenging subjects in intensive pig farming. Animal vocalization analysis is a noninvasive procedure and may be used as a tool for assessing animal welfare status. The objective of this research was to identify stress conditions in piglets reared in farrowing pens through their vocalization. Vocal signals were collected from 40 animals under the following situations: normal (baseline), feeling cold, in pain, and feeling hunger. A unidirectional microphone positioned about 15 cm from the animals’ mouth was used for recording the acoustic signals. The microphone was connected to a digital recorder, where the signals were digitized at the 44,100 Hz frequency. The collected sounds were edited and analyzed. The J48 decision tree algorithm available at the Weka® data mining software was used for stress classification. It was possible to categorize diverse conditions from the piglets’ vocalization during the farrowing phase (pain, cold and hunger), with an accuracy rate of 81.12%. Results indicated that vocalization might be an effective welfare indicator, and it could be applied for assessing distress from pain, cold and hunger in farrowing piglets. PMID:26479541

  12. Do US Black Women Experience Stress-Related Accelerated Biological Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Margaret T.; Pearson, Jay A.; Seashols, Sarah J.; Brown, Kelly L.; Cruz, Tracey Dawson

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that black women experience accelerated biological aging in response to repeated or prolonged adaptation to subjective and objective stressors. Drawing on stress physiology and ethnographic, social science, and public health literature, we lay out the rationale for this hypothesis. We also perform a first population-based test of its plausibility, focusing on telomere length, a biomeasure of aging that may be shortened by stressors. Analyzing data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), we estimate that at ages 49–55, black women are 7.5 years biologically “older” than white women. Indicators of perceived stress and poverty account for 27% of this difference. Data limitations preclude assessing objective stressors and also result in imprecise estimates, limiting our ability to draw firm inferences. Further investigation of black-white differences in telomere length using large-population-based samples of broad age range and with detailed measures of environmental stressors is merited. PMID:20436780

  13. The role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in accelerated aging and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Noto, Cristiano; Rizzo, Lucas B; Rios, Adiel C; Nunes, Sandra O V; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Sethi, Sumit; Zeni, Maiara; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Maes, Michael; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-02-04

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects millions of individuals and is highly comorbid with many age associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus, immune-inflammatory dysregulation and cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative/nitrosative stress plays a fundamental role in aging, as well as in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders including MDD. In this review, we critically review the evidence for an involvement of oxidative/nitrosative stress in acceleration of aging process in MDD. There are evidence of the association between MDD and changes in molecular mechanisms involved in aging. There is a significant association between telomere length, enzymatic antioxidant activities (SOD, CAT, GPx), glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (MDA), nuclear factor κB, inflammatory cytokines with MDD. Major depression also is characterized by significantly lower concentration of antioxidants (zinc, coenzyme Q10, PON1). Since, aging and MDD share a common biological base in their pathophysiology, the potential therapeutic use of antioxidants and anti-aging molecules in MDD could be promising.

  14. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  15. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  16. Cavitation behavior observed in three monoleaflet mechanical heart valves under accelerated testing conditions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Liu, Jia-Shing; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien; Hwang, Ned H

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated testing provides a substantial amount of data on mechanical heart valve durability in a short period of time, but such conditions may not accurately reflect in vivo performance. Cavitation, which occurs during mechanical heart valve closure when local flow field pressure decreases below vapor pressure, is thought to play a role in valve damage under accelerated conditions. The underlying flow dynamics and mechanisms behind cavitation bubble formation are poorly understood. Under physiologic conditions, random perivalvular cavitation is difficult to capture. We applied accelerated testing at a pulse rate of 600 bpm and transvalvular pressure of 120 mm Hg, with synchronized videographs and high-frequency pressure measurements, to study cavitation of the Medtronic Hall Standard (MHS), Medtronic Hall D-16 (MHD), and Omni Carbon (OC) valves. Results showed cavitation bubbles between 340 and 360 micros after leaflet/housing impact of the MHS, MHD, and OC valves, intensified by significant leaflet rebound. Squeeze flow, Venturi, and water hammer effects each contributed to cavitation, depending on valve design.

  17. Electron Acceleration in a Dynamically Evolved Current Sheet Under Solar Coronal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Du, A. M.; Feng, Xueshang; Cao, Xin; Lu, Quanming; Yang, Liping; Chen, Gengxiong; Zhang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Electron acceleration in a drastically evolved current sheet under solar coronal conditions is investigated via the combined 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and test-particle approaches. Having a high magnetic Reynolds number (105), the long, thin current sheet is torn into a chain of magnetic islands, which grow in size and coalesce with each other. The acceleration of electrons is explored in three typical evolution phases: when several large magnetic islands are formed (phase 1), two of these islands are approaching each other (phase 2), and almost merging into a "monster" magnetic island (phase 3). The results show that for all three phases electrons with an initial Maxwell distribution evolve into a heavy-tailed distribution and more than 20 % of the electrons can be accelerated higher than 200 keV within 0.1 second and some of them can even be energized up to MeV ranges. The lower-energy electrons are located away from the magnetic separatrices and the higher-energy electrons are inside the magnetic islands. The most energetic electrons have a tendency to be around the outer regions of the magnetic islands or to appear in the small secondary magnetic islands. It is the trapping effect of the magnetic islands and the distributions of E p that determine the acceleration and spatial distributions of the energetic electrons.

  18. Sex differences in fear conditioning in posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Inslicht, Sabra S.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Garcia, Natalia M.; Pineles, Suzanne L.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Orr, Scott P.; Marmar, Charles R.; Neylan, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women are twice as likely as men to develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Abnormal acquisition of conditioned fear has been suggested as a mechanism for the development of PTSD. While some studies of healthy humans suggest that women are either no different or express less conditioned fear responses during conditioning relative to men, differences in the acquisition of conditioned fear between men and women diagnosed with PTSD has not been examined. Methods Thirty-one participants (18 men; 13 women) with full or subsyndromal PTSD completed a fear conditioning task. Participants were shown computer-generated colored circles that were paired (CS+) or unpaired (CS−) with an aversive electrical stimulus and skin conductance levels were assessed throughout the task. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant sex by stimulus interaction during acquisition. Women had greater differential conditioned skin conductance responses (CS + trials compared to CS− trials) than did men, suggesting greater acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Conclusions In contrast to studies of healthy individuals, we found enhanced acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Greater fear conditioning in women may either be a pre-existing vulnerability trait or an acquired phenomenon that emerges in a sex-dependent manner after the development of PTSD. Characterizing the underlying mechanisms of these differences is needed to clarify sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of PTSD. PMID:23107307

  19. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Three tasks were undertaken to investigate reliability attributes of terrestrial solar cells: (1) a study of the electrical behavior of cells in the second (reverse) quadrant; (2) the accelerated stress testing of three new state-of-the-art cells; and (3) the continued bias-temperature testing of four block 2 type silicon cells at 78 C and 135 C. Electrical characteristics measured in the second quadrant were determined to be a function of the cell's thermal behavior with breakdown depending on the initiation of localized heating. This implied that high breakdown cells may be more fault tolerant when forced to operate in the second quadrant, a result contrary to conventional thinking. The accelerated stress tests used in the first (power) quadrant were bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, temperature-humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycle. The new type cells measured included an EFG cell, a polycrystalline cell, and a Czochralski cell. Significant differences in the response to the various tests were observed between cell types. A microprocessed controlled, short interval solar cell tester was designed and construction initiated on a prototype.

  20. Aerodynamic Surface Stress Intermittency and Conditionally Averaged Turbulence Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian erosion of dry, flat, semi-arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by kinetic energy fluxes in the aloft atmospheric surface layer. During saltation -- the mechanism responsible for surface fluxes of dust and sediment -- briefly suspended sediment grains undergo a ballistic trajectory before impacting and `splashing' smaller-diameter (dust) particles vertically. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment flux, q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic (basal) stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. Since basal stress (in fully rough, inertia-dominated flows) scales with the incoming velocity squared, u^2, it follows that q ~ u^2n (where u is some relevant component of the above flow field, u(x,t)). Thus, even small (turbulent) deviations of u from its time-averaged value may play an enormously important role in aeolian activity on flat, dry landscapes. The importance of this argument is further augmented given that turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer exhibits maximum Reynolds stresses in the fluid immediately above the landscape. In order to illustrate the importance of surface stress intermittency, we have used conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress during large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow over a flat landscape with momentum roughness length appropriate for the Llano Estacado in west Texas (a flat agricultural region that is notorious for dust transport). By using data from a field campaign to measure diurnal variability of aeolian activity and prevailing winds on the Llano Estacado, we have retrieved the threshold friction velocity (which can be used to compute threshold surface stress under the geostrophic balance with the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory). This averaging procedure provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Preliminary evidence indicates that surface stress peaks are associated with the passage of

  1. [Changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianbao; Li, Zhaoshen; Cui, Zhongmin; Duan, Yimin; Nie, Shinan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Guoming

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under conditions of water immersion restraint stress. METHODS Eighty rats were randomly divided into Group A (20 rats), B (40 rats) and C (20 rats) after being fasted for 24 hours. And then Group A was divided into two subgroups with ten rats in each. The two subgroups in Group A were given normal saline or omeprazole respectively while under the stress condition. The changes of gastric acid or bicarbonate secretion were determined. Group B (40 rats) were randomly divided into four subgroups,which were subgroup control, 1h, 2h and 4h after beginning of the stress. The quantity of glandular mucosal adherent mucus, the thickness of mucus gel layer and ulcer index were measured after stress in Group B. The glandular mucosal samples were labeled by Lanthanum and observed by transmission electromicroscopy. Group C was randomly divided into two subgroups in the same way with Group A. And each subgroup received normal saline or omeprazole respectively H(+) loss in gastric lumen was calculated by determining the difference of acidity between lavage and drainage fluid H(+) concentration. RESULTS It was found that gastric alkaline secretion decreased progressively (P < 0.05), while gastric acid secretion increased progressively under stress conditions (P < 0.05). The mucus quantity(A/g) in the four subgroups in Group B were 0.137 +/- 0.030, 0.143 +/- 0.012, 0.066 +/- 0.016 and 0.016 +/- 0.016 respectively. The mucus gel thickness(microm) were 71.08 +/- 5.85, 74.50 +/- 12.85, 57.63 +/- 6.45 and 51.35 +/- 2.84 respectively. The ulcer index were 0.2 +/- 0.1,0.4 +/- 0.1,5.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.0 +/- 0.5 respectively. Statistics showed that the mucus quantity was correlated with the mucus gel thickness positively(r = 0.89), while either of them was correlated with the ulcer index negatively(r = 0.85 and "r = 0.83). And it was also found that Lanthanum rarely stained the glandular mucosa in control subgroup, while heavily

  2. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol.

  3. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  4. Separating Fluid Shear Stress from Acceleration during Vibrations in Vitro: Identification of Mechanical Signals Modulating the Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Manske, Sarah L; Chan, M Ete; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Rubin, Clinton T; Frame, Mary D; Judex, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the physical mechanism(s) by which cells can sense vibrations requires the determination of the cellular mechanical environment. Here, we quantified vibration-induced fluid shear stresses in vitro and tested whether this system allows for the separation of two mechanical parameters previously proposed to drive the cellular response to vibration – fluid shear and peak accelerations. When peak accelerations of the oscillatory horizontal motions were set at 1g and 60Hz, peak fluid shear stresses acting on the cell layer reached 0.5Pa. A 3.5-fold increase in fluid viscosity increased peak fluid shear stresses 2.6-fold while doubling fluid volume in the well caused a 2-fold decrease in fluid shear. Fluid shear was positively related to peak acceleration magnitude and inversely related to vibration frequency. These data demonstrated that peak shear stress can be effectively separated from peak acceleration by controlling specific levels of vibration frequency, acceleration, and/or fluid viscosity. As an example for exploiting these relations, we tested the relevance of shear stress in promoting COX-2 expression in osteoblast like cells. Across different vibration frequencies and fluid viscosities, neither the level of generated fluid shear nor the frequency of the signal were able to consistently account for differences in the relative increase in COX-2 expression between groups, emphasizing that the eventual identification of the physical mechanism(s) requires a detailed quantification of the cellular mechanical environment. PMID:23074384

  5. Accurate Attitude Estimation Using ARS under Conditions of Vehicle Movement Based on Disturbance Acceleration Adaptive Estimation and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Li; Hang, Yijun; Xiong, Zhi; Liu, Jianye; Wan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a disturbance acceleration adaptive estimate and correction approach for an attitude reference system (ARS) so as to improve the attitude estimate precision under vehicle movement conditions. The proposed approach depends on a Kalman filter, where the attitude error, the gyroscope zero offset error and the disturbance acceleration error are estimated. By switching the filter decay coefficient of the disturbance acceleration model in different acceleration modes, the disturbance acceleration is adaptively estimated and corrected, and then the attitude estimate precision is improved. The filter was tested in three different disturbance acceleration modes (non-acceleration, vibration-acceleration and sustained-acceleration mode, respectively) by digital simulation. Moreover, the proposed approach was tested in a kinematic vehicle experiment as well. Using the designed simulations and kinematic vehicle experiments, it has been shown that the disturbance acceleration of each mode can be accurately estimated and corrected. Moreover, compared with the complementary filter, the experimental results have explicitly demonstrated the proposed approach further improves the attitude estimate precision under vehicle movement conditions. PMID:27754469

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidative Stress Triggers Tgf-Beta-Dependent Muscle Dysfunction by Accelerating Ascorbic Acid Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Pozzer, Diego; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Bolis, Marco; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Solagna, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Zito, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are two related phenomena that have important metabolic consequences. As many skeletal muscle diseases are triggered by oxidative stress, we explored the chain of events linking a hyperoxidized ER (which causes ER and oxidative stress) with skeletal muscle dysfunction. An unbiased exon expression array showed that the combined genetic modulation of the two master ER redox proteins, selenoprotein N (SEPN1) and endoplasmic oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1), led to an SEPN1-related myopathic phenotype due to excessive signalling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. The increased TGF-beta activity in the genetic mutants was caused by accelerated turnover of the ER localized (anti-oxidant) ascorbic acid that affected collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix. In a mouse mutant of SEPN1, which is dependent on exogenous ascorbic acid, a limited intake of ascorbic acid revealed a myopathic phenotype as a consequence of an altered TGF-beta signalling. Indeed, systemic antagonism of TGF-beta re-established skeletal muscle function in SEPN1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study sheds new light on the molecular mechanism of SEPN1-related myopathies and indicates that the TGF-beta/ERO1/ascorbic acid axis offers potential for their treatment. PMID:28106121

  7. Accelerated hydration of the Earth's deep crust induced by stress perturbations.

    PubMed

    Jamtveit, B; Austrheim, H; Malthe-Sørenssen, A

    2000-11-02

    The metamorphic cycle associated with the formation of mountain belts produces a lower crust containing little or no free fluid. The introduction of external fluids to dry and impermeable volumes of the Earth's crust is thus a prerequisite for the retrogressive metamorphism later observed in such regimes. Such metamorphism can cause significant changes in the crust's physical properties, including its density, rheology and elastic properties. On a large scale, the introduction of fluids requires the presence of high-permeability channels, such as faults or fractures, which are the result of external tectonic stresses. But extensive interaction between externally derived fluids and the fractured rock requires efficient mass transport away from the initial fractures into the rock itself, and this transport often occurs over distances much longer than expected from grain-boundary diffusion. Here we present both field observations and a simple network model that demonstrate how the transport of fluids into initially dry rock can be accelerated by perturbations in the local stress field caused by reactions with fluids. We also show that the morphology of reaction fronts separating 'dry' from 'wet' rocks depends on the anisotropy of the external stress field.

  8. PDCD10 interacts with STK25 to accelerate cell apoptosis under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Deng, Xuan; Chen, Yiyu; Mo, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2012-06-01

    An apoptosis-related protein, cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3 or PDCD10), has recently been implicated in mutations associated with cerebral cavernous malformation. Herein, we show that PDCD10 interacts with serine/threonine kinase 25 (STK25), an oxidant stress response kinase related to sterile-20 (Ste20) that is activated by oxidative stress and induces apoptotic cell death. Functional investigations indicate that PDCD10 and STK25 protein are up-regulated by H2O2 stimulation, and that co-expression of the proteins accelerates cell apoptosis. The induction of small interfering PDCD10 (siPDCD10) or siSTK25 results in decreased endogenous PDCD10 and STK25 expression, which is accompanied by attenuated cell apoptosis. Interaction between PDCD10 and STK25 modulates ERK activity under oxidative stress. PDCD10 stabilizes STK25 protein through a proteasome-dependent pathway. Our findings suggest that PDCD10 might be a regulatory adaptor required for STK25 functions, which differ distinctly depending on the redox status of the cells that may be potentially related to tumor progression.

  9. A review of accelerated conditioning for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Zhang, Shengsheng; Sun, Jian Colin; Wang, Haijiang

    A newly fabricated polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell usually needs a so-called break-in/conditioning/incubation period to activate it and reach its best performance. Typically, during this activation period the cell performance increases gradually, and then reaches a plateau without further increase. Depending on the membrane electrode assemblies, this process can take hours and even days to complete, which consumes a considerable amount of hydrogen fuel, leading to a higher operating cost. To provide for accelerated conditioning techniques that can complete the process in a short time period, this paper reviews established conditioning protocols and reported methods to condition PEM single cells and stacks, in an attempt to summarize available information on PEM fuel cell conditioning and the underlying mechanisms. Various techniques are arranged into two categories: on-line conditioning and off-line conditioning. For each technique, the experimental procedure and outcomes are outlined. Finally, weaknesses of the currently used conditioning techniques are indicated and further research efforts are proposed.

  10. A specific group of genes respond to cold dehydration stress in cut Alstroemeria flowers whereas ambient dehydration stress accelerates developmental senescence expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Bramke, Irene; Breeze, Emily; Thornber, Sarah; Harrison, Elizabeth; Thomas, Brian; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Stead, Tony; Rogers, Hilary

    2010-06-01

    Petal development and senescence entails a normally irreversible process. It starts with petal expansion and pigment production, and ends with nutrient remobilization and ultimately cell death. In many species this is accompanied by petal abscission. Post-harvest stress is an important factor in limiting petal longevity in cut flowers and accelerates some of the processes of senescence such as petal wilting and abscission. However, some of the effects of moderate stress in young flowers are reversible with appropriate treatments. Transcriptomic studies have shown that distinct gene sets are expressed during petal development and senescence. Despite this, the overlap in gene expression between developmental and stress-induced senescence in petals has not been fully investigated in any species. Here a custom-made cDNA microarray from Alstroemeria petals was used to investigate the overlap in gene expression between developmental changes (bud to first sign of senescence) and typical post-harvest stress treatments. Young flowers were stressed by cold or ambient temperatures without water followed by a recovery and rehydration period. Stressed flowers were still at the bud stage after stress treatments. Microarray analysis showed that ambient dehydration stress accelerates many of the changes in gene expression patterns that would normally occur during developmental senescence. However, a higher proportion of gene expression changes in response to cold stress were specific to this stimulus and not senescence related. The expression of 21 transcription factors was characterized, showing that overlapping sets of regulatory genes are activated during developmental senescence and by different stresses.

  11. Understanding posttraumatic stress disorder through fear conditioning, extinction and reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Careaga, Mariella Bodemeier Loayza; Girardi, Carlos Eduardo Neves; Suchecki, Deborah

    2016-12-01

    Careaga MBL, Girardi CEN, Suchecki D. Understanding posttraumatic stress disorder through fear conditioning, extinction and reconsolidation. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV -Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychopathology characterized by exacerbation of fear response. A dysregulated fear response may be explained by dysfunctional learning and memory, a hypothesis that was proposed decades ago. A key component of PTSD is fear conditioning and the study of this phenomenon in laboratory has expanded the understanding of the underlying neurobiological changes in PTSD. Furthermore, traumatic memories are strongly present even years after the trauma and maintenance of this memory is usually related to behavioral and physiological maladaptive responses. Persistence of traumatic memory may be explained by a dysregulation of two memory processes: extinction and reconsolidation. The former may explain the over-expression of fear responses as an imbalance between traumatic and extinction memory. The latter, in turn, explains the maintenance of fear responses as a result of enhancing trauma-related memories. Thus, this review will discuss the importance of fear conditioning for the establishment of PTSD and how failure in extinction or abnormal reconsolidation may contribute to the maintenance of fear response overtime.

  12. An influence of normal stress and pore pressure on the conditions and dynamics of shear crack propagation in brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilko, Evgeny V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the influence of crack-normal stress on the shear strength of the brittle material with initial crack and the geometrical condition of acceleration of dynamically growing crack towards the longitudinal wave speed. We considered elastic-brittle permeable materials with nanoscale pore size. We have shown that pore fluid in nanoporous brittle materials influences mainly the condition of shear crack propagation transition from conventional sub-Rayleigh regime to supershear one. The results of the study make it possible to assess the ability of initial cracks in brittle materials to develop in supershear regime under the condition of confined longitudinal shear.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-01

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator on Supersonic Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-30

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. But these vehicles remained in a very low subsonic flight. Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) is developed as unique laser propulsion system at Tohoku University. In this paper, flow characteristics and momentum coupling coefficients are studied numerically in the supersonic condition with the same configuration of LITA. Because of the aerodynamic drag, the coupling coefficient could not get correctly especially at the low energy input. In this study, the coupling coefficient was calculated using the concept of the effective impulse.

  15. Electron Acceleration in a Dynamically Evolved Current Sheet of Solar Coronal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaohua, Z.; Du, A.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    Electron acceleration in a drastically evolved current sheet of solar coronal conditions is investigated via the combined resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and test particle approaches. With high magnetic Reynolds number, the long-thin current sheet is tearing into a chain of magnetic islands, which grow in size and coalesce together. The acceleration of electrons are explored in three typical evolvement phases: when several large magnetic islands are formed (phase1), two of them are approaching each other (phase2) and almost merging into a "monster" magnetic island (phase3). The results show that for all the three phases electrons with an initially Maxwellian distribution evolve into a heavy-tailed distribution and more than 20% of the electrons can be accelerated higher than 200 keV within 0.1 second and some of them can even be energized up to MeV ranges. Most of the energetic electrons move around the magnetic islands in clockwise direction (anti-parallel to the magnetic field lines), drifting in the -Z direction. The energetic electrons with 10 keV < Ek < 200 keV are located outside the magnetic separatrices, where parallel electric field (Ep) is small. The electrons with 200 keV < Ek < 5000 keV are distributed inside the magnetic islands where Ep is moderate large but have complex structures. The electrons with Ek > 5000 keV are located around the outer regions of the magnetic islands or at the core regions of the magnetic islands. Some of the most energetic electrons even appear in the small secondary magnetic islands that are embedded in the diusion regions in between the magnetic islands. It is the trapping eect of the magnetic islands and the distributions of Ep that determine the acceleration processes and space distribution of the energetic electrons.

  16. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the reliability of terrestrial solar cells was performed to identify failure/degradation modes affecting solar cells and to relate these to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Particular concerns addressed were the reliability attributes of individual single crystalline, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin film silicon cells. Results of subjecting different types of crystalline cells to the Clemson accelerated test schedule are given. Preliminary step stress results on one type of thin film amorphous silicon (a:Si) cell indicated that extraneous degradation modes were introduced above 140 C. Also described is development of measurement procedures which are applicable to the reliability testing of a:Si solar cells as well as an approach to achieving the necessary repeatability of fabricating a simulated a:Si reference cell from crystalline silicon photodiodes.

  17. TUSC3 Loss Alters the ER Stress Response and Accelerates Prostate Cancer Growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Peter; Tomasich, Erwin; Vaňhara, Petr; Kratochvílová, Kateřina; Anees, Mariam; Marhold, Maximilian; Lemberger, Christof E.; Gerschpacher, Marion; Horvat, Reinhard; Sibilia, Maria; Pils, Dietmar; Krainer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in developed countries. Tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, though its function has not been characterized. TUSC3 shares homologies with the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex subunit Ost3p, suggesting a role in protein glycosylation. We provide evidence that TUSC3 is part of the OST complex and affects N-linked glycosylation in mammalian cells. Loss of TUSC3 expression in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines leads to increased proliferation, migration and invasion as well as accelerated xenograft growth in a PTEN negative background. TUSC3 downregulation also affects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structure and stress response, which results in increased Akt signaling. Together, our findings provide first mechanistic insight in TUSC3 function in prostate carcinogenesis in general and N-glycosylation in particular.

  18. A fiber optics sensor for strain and stress management in superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1993-09-20

    A novel cryogenic interferometric fiber optics sensor for the measurement of strain and stress in the coil windings of superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The sensor can operate with two different readout sources, monochromatic laser light and white light respectively. The sensor head is built up as an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer formed with two cleaved fiber surfaces, and can be mounted in several configurations. When read with laser light, the sensor is an extremely sensitive relative strain or temperature detector. When read with white light the absolute strain and pressure can be measured. Results are presented of tests in several configurations at 77 K and 4.2 K, both for the relative and absolute readout method. Finally, the possible use for quench localization using the temperature sensitivity is described.

  19. TUSC3 Loss Alters the ER Stress Response and Accelerates Prostate Cancer Growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Peter; Tomasich, Erwin; Vaňhara, Petr; Kratochvílová, Kateřina; Anees, Mariam; Marhold, Maximilian; Lemberger, Christof E.; Gerschpacher, Marion; Horvat, Reinhard; Sibilia, Maria; Pils, Dietmar; Krainer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in developed countries. Tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, though its function has not been characterized. TUSC3 shares homologies with the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex subunit Ost3p, suggesting a role in protein glycosylation. We provide evidence that TUSC3 is part of the OST complex and affects N-linked glycosylation in mammalian cells. Loss of TUSC3 expression in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines leads to increased proliferation, migration and invasion as well as accelerated xenograft growth in a PTEN negative background. TUSC3 downregulation also affects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structure and stress response, which results in increased Akt signaling. Together, our findings provide first mechanistic insight in TUSC3 function in prostate carcinogenesis in general and N-glycosylation in particular. PMID:24435307

  20. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells. Third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.W.; Hartman, R.A.; Saylor, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The third year of the accelerated reliability testing program concentrated on electrical measurement instrumentation and in modeling cell behavior in the second quadrant. In addition, some preliminary work was done on correlating cell color changes with electrical degradation. Not reported are results of continuing accelerated stress tests on state of the art cells. A number of new cells were added to the program, but not in time for sufficient data to be obtained, while the older cells are undergoing extended test periods and new data are not yet available on them. The all-digital, microprocessor controlled, short interval tester, which was designed and fabricated, has replaced the manual measurement procedure formerly used. This has improved measurement accuracy and repeatability, reduced measurement time, and through coordinated data management procedures, eliminated data errors. A complete description of the tester including schematics and software is given and its operating procedures described. A computer model, based on the thermal and electrical properties of the cells and encapsulating materials, was developed to relate cell temperature to electrical characteristics in the second quadrant. This model adequately predicted the behavior of both encapsulated and unencapsulated cells, although accurate temperature measurements on encapsulated cells were difficult to obtain. In addition, only cells of one type were used for comparison and other cell types may require different parameter values for fitting. Use of the model should permit the prediction of a cell's sensitivity to degradation in the second quadrant. The computer program is listed together with a description of its operation.

  1. Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation Material Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.

    2007-09-16

    To predict the long-term fate of low- and high-level waste forms in the subsurface over geologic time scales, it is important to understand the behavior of the corroding waste forms under conditions the mimic to the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository. Fluidized bed steam reformation (FBSR), a supplemental treatment technology option, is being considered as a waste form for the immobilization of low-activity tank waste. To obtain the fundamental information needed to evaluate the behavior of the FBSR waste form under repository relevant conditions and to monitor the long-term behavior of this material, an accelerated weathering experiment is being conducted with the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus. Unlike other accelerated weathering test methods (product consistency test, vapor hydration test, and drip test), PUF experiments are conducted under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. These experiments are unique because they mimic the vadose zone environment and allow the corroding waste form to achieve its final reaction state. Results from this on-going experiment suggest the volumetric water content varied as a function of time and reached steady state after 160 days of testing. Unlike the volumetric water content, periodic excursions in the solution pH and electrical conductivity have been occurring consistently during the test. Release of elements from the column illustrates a general trend of decreasing concentration with increasing reaction time. Normalized concentrations of K, Na, P, Re (a chemical analogue for 99Tc), and S are as much as 1 × 104 times greater than Al, Cr, Si, and Ti. After more than 600 days of testing, the solution chemistry data collected to-date illustrate the importance of understanding the long-term behavior of the FBSR product under conditions that mimic the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository.

  2. FHL2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell functions under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yu; Wang, Xiaoqin; Li, LiPing; Fan, Rong; Chen, Ju; Zhu, Tongyu; Li, Wen; Jiang, Yanwen; Mittal, Nupur; Wu, Wenshu; Peace, David; Qian, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    FHL2, a member of the four and one half LIM domain protein family, is a critical transcriptional modulator. Here, we identify FHL2 as a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is essential for maintaining HSC self-renewal under regenerative stress. We find that Fhl2 loss has limited effects on hematopoiesis under homeostatic conditions. In contrast, Fhl2-null chimeric mice reconstituted with Fhl2-null bone marrow cells developed abnormal hematopoiesis with significantly reduced numbers of HSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), red blood cells and platelets as well as hemoglobin levels. In addition, HSCs displayed a significantly reduced self-renewal capacity and were skewed toward myeloid lineage differentiation. We find that Fhl2 loss reduces both HSC quiescence and survival in response to regenerative stress, probably as a consequence of Fhl2-loss-mediated down-regulation of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)-inhibitors, including p21(Cip) and p27(Kip1). Interestingly, FHL2 is regulated under control of a tissue specific promoter in hematopoietic cells and it is down-regulated by DNA hypermethylation in the leukemia cell line and primary leukemia cells. Furthermore, we find that down-regulation of FHL2 frequently occurs in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, raising a possibility that FHL2 down-regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. PMID:25179730

  3. Changes in Stress and Psychological Adjustment during the Transition to High School among Freshmen in an Accelerated Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This study determined whether participation in an accelerated curriculum (specifically, the International Baccalaureate [IB] program) upon entry to high school is associated with increases in stress and/or associated with psychological problems. Data from self-report questionnaires were collected at two time points (summer after eighth grade, fall…

  4. Effects of psychological stress and housing conditions on the delay of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Óscar; VanBuskirk, JoAnne; Richardson, Steven; Parfitt, David; Helmreich, Dana; Rempel, Max; Moynihan, Jan; Tausk, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    This study explores the effects of stress and housing conditions on the healing of cutaneous wounds and its relationship with circulating levels of corticosterone. Specifically, we set out to examine the effect of combined physical (restraint stress and ultrasound) and psychological (predator scent) stressors on the cutaneous wound healing of female mice that had been housed either in groups (with social support; n= 16) or individually (without social support; n= 16). In contrast with other studies, the model of multiple ethological mild stressors utilized in this study significantly increased the levels of corticosterone, but failed to dramatically alter the healing of skin wounds. However, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of housing conditions, suggesting that positive social interactions in females accelerate the rate of wound healing, and reduce levels of anxiety and circulating corticosterone. The level of anxiety, as well as the basal levels of corticosterone, proved to be valid predictors of the healing rates during different stages of cutaneous wound healing.

  5. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  6. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein induces oxidative stress and accelerated senescence in human endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Carracedo, Julia; Merino, Ana; Briceño, Carolina; Soriano, Sagrario; Buendía, Paula; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez, Mariano; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein (cLDL) plays a role in atherosclerosis. In this study we evaluate the effect of uremia on LDL carbamylation and the effect of cLDL and oxidized LDL (oxLDL; 200 μg/ml) on number, function, and genomic stability of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) obtained from healthy volunteers. cLDL was generated after incubation of native LDL (nLDL) with uremic serum from patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 2-4. Oxidative stress was measured by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy, mitochondrial depolarization by flow cytometry, senescence by β-galactosidase activity and telomere length, and DNA damage by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). The percentage of cLDL by uremic serum was related to the severity of CKD. Compared with nLDL, cLDL induced an increase in oxidative stress (62±5 vs. 8±3%, P<0.001) and cells with mitochondrial depolarization (73±7 vs. 9±5%, P<0.001), and a decrease in EPC proliferation and angiogenesis. cLDL also induced accelerated senescence (73±16 vs. 12±9%, P<0.001), which was associated with a decrease in the expression of γH2AX (62±9 vs. 5±3%, P<0.001). The degree of injury induced by cLDL was comparable to that observed with oxLDL. This study supports the hypothesis that cLDL triggers genomic damage in EPCs, resulting in premature senescence. We can, therefore, hypothesize that EPCs injury by cLDL contributes to an increase in atherosclerotic disease in CKD.

  7. Further study of the effect of the downstream plasma condition on accelerator grid erosion in an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Further numerical results are presented of earlier particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo calculations of accelerator grid erosion in an ion thruster. A comparison between numerical and experimental results suggests that the accelerator grid impingement is primarily due to ions created far downstream from the accelerator grid. In particular, for the same experimental conditions as those of Monheiser and Wilbur at Colorado State University, it is found that a downstream plasma density of 2 x 10 exp 14/cu m is required to give the same ratio of accelerator grid impingement current to beam current (5 percent). For this condition, a potential hill is found in the downstream region of 2.5 V.

  8. Development and Use of Mark Sense Record Cards for Recording Medical Data on Pilots Subjected to Acceleration Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Havill, C. Dewey

    1962-01-01

    A TIME-HONORED system of recording medical histories and the data obtained on physical and laboratory examination has been that of writing the information on record sheets that go into a folder for each patient. In order to have information which would be more readily retrieved, 'a program was initiated in 1952 by the U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in connection with their "Care of the Flyer" study to place this information on machine record cards. In 1958, a machine record card method was developed for recording medical data in connection with the astronaut selection program. Machine record cards were also developed by the Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania, for use in connection with a variety of tests including acceleration stress.1 Therefore, a variety of systems resulted in which data of a medical nature could easily be recalled. During the NASA, Ames Research Center centrifuge studies/'S the pilot subjects were interviewed after each centrifuge run, or series of runs, and subjective information was recorded in a log book by the usual history taking methods referred to above. After the methods Were reviewed, it' was recognized that a card system would be very useful in recording data from our pilots after they had been exposed to acceleration stress. Since the acceleration stress cards already developed did not meet our requirements, it was decided a different card was needed.

  9. Recovery mechanisms in proton exchange membrane fuel cells after accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of performance recovery after accelerated stress test (AST) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are systematically studied. Experiments are carried out by incorporating a well-designed performance recovery procedure right after the AST protocol. The experiment results show that the cell performance recovers significantly from the degraded state after the AST procedure. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements further show that the performance recovery can be divided into kinetic and mass transport recoveries. It is further determined that the kinetic recovery, i.e. the recovery of electrochemical active area (ECA), is due to two distinct mechanisms: the reduction of platinum oxide and the re-attachment of detached platinum nanoparticles onto the carbon surface. The mass transport resistance is probably due to reduction of hydrophilic oxide groups on the carbon surface and the microstructure change that alleviates flooding. Performance comparisons show that the recovery procedure is highly effective, indicating the results of AST significantly over-estimate the true degradation in a PEM fuel cell. Therefore, a recovery procedure is highly recommended when an AST protocol is used to evaluate cell degradations to avoid over-estimating true performance degradations in PEMFCs.

  10. Methodology for the design of accelerated stress tests for non-precious metal catalysts in fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharabi, Ronit; Wijsboom, Yair Haim; Borchtchoukova, Nino; Finkelshtain, Gennadi; Elbaz, Lior

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose systematic methods for testing non-precious group metal catalysts and support degradation alkaline fuel cell cathodes. In this case study, we used a cathode composed of a pyrolyzed non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) on activated carbon. The vulnerabilities of the cathode components were studied in order to develop the methodology and design an accelerated stress test (AST) for NPMC-based cathode in alkaline environment. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the cathode and to follow the changes that occur as a result of exposing the cathodes to extreme operating conditions. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) was used to study the cathodes kinetics; Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to study the structural changes in the electrode surface as well as depletion of the catalysts' active sites from the electrode. The changes in the composition of the electrode and catalyst were detected using X-ray diffraction (XRD). For the first time, we show that NPMC degrade rapidly at low operating potentials whereas the support degrades at high operating potentials and developed a tailor-made AST to take these into account.

  11. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier by accelerating skin ageing process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwa-Young; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jung, Minyoung; Chung, Choon Hee; Hasham, Rosnani; Park, Chang Seo; Choi, Eung Ho

    2011-12-01

    Uncontrolled chronic hyperglycaemia including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) induces many skin problems related to chronic impaired skin barrier state. However, little is known about the skin barrier state of chronic hyperglycaemia patients, the dysfunction of which may be a major cause of their skin problems. In this study, we investigated whether a long-standing hyperglycaemic condition including type 2 DM impairs skin barrier homoeostasis in proportion to the duration and its pathomechanism. We utilized the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as an animal model of long-standing hyperglycaemia and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats as a control strain. We confirmed that a long-standing hyperglycaemia delayed skin barrier homoeostasis, which correlated with haemoglobin A1c levels. OLETF rats as a long-standing hyperglycaemia model exhibited decreased epidermal lipid synthesis and antimicrobial peptide expression with increasing age. Decreased epidermal lipid synthesis accounted for decreased lamellar body production. In addition, OLETF rats had significantly higher serum levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and elevated levels of the receptor for AGE in the epidermis. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier function including permeability and antimicrobial barriers by accelerating skin ageing process in proportion to the duration of hyperglycaemia, which could be a major pathophysiology underlying cutaneous complications of DM.

  12. Thermomechanical conditions and stresses on the friction stir welding tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atthipalli, Gowtam

    Friction stir welding has been commercially used as a joining process for aluminum and other soft materials. However, the use of this process in joining of hard alloys is still developing primarily because of the lack of cost effective, long lasting tools. Here I have developed numerical models to understand the thermo mechanical conditions experienced by the FSW tool and to improve its reusability. A heat transfer and visco-plastic flow model is used to calculate the torque, and traverse force on the tool during FSW. The computed values of torque and traverse force are validated using the experimental results for FSW of AA7075, AA2524, AA6061 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The computed torque components are used to determine the optimum tool shoulder diameter based on the maximum use of torque and maximum grip of the tool on the plasticized workpiece material. The estimation of the optimum tool shoulder diameter for FSW of AA6061 and AA7075 was verified with experimental results. The computed values of traverse force and torque are used to calculate the maximum shear stress on the tool pin to determine the load bearing ability of the tool pin. The load bearing ability calculations are used to explain the failure of H13 steel tool during welding of AA7075 and commercially pure tungsten during welding of L80 steel. Artificial neural network (ANN) models are developed to predict the important FSW output parameters as function of selected input parameters. These ANN consider tool shoulder radius, pin radius, pin length, welding velocity, tool rotational speed and axial pressure as input parameters. The total torque, sliding torque, sticking torque, peak temperature, traverse force, maximum shear stress and bending stress are considered as the output for ANN models. These output parameters are selected since they define the thermomechanical conditions around the tool during FSW. The developed ANN models are used to understand the effect of various input parameters on the total

  13. Potential Therapeutic Role of L-Carnitine in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress and Atrophy Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Anna; Senesi, Pamela; Luzi, Livio; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN) is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging. PMID:25838869

  14. Stress-responsive expression patterns and functional characterization of cold shock domain proteins in cabbage (Brassica rapa) under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Ji; Park, Ye Rin; Park, Su Jung; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-11-01

    Although the functional roles of cold shock domain proteins (CSDPs) have been demonstrated during the growth, development, and stress adaptation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), the functions of CSDPs in other plants species, including cabbage (Brassica rapa), are largely unknown. To gain insight into the roles of CSDPs in cabbage under stress conditions, the genes encoding CSDPs in cabbage were isolated, and the functional roles of CSDPs in response to environmental stresses were analyzed. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the levels of BrCSDP transcripts increased during cold, salt, or drought stress, as well as upon ABA treatment. Among the five BrCSDP genes found in the cabbage genome, one CSDP (BRU12051), named BrCSDP3, was unique in that it is localized to the chloroplast as well as to the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BrCSDP3 in Arabidopsis resulted in accelerated seed germination and better seedling growth compared to the wild-type plants under high salt or dehydration stress conditions, and in response to ABA treatment. BrCSDP3 did not affect the splicing of intron-containing genes and processing of rRNAs in the chloroplast. BrCSDP3 had the ability to complement RNA chaperone-deficient Escherichia coli mutant cells under low temperatures as well as DNA- and RNA-melting abilities, suggesting that it possesses RNA chaperone activity. Taken together, these results suggest that BrCSDP3, harboring RNA chaperone activity, plays a role as a positive regulator in seed germination and seedling growth under stress conditions.

  15. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 2: Delimitation of conditions for charge transfert establishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions for establishment of charge transfer during acceleration of nuclei up to Fe, for typical conditions of solar flare regions T = 5 x 10 to the 3rd power to 2.5 x 10 to the 8th power degrees K were explored. Results show that such conditions are widely assorted, depending on the acceleration mechanism, the kind of projections and their velocity, the target elements, the source temperature and consequently on the degree of ionization of matter and the local charge state of the accelerated ions. Nevertheless, in spite of that assorted behavior, there are some general tendencies that can be summarized as follows. In atomic H electron capture is systematically established from thermal energies up to high energies, whatever the element and for both acceleration process. For a given element and fixed temperature (T), the probability and energy domain of electron capture and loss with Fermi are higher than with Betatron acceleration. For a given acceleration process the heavier the ion the higher the probability and the wider the energy range for electron capture and loss. For given acceleration mechanism and fixed element the importance and energy domain of capture and loss increase with T: for those reasons, the energy range of charge equilibrium (illustrated with solid lines on the next figs.) is wider with Fermi and increases with temperature and atomic number of projectiles. For the same reasons, electron loss is smaller while the lighter the element, the lower the temperature and the Betatron process, such that there are conditions for which electron loss is not allowed at low energies, but only electron capture is established.

  16. The Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor NTL4 participates in a positive feedback loop that induces programmed cell death under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Lee, Hyo-Jun; Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Ha, Jun-Ho; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral component of plant development and adaptation under adverse environmental conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important players that trigger PCD in plants, and ROS-generating machinery is activated in plant cells undergoing PCD. The membrane-bound NAC transcription factor NTL4 has recently been proven to facilitate ROS production in response to drought stress in Arabidopsis. In this work, we show that NTL4 participates in a positive feedback loop that bursts ROS accumulation to modulate PCD under heat stress conditions. Heat stress induces NTL4 gene transcription and NTL4 protein processing. The level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was elevated in 35S:4ΔC transgenic plants that overexpress a transcriptionally active nuclear NTL4 form but significantly reduced in NTL4-deficient ntl4 mutants under heat stress conditions. In addition, heat stress-induced cell death was accelerated in the 35S:4ΔC transgenic plants but decreased in the ntl4 mutants. Notably, H2O2 triggers NTL4 gene transcription and NTL4 protein processing under heat stress conditions. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that NTL4 modulates PCD through a ROS-mediated positive feedback control under heat stress conditions, possibly providing an adaptation strategy by which plants ensure their survival under extreme heat stress conditions.

  17. Relation Between Motility, Accelerated Aging and Gene Expression in Selected Drosophila Strains under Hypergravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Paloma; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2013-02-01

    Motility and aging in Drosophila have proven to be highly modified under altered gravity conditions (both in space and ground simulation facilities). In order to find out how closely connected they are, five strains with altered geotactic response or survival rates were selected and exposed to an altered gravity environment of 2 g. By analysing the different motile and behavioural patterns and the median survival rates, we show that altered gravity leads to changes in motility, which will have a negative impact on the flies' survival. Previous results show a differential gene expression between sessile samples and adults and confirm that environmentally-conditioned behavioural patterns constrain flies' gene expression and life span. Therefore, hypergravity is considered an environmental stress factor and strains that do not respond to this new environment experience an increment in motility, which is the major cause for the observed increased mortality also under microgravity conditions. The neutral-geotaxis selected strain (strain M) showed the most severe phenotype, unable to respond to variations in the gravitational field. Alternatively, the opposite phenotype was observed in positive-geotaxis and long-life selected flies (strains B and L, respectively), suggesting that these populations are less sensitive to alterations in the gravitational load. We conclude that the behavioural response has a greater contribution to aging than the modified energy consumption in altered gravity environments.

  18. Properties of the shear stress peak radiated ahead of rapidly accelerating rupture fronts that mediate frictional slip

    PubMed Central

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Pino Muñoz, Daniel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S.; Molinari, Jean-François; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We study rapidly accelerating rupture fronts at the onset of frictional motion by performing high-temporal-resolution measurements of both the real contact area and the strain fields surrounding the propagating rupture tip. We observe large-amplitude and localized shear stress peaks that precede rupture fronts and propagate at the shear-wave speed. These localized stress waves, which retain a well-defined form, are initiated during the rapid rupture acceleration phase. They transport considerable energy and are capable of nucleating a secondary supershear rupture. The amplitude of these localized waves roughly scales with the dynamic stress drop and does not decrease as long as the rupture front driving it continues to propagate. Only upon rupture arrest does decay initiate, although the stress wave both continues to propagate and retains its characteristic form. These experimental results are qualitatively described by a self-similar model: a simplified analytical solution of a suddenly expanding shear crack. Quantitative agreement with experiment is provided by realistic finite-element simulations that demonstrate that the radiated stress waves are strongly focused in the direction of the rupture front propagation and describe both their amplitude growth and spatial scaling. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of brittle fracture theory to fundamental understanding of friction. Implications for earthquake dynamics are discussed. PMID:26729877

  19. Battlefield Stress: Pre-Conditioning Soldiers for Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-05

    solutl on, educating the individual on concepts of stress, stress reactions, its myths and truths. Other techniques include interpersonal skill development...Relaxation Develop Skills, Attitude, Commitment Self-Suggestion Imagery Meditation Interpersonal Relation2 (ventilation) Inoculation Control use of...several into one. Table 6. Cooino Technioues & Mechanisms. (World War I1 & Korean War) Personal Invulnerability Interpersonal Relations (Ventilation

  20. Effects of Swim Stress on Neophobia and Reconditioning Using a Conditioned Taste Aversion Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jennifer M.; Ramsey, Ashley K.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has found that swim stress during a classical conditioning trial attenuates conditioned taste aversion (CTA). In the current study, rats were used to examine the effects of inescapable swim stress on the habituation of neophobia to a flavored solution and reacquisition of an extinguished conditioned taste aversion. In Experiment…

  1. Renin-angiotensin system activation accelerates atherosclerosis in experimental renal failure by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress-related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Xinyi; Tang, Weixue; Gan, Hua

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and atherosclerosis (AS) in uremic apolipo-protein E knockout (apoE−/−) mice. Mild uremia was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) in 10-week-old apoE−/− mice. Four weeks after nephrectomy, the mice received losartan or no treatment for 16 weeks. Sham-operated mice served as the controls. We found that uremia accelerated AS at the aortic root. The activation of ER stress and the significant upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed in the uremic mice. Phosphorylated inositol-requiring 1α (p-IRE1α), an ER stress marker protein, was mainly expressed in macrophages in the atherosclerotic lesions. Treatment with losartan significantly attenuated aortic AS, inhibited ER stress and reduced aortic inflammation. In in vitro experiments, angiotensin II (Ang II) increased the levels of the common ER stress maker, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and the phosphorylation of IRE1α in RAW264.7 macrophages. Treatment with losartan inhibited the activation of ER stress and the upregulation of GRP78, and enhanced the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor (IκB) in Ang II-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. IRE1α-siRNA suppressed inflammation and downregulated IκB expression and IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, which inhibited IκB degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in Ang II-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. These findings suggest that RAS activation accelerates AS by promoting ER stress-related inflammation in uremic mice. PMID:28098884

  2. Systolic Peak Detection in Acceleration Photoplethysmograms Measured from Emergency Responders in Tropical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Abbott, Derek; Schuurmans, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Photoplethysmogram (PPG) monitoring is not only essential for critically ill patients in hospitals or at home, but also for those undergoing exercise testing. However, processing PPG signals measured after exercise is challenging, especially if the environment is hot and humid. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that can detect systolic peaks under challenging conditions, as in the case of emergency responders in tropical conditions. Accurate systolic-peak detection is an important first step for the analysis of heart rate variability. Algorithms based on local maxima-minima, first-derivative, and slope sum are evaluated, and a new algorithm is introduced to improve the detection rate. With 40 healthy subjects, the new algorithm demonstrates the highest overall detection accuracy (99.84% sensitivity, 99.89% positive predictivity). Existing algorithms, such as Billauer's, Li's and Zong's, have comparable although lower accuracy. However, the proposed algorithm presents an advantage for real-time applications by avoiding human intervention in threshold determination. For best performance, we show that a combination of two event-related moving averages with an offset threshold has an advantage in detecting systolic peaks, even in heat-stressed PPG signals. PMID:24167546

  3. Self-consistency conditions for elementary Reynolds stress closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes the analytical representation of the correlation tensor in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence and sketches an application to Reynolds stress transport turbulence models. It is shown that the analytical approach can address some of the limitations of conventional modeling.

  4. Oxidative stress accelerates amyloid deposition and memory impairment in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-02-05

    Oxidative stress is known to play a prominent role in the onset and early stage progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels are increased in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Here, we created a double-transgenic mouse model of AD to explore the pathological and behavioral effects of oxidative stress. Double transgenic (APP/DAL) mice were constructed by crossing Tg2576 (APP) mice, which express a mutant form of human amyloid precursor protein (APP), with DAL mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), in which oxidative stress is enhanced. Y-maze and object recognition tests were performed at 3 and 6 months of age to evaluate learning and memory. The accumulation of amyloid plaques, deposition of phosphorylated-tau protein, and number of astrocytes in the brain were assessed histopathologically at 3, 6, 9, and 12-15 months of age. The life span of APP/DAL mice was significantly shorter than that of APP or DAL mice. In addition, they showed accelerated amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, and gliosis. Furthermore, these mice showed impaired performance on Y-maze and object recognition tests at 3 months of age. These data suggest that oxidative stress accelerates cognitive dysfunction and pathological insults in the brain. APP/DAL mice could be a useful model for exploring new approaches to AD treatment.

  5. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity conditions offer an environment in which convection in a nonisothermal gas could be driven primarily by thermal stress. A direct examination of thermal stress flows would be invaluable in assessing the accuracy of the Burnett terms in the fluid stress tensor. We present a preliminary numerical investigation of the competing effects of thermal stress, thermal creep at the side walls, and buoyancy on gas convection in nonuniformly heated containers under normal and reduced gravity levels. Conditions in which thermal stress convection becomes dominant are identified, and issues regarding the experimental measurement of the flows are discussed.

  6. [Induction of the NO synthesis in lactobacilli under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Smolentseva, O A; Iarullina, D R; Il'inskaia, O N

    2012-01-01

    An increase in the nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis in Lactobacillus plantarum 8P-A3 cells takes place under strong stress influence, which leads to a considerable decrease in the microbial cell viability: heating at 70 degrees C and 80 degrees C, prolonged cultivation, toxic effect of hexylresorcinol. The factors, which do not lead to cell death, such as heating at 60 degrees C, 50 microg/ml homoserine lactone, Bacillus intermedius 7P ribonuclease (binase) in concentrations up to 300 microg/ml, do not induce NO synthesis. The activation of the NO biosynthesis in response to stress treatment evidences to universality of key-mechanisms of stress response in cells differing in the level of their organization as well as to important role of nitric oxide in them.

  7. Bacterial economics: adaptation to stress conditions via stage-wise changes in the response mechanism.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, J; Metris, A; George, S M

    2015-02-01

    Common features of microbial adaptation are analysed with mathematical models and extended to stress conditions when the bacterial population declines before growing again. A parallel is drawn between bacterial and human communities in terms of non-mutation-based adaptation (acclimation) to stress. For a case study, the behaviour of Escherichia coli under osmotic stress, is detailed. It is suggested that stress modelling adaptation should be the focus of further developments in predictive food microbiology.

  8. Genome-wide association analysis of agronomic traits in wheat under drought-stressed and non-stressed conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mwadzingeni, Learnmore; Shimelis, Hussein; Rees, D. Jasper G.; Tsilo, Toi J.

    2017-01-01

    This study determined the population structure and genome-wide marker-trait association of agronomic traits of wheat for drought-tolerance breeding. Ninety-three diverse bread wheat genotypes were genotyped using the Diversity Arrays Technology sequencing (DArTseq) protocol. The number of days-to-heading (DTH), number of days-to-maturity (DTM), plant height (PHT), spike length (SPL), number of kernels per spike (KPS), thousand kernel weight (TKW) and grain yield (GYLD), assessed under drought-stressed and non-stressed conditions, were considered for the study. Population structure analysis and genome-wide association mapping were undertaken based on 16,383 silico DArTs loci with < 10% missing data. The population evaluated was grouped into nine distinct genetic structures. Inter-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium showed the existence of linkage decay as physical distance increased. A total of 62 significant (P < 0.001) marker-trait associations (MTAs) were detected explaining more than 20% of the phenotypic variation observed under both drought-stressed and non-stressed conditions. Significant (P < 0.001) MTA event(s) were observed for DTH, PHT, SPL, SPS, and KPS; under both stressed and non-stressed conditions, while additional significant (P < 0.05) associations were observed for TKW, DTM and GYLD under non-stressed condition. The MTAs reported in this population could be useful to initiate marker-assisted selection (MAS) and targeted trait introgression of wheat under drought-stressed and non-stressed conditions, and for fine mapping and cloning of the underlying genes and QTL. PMID:28234945

  9. Study of the effect of temperature on Pt dissolution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells via accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanushkodi, S. R.; Kundu, S.; Fowler, M. W.; Pritzker, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) at higher cell temperatures accelerates Pt dissolution in the catalyst layer. In this study, a Pt dissolution accelerated stress testing protocol involving the application of a potentiostatic square-wave with 3 s at 0.6 V followed by 3 s at 1.0 V was developed to test fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The use of this Pt dissolution protocol at three different temperatures (40 °C, 60 °C and 80 °C) was investigated for the same membrane electrode assembly composition. Impedance analysis of the membrane electrode assemblies showed an increase in polarization resistance during the course of the accelerated stress testing. Polarization analysis and electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) loss measurements revealed evidence of increased cathode catalyst layer (CCL) degradation due to Pt dissolution and deposition in the membrane as the cell temperature was raised. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images confirmed the formation of Pt bands in the membrane. A diagnostic expression was developed to estimate kinetic losses due to oxygen reduction using the effective platinum surface area (EPSA) estimated from cyclic voltammograms. The results indicated that performance degradation occurred mainly due to Pt loss.

  10. Understanding How Kurtosis Is Transferred from Input Acceleration to Stress Response and Its Influence on Fatigue Llife

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kihm, Frederic; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Ferguson, Neil S.; Halfpenny, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    High cycle fatigue of metals typically occurs through long term exposure to time varying loads which, although modest in amplitude, give rise to microscopic cracks that can ultimately propagate to failure. The fatigue life of a component is primarily dependent on the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations. For most vibration tests, it is common to assume a Gaussian distribution of both the input acceleration and stress response. In real life, however, it is common to experience non-Gaussian acceleration input, and this can cause the response to be non-Gaussian. Examples of non-Gaussian loads include road irregularities such as potholes in the automotive world or turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations for the aerospace sector or more generally wind, wave or high amplitude acoustic loads. The paper first reviews some of the methods used to generate non-Gaussian excitation signals with a given power spectral density and kurtosis. The kurtosis of the response is examined once the signal is passed through a linear time invariant system. Finally an algorithm is presented that determines the output kurtosis based upon the input kurtosis, the input power spectral density and the frequency response function of the system. The algorithm is validated using numerical simulations. Direct applications of these results include improved fatigue life estimations and a method to accelerate shaker tests by generating high kurtosis, non-Gaussian drive signals.

  11. Effects of swim stress on latent inhibition using a conditioned taste aversion procedure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shawn; Fieser, Sarah; Jones, Jennifer; Schachtman, Todd R

    2008-10-20

    Rats were used to examine the effects of inescapable swim stress on latent inhibition using a conditioned taste aversion procedure. Subjects were subjected to inescapable swim after each of three saccharin taste preexposures and saccharin was later paired with LiCl. The ability of swim to influence latent inhibition was assessed on subsequent saccharin test trials. Swim stress significantly attenuated latent inhibition. The implications of these results regarding the effects of swim stress on conditioned taste aversion are discussed.

  12. Chronic stress and sex differences on the recall of fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Baran, Sarah E; Armstrong, Charles E; Niren, Danielle C; Hanna, Jeffery J; Conrad, Cheryl D

    2009-03-01

    Chronic stress effects and sex differences were examined on conditioned fear extinction. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically stressed by restraint (6 h/d/21 d), conditioned to tone and footshock, followed by extinction after 1 h and 24 h delays. Chronic stress impaired the recall of fear extinction in males, as evidenced by high freezing to tone after the 24 h delay despite exposure to the previous 1 h delay extinction trials, and this effect was not due to ceiling effects from overtraining during conditioning. In contrast, chronic stress attenuated the recall of fear conditioning acquisition in females, regardless of exposure to the 1 h extinction exposure. Since freezing to tone was reinstated following unsignalled footshocks, the deficit in the stressed rats reflected impaired recall rather than impaired consolidation. Sex differences in fear conditioning and extinction were observed in nonstressed controls as well, with control females resisting extinction to tone. Analysis of contextual freezing showed that all groups (control, stress, male, female) increased freezing immediately after the first tone extinction trial, demonstrating contextual discrimination. These findings show that chronic stress and sex interact to influence fear conditioning, with chronic stress impairing the recall of delayed fear extinction in males to implicate the medial prefrontal cortex, disrupting the recall of the fear conditioning acquisition in females to implicate the amygdala, and nonstressed controls exhibiting sex differences in fear conditioning and extinction, which may involve the amygdala and/or corticosterone levels.

  13. Anticoagulation and antiplatelet effects of semax under conditions of acute and chronic immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Grigorjeva, M E; Lyapina, L A

    2010-07-01

    The effects of semax on anticoagulant, fibrinolytic, and platelet components of the anticoagulation system were studied on albino rats under conditions of acute and chronic immobilization stress. Semax exhibited a protective antistress effect after repeated intranasal administration under conditions of hypercoagulation developing in response to immobilization stress of different degree. The effect manifested in stimulation of the anticoagulation system.

  14. Good genes, oxidative stress and condition-dependent sexual signals.

    PubMed Central

    von Schantz, T; Bensch, S; Grahn, M; Hasselquist, D; Wittzell, H

    1999-01-01

    The immune and the detoxication systems of animals are characterized by allelic polymorphisms, which underlie individual differences in ability to combat assaults from pathogens and toxic compounds. Previous studies have shown that females may improve offspring survival by selecting mates on the basis of sexual ornaments and signals that honestly reveal health. In many cases the expression of these ornaments appears to be particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. Activated immune and detoxication systems often generate oxidative stress by an extensive production of reactive metabolites and free radicals. Given that tolerance or resistance to toxic compounds and pathogens can be inherited, female choice should promote the evolution of male ornaments that reliably reveal the status of the bearers' level of oxidative stress. Hence, oxidative stress may be one important agent linking the expression of sexual ornaments to genetic variation in fitness-related traits, thus promoting the evolution of female mate choice and male sexual ornamentation, a controversial issue in evolutionary biology ever since Darwin. PMID:10081154

  15. Centrifugal acceleration to 3Gz is related to increased release of stress hormones and decreased mood in men and women.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Guardiera, Simon; Kleinert, Jens; Steinbacher, Anja; Abel, Thomas; Carnahan, Heather; Strüder, Heiko K

    2008-09-01

    It has been suggested that the central and peripheral neural processes (CPNP) are affected by gravitational changes. Based on the previous experiments during parabolic flights, central and peripheral changes may not only be due to the changed gravitational forces but also due to neuroendocrine reactions related to the psycho-physiological consequences of gravitational changes. The present study focuses on the interaction of neuroendocrine changes and the physical and mental states after acceleration to three-time terrestrial gravity (3Gz). Eleven participants (29.4+/-5.1 [SD] years (male (n=8): 30+/-5.1 years; female (n=3): 27.7+/-2.1 years) underwent a 15 min acceleration to 3Gz in a human centrifuge. Before and after the acceleration to 3Gz circulating stress hormone concentrations (cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), prolactin, epinephrine, norepinephrine) and perceived physical and mental states were recorded. A second control group of 11 participants underwent the same testing procedure in a laboratory session. Serum cortisol concentration during exposure to the centrifugal acceleration increased by 70%, plasma concentration of ACTH increased threefold, prolactin twofold, epinephrine by 70% and norepinephrine by 45%, whereas the perceived physical well-being decreased. These findings demonstrate that psycho-physiological changes have to be regarded as a relevant factor for the changes in CPNP during phases of hypergravity exposure.

  16. Designing of the low energy beam lines with achromatic condition in the RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2017-01-01

    The RAON accelerator has been built to create and accelerate stable heavy-ion beams and rare isotope beams. The stable heavy-ion beams are generated by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and accelerated by the low energy superconducting linac SCL1. The beams accelerated by the SCL1 are re-accelerated by the high energy superconducting linac SCL2 for the generation of rare isotope beams by using the in-flight fragmentation system or are put to use in the low energy experimental halls, which include the neutron science facility and the KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus after having passed through the low energy beam lines which have long deflecting sections. At the end of each beam line in the low energy experimental halls, the beams should meet the targets of the two facilities with the specific requirements satisfied. Namely, if the beam is to be sent safely and accurately to the targets and simultaneously, satisfy the requirements, an achromatic lattice design needs to be applied in each beam line. In this paper, we will present the lattice design of the low energy beam lines and describe the results of the beam dynamics simulations. In addition, the correction of the beam orbit, which is distorted by machine imperfections, will be discussed.

  17. Communities of different plant diversity respond similarly to drought stress: experimental evidence from field non-weeded and greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Doležal, Jiří; Zemková, Lenka; Lepš, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Accelerating rate of species loss has prompted researchers to study the role of species diversity in processes that control ecosystem functioning. Although negative impact of species loss has been documented, the evidence concerning its impact on ecosystem stability is still limited. Here, we studied the effects of declining species and functional diversity on plant community responses to drought in the field (open to weed colonization) and greenhouse conditions. Both species and functional diversity positively affected the average yields of field communities. However, this pattern was similar in both drought-stressed and control plots. No effect of diversity on community resistance, biomass recovery after drought and resilience was found because drought reduced biomass production similarly at each level of diversity by approximately 30%. The use of dissimilarity (characterized by Euclidean distance) revealed higher variation under changing environments (drought-stressed vs. control) in more diverse communities compared to less species-rich assemblages. In the greenhouse experiment, the effect of species diversity affected community resistance, indicating that more diverse communities suffered more from drought than species-poor ones. We conclude that our study did not support the insurance hypothesis (stability properties of a community should increase with species richness) because species diversity had an equivocal effect on ecosystem resistance and resilience in an environment held under non-weeded practice, regardless of the positive relationship between sown species diversity and community biomass production. More species-rich communities were less resistant against drought-stressed conditions than species-poor ones grown in greenhouse conditions.

  18. Communities of different plant diversity respond similarly to drought stress: experimental evidence from field non-weeded and greenhouse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Doležal, Jiří; Zemková, Lenka; Lepš, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Accelerating rate of species loss has prompted researchers to study the role of species diversity in processes that control ecosystem functioning. Although negative impact of species loss has been documented, the evidence concerning its impact on ecosystem stability is still limited. Here, we studied the effects of declining species and functional diversity on plant community responses to drought in the field (open to weed colonization) and greenhouse conditions. Both species and functional diversity positively affected the average yields of field communities. However, this pattern was similar in both drought-stressed and control plots. No effect of diversity on community resistance, biomass recovery after drought and resilience was found because drought reduced biomass production similarly at each level of diversity by approximately 30 %. The use of dissimilarity (characterized by Euclidean distance) revealed higher variation under changing environments (drought-stressed vs. control) in more diverse communities compared to less species-rich assemblages. In the greenhouse experiment, the effect of species diversity affected community resistance, indicating that more diverse communities suffered more from drought than species-poor ones. We conclude that our study did not support the insurance hypothesis (stability properties of a community should increase with species richness) because species diversity had an equivocal effect on ecosystem resistance and resilience in an environment held under non-weeded practice, regardless of the positive relationship between sown species diversity and community biomass production. More species-rich communities were less resistant against drought-stressed conditions than species-poor ones grown in greenhouse conditions.

  19. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  20. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm−/− mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm−/− and Gclm+/+ mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm−/− mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm−/− ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm−/− mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  1. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut.

  2. A Flight Evaluation of an Airborne Physiological Instrumentation System, Including Preliminary Results Under Conditions of Varying Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Holden, George R.; Smith, Joseph R., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    A physiological instrumentation system capable of recording the electrocardiogram, pulse rate, respiration rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures during flight has been developed. This instrumentation system was designed for use during control studies at varied levels of acceleration in order to monitor the well-being of the pilot and at the same time to obtain data for study of the relationships between his various physiological functions and his performance capability. Flights, made in a T-33 aircraft, demonstrated the ability of the system to obtain the desired physiological data in flight. The data obtained in these flights, although limited in nature, indicate a slowing of the pulse rate under the subgravity conditions of brief duration. There appeared to be a proportional nearly in-phase relationship between pulse rate and acceleration. A decrease in diastolic blood pressure together with an increase in pulse pressure was noted during subgravity conditions and an elevation of the diastolic pressure together with a decrease in pulse pressure du-ring increased accelerations. No change worthy of note was seen in the records of the systolic blood pressure, the respiration rate, or the electrocardiogram over the range of acceleration studied (0 to 3 g).

  3. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  4. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-04-18

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved.

  5. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    PubMed Central

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients. PMID:27095931

  6. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot.

  7. The effects of acceleration stress on human workload and manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. T.; Albery, W. B.; Ward, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of +Gz stress on operator task performance and workload were assessed. Subjects were presented a two dimensional maze and were required to solve it as rapidly as possible (by moving a light dot through it via a trim switch on a control stick) while under G-stress at levels from +1 Gz to +6 Gz. The G-stress was provided by a human centrifuge. The effects of this stress were assessed by two techniques; (1) objective performance measures on the primary maze-solving task, and (2) subjective workload measures obtained using the subjective workload assessment technique (SWAT). It was found that while neither moderate (+3 Gz) nor high (+5 Gz and +6 Gz) levels of G-stress affected maze solving performance, the high G levels did increase significantly the subjective workload of the maze task.

  8. Effect of certain psychopharmacological preparations on adaptation under stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanishevskaya, A. V.; Mezentseva, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments staged on rats demonstrated that the formation of pathological states caused by stress and accompanied by the development of ulcerative lesion of the gastric mucosa are associated with the degree of the catecholamines level drop in the mesencephalon and hypothalamus. The application of seduxen and also of combinations consisting of L-DOPA with seduxen, or with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan tends to reduce the frequency of developing alcerative lesions of the stomach. The protective effect produced by the combination of L-DOPA with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan is barred by an additional administration of an B-adrenoblocking agent, inderal.

  9. Oligomerised lychee fruit-derived polyphenol attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice and endoplasmic reticulum stress in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Kitadate, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hajime; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Izawa, Tetsuya; Ohno, Hideki

    2013-11-14

    Recently, the ability of polyphenols to reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has attracted a great deal of interest. In the present study, we investigated the attenuating effects of oligomerised lychee fruit-derived polyphenol (OLFP, also called Oligonol) on early cognitive impairment. Male senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice (4 months old) were given OLFP (100 mg/kg per d) for 2 months, and then conditioned fear memory testing was conducted. Contextual fear memory, which is considered hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice compared with non-senescence-accelerated mice. OLFP attenuated cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice. Moreover, the results of real-time PCR analysis that followed DNA array analysis in the hippocampus revealed that, compared with SAMP8 mice, the mRNA expression of Wolfram syndrome 1 (Wfs1) was significantly higher in SAMP8 mice administered with OLFP. Wfs1 reportedly helps to protect against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is thought to be one of the causes for AD. The expression of Wfs1 was significantly up-regulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by the treatment with OLFP, and the up-regulation was inhibited by the treatment of the cells with a c-Jun N-terminal kinase-specific inhibitor rather than with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor. Moreover, OLFP significantly attenuated the tunicamycin-induced expression of the ER stress marker BiP (immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein) in the cells. These results suggest that OLFP has an attenuating effect on early cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice, and diminishes ER stress in neuronal cells.

  10. Beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress on pancreas of a senescence accelerated mice model.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; García, Cruz; Forman, Katherine; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of aging on parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pancreas obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and resistant mice (SAMR1). Animals of 2 (young) and 10 months of age (old) were used (n = 64). The influence of the administration of melatonin in the drinking water for one month at two different dosages (1 and 10mg/(kg day) on old SAMP8 mice on these parameters was also studied. SAMP8 mice showed with age a significant increase in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Furthermore the protein expression of several NFκB subunits was also enhanced. On the contrary aged SAMR1 mice did not show significant increases in these parameters. Melatonin administration to SAMP8 mice was able to reduce these age related alterations at the two used dosages.

  11. Tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease under resting-state and stress-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Ji; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Sang Kyong; Park, Hyeyoung; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Han Byul; Jeon, Beom S; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-15

    Tremor characteristics-amplitude and frequency components-are primary quantitative clinical factors for diagnosis and monitoring of tremors. Few studies have investigated how different patient's conditions affect tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we analyzed tremor characteristics under resting-state and stress-state conditions. Tremor was recorded using an accelerometer on the finger, under resting-state and stress-state (calculation task) conditions, during rest tremor and postural tremor. The changes of peak power, peak frequency, mean frequency, and distribution of power spectral density (PSD) of tremor were evaluated across conditions. Patients whose tremors were considered more than "mild" were selected, for both rest (n=67) and postural (n=25) tremor. Stress resulted in both greater peak powers and higher peak frequencies for rest tremor (p<0.001), but not for postural tremor. Notably, peak frequencies were concentrated around 5 Hz under stress-state condition. The distributions of PSD of tremor were symmetrical, regardless of conditions. Tremor is more evident and typical tremor characteristics, namely a lower frequency as amplitude increases, are different in stressful condition. Patient's conditions directly affect neural oscillations related to tremor frequencies. Therefore, tremor characteristics in PD should be systematically standardized across patient's conditions such as attention and stress levels.

  12. Seasonal stress physiology and body condition differ among co-occurring tropical finch species.

    PubMed

    Maute, Kimberly L; French, Kristine; Legge, Sarah; Astheimer, Lee

    2013-12-01

    Seasonal changes in avian hormonal stress responses and condition are well known for common species found at temperate and arctic latitudes, but declining and tropical species are poorly studied. This study compares stress and condition measures of co-occurring declining and non-declining tropical grass finch species in Australia. We monitored declining Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) and non-declining long-tailed and masked finches (Poepila acuticauda and P. personata) during two seasons that are potentially stressful: peak breeding (early dry season when food is plentiful) and moult (late dry to early wet season when food may be scarce). We measured body condition (muscle and fat), haematocrit, and stress response to capture using plasma corticosterone and binding globulin concentrations. All species had higher muscle and lower fat indices during breeding than moult. Haematocrit did not consistently differ between seasons. Long-tailed finches had higher stress responses during breeding than moult, similar to other passerines studied. Masked finches showed no seasonal changes in stress response. Gouldian finches had stress response patterns opposite to those of long-tailed finches, with higher stress responses during moult. However, seasonal trends in Gouldian and long-tailed finch stress responses sometimes differed between years or sites. The differences in stress response patterns between species suggest that the declining Gouldian finch is more sensitive to recent environmental changes which are thought to further reduce grass seed food resources during the late dry to early wet season. Retention of stress responsiveness during a protracted moult could increase the survival potential of Gouldian finches. This study highlights the utility of stress and condition indices to determine the sensitivity of co-occurring species to environmental conditions.

  13. Accelerated Growth Rate and Increased Drought Stress Resilience of the Model Grass Brachypodium distachyon Colonized by Bacillus subtilis B26.

    PubMed

    Gagné-Bourque, François; Mayer, Boris F; Charron, Jean-Benoit; Vali, Hojatollah; Bertrand, Annick; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGB) induce positive effects in plants, for instance, increased growth and reduced abiotic stresses susceptibility. The mechanisms by which these bacteria impact the host plant are numerous, diverse and often specific. Here, we studied the agronomical, molecular and biochemical effects of the endophytic PGB Bacillus subtilis B26 on the full life cycle of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21, an established model species for functional genomics in cereal crops and temperate grasses. Inoculation of Brachypodium with B. subtilis strain B26 increased root and shoot weights, accelerated growth rate and seed yield as compared to control plants. B. subtilis strain B26 efficiently colonized the plant and was recovered from roots, stems and blades as well as seeds of Brachypodium, indicating that the bacterium is able to migrate, spread systemically inside the plant, establish itself in the aerial plant tissues and organs, and is vertically transmitted to seeds. The presence of B. subtilis strain B26 in the seed led to systemic colonization of the next generation of Brachypodium plants. Inoculated Brachypodium seedlings and mature plants exposed to acute and chronic drought stress minimized the phenotypic effect of drought compared to plants not harbouring the bacterium. Protection from the inhibitory effects of drought by the bacterium was linked to upregulation of the drought-response genes, DREB2B-like, DHN3-like and LEA-14-A-like and modulation of the DNA methylation genes, MET1B-like, CMT3-like and DRM2-like, that regulate the process. Additionally, total soluble sugars and starch contents increased in stressed inoculated plants, a biochemical indication of drought tolerance. In conclusion, we show a single inoculation of Brachypodium with a PGB affected the whole growth cycle of the plant, accelerating its growth rates, shortening its vegetative period, and alleviating drought stress effects. These effects are relevant to grasses and cereal

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Banks, Curtis E.; Madaras, Eric I.; Waller, Jess M.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-09-01

    To project objective is to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation(NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring(SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  15. KIAA0368-deficiency affects disassembly of 26S proteasome under oxidative stress condition.

    PubMed

    Haratake, Kousuke; Sato, Akitsugu; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    Many cellular stresses cause damages of intracellular proteins, which are eventually degraded by the ubiquitin and proteasome system. The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex composed of 20S core particle and the proteasome activators that regulate the proteasome activity. Extracellular mutants 29 (Ecm29) is a 200 kDa protein encoded by KIAA0368 gene, associates with the proteasome, but its role is largely unknown. Here, we generated KIAA0368-deficient mice and investigated the function of Ecm29 in stress response. KIAA0368-deficient mice showed normal peptidase activity and proteasome formation at normal condition. Under stressed condition, 26S proteasome dissociates in wild-type cells, but not in KIAA0368(-/-) cells. This response was correlated with efficient degradation of damaged proteins and resistance to oxidative stress of KIAA0368(-/-) cells. Thus, Ecm29 is involved in the dissociation process of 26S proteasome, providing clue to analyse the mechanism of proteasomal degradation under various stress condition.

  16. Influence of stress on fear memory processes in an aversive differential conditioning paradigm in humans.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Wilhelm, Frank H; Hartmann, Francina R; Kunz, Sabrina; von Rohr, Isabelle R Rudolf; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-07-01

    It is widely assumed that learning and memory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis, expression, maintenance and therapy of anxiety disorders, such as phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Memory retrieval is involved in symptom expression and maintenance of these disorders, while memory extinction is believed to be the underlying mechanism of behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders. There is abundant evidence that stress and stress hormones can reduce memory retrieval of emotional information, whereas they enhance memory consolidation of extinction training. In this study we aimed at investigating if stress affects these memory processes in a fear conditioning paradigm in healthy human subjects. On day 1, fear memory was acquired through a standard differential fear conditioning procedure. On day 2 (24h after fear acquisition), participants either underwent a stressful cold pressor test (CPT) or a control condition, 20 min before memory retrieval testing and extinction training. Possible prolonged effects of the stress manipulation were investigated on day 3 (48 h after fear acquisition), when memory retrieval and extinction were tested again. On day 2, men in the stress group showed a robust cortisol response to stress and showed lower unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy ratings than men in the control group. This reduction in fear memory retrieval was maintained on day 3. In women, who showed a significantly smaller cortisol response to stress than men, no stress effects on fear memory retrieval were observed. No group differences were observed with respect to extinction. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that stress can reduce memory retrieval of conditioned fear in men. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of stress and glucocorticoids on fear symptoms in anxiety disorders and suggest that such effects may be sex-specific.

  17. Does cyclic stress and accelerated ageing influence the wear behavior of highly crosslinked polyethylene?

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; De Mattia, Jonathan Salvatore; Bracco, Pierangiola; Pavoni, Eleonora; Taddei, Paola

    2016-06-01

    First-generation (irradiated and remelted or annealed) and second-generation (irradiated and vitamin E blended or doped) highly crosslinked polyethylenes were introduced in the last decade to solve the problems of wear and osteolysis. In this study, the influence of the Vitamin-E addition on crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE_VE) was evaluated by comparing the in vitro wear behavior of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) versus Vitamin-E blended polyethylene XLPE and conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (STD_PE) acetabular cups, after accelerated ageing according to ASTM F2003-02 (70.0±0.1°C, pure oxygen at 5bar for 14 days). The test was performed using a hip joint simulator run for two millions cycles, under bovine calf serum as lubricant. Mass loss was found to decrease along the series XLPE_VE>STD_PE>XLPE, although no statistically significant differences were found between the mass losses of the three sets of cups. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate at a molecular level the morphology changes induced by wear. The spectroscopic analyses showed that the accelerated ageing determined different wear mechanisms and molecular rearrangements during testing with regards to the changes in both the chain orientation and the distribution of the all-trans sequences within the orthorhombic, amorphous and third phases. The results of the present study showed that the addition of vitamin E was not effective to improve the gravimetric wear of PE after accelerated ageing. However, from a molecular point of view, the XLPE_VE acetabular cups tested after accelerated ageing appeared definitely less damaged than the STD_PE ones and comparable to XLPE samples.

  18. Measurement of heat stress conditions at cow level and comparison to climate conditions at stationary locations inside a dairy barn.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Laura K; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine heat stress conditions at cow level and to investigate the relationship to the climate conditions at 5 different stationary locations inside a dairy barn. In addition, we compared the climate conditions at cow level between primiparous and multiparous cows for a period of 1 week after regrouping. The temperature-humidity index (THI) differed significantly between all stationary loggers. The lowest THI was measured at the window logger in the experimental stall and the highest THI was measured at the central logger in the experimental stall. The THI at the mobile cow loggers was 2·33 THI points higher than at the stationary loggers. Furthermore, the mean daily THI was higher at the mobile cow loggers than at the stationary loggers on all experimental days. The THI in the experimental pen was 0·44 THI points lower when the experimental cow group was located inside the milking parlour. The THI measured at the mobile cow loggers was 1·63 THI points higher when the experimental cow group was located inside the milking parlour. However, there was no significant difference for all climate variables between primiparous and multiparous cows. These results indicate, there is a wide range of climate conditions inside a dairy barn and especially areas with a great distance to a fresh air supply have an increased risk for the occurrence of heat stress conditions. Furthermore, the heat stress conditions are even higher at cow level and cows not only influence their climatic environment, but also generate microclimates within different locations inside the barn. Therefore climate conditions should be obtained at cow level to evaluate the heat stress conditions that dairy cows are actually exposed to.

  19. Stress-related hormones and glycinebetaine interplay in protection of photosynthesis under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Zaman, Mohammad; Pharis, Richard P; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-12-01

    Plants subjected to abiotic stresses such as extreme high and low temperatures, drought or salinity, often exhibit decreased vegetative growth and reduced reproductive capabilities. This is often associated with decreased photosynthesis via an increase in photoinhibition, and accompanied by rapid changes in endogenous levels of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene. However, certain plant species and/or genotypes exhibit greater tolerance to abiotic stress because they are capable of accumulating endogenous levels of the zwitterionic osmolyte-glycinebetaine (GB). The accumulation of GB via natural production, exogenous application or genetic engineering, enhances plant osmoregulation and thus increases abiotic stress tolerance. The final steps of GB biosynthesis occur in chloroplasts where GB has been shown to play a key role in increasing the protection of soluble stromal and lumenal enzymes, lipids and proteins, of the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition, we suggest that the stress-induced GB biosynthesis pathway may well serve as an additional or alternative biochemical sink, one which consumes excess photosynthesis-generated electrons, thus protecting photosynthetic apparatus from overreduction. Glycinebetaine biosynthesis in chloroplasts is up-regulated by increases in endogenous ABA or SA levels. In this review, we propose and discuss a model describing the close interaction and synergistic physiological effects of GB and ABA in the process of cold acclimation of higher plants.

  20. Stress physiology and weapon integrity of intertidal mantis shrimp under future ocean conditions

    PubMed Central

    deVries, Maya S.; Webb, Summer J.; Tu, Jenny; Cory, Esther; Morgan, Victoria; Sah, Robert L.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Taylor, Jennifer R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Calcified marine organisms typically experience increased oxidative stress and changes in mineralization in response to ocean acidification and warming conditions. These effects could hinder the potency of animal weapons, such as the mantis shrimp’s raptorial appendage. The mechanical properties of this calcified weapon enable extremely powerful punches to be delivered to prey and aggressors. We examined oxidative stress and exoskeleton structure, mineral content, and mechanical properties of the raptorial appendage and the carapace under long-term ocean acidification and warming conditions. The predatory appendage had significantly higher % Mg under ocean acidification conditions, while oxidative stress levels as well as the % Ca and mechanical properties of the appendage remained unchanged. Thus, mantis shrimp tolerate expanded ranges of pH and temperature without experiencing oxidative stress or functional changes to their weapons. Our findings suggest that these powerful predators will not be hindered under future ocean conditions. PMID:27974830

  1. The Photoelastic Investigation of Three-dimensional Stress and Strain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppel, G

    1937-01-01

    The present report contains the description and typical application of two photoelastic methods which are suitable for the study of stress and strain conditions in three dimensions, namely: the fixation method and the immersion method.

  2. Polar 5 - An electron accelerator experiment within an aurora. I - Instrumentation and geophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehlum, B. N.; Grandal, B.; Jacobsen, T. A.; Maseide, K.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Soraas, F.; Aarsnes, K.; Stadsnes, J.; Maynard, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    A mother-daughter rocket was launched over two auroral structures, which included a 10 keV electron accelerator and a series of diagnostic instruments for monitoring optical and wave effects generated through beam-atmospheric interactions and production of secondary electrons. The instrumentation, the ground and rocket background measurements obtained, and some of the beam effects on various geophysical parameters are presented. Attention is given to the rocket geometry, capacitance probe, particle counters, photometers, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray detector. Observations on the plasma environment, auroral particle precipitation, d.c. electric field, optical emissions, and auroral background HF and VLF emissions are also discussed.

  3. Experimental Study on the Control of the Supersonic Axisymmetric Intake under the Acceleration/Deceleration Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takayuki; Sato, Tetsuya; Tanatsugu, Nobuhiro; Enomoto, Yoshinari

    A control system of variable geometry mixed compression axisymmetric intake is experimentally studied at ONERA S3 supersonic wind tunnel. The acceleration/deceleration of the space plane is simulated by changing the free stream velocity. The intake is successfully controlled with 90% of the maximum total pressure recovery and mass capture ratio. In this experiment, two subjects about control of axisymmetric intake are also cleared. First, the effect of the trapping of the terminal shock by bleed holes causes the disturbances in the terminal shock control system. Second, a special compression form change operation is necessary when the intake compression form change from all external compression to mixed compression.

  4. Odors, Deployment Stress, and Health: A Conditioning Analysis of Gulf War Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    conditioning can powerfully mediate elevations in hormonal status ( salivary cortisol) self-reported stress, health symptoms and judged cognitive effort on...memory tests, and that cognitive information about the nature of the chemical odor may enhance the stress and health symptom reports over that which is...short-term and general memory performance). In both conditioning and test phases we will collect salivary samples 8 times in order to measure cortisol

  5. The influence of acute stress on the regulation of conditioned fear

    PubMed Central

    Raio, Candace M.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Fear learning and regulation is a prominent model for describing the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders and stress-related psychopathology. Fear expression can be modulated using a number of regulatory strategies, including extinction, cognitive emotion regulation, avoidance strategies and reconsolidation. In this review, we examine research investigating the effects of acute stress and stress hormones on these regulatory techniques. We focus on what is known about the impact of stress on the ability to flexibly regulate fear responses that are acquired through Pavlovian fear conditioning. Our primary aim is to explore the impact of stress on fear regulation in humans. Given this, we focus on techniques where stress has been linked to alterations of fear regulation in humans (extinction and emotion regulation), and briefly discuss other techniques (avoidance and reconsolidation) where the impact of stress or stress hormones have been mainly explored in animal models. These investigations reveal that acute stress may impair the persistent inhibition of fear, presumably by altering prefrontal cortex function. Characterizing the effects of stress on fear regulation is critical for understanding the boundaries within which existing regulation strategies are viable in everyday life and can better inform treatment options for those who suffer from anxiety and stress-related psychopathology. PMID:25530986

  6. Modulation of thiamine metabolism in Zea mays seedlings under conditions of abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Kowalska, Ewa; Ostrowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    The responses of plants to abiotic stress involve the up-regulation of numerous metabolic pathways, including several major routes that engage thiamine diphosphate (TDP)-dependent enzymes. This suggests that the metabolism of thiamine (vitamin B1) and its phosphate esters in plants may be modulated under various stress conditions. In the present study, Zea mays seedlings were used as a model system to analyse for any relation between the plant response to abiotic stress and the properties of thiamine biosynthesis and activation. Conditions of drought, high salt, and oxidative stress were induced by polyethylene glycol, sodium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The expected increases in the abscisic acid levels and in the activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were found under each stress condition. The total thiamine compound content in the maize seedling leaves increased under each stress condition applied, with the strongest effects on these levels observed under the oxidative stress treatment. This increase was also found to be associated with changes in the relative distribution of free thiamine, thiamine monophosphate (TMP), and TDP. Surprisingly, the activity of the thiamine synthesizing enzyme, TMP synthase, responded poorly to abiotic stress, in contrast to the significant enhancement found for the activities of the TDP synthesizing enzyme, thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and a number of the TDP/TMP phosphatases. Finally, a moderate increase in the activity of transketolase, one of the major TDP-dependent enzymes, was detectable under conditions of salt and oxidative stress. These findings suggest a role of thiamine metabolism in the plant response to environmental stress.

  7. HPLC and HPLC/MS/MS Studies on Stress, Accelerated and Intermediate Degradation Tests of Antivirally Active Tricyclic Analog of Acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Monika A; Dereziński, Paweł; Klupczyńska, Agnieszka; Kokot, Zenon J; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Zeidler, Joanna; Muszalska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of a tricyclic analog of acyclovir [6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV] was determined in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines for good clinical practice under different stress conditions (neutral hydrolysis, strong acid/base degradation, oxidative decomposition, photodegradation, and thermal degradation). Accelerated [40±2°C/75%±5% relative humidity (RH)] and intermediate (30±2°C/65%±5% RH) stability tests were also performed. For observation of the degradation of the tested compound the RP-HPLC was used, whereas for the analysis of its degradation products HPLC/MS/MS was used. Degradation of the tested substance allowed its classification as unstable in neutral environment, acidic/alkaline medium, and in the presence of oxidizing agent. The tested compound was also light sensitive and was classified as photolabile both in solution and in the solid phase. However, the observed photodegradation in the solid phase was at a much lower level than in the case of photodegradation in solution. The study showed that both air temperature and RH had no significant effect on the stability of the tested substance during storage for 1 month at 100°C (dry heat) as well as during accelerated and intermediate tests. Based on the HPLC/MS/MS analysis, it can be concluded that acyclovir was formed as a degradation product of 6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV.

  8. Accelerated tissue aging and increased oxidative stress in broiler chickens fed allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Rathore, D S; Iqbal, M; Shi, X; Van Dyke, K

    2001-06-01

    Uric acid has been hypothesized as being one of the more important antioxidants in limiting the accumulation of glycosylated endproducts in birds. Study 1 was designed to quantitatively manipulate the plasma concentrations of uric acid using hemin and allopurinol while study 2 determined their effects on skin pentosidine, the shear force value of Pectoralis major muscle, plasma glucose, body weight and chemiluminescence monitored oxidative stress in broiler chickens. Hemin was hypothesized to raise uric acid concentrations thereby lowering oxidative stress whereas allopurinol was hypothesized to lower uric acid concentrations and raise measures of oxidative stress. In study 1 feeding allopurinol (10 mg/kg body weight) to 8-week-old broiler chicks (n=50) for 10 days decreased plasma uric acid by 57%. However, hemin (10 mg/kg body weight) increased uric acid concentrations 20%. In study 2, 12-week-old broiler chicks (n=90) were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum (AL) diet or a diet restricted (DR) group. Each group was further divided into three treatments (control, allopurinol or hemin fed). Unexpectedly, hemin did not significantly effect uric acid concentrations but increased (P<0.05) measures of chemiluminescence dependent oxidative stress in both the DR and AL birds probably due to the ability of iron to generate oxygen radicals. Allopurinol lowered concentrations of uric acid and increased (P<0.05) the oxidative stress in the AL birds at week 22, reduced (P<0.05) body weight in both the AL and DR fed birds at 16 and 22 weeks of age, and markedly increased (P<0.001) shear force values of the pectoralis major muscle. Skin pentosidine levels increased (P<0.05) in AL birds fed allopurinol or hemin fed birds, but not in the diet restricted birds at 22 weeks. The significance of these studies is that concentrations of plasma uric acid can be related to measures of oxidative stress, which can be linked to tissue aging.

  9. Failure Engineering Study and Accelerated Stress Test Results for the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft's Power Shunt Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Larson, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    An Engineering-of-Failure approach to designing and executing an accelerated product qualification test was performed to support a risk assessment of a "work-around" necessitated by an on-orbit failure of another piece of hardware on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The proposed work-around involved exceeding the previous qualification experience both in terms of extreme cold exposure level and in terms of demonstrated low cycle fatigue life for the power shunt assemblies. An analysis was performed to identify potential failure sites, modes and associated failure mechanisms consistent with the new use conditions. A test was then designed and executed which accelerated the failure mechanisms identified by analysis. Verification of the resulting failure mechanism concluded the effort.

  10. Ultrastructural and physiological changes induced by different stress conditions on the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Hernández, Karla Daniela Rodríguez; Martínez, Ignacio; Agredano-Moreno, Lourdes Teresa; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Espinoza, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The life cycle of this protozoan parasite is digenetic because it alternates its different developmental forms through two hosts, a vector insect and a vertebrate host. As a result, the parasites are exposed to sudden and drastic environmental changes causing cellular stress. The stress response to some types of stress has been studied in T. cruzi, mainly at the molecular level; however, data about ultrastructure and physiological state of the cells in stress conditions are scarce or null. In this work, we analyzed the morphological, ultrastructural, and physiological changes produced on T. cruzi epimastigotes when they were exposed to acid, nutritional, heat, and oxidative stress. Clear morphological changes were observed, but the physiological conditions varied depending on the type of stress. The maintenance of the physiological state was severely affected by heat shock, acidic, nutritional, and oxidative stress. According to the surprising observed growth recovery after damage by stress alterations, different adaptations from the parasite to these harsh conditions were suggested. Particular cellular death pathways are discussed.

  11. Molecular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine and laboratory strains to high sugar stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martí, E; Zuzuarregui, A; Gomar-Alba, M; Gutiérrez, D; Gil, C; del Olmo, M

    2011-01-31

    One of the stress conditions that can affect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells during their growth is osmotic stress. Under particular environments (for instance, during the production of alcoholic beverages) yeasts have to cope with osmotic stress caused by high sugar concentrations. Although the molecular changes and pathways involved in the response to saline or sorbitol stress are widely understood, less is known about how cells respond to high sugar concentrations. In this work we present a comprehensive study of the response to this form of stress which indicates important transcriptomic changes, especially in terms of the genes involved in both stress response and respiration, and the implication of the HOG pathway. We also describe several genes of an unknown function which are more highly expressed under 20% (w/v) glucose than under 2% (w/v) glucose. In this work we focus on the YHR087w (RTC3) gene and its encoded protein. Proteomic analysis of the mutant deletion strain reveals lower levels of several yeast Hsp proteins, which establishes a link between this protein and the response to several forms of stress. The relevance of YHR087W for the response to high sugar and other stress conditions and the relationship of the encoded protein with several Hsp proteins suggest applications of this gene in biotechnological processes in which response to stress is important.

  12. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hartman, R. A.; Saylor, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Major effort during this reporting period was devoted to two tasks: improvement of the electrical measurement instrumentation through the design and construction of a microcomputer controlled short interval tester, and better understanding of second quadrant behavior by developing a mathematical model relating cell temperature to electrical characteristics. In addition, some preliminary work is reported on an investigation into color changes observed after stressing.

  13. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  14. A transdiagnostic minority stress treatment approach for gay and bisexual men's syndemic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Pachankis, John E

    2015-10-01

    Developing and deploying separate treatments for separate conditions seems ill-suited to intervening upon the co-occurring, and possibly functionally similar, psychosocial conditions facing gay and bisexual men. This article argues for the need to create transdiagnostic interventions that reduce multiple syndemic conditions facing gay and bisexual men at the level of their shared source in minority stress pathways. This article first reviews psychosocial syndemic conditions affecting gay and bisexual men, then suggests pathways that might link minority stress to psychosocial syndemics based on recent advancements in emotion science, psychiatric nosology, and cognitive-affective neuroscience, and finally suggests cross-cutting psychosocial treatment principles to reduce minority stress-syndemic pathways among gay and bisexual men. Because minority stress serves as a common basis of all psychosocial syndemic conditions reviewed here, locating the pathways through which minority stress generates psychosocial syndemics and employing overarching treatment principles capable of simultaneously alleviating these pathways will ultimately create a transdiagnostic approach to improving gay and bisexual men's health. Clinical research and training approaches are suggested to further validate the pathways suggested here, establish the efficacy of treatment approaches tied to those pathways, and generate effective methods for disseminating a transdiagnostic minority stress treatment approach for gay and bisexual men's psychosocial syndemic health.

  15. Histone acetylation rescues contextual fear conditioning in nNOS KO mice and accelerates extinction of cued fear conditioning in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Yossef; Anderson, Karen L; Kelley, Jonathan B; Petkov, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure is an essential molecular mechanism that contributes to the formation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM). An important regulatory process of chromatin structure is acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) increases acetylation of histone proteins and facilitate learning and memory. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway has a role in synaptic plasticity, LTM and regulation of histone acetylation. We have previously shown that NO signaling pathway is required for contextual fear conditioning. The present study investigated the effects of systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB) on fear conditioning in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. The effect of single administration of NaB on total H3 and H4 histone acetylation in hippocampus and amygdala was also investigated. A single administration of NaB prior to fear conditioning (a) rescued contextual fear conditioning of nNOS KO mice and (b) had long-term (weeks) facilitatory effect on the extinction of cued fear memory of WT mice. The facilitatory effect of NaB on extinction of cued fear memory of WT mice was confirmed in a study whereupon NaB was administered during extinction. Results suggest that (a) the rescue of contextual fear conditioning in nNOS KO mice is associated with NaB-induced increase in H3 histone acetylation and (b) the accelerated extinction of cued fear memory in WT mice is associated with NaB-induced increase in H4 histone acetylation. Hence, a single administration of HDAC inhibitor may rescue NO-dependent cognitive deficits and afford a long-term accelerating effect on extinction of fear memory of WT mice.

  16. Microglial cells from psychologically stressed mice as an accelerator of cerebral cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masae; Jones, Vickie C; Kobayashi, Makiko; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-12-01

    Severe stress decreases the resistance of hosts exposed to microbial infections. As compared with two groups of control mice (normal mice, food-and-water-deprived mice [FWD mice]), restraint-stressed mice (RST mice) were shown to be greatly susceptible to intracerebral growth of Cryptococcus neoformans. The susceptibility of FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis increased to the level shown in RST mice, when these groups of mice were inoculated with microglial cells from the brains of RST mice. However, the susceptibility of FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis was not influenced by the adoptive transfer of microglial cells from normal mice or FWD mice. Microglial cells from RST mice produced CC-chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), but not microglial cells from FWD mice. The resistance of RST mice to cerebral cryptococcosis was improved to the extent shown in FWD mice, when they were treated with anti-CCL-2 antibody. However, the susceptibility of normal mice and FWD mice to cerebral cryptococcosis increased to that shown in RST mice, when they were treated with rCCL-2. Microglial cells from RST mice were discriminated from the same cell preparations derived from FWD mice by their abilities to produce CCL-2, to phagocytize C. neoformans cells and to express Toll-like receptor 2. These results indicate that the resistance of RST mice to cerebral cryptococcosis is diminished by CCL-2 produced by microglial cells that are influenced by restraint stress.

  17. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  18. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  19. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  20. Vulnerability of conditional NCAM-deficient mice to develop stress-induced behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, Reto; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies in rodents showed that chronic stress induces structural and functional alterations in several brain regions, including shrinkage of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, which are accompanied by cognitive and emotional disturbances. Reduced expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) following chronic stress has been proposed to be crucially involved in neuronal retraction and behavioral alterations. Since NCAM gene polymorphisms and altered expression of alternatively spliced NCAM isoforms have been associated with bipolar depression and schizophrenia in humans, we hypothesized that reduced expression of NCAM renders individuals more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of stress on behavior. Here, we specifically questioned whether mice in which the NCAM gene is inactivated in the forebrain by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter (conditional NCAM-deficient mice), display increased vulnerability to stress. We assessed the evolving of depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning and memory impairments following a subchronic stress protocol (2 weeks) that does not result in behavioral dysfunction, nor in altered NCAM expression, in wild-type mice. Indeed, while no behavioral alterations were detected in wild-type littermates after subchronic stress, conditional NCAM-deficient mice showed increased immobility in the tail suspension test and deficits in reversal spatial learning in the water maze. These findings indicate that diminished NCAM expression might be a critical vulnerability factor for the development of behavioral alterations by stress and further support a functional involvement of NCAM in stress-induced cognitive and emotional disturbances.

  1. Spirulina prevents memory dysfunction, reduces oxidative stress damage and augments antioxidant activity in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Lee, I-Te; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Wu, Su-Mei; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina has proven to be effective in treating certain cancers, hyperlipidemia, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Spirulina on memory dysfunction, oxidative stress damage and antioxidant enzyme activity. Three-month-old male senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly assigned to either a control group or to one of two experimental groups (one receiving daily dietary supplementation with 50 mg/kg BW and one with 200 mg/kg BW of Spirulina platensis water extract). Senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAMR1) mice were used as the external control. Results showed that the Spirulina-treated groups had better passive and avoidance scores than the control group. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition was significantly reduced at the hippocampus and whole brain in both Spirulina groups. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly reduced at the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex in both Spirulina groups, while catalase activity was significantly higher only in the 200 mg/kg BW Spirulina group than in the control group. Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher only in the cortex of the 200 mg/kg group than in that of the SAMP8 control group. However, superoxide dismutase activity in all parts of the brain did not significantly differ among all groups. In conclusion, Spirulina platensis may prevent the loss of memory possibly by lessening Aβ protein accumulation, reducing oxidative damage and mainly augmenting the catalase activity.

  2. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  3. Diet restriction delays accelerated aging and genomic stress in DNA repair deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, W.P.; Dollé, M.E.T.; Reiling, E.; Jaarsma, D.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Bombardieri, C.R.; Wu, H.; Roks, A.J.M.; Botter, S.M.; van der Eerden, B.C.; Youssef, S.A.; Kuiper, R.V.; Nagarajah, B.; van Oostrom, C.T.; Brandt, R.M.C.; Barnhoorn, S.; Imholz, S.; Pennings, J.L.A.; de Bruin, A.; Gyenis, Á.; Pothof, J.; Vijg, J.; van Steeg, H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient Ercc1Δ/− mice show numerous accelerated aging features limiting lifespan to 4–6 month1–4. Simultaneously they exhibit a ‘survival response’, which suppresses growth and enhances maintenance, resembling the anti-aging response induced by dietary restriction (DR)1,5. Here we report that subjecting these progeroid, dwarf mutants to 30% DR tripled median and maximal remaining lifespan, and drastically retarded numerous aspects of accelerated aging, e.g. DR animals retained 50% more neurons and maintained full motoric function, even far beyond the lifespan of ad libitum (AL) animals. Repair-deficient, progeroid Xpg−/− mice, a Cockayne syndrome model6, responded similarly, extending this observation to other repair mutants. The DR response in Ercc1Δ/− mice closely resembled DR in wild type animals. Interestingly, AL Ercc1Δ/− liver showed preferential extinction of expression of long genes, a phenomenon we also observe in several normal aging tissues. This is consistent with accumulation of stochastic, transcription-blocking lesions, affecting long genes more than short ones. DR largely prevented declining transcriptional output and reduced γH2AX DNA damage foci, indicating that DR preserves genome function by alleviating DNA damage. Our findings establish Ercc1Δ/− mice as powerful model for interventions sustaining health, reveal untapped potential for reducing endogenous damage, provide new venues for understanding the molecular mechanism of DR, and suggest a counterintuitive DR-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general. PMID:27556946

  4. Restricted diet delays accelerated ageing and genomic stress in DNA-repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, W P; Dollé, M E T; Reiling, E; Jaarsma, D; Payan-Gomez, C; Bombardieri, C R; Wu, H; Roks, A J M; Botter, S M; van der Eerden, B C; Youssef, S A; Kuiper, R V; Nagarajah, B; van Oostrom, C T; Brandt, R M C; Barnhoorn, S; Imholz, S; Pennings, J L A; de Bruin, A; Gyenis, Á; Pothof, J; Vijg, J; van Steeg, H; Hoeijmakers, J H J

    2016-09-15

    Mice deficient in the DNA excision-repair gene Ercc1 (Ercc1(∆/-)) show numerous accelerated ageing features that limit their lifespan to 4-6 months. They also exhibit a 'survival response', which suppresses growth and enhances cellular maintenance. Such a response resembles the anti-ageing response induced by dietary restriction (also known as caloric restriction). Here we report that a dietary restriction of 30% tripled the median and maximal remaining lifespans of these progeroid mice, strongly retarding numerous aspects of accelerated ageing. Mice undergoing dietary restriction retained 50% more neurons and maintained full motor function far beyond the lifespan of mice fed ad libitum. Other DNA-repair-deficient, progeroid Xpg(-/-) (also known as Ercc5(-/-)) mice, a model of Cockayne syndrome, responded similarly. The dietary restriction response in Ercc1(∆/-) mice closely resembled the effects of dietary restriction in wild-type animals. Notably, liver tissue from Ercc1(∆/-) mice fed ad libitum showed preferential extinction of the expression of long genes, a phenomenon we also observed in several tissues ageing normally. This is consistent with the accumulation of stochastic, transcription-blocking lesions that affect long genes more than short ones. Dietary restriction largely prevented this declining transcriptional output and reduced the number of γH2AX DNA damage foci, indicating that dietary restriction preserves genome function by alleviating DNA damage. Our findings establish the Ercc1(∆/-) mouse as a powerful model organism for health-sustaining interventions, reveal potential for reducing endogenous DNA damage, facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of dietary restriction and suggest a role for counterintuitive dietary-restriction-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general.

  5. Psychological Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress as a Model of Sub-Healthy Condition and the Effect of TCM

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Muxin, Gong; Nishida, Hiroshi; Shirakawa, Chieko; Sato, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    Distress-mediated tissue oxidative stress was examined as a model of sub-healthy condition defined in traditional Chinese medicine theory. Mice were subjected to psychologically stressful conditions by whiskers removal. Under this condition, spontaneous locomotive activity was significantly enhanced in the dark (P < 0.05 versus the control mice in three different movements), and granulocytes/lymphocytes balance shifted to granulocytes. At the same time, peroxynitrite level in blood plasma increased to ∼180% from that of the control mice at 6 h after removal of the whiskers (P < 0.01), and was maintained even after 12 h. Both protein carbonyl formation and lipid peroxidation were significantly increased under this condition in brain, heart, liver and spleen at 6 h after removal of whiskers (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), and these levels were maximized after 12 h (increased to 120–160%, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The oxidative tissue injuries observed at 12 h after the removal of the whiskers were effectively prevented by two traditional Chinese medicine formula: Shengmai San (SMS) and Ling Gui Zhu Gan Tang (LGZGT), when administered for 5 days before the removal of the whiskers. Therefore, this stress model is considered useful in assessing the preventive potential of antioxidants and antioxidant-based herbal mixtures in treating the pathophysiology associated with psychological or emotional distress. PMID:17549236

  6. Effects of Stress and Sex on Acquisition and Consolidation of Human Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Cynthia M.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Zorawski, Michael; Blanding, Nineequa Q.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the relationship between stress hormone (cortisol) release and acquisition and consolidation of conditioned fear learning in healthy adults. Participants underwent acquisition of differential fear conditioning, and consolidation was assessed in a 24-h delayed extinction test. The acquisition phase was immediately followed by an 11-min…

  7. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  8. A Transdiagnostic Minority Stress Treatment Approach for Gay and Bisexual Men’s Syndemic Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pachankis, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Developing and deploying separate treatments for separate conditions seems ill-suited to intervening upon the co-occurring, and possibly functionally similar, psychosocial conditions facing gay and bisexual men. This article argues for the need to create transdiagnostic interventions that reduce multiple syndemic conditions facing gay and bisexual men at the level of their shared source in minority stress pathways. This article first reviews psychosocial syndemic conditions affecting gay and bisexual men, then suggests pathways that might link minority stress to psychosocial syndemics based on recent advancements in emotion science, psychiatric nosology, and cognitive-affective neuroscience, and finally suggests cross-cutting psychosocial treatment principles to reduce minority stress–syndemic pathways among gay and bisexual men. Because minority stress serves as a common basis of all psychosocial syndemic conditions reviewed here, locating the pathways through which minority stress generates psychosocial syndemics and employing overarching treatment principles capable of simultaneously alleviating these pathways will ultimately create a transdiagnostic approach to improving gay and bisexual men’s health. Clinical research and training approaches are suggested to further validate the pathways suggested here, establish the efficacy of treatment approaches tied to those pathways, and generate effective methods for disseminating a transdiagnostic minority stress treatment approach for gay and bisexual men’s psychosocial syndemic health. PMID:26123065

  9. Social defeat stress switches the neural system mediating benzodiazepine conditioned motivation.

    PubMed

    Riad-Allen, Lilian; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-08-01

    Benzodiazepines have been demonstrated to have a high abuse liability in persons suffering from anxiety but have demonstrated mixed abuse liability findings in preclinical models. We hypothesized that by modeling anxiety in a male C57BL/6 mouse model it would be possible to reveal a preference for benzodiazepines within this subpopulation through negative reinforcement. Using the Tube Test of Social Dominance and the Resident/Intruder Paradigm we investigated whether animals identified as dominant or submissive/defeated would differentially display a preference for midazolam (a short acting benzodiazepine) in a conditioned place preference paradigm. Consistent with our hypotheses, benzodiazepine conditioned motivation was mediated by negative reinforcement as submissive but not dominant mice displayed a preference for midazolam. Furthermore, different neural systems mediated midazolam conditioned motivation depending on the stress status of the animal (single vs. repeated stress-as induced by the Resident/Intruder Paradigm). Singly stressed animals showed midazolam place preferences through a dopamine-independent pathway, whereas the place preferences of repeatedly stressed animals were mediated through a dopamine-dependent pathway. This demonstrates that stress is sufficient for switching the neural system mediating midazolam conditioned motivation. Finally, midazolam reinforcement in the conditioned place preference paradigm was shown to be predictive for dominance/submission status.

  10. Psychosomatic symptoms and stressful working conditions among Palestinian nurses: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Yousef; Nijem, Khaldoun; Lien, Lars; Stigum, Hein; Bjertness, Espen; Bast-Pettersen, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background: High levels of perceived stressful working conditions have been found to have an adverse effect on physical and mental health. Objectives: To examine the associations between self-reported stressful working conditions and Psychosomatic Symptoms (PSS), and to investigate possible gender differences. Methods: The present cross-sectional study comprises 430 nurses employed in Hebron district, Palestine. Self-reported stressful working conditions were recorded, and a Psychosomatic Symptoms Check list was used to assess prevalence of PSS. Findings: Median score on the psychosomatic symptom checklist for the group was 11, (range 1–21). Women reported more symptoms than men, with medians 11.6 and 10.0, respectively (p = .0001). PSS were associated with more self-reported stressful working conditions for both men (p < .0001) and women (p < .0001). The association was strongest among men. Conclusions: PSS were associated with high self-reported stressful working conditions, and this association was strongest among the men. PMID:27160155

  11. A QR accelerated volume-to-surface boundary condition for finite element solution of eddy current problems

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Fasenfest, B; Rieben, R; Stowell, M

    2006-09-08

    We are concerned with the solution of time-dependent electromagnetic eddy current problems using a finite element formulation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes. We allow for multiple conducting regions, and our goal is to develop an efficient computational method that does not require a computational mesh of the air/vacuum regions. This requires a sophisticated global boundary condition specifying the total fields on the conductor boundaries. We propose a Biot-Savart law based volume-to-surface boundary condition to meet this requirement. This Biot-Savart approach is demonstrated to be very accurate. In addition, this approach can be accelerated via a low-rank QR approximation of the discretized Biot-Savart law.

  12. Conditional Induction of Oxidative Stress in RPE: A Mouse Model of Progressive Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Mao, Haoyu; Seo, Soo Jung; Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Hong; Le, Yun Z; Lewin, Alfred S

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate animal model is essential to screening drugs or designing a treatment strategy for geographic atrophy. Since oxidative stress contributes to the pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), we are reporting a new mouse AMD model of retinal degeneration by inducing mitochondrial oxidative stress in RPE. Sod2 the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was deleted in RPE layer using conditional knockout strategy. Fundus microscopy, SD-OCT and electroretinography were used to monitor retinal structure and function in living animals and microscopy was used to assess pathology post mortem. Tissue specific deletion of Sod2 caused elevated signs of oxidative stress, RPE dysfunction and showed some key features of AMD. Due to induction of oxidative stress, the conditional knockout mice show progressive reduction in ERG responses and thinning of outer nuclear layer (ONL) compared to non-induced littermates.

  13. Measurement of stress distributions in truck tyre contact patch in real rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelache, Gabriel; Moisescu, Raluca

    2012-12-01

    Stress distributions on three orthogonal directions have been measured across the contact patch of truck tyres using the complex measuring system that contains a transducer assembly with 30 sensing elements placed in the road surface. The measurements have been performed in straight line, in real rolling conditions. Software applications for calibration, data acquisition, and data processing were developed. The influence of changes in inflation pressure and rolling speed on the shapes and sizes of truck tyre contact patch has been shown. The shapes and magnitudes of normal, longitudinal, and lateral stress distributions, measured at low speed, have been presented and commented. The effect of wheel toe-in and camber on the stress distribution results was observed. The paper highlights the impact of the longitudinal tread ribs on the shear stress distributions. The ratios of stress distributions in the truck tyre contact patch have been computed and discussed.

  14. Conditioning Factors in the Relationship between Stress and Opioid Self-Administration in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-03

    correlation between swim -stress induced antinociception and [3Hlleu-enkephalin binding to brain homogenates in mice . Pharmacology Biochemistry and Beha vior...APPROVAL SHEET GRAOIJA TE EDUCATION TEACHING HOSPITALS WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER NAVAL HOSPITAL. BETHESDA MALCOLM GROW AIR FORCE MEDICAL...CENTER WILFORD HALL AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER Title of Dissertation: "Conditioning Factors in the Relationship between Stress and Opioid Self

  15. Hippocampal ripple-contingent training accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning and retards extinction in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2010-08-25

    There are at least two distinct oscillatory states of the hippocampus that are related to distinct behavioral patterns. Theta (4-12 Hz) oscillation has been suggested to indicate selective attention during which the animal concentrates on some features of the environment while suppressing reactivity to others. In contrast, sharp-wave ripples ( approximately 200 Hz) can be seen in a state in which the hippocampus is at its most responsive to any kind of afferent stimulation. In addition, external stimulation tends to evoke and reset theta oscillation, the phase of which has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Theoretically, training on a hippocampus-dependent learning task contingent upon ripples could enhance learning rate due to elevated responsiveness and enhanced phase locking of the theta oscillation. We used a brain-computer interface to detect hippocampal ripples in rabbits to deliver trace eyeblink conditioning and extinction trials selectively contingent upon them. A yoked control group was trained regardless of their ongoing neural state. Ripple-contingent training expedited acquisition of the conditioned response early in training and evoked stronger theta-band phase locking to the conditioned stimulus. Surprisingly, ripple-contingent training also resulted in slower extinction in well trained animals. We suggest that the ongoing oscillatory activity in the hippocampus determines the extent to which a stimulus can induce a phase reset of the theta oscillation, which in turn is the determining factor of learning rate in trace eyeblink conditioning.

  16. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    PubMed

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Jung-Ho; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Paik, Seung R

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  17. Femoral neck stress fracture a potentially disabling condition: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, Joe J; O’Connor, Sandra M

    1993-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture represents a focal weakening of the bone often associated with a recent increase in activity level. Since plain film radiographs are initially normal, the clinical diagnosis is based solely on the history and physical examination. The consequence of a delayed diagnosis could result in a complete fracture or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This paper includes a case report illustrating the important aspects of recognizing patients presenting with an underlying femoral neck stress fracture. The need for radionuclide bone scanning for the early diagnosis of this potentially disabling condition is stressed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  18. Proteomic study of a tolerant genotype of durum wheat under salt-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Borrelli, Grazia Maria; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Papa, Roberto; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stress conditions limiting crop growth and productivity. Duilio is a wheat genotype that shows tolerant behavior in both salt-stress and drought-stress conditions. Toward better understanding of the biochemical response to salinity in this genotype of durum wheat, a comparative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis based on normalized spectral abundance factors was conducted on wheat leaf samples subjected to increasing salt-stress levels (100 and 200 mmol L(-1) NaCl) with respect to untreated samples. We found significant changes in 71 proteins for the first stress level, in 83 proteins at the higher salinity level, and in 88 proteins when comparing salt-stress levels with each other. The major changes concerned the proteins involved in primary metabolism and production of energy, followed by those involved in protein metabolism and cellular defense mechanisms. Some indications of different specific physiological and defense mechanisms implicated in increasing tolerance were obtained. The enhanced salinity tolerance in Duilio appeared to be governed by a higher capacity for osmotic homeostasis, a more efficient defense, and an improvement of protection from mechanical stress by increased cell wall lignifications, allowing a better potential for growth recovery.

  19. Rearing conditions have long-term consequences for stress responsiveness in free-living great tits.

    PubMed

    Landys, Mėta M; Goymann, Wolfgang; Slagsvold, Tore

    2011-11-01

    In captivity, the adrenocortical stress response can be permanently altered by events that occur during early life. Free-living animals have rarely been examined in this regard. To examine whether early-life events impact the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the natural setting, we evaluated the stress response of free-living interspecifically cross-fostered great tits (Parus major). Cross-fostered birds may show a long-term potentiation of the adrenocortical stress response because species-specific nutritional requirements may not be met in the nest and/or cross-fostered birds may experience psychosocial stress while being raised by heterospecifics. Nevertheless, we hypothesized that in the natural setting, programmed changes in HPA function would be eclipsed by reactive responses to the immediate environment. Thus, we predicted that adult cross-fostered great tits and controls would show no differences in their adrenocortical stress response. Contrary to predictions, we found that stress responsiveness (i.e., the rate of the corticosterone increase associated with capture and handling) was significantly higher in cross-fostered great tits than in controls. Further, stress responsiveness was not significantly different between mature adults and first-year juveniles. Thus, data indicate significant effects of early rearing conditions on adrenocortical reactivity in the natural setting and also suggest that effects of rearing conditions in free-living animals can last into adulthood.

  20. Pre-slaughter conditions, animal stress and welfare: current status and possible future research.

    PubMed

    Terlouw, E M C; Arnould, C; Auperin, B; Berri, C; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Deiss, V; Lefèvre, F; Lensink, B J; Mounier, L

    2008-10-01

    The present paper describes the main procedures used to slaughter fowl, pigs, calves and adult cattle, sheep, and farmed fish, starting on the farm and ending with the death of the animal at the abattoir. It reviews the currently known causes of stress, indicated by behavioural and physiological measurements on the animal level, and by post-mortem muscle metabolism. During the pre-slaughter period, psychological stress is due to changes of environment, social disturbances and handling, and physical stress is due to food deprivation, climatic conditions, fatigue, and sometimes pain. The exact causes of stress depend, however, on the characteristics of each species, including the rearing system. For fowl, bird catching and crating, duration and climatic conditions of transport and of lairage and shackling are the main known pre-slaughter stress factors. For pigs, stress is caused by fighting during mixing of pens, loading and unloading conditions, and introduction in the restrainer. Handling and novelty of the situation contribute to the stress reactions. For veal calves and adult cattle, disruption of the social group, handling, loading and sometimes unloading conditions, fatigue, novelty of the situation and for calves mixing with unfamiliar animals are known stress factors. Gathering and yarding of extensively reared lambs and sheep causes stress, particularly when shepherd dogs are used. Subsequent transport may induce fatigue, especially if sheep are commercialised through auctions or markets. In farmed fish, stress is predominantly related to environmental aspects such as temperature, oxygen, cleanliness of the water and, to a certain extent, stocking density and removal of the fish from the water. If transport and lairage conditions are good and their durations not too long, they may allow pigs, calves and adult cattle, sheep, and fish to rest. For certain species, it was shown that genetic origin and earlier experience influence reactions to the slaughter

  1. Effects of light condition after simulated acid snow stress on leaves of winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Inada, Hidetoshi; Fujikawa, Seizo; Saito, Hideyuki; Arakawa, Keita

    2007-01-01

    Winter plants regrow after freeze-thawing in acidic meltwater from the acid-snow layer in early winter or early spring. In this study, the responses of cold-acclimated wheat seedlings to different light conditions during the regrowth period after simulated acid snow (SAS) stress were investigated. After freeze-thawing in sulfuric acid (SAS stress) of pH 2.0, dry weight and the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) decreased more in mature leaves than in young leaves. In a subsequent regrowth period under light condition, dry weight, relative water content, and the maximal quantum yield of PSII were severely affected in mature leaves but were only slightly affected in SAS (pH 2.0)-stressed young leaves. The levels of membrane lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide in mature leaves of SAS (pH 2.0)-stressed seedlings were significantly higher than those in young leaves during the regrowth period under light condition. The superoxide dismutase activity in young leaves was higher than that in mature leaves during the regrowth period. These results indicate that mature leaves of seedlings during the snow melt season are more sensitive than young leaves to photooxidative stress because of their low acid snow stress tolerance and low capacity for the detoxification of superoxide.

  2. Stress concentration in the vicinity of a hole defect under conditions of Hertzian contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Eguchi, M.; Murayama, K.

    1981-01-01

    Two dimensional photoelastic stress analyses were conducted for epoxy resin models containing a hole defect under the conditions of Hertzian contact. Stress concentrations around the defect were determined as a function of several parameters. The effect of tangential traction on the stress concentration was also determined. Sharp stress concentrations occur in the vicinity of both the left and the right side of the hole. The stress concentration becomes more distinct the larger the hole diameter and the smaller distance between the hole and the contact surface. The stress concentration is greatest when the disk imposing a normal load is located at the contact surface directly over the hole. The magnitude and the location of stress concentration varies with the distance between the Hertzian contact area and the hole. The area involved in a process of rolling contact fatigue is confined to a shallow region at both sides of the hole. It was found that the effect of tangential traction is comparatively small on the stress concentration around the hole.

  3. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  4. Accelerated decolorization of reactive azo dyes under saline conditions by bacteria isolated from Arabian seawater sediment.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Kausar, Farzana; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2012-12-01

    Presence of huge amount of salts in the wastewater of textile dyeing industry is one of the major limiting factors in the development of an effective biotreatment system for the removal of azo dyes from textile effluents. Bacterial spp. capable of thriving under high salt conditions could be employed for the treatment of saline dyecontaminated textile wastewaters. The present study was aimed at isolating the most efficient bacterial strains capable of decolorizing azo dyes under high saline conditions. Fiftyeight bacterial strains were isolated from seawater, seawater sediment, and saline soil, using mineral salt medium enriched with 100 mg l−1 Reactive Black-5 azo dye and 50 g NaCl l−1 salt concentration. Bacterial strains KS23 (Psychrobacter alimentarius) and KS26 (Staphylococcus equorum) isolated from seawater sediment were able to decolorize three reactive dyes including Reactive Black 5, Reactive Golden Ovifix, and Reactive Blue BRS very efficiently in liquid medium over a wide range of salt concentration (0-100 g NaCl l)⁻¹. Time required for complete decolorization of 100 mg dye l ⁻¹ varied with the type of dye and salt concentration. In general, there was an inverse linear relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction (V) and salt concentration. This study suggested that bacteria isolated from saline conditions such as seawater sediment could be used in designing a bioreactor for the treatment of textile effluent containing high concentration of salts.

  5. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to not only increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation directly but also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOCs. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOAs in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global-scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions respectively from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold, resulting in 200-1000-fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global-scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10 % of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480 %) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45 %). Satellite observations indicated a 2-fold increase in aerosol optical depth over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  6. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-04-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from vegetation directly, but will also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOC. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOA in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions, respectively, from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold resulting in 200-1000 fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10% of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480%) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45%). Satellite observations indicated a two-fold increase in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  7. Accelerated Stress Testing and Diagnostic Analysis of Degradation in CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S.

    2008-11-01

    The primary goal of this study was to ascertain the presence and types of mechanisms affecting CdS/CdTe device stability in the temperature range of 60 to 120 ..deg..C. It should be noted that the results presented were specific to cells made using the specific growth conditions described.

  8. Formulation of boundary conditions for the multigrid acceleration of the Euler and Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Thomas Neil; Usab, William J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An explicit, Multigrid algorithm was written to solve the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with special consideration given to the coarse mesh boundary conditions. These are formulated in a manner consistent with the interior solution, utilizing forcing terms to prevent coarse-mesh truncation error from affecting the fine-mesh solution. A 4-Stage Hybrid Runge-Kutta Scheme is used to advance the solution in time, and Multigrid convergence is further enhanced by using local time-stepping and implicit residual smoothing. Details of the algorithm are presented along with a description of Jameson's standard Multigrid method and a new approach to formulating the Multigrid equations.

  9. Analysis of extinction acquisition to attenuated tones in prenatally stressed and non-stressed offspring following auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Salm, A K; Lally, B E; Borysiewicz, E; Fil, D; Konat, G

    2015-02-01

    Stimulus generalization occurs when stimuli with characteristics similar to a previously conditioned stimulus (CS) become able to evoke a previously conditioned response. Experimental data (Lissek et al., 2005) indicate that patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), more often show stimulus generalization following fear conditioning when tested under laboratory conditions. Factors surrounding this observation may contribute to two common features of PTSD: 1) hyper-responsiveness to sensory stimuli reminiscent of those associated with the original trauma, and 2) resistance of PTSD to extinction-based therapies. Adverse early experience is considered a risk factor for the later development of PTSD and in the present experiments we hypothesized that stimulus generalization would occur in an animal model of adverse early experience, the prenatally stressed (PS) rat. Adult PS and control (CON) rats underwent extensive pre-habituation to a conditioning chamber followed by conventional auditory fear conditioning. The next day both groups began an extinction regimen where a series of quieter (attenuated), CSs were administered prior to the full 75 dB training CS. When tested in this manner, PS rats froze at significantly lower tone amplitudes than did CON offspring on the first day of extinction training. This suggests that the PS rats had stimulus-generalized the CS to lower decibel tones. In addition to this finding, we also observed that PS rats froze more often and longer during three ensuing days of extinction training to attenuated tones. Group differences vanished when PS and CON rats were extinguished under conventional conditions. Thus, it appears that the two extinction regimens differed in their aversive cue saliency for the PS vs. CON rats. Follow-up prefrontal cortex transcriptome probing suggests that cholinergic and dopaminergic alterations may be involved.

  10. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-09-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  11. Genotoxic stress accelerates age-associated degenerative changes in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Wang, Dong; Robinson, Andria R.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Roughley, Peter; Epperly, Michael; Huq, Saiful M.; Pola, Enrico; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Robbins, Paul D.; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Vo, Nam V.

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the leading cause of debilitating spinal disorders such as chronic lower back pain. Aging is the greatest risk factor for IDD. Previously, we demonstrated IDD in a murine model of a progeroid syndrome caused by reduced expression of a key DNA repair enzyme. This led us to hypothesize that DNA damage promotes IDD. To test our hypothesis, we chronically exposed adult wild-type (Wt) and DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice to the cancer therapeutic agent mechlorethamine (MEC) or ionization radiation (IR) to induce DNA damage and measured the impact on disc structure. Proteoglycan, a major structural matrix constituent of the disc, was reduced 3-5x in the discs of MEC- and IR-exposed animals compared to untreated controls. Expression of the protease ADAMTS4 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments were significantly increased. Additionally, new PG synthesis was reduced 2-3x in MEC- and IR-treated discs compared to untreated controls. Both cellular senescence and apoptosis were increased in discs of treated animals. The effects were more severe in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1−/Δ mice than in Wt littermates. Local irradiation of the vertebra in Wt mice elicited a similar reduction in PG. These data demonstrate that genotoxic stress drives degenerative changes associated with IDD. PMID:23262094

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Interactions with Micro- and Nanoparticles: Adsorption, Aggregation and Accelerated Stress Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Chiu, David; Sawicki, Suzanne; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Chatterjee, Koustuv; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are exposed to various wetted surfaces that could shed sub-visible particles. In this work we measured the adsorption of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to various microparticles, characterized the adsorbed mAb secondary structure, and determined the reversibility of adsorption. We also developed and used a front-face fluorescence quenching method to determine that the mAb tertiary structure was near-native when adsorbed to glass, cellulose and silica. Initial adsorption to each of the materials tested was rapid. During incubation studies, exposure to the air-water interface was a significant cause of aggregation but acted independently of the effects of microparticles. Incubations with glass, cellulose, stainless steel or Fe2O3 microparticles gave very different results. Cellulose preferentially adsorbed aggregates from solution. Glass and Fe2O3 adsorbed the mAb but did not cause aggregation. Adsorption to stainless steel microparticles was irreversible, and caused appearance of soluble aggregates upon incubation. The secondary structure of mAb adsorbed to glass and cellulose was near-native. We suggest that the protocol described in this work could be a useful preformulation stress screening tool to determine the sensitivity of a therapeutic protein to exposure to common surfaces encountered during processing and storage. PMID:19492408

  13. Long-term effects of traumatic stress on subsequent contextual fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryoke, Rie; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2014-04-22

    Exposure to stressful events affects subsequent sensitivity to fear. We investigated the long-term effects of a traumatic experience on subsequent contextual fear conditioning and anxiety-like behaviors in rats (Experiment 1). In addition, we tested whether the administration of the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (MET) attenuated the sensitization of fear induced by traumatic stress (Experiment 2). Male rats were subjected to a multiple stress (MS) session, which consisted of 4 foot shocks (1mA, 1s) and forced swimming for 20min, followed by exposure to a situational reminder 7days after the MS session. MET (25 or 100mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered 30min before MS. The contextual fear conditioning was performed 14days after MS. MS enhanced the conditioned fear response for at least 14days after the conditioning, and pretreatment with MET did not affect the enhancement of conditioned fear. These results suggest that glucocorticoid secretion triggered by MS is not involved in regulating the long-term stress-induced sensitization of fear.

  14. Application of in situ stress estimation methods in wellbore stability analysis under isotropic and anisotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of in situ stresses is a key step in many petroleum engineering applications, ranging from wellbore stability to sanding analysis and hydraulic fracturing design. Direct techniques conventionally used to determine in situ stresses are indeed very time consuming and expensive. These measurements would also be restricted as to the depth of acquisition, and generalization of the results to entire rock masses may not yield representative results. In this paper, applications of three indirect methods-Zoback’s polygon, shear moduli, and poroelastic-are studied to assess their applicability in providing reliable stress estimation under isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Determination of elastic, strength, and in situ stress parameters according to the assumption of each method for one of the vertical wells drilled in south Iran indicated that the shear moduli method is an appropriate approach for prediction of maximum horizontal stress within an interval where sufficient field data including leak-off tests are acquired. However, the poroelastic method seems to be a better method in prediction of in situ stresses under anisotropic conditions. This might be due to the presence of excessive shale formations in subsurface layers, causing structural or intrinsic anisotropy-based methods such as poroelastic equations to deliver more accurate results. However, making general conclusions based on studying a single vertical wellbore may not be sufficient, and therefore further studies are required.

  15. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of a single living cell in environmentally stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajendra P.; Creely, Caitriona; Volpe, Giovanni; Grotsch, Helga; Petrov, Dmitri

    2005-08-01

    Living cells initiate a stress response in order to survive environmentally stressful conditions. We monitored changes in the Raman spectra of an optically trapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell under normal and hyperosmotic stress conditions. When the yeast cells were challenged with a high concentration of glucose so as to exert hyperosmotic stress, it was shown that two chemical substances - glycerol and ethanol - could be monitored in real time in a single cell. The volume of the detection area of our confocal microspectrometer is approximately 1 fL. The average quantities of detected glycerol and ethanol are about 300 attomol and 700 attomol respectively. This amounts to the detection of approximately 108 glycerol molecules and 4 X 108 ethanol molecules after 36 min of hyper osmotic stress. Besides this, we also optically trapped a single yeast cell for up to three hours under normal conditions and monitored the changes in the Raman spectra during the lag phase of its growth and the G1 phase of its cell cycle. During the lag phase the cell synthesises new proteins and the observed behavior of the peaks corresponding to these proteins as well as those of RNA served as a sensitive indicator of the adaptation of the cell to its changed environment. The changes observed in the Raman spectra of a trapped yeast cell in the late G1 phase or the beginning of S phase corresponded to the growth of a bud.

  17. Information on stress conditions in the oceanic crust from oval fractures in a deep borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Oval images etched into the wall of a deep borehole were detected in DSDP Hole 504B, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, from analysis of an acoustic televiewer log. A systematic inspection of these ovals has identified intriguing consistencies in appearance that cannot be explained satisfactorily by a random, coincidental distribution of pillow lavas. As an alternative hypothesis, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is used to account for the generation and orientation of similarly curved, stress-induced fractures. Consequently, these oval features can be interpreted as fractures and related directly to stress conditions in the oceanic crust at this site. The azimuth of the oval center corresponds to the orientation of maximum horizontal principal stress (SH), and the oval width, which spans approximately 180?? of the borehole, is aligned with the azimuth of minimum horizontal principal stress (Sh). The oval height is controlled by the fracture angle and thus is a function of the coefficient of internal friction of the rock. -from Author

  18. Determination of blade stresses under constant speed and transient conditions with nonlinear damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, J.S.; Vyas, N.S.

    1996-04-01

    Determination of resonant stresses is an important step in the life estimation of turbomachine blades. Resonance may occur either at a steady operating speed or under transient conditions of operation when the blade passes through a critical speed. Damping plays a significant role in limiting the amplitudes of vibration and stress values. The blade damping mechanism is very complex in nature, because of interfacial slip, material hysteresis, and gas dynamic damping occurring simultaneously. In this paper, a numerical technique to compute the stress response of a turbine blade with nonlinear damping characteristics, during steady and transient operations of the rotor, is presented. Damping is defined as a function of vibratory mode, rotor speed, and strain amplitude. The technique is illustrated by computing the stress levels at resonant rotor speeds for typical operation of a turbomachine.

  19. Adaptation to cold swim stress-induced hypothermia: Absence of Pavlovian conditional tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidis, L

    1986-01-01

    Mice subjected to cold swim stress developed pronounced hypothermia. Exposure to warm water swim, however, had little or no effect on body temperature. After repeated exposure to cold swim, the stress-induced hypothermia was attenuated. The finding that cold swim resulted in hypothermia, whereas warm swim had no effect in this respect, provided a useful experimental design by which to assess the role of conditioning factors in the adaptation to the thermic effects of cold swim. In two subsequent experiments, mice received cold swim either in a familiar environment or in a novel environment. Adaptation to the thermic effects of cold swim was observed when mice were tested in the distinctive environment, regardless of the environmental cues previously paired with repeated exposure to the cold swim stress. These findings suggest that contextual cues were not of primary importance in the development of tolerance to the thermic effects of cold swim stress.

  20. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  1. Ethylene is involved in maintaining tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) pollen quality under heat-stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Firon, Nurit; Pressman, Etan; Meir, Shimon; Khoury, Reham; Altahan, Leviah

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Exposure to higher-than-optimal temperatures reduces crop yield and quality, mainly due to sensitivity of developing pollen grains. The mechanisms maintaining high pollen quality under heat-stress conditions are poorly understood. Our recently published data indicate high heat-stress-induced expression of ethylene-responsive genes in tomato pollen, indicating ethylene involvement in the pollen heat-stress response. Here we elucidated ethylene's involvement in pollen heat-stress response and thermotolerance by assessing the effects of interfering with the ethylene signalling pathway and altering ethylene levels on tomato pollen functioning under heat stress. Methodology Plants of the ethylene-insensitive mutant Never ripe (Nr)—defective in an ethylene response sensor (ERS)-like ethylene receptor—and the corresponding wild type were exposed to control or heat-stress growing conditions, and pollen quality was determined. Starch and carbohydrates were measured in isolated pollen grains from these plants. The effect of pretreating cv. Micro-Tom tomato plants, prior to heat-stress exposure, with an ethylene releaser or inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis on pollen quality was assessed. Principal results Never ripe pollen grains exhibited higher heat-stress sensitivity, manifested by a significant reduction in the total number of pollen grains, reduction in the number of viable pollen and elevation of the number of non-viable pollen, compared with wild-type plants. Mature Nr pollen grains accumulated only 40 % of the sucrose level accumulated by the wild type. Pretreatment of tomato plants with an ethylene releaser increased pollen quality under heat stress, with an over 5-fold increase in the number of germinating pollen grains per flower. Pretreatment with an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor reduced the number of germinating pollen grains following heat-stress exposure over 5-fold compared with non-treated controls. Conclusions Ethylene plays a

  2. Non-thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi Acceleration and its Dependence on Pre-shock Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-12-01

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (Ms = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (gsim 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  3. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  4. Reference genes selection and normalization of oxidative stress responsive genes upon different temperature stress conditions in Hypericum perforatum L.

    PubMed

    Velada, Isabel; Ragonezi, Carla; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Cardoso, Hélia

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a widely used technique for gene expression analysis. The reliability of this method depends largely on the suitable selection of stable reference genes for accurate data normalization. Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is a field growing plant that is frequently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental stresses that can negatively affect its productivity. This widely known medicinal plant with broad pharmacological properties (anti-depressant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-cancer, and antibacterial) has been overlooked with respect to the identification of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR data normalization. In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were analyzed in H. perforatum plants subjected to cold and heat stresses. The expression stability of these genes was assessed using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The results revealed that the ranking of stability among the three algorithms showed only minor differences within each treatment. The best-ranked reference genes differed between cold- and heat-treated samples; nevertheless, TUB was the most stable gene in both experimental conditions. GSA and GAPDH were found to be reliable reference genes in cold-treated samples, while GAPDH showed low expression stability in heat-treated samples. 26SrRNA and H2A had the highest stabilities in the heat assay, whereas H2A was less stable in the cold assay. Finally, AOX1, AOX2, CAT1 and CHS genes, associated with plant stress responses and oxidative stress, were used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. These target genes showed differential expression profiles over time in treated samples. This study not only is the first systematic analysis for the selection of suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in H. perforatum subjected to temperature stress conditions, but may also provide valuable information

  5. Reference Genes Selection and Normalization of Oxidative Stress Responsive Genes upon Different Temperature Stress Conditions in Hypericum perforatum L

    PubMed Central

    Velada, Isabel; Ragonezi, Carla; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Cardoso, Hélia

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a widely used technique for gene expression analysis. The reliability of this method depends largely on the suitable selection of stable reference genes for accurate data normalization. Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is a field growing plant that is frequently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental stresses that can negatively affect its productivity. This widely known medicinal plant with broad pharmacological properties (anti-depressant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-cancer, and antibacterial) has been overlooked with respect to the identification of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR data normalization. In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were analyzed in H. perforatum plants subjected to cold and heat stresses. The expression stability of these genes was assessed using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The results revealed that the ranking of stability among the three algorithms showed only minor differences within each treatment. The best-ranked reference genes differed between cold- and heat-treated samples; nevertheless, TUB was the most stable gene in both experimental conditions. GSA and GAPDH were found to be reliable reference genes in cold-treated samples, while GAPDH showed low expression stability in heat-treated samples. 26SrRNA and H2A had the highest stabilities in the heat assay, whereas H2A was less stable in the cold assay. Finally, AOX1, AOX2, CAT1 and CHS genes, associated with plant stress responses and oxidative stress, were used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. These target genes showed differential expression profiles over time in treated samples. This study not only is the first systematic analysis for the selection of suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in H. perforatum subjected to temperature stress conditions, but may also provide valuable information

  6. Exploring valid internal-control genes in Porphyra yezoensis (Bangiaceae) during stress response conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlei; Wu, Xiaojie; Wang, Chao; Jia, Zhaojun; He, Linwen; Wei, Yifan; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2014-07-01

    To screen the stable expression genes related to the stress (strong light, dehydration and temperature shock) we applied Absolute real-time PCR technology to determine the transcription numbers of the selected test genes in P orphyra yezoensis, which has been regarded as a potential model species responding the stress conditions in the intertidal. Absolute real-time PCR technology was applied to determine the transcription numbers of the selected test genes in P orphyra yezoensis, which has been regarded as a potential model species in stress responding. According to the results of photosynthesis parameters, we observed that Y(II) and F v/ F m were significantly affected when stress was imposed on the thalli of P orphyra yezoensis, but underwent almost completely recovered under normal conditions, which were collected for the following experiments. Then three samples, which were treated with different grade stresses combined with salinity, irradiation and temperature, were collected. The transcription numbers of seven constitutive expression genes in above samples were determined after RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Finally, a general insight into the selection of internal control genes during stress response was obtained. We found that there were no obvious effects in terms of salinity stress (at salinity 90) on transcription of most genes used in the study. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene had the highest expression level, varying remarkably among different tested groups. RPS8 expression showed a high irregular variance between samples. GAPDH presented comparatively stable expression and could thus be selected as the internal control. EF-1α showed stable expression during the series of multiple-stress tests. Our research provided available references for the selection of internal control genes for transcripts determination of P. yezoensis.

  7. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Adaptation to Wine Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Margalef-Català, Mar; Araque, Isabel; Bordons, Albert; Reguant, Cristina; Bautista-Gallego, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni, the main lactic acid bacteria responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine, has to adapt to stressful conditions, such as low pH and high ethanol content. In this study, the changes in the transcriptome and the proteome of O. oeni PSU-1 during the adaptation period before MLF start have been studied. DNA microarrays were used for the transcriptomic analysis and two complementary proteomic techniques, 2-D DIGE and iTRAQ labeling were used to analyze the proteomic response. One of the most influenced functions in PSU-1 due to inoculation into wine-like medium (WLM) was translation, showing the over-expression of certain ribosomal genes and the corresponding proteins. Amino acid metabolism and transport was also altered and several peptidases were up regulated both at gene and protein level. Certain proteins involved in glutamine and glutamate metabolism showed an increased abundance revealing the key role of nitrogen uptake under stressful conditions. A strong transcriptional inhibition of carbohydrate metabolism related genes was observed. On the other hand, the transcriptional up-regulation of malate transport and citrate consumption was indicative of the use of L-malate and citrate associated to stress response and as an alternative energy source to sugar metabolism. Regarding the stress mechanisms, our results support the relevance of the thioredoxin and glutathione systems in the adaptation of O. oeni to wine related stress. Genes and proteins related to cell wall showed also significant changes indicating the relevance of the cell envelop as protective barrier to environmental stress. The differences found between transcriptomic and proteomic data suggested the relevance of post-transcriptional mechanisms and the complexity of the stress response in O. oeni adaptation. Further research should deepen into the metabolisms mostly altered due to wine conditions to elucidate the role of each mechanism in the O. oeni ability to develop MLF. PMID

  8. A novel gene involved in the survival of Streptococcus mutans under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Shibata, Yukie; Takeshita, Toru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    A Streptococcus mutans mutant defective in aciduricity was constructed by random-insertion mutagenesis. Sequence analysis of the mutant revealed a mutation in gidA, which is known to be involved in tRNA modification in Streptococcus pyogenes. Complementation of gidA by S. pyogenes gidA recovered the acid tolerance of S. mutans. Although the gidA-inactivated S. pyogenes mutant exhibited significantly reduced expression of multiple extracellular virulence proteins, the S. mutans mutant did not. On the other hand, the gidA mutant of S. mutans showed reduced ability to withstand exposure to other stress conditions (high osmotic pressure, high temperature, and bacitracin stress) besides an acidic environment. In addition, loss of GidA decreased the capacity for glucose-dependent biofilm formation by over 50%. This study revealed that gidA plays critical roles in the survival of S. mutans under stress conditions, including lower pH.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  10. A new experimental system for irradiating tumors in mice using a linear accelerator under specific pathogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Inamura, K; Tahara, S; Kurabayashi, Y; Akagi, T; Asaumi, J; Togami, I; Takemoto, M; Honda, O; Morioka, Y; Kawasaki, S; Hiraki, Y

    1999-06-01

    We developed a reliable system for the irradiation of xenografted tumors in mice which allows for accurate local irradiation under specific pathogen-free conditions. The system presented here consists of acrylic supports for mice and an acrylic box connected to a pump through 0.22 microns pore-sized filters. Mice with xenotransplanted tumors growing on their right hind legs were set on the supports and put into the box in a laminar flow hood. The tumors of 7 mice were irradiated simultaneously with X-rays of 6 and 10 MV generated by a linear accelerator at a dose rate of 3.1-4.7 Gy/min. The air was ventilated through filters during irradiation in the closed box. Microorganism tests confirmed that no bacteria entered or left the box. One of the significant characteristics of this setup is that it allows for irradiation under conditions of acute hypoxia, which is obtained using an integrated tourniquet. The dose variation among 7 tumors was less than 1%. The rest of the mouse's body was shielded effectively by a half-field technique and a lead block. As a result, the whole body dose for the mice was 0-4% of the total dose absorbed by the tumor. Due to the high dose rate and the ability to irradiate 7 mice simultaneously under specific pathogen-free conditions, this new system can be considered a time-saving and valuable tool for radiation oncology research.

  11. Translucent tissue defect in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is associated with oxidative stress accompanying an accelerated aging phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zommick, Daniel H; Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2013-12-01

    Translucent tissue defect (TTD) is an undesirable postharvest disorder of potato tubers characterized by the development of random pockets of semi-transparent tissue containing high concentrations of reducing sugars. Translucent areas turn dark during frying due to the Maillard reaction. The newly released cultivar, Premier Russet, is highly resistant to low temperature sweetening, but susceptible to TTD. Symptoms appeared as early as 170 days after harvest and worsened with time in storage (4-9 °C, 95 % RH). In addition to higher concentrations of glucose, fructose and sucrose, TTD resulted in lower dry matter, higher specific activities of starch phosphorylase and glc-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, higher protease activity, loss of protein, and increased concentrations of free amino acids (esp. asparagine and glutamine). The mechanism of TTD is unknown; however, the disorder has similarities with the irreversible senescent sweetening that occurs in tubers during long-term storage, where much of the decline in quality is a consequence of progressive increases in oxidative stress with advancing age. The respiration rate of non-TTD 'Premier Russet' tubers was inherently higher (ca. 40 %) than that of 'Russet Burbank' tubers (a non-TTD cultivar). Moreover, translucent tissue from 'Premier Russet' tubers had a 1.9-fold higher respiration rate than the average of non-translucent tissue and tissue from non-TTD tubers. Peroxidation of membrane lipids during TTD development resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde and likely contributed to a measurable increase in membrane permeability. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione were substantially higher in translucent tissue. TTD tubers also contained twofold less ascorbate than non-TTD tubers. TTD appears to be a consequence of oxidative stress associated with accelerated aging of 'Premier Russet' tubers.

  12. Effects of Housing Conditions on Stress Responses, Feeding, and Drinking in Male and Female Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-07

    Garcia - Marquez , & Jolin, 1987; Gamallo, Villanua, & Beato, 1986; Calhoun, 1962). Social conditions have been manipulated by crowding a small number...Physiology and Behavior, 32, 35-37. Armario, A , Garcia - Marquez , C., & Jolin, T. (1987). Crowding-induced changes in basal and stress levels of

  13. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  14. Common reed accumulates starch in its stem by metabolic adaptation under Cd stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Kyoko; Kanai, Masatake; Tsuchiya, Masahisa; Ishii, Haruka; Shibuya, Naofumi; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori; Suzui, Nobuo; Fujimaki, Shu; Miwa, Eitaro

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the common reed accumulates water-soluble Cd complexed with an α-glucan-like molecule, and that the synthesis of this molecule is induced in the stem of the common reed under Cd stress. We studied the metabolic background to ensure α-glucan accumulation under the Cd stress conditions that generally inhibit photosynthesis. We found that the common reed maintained an adequate CO2 assimilation rate, tended to allocate more assimilated 11C to the stem, and accumulated starch granules in its stem under Cd stress conditions. AGPase activity, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for starch synthesis, increased in the stem of common reed grown in the presence of Cd. Starch accumulation in the stem of common reed was not obvious under other excess metal conditions. Common reed may preferentially allocate assimilated carbon as the carbon source for the formation of Cd and α-glucan complexes in its stem followed by prevention of Cd transfer to leaves acting as the photosynthetic organ. These responses may allow the common reed to grow even under severe Cd stress conditions. PMID:25806040

  15. Common reed accumulates starch in its stem by metabolic adaptation under Cd stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kyoko; Kanai, Masatake; Tsuchiya, Masahisa; Ishii, Haruka; Shibuya, Naofumi; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori; Suzui, Nobuo; Fujimaki, Shu; Miwa, Eitaro

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the common reed accumulates water-soluble Cd complexed with an α-glucan-like molecule, and that the synthesis of this molecule is induced in the stem of the common reed under Cd stress. We studied the metabolic background to ensure α-glucan accumulation under the Cd stress conditions that generally inhibit photosynthesis. We found that the common reed maintained an adequate CO2 assimilation rate, tended to allocate more assimilated (11)C to the stem, and accumulated starch granules in its stem under Cd stress conditions. AGPase activity, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for starch synthesis, increased in the stem of common reed grown in the presence of Cd. Starch accumulation in the stem of common reed was not obvious under other excess metal conditions. Common reed may preferentially allocate assimilated carbon as the carbon source for the formation of Cd and α-glucan complexes in its stem followed by prevention of Cd transfer to leaves acting as the photosynthetic organ. These responses may allow the common reed to grow even under severe Cd stress conditions.

  16. Study of the degradation mechanisms of carbon-supported platinum fuel cells catalyst via different accelerated stress test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanliang; Chen, Siguo; Wang, Yao; Ding, Wei; Wu, Rui; Li, Li; Qi, Xueqiang; Wei, Zidong

    2015-01-01

    A combination method based on three different accelerated stress test (AST) protocols along with the monitoring of electrochemical surface area (ECSA), oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities, X-Ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) response is introduced to investigate the degradation mechanisms of carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C) catalyst. By comparing the ECSA and ORR activity loss under different AST protocols, we revealed that the activity loss in AST can be divided into recoverable activity loss and unrecoverable activity loss. The recoverable activity loss is attributed to the reduction of Pt oxide or partially due to the removal of CO formed during carbon corrosion. The unrecoverable activity loss is ascribed to the Pt dissolution/re-deposition, agglomeration, detachment and carbon corrosion. XPS results show that the Pt dissolution/re-deposition in AST can be detected by using a more negative potential window. TEM images and analysis confirmed that the Pt growth mode in this study is mainly due to the Pt agglomeration rather than dissolution/re-deposition. EIS analysis reveals that the alternative decomposition/formation of oxygen containing groups over time is the main corrosion pathway of carbon support. These findings are very important for understanding Pt/C catalyst degradation and are also useful for developing fast test protocol for screening new durable catalyst materials.

  17. Prognostics of Power Mosfets Under Thermal Stress Accelerated Aging Using Data-Driven and Model-Based Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Saxena, Abhinav; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai F.

    2011-01-01

    An approach for predicting remaining useful life of power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor) devices has been developed. Power MOSFETs are semiconductor switching devices that are instrumental in electronics equipment such as those used in operation and control of modern aircraft and spacecraft. The MOSFETs examined here were aged under thermal overstress in a controlled experiment and continuous performance degradation data were collected from the accelerated aging experiment. Dieattach degradation was determined to be the primary failure mode. The collected run-to-failure data were analyzed and it was revealed that ON-state resistance increased as die-attach degraded under high thermal stresses. Results from finite element simulation analysis support the observations from the experimental data. Data-driven and model based prognostics algorithms were investigated where ON-state resistance was used as the primary precursor of failure feature. A Gaussian process regression algorithm was explored as an example for a data-driven technique and an extended Kalman filter and a particle filter were used as examples for model-based techniques. Both methods were able to provide valid results. Prognostic performance metrics were employed to evaluate and compare the algorithms.

  18. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  19. Fluorescent differential display analysis of Lactobacillus sakei strains under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Maria Grazia; Sico, Maria Anna; Grieco, Simona; Salzano, Giovanni

    2010-07-01

    Lactobacillus (Lb.) sakei is widely used as starter in the production process of Italian fermented sausages and its growth and survival are affected by various factors such as temperature, pH and salt concentration. We studied the behaviour of Lb. sakei strains under various growth conditions relative to acid, osmotic and heat stress treatments by a novel fluorescent differential display (FDD) technique. This study obtained the development and the optimization of a technique that allows the identification of genome expression changes, associated with differential microbial behaviour under different stress conditions with a better stress response definition and a better discrimination of starter cultures. DNA sequence information from the FDD products provided an important tool to assess and observe the response to a variety of environmental stimuli and the adaptation to bacterial stress. Our work provided an innovative FDD method, with a high level of reproducibility and quality for studying and probing the knowledge of the relation between differential genome expression and different stresses tolerance.

  20. Effects of City Expansion on Heat Stress under Climate Change Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Argüeso, Daniel; Evans, Jason P.; Pitman, Andrew J.; Di Luca, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We examine the joint contribution of urban expansion and climate change on heat stress over the Sydney region. A Regional Climate Model was used to downscale present (1990–2009) and future (2040–2059) simulations from a Global Climate Model. The effects of urban surfaces on local temperature and vapor pressure were included. The role of urban expansion in modulating the climate change signal at local scales was investigated using a human heat-stress index combining temperature and vapor pressure. Urban expansion and climate change leads to increased risk of heat-stress conditions in the Sydney region, with substantially more frequent adverse conditions in urban areas. Impacts are particularly obvious in extreme values; daytime heat-stress impacts are more noticeable in the higher percentiles than in the mean values and the impact at night is more obvious in the lower percentiles than in the mean. Urban expansion enhances heat-stress increases due to climate change at night, but partly compensates its effects during the day. These differences are due to a stronger contribution from vapor pressure deficit during the day and from temperature increases during the night induced by urban surfaces. Our results highlight the inappropriateness of assessing human comfort determined using temperature changes alone and point to the likelihood that impacts of climate change assessed using models that lack urban surfaces probably underestimate future changes in terms of human comfort. PMID:25668390

  1. Suppression of charcoal rot of chickpea by fluorescent Pseudomonas under saline stress condition.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ekta; Singh, Sachin; Maheshwari, D K; Arora, Naveen K

    2011-05-01

    The ability of fluorescent Pseudomonas strain EKi, in production of biocontrol and plant growth promotory (PGP) metabolites under saline stress was evaluated. Strain EKi could tolerate NaCl up to 1,550 mM and showed biocontrol of Macrophomina phaseolina (76.19%) in the presence of up to 400 mM NaCl. Strain EKi was able to produce IAA, siderophore and pyocyanin with gradual reduction of up to 76.31, 45.46, and 48.99%, respectively, as NaCl concentration increased from 0 to 500 mM. Reduced growth rate resulted in delayed induction of IAA, siderophore and pyocyanin by the PGPR. Thin layer chromatography of chloroform extract from non-stressed and salt stressed EKi, and inhibition of M. phaseolina by purified pyocyanin clearly indicated its role in biocontrol. In vitro and in vivo results showed the growth promotion and charcoal rot disease suppression of chickpea by strain EKi under both non-stressed and saline stress. There was 76.75 and 65.25% reduction of disease incidence in non-saline and saline conditions, respectively, in vitro conditions. In presence of M. phaseolina strain EKi brought about 67.65 and 58.45% reduction of disease incidence in non-saline and saline soil, respectively.

  2. The effects of extrinsic stress on somatic markers and behavior are dependent on animal housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Huzard, Damien; Mumby, Dave G; Sandi, Carmen; Poirier, Guillaume L; van der Kooij, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Properties of the environment play an important role in animal wellbeing and may modulate the effects of external threats. Whereas stressors can affect emotion and impair cognition, environmental enrichment may prevent the occurrence of such negative sequelae. Animals exposed to semi-natural group-housing experience a complex environment; whereas environmental enrichment might protect against stressors, a socially-enriched environment(SEE) could entail aggressive inter-male encounters with additive stress effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exposure to external stressors, footshocks and forced swimming, on adrenal gland and body weights as well as on behavior in rats housed under SEE or standard, non-enriched environment (NEE), conditions. We found that SEEs reduced the anxiogenic effects of stress. Moreover, SEEs improved the performance in an operant task and prevented the increase in impulsive behavior produced by external stressors on NEE animals. Whereas these findings are indicative of stress-buffering effects of SEEs, adrenal gland weights were increased while total body weights were decreased in SEE rats, suggesting that SEEs may simultaneously exacerbate physiological measurements of stress. Finally, in the SEE, total aggressive behaviors and body wounds were paradoxically reduced in animals that received external stressors in comparison to non-stressed controls. The consequences of the external stressors applied here are not uniform, varying according to the housing condition and the outcome considered.

  3. Effects of city expansion on heat stress under climate change conditions.

    PubMed

    Argüeso, Daniel; Evans, Jason P; Pitman, Andrew J; Di Luca, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We examine the joint contribution of urban expansion and climate change on heat stress over the Sydney region. A Regional Climate Model was used to downscale present (1990-2009) and future (2040-2059) simulations from a Global Climate Model. The effects of urban surfaces on local temperature and vapor pressure were included. The role of urban expansion in modulating the climate change signal at local scales was investigated using a human heat-stress index combining temperature and vapor pressure. Urban expansion and climate change leads to increased risk of heat-stress conditions in the Sydney region, with substantially more frequent adverse conditions in urban areas. Impacts are particularly obvious in extreme values; daytime heat-stress impacts are more noticeable in the higher percentiles than in the mean values and the impact at night is more obvious in the lower percentiles than in the mean. Urban expansion enhances heat-stress increases due to climate change at night, but partly compensates its effects during the day. These differences are due to a stronger contribution from vapor pressure deficit during the day and from temperature increases during the night induced by urban surfaces. Our results highlight the inappropriateness of assessing human comfort determined using temperature changes alone and point to the likelihood that impacts of climate change assessed using models that lack urban surfaces probably underestimate future changes in terms of human comfort.

  4. Improvements of tolerance to stress conditions by genetic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2014-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, industrial yeast isolate, has been of great interest in recent years for fuel ethanol production. The ethanol yield and productivity depend on many inhibitory factors during the fermentation process such as temperature, ethanol, compounds released as the result of pretreatment procedures, and osmotic stress. An ideal strain should be able to grow under different stress conditions occurred at different fermentation steps. Development of tolerant yeast strains can be achieved by reprogramming pathways supporting the ethanol metabolism by regulating the energy balance and detoxicification processes. Complex gene interactions should be solved for an in-depth comprehension of the yeast stress tolerance mechanism. Genetic engineering as a powerful biotechnological tool is required to design new strategies for increasing the ethanol fermentation performance. Upregulation of stress tolerance genes by recombinant DNA technology can be a useful approach to overcome inhibitory situations. This review presents the application of several genetic engineering strategies to increase ethanol yield under different stress conditions including inhibitor tolerance, ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, and osmotolerance.

  5. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A.; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health. PMID:23878734

  6. Exposure to chronic alcohol accelerates development of wall stress and eccentric remodeling in rats with volume overload.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Alan J; Ninh, Van K; El Hajj, Elia C; El Hajj, Milad C; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Gardner, Jason D

    2016-08-01

    expression, whereas this effect was not observed in rats with VO+EtOH. In conclusion, chronic EtOH accelerates the development of elevated wall stress and promotes early eccentric remodeling in rats with VO. Our data indicate that these effects may be due to disruptions in compensatory hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling in response to volume overload.

  7. Human-animal interaction, stress, and embryo production in Bos indicus embryo donors under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Gustavo Guerino; Zúccari, Carmem Estefânia Serra Neto; de Abreu, Urbano Gomes Pinto; Negrão, João Alberto; da Costa e Silva, Eliane Vianna

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of human-animal interaction (HAI) and the stress response on the quality of embryo production in superovulated Nelore (Bos indicus) cattle, under tropical conditions. Thirty-two females underwent a superovulation protocol for 5 days. Cortisol concentrations were determined in blood plasma collected on days 0, 4, and 5. Artificial insemination was performed on days 4 and 5, and nonsurgical embryo flushing on day 11. Embryo production and viability were determined. Human stimulation, animal behaviors, accidents, and handling time were recorded to assess HAI. Cattle age was negatively correlated with accidents, frequency of aversive behaviors, and negative stimuli by stockperson during transit through corral compartments to receive superovulation treatments. The factor analysis revealed two distinct groups. The first group was called stressed and had higher cortisol concentration than the nonstressed group, 16.0 ± 2.1 and 12.5 ± 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. Comparisons between these groups showed that the frequency of voice emissions by the stockperson and the number of accidents were higher in the stressed group, and also, the mean handling time was longer in the stressed group than for the nonstressed. As a result, viability rate of the embryos was 19% lower in the stressed group (P < 0.05). This indicates that intensive negative HAI is likely related to stress, which affects embryo production in a superovulation program.

  8. Repeated social defeat stress enhances glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the VTA and cocaine place conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Stelly, Claire E; Pomrenze, Matthew B; Cook, Jason B; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enduring memories of sensory cues associated with drug intake drive addiction. It is well known that stressful experiences increase addiction vulnerability. However, it is not clear how repeated stress promotes learning of cue-drug associations, as repeated stress generally impairs learning and memory processes unrelated to stressful experiences. Here, we show that repeated social defeat stress in rats causes persistent enhancement of long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Protein kinase A-dependent increase in the potency of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-induced Ca2+ signaling underlies LTP facilitation. Notably, defeated rats display enhanced learning of contextual cues paired with cocaine experience assessed using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Enhancement of LTP in the VTA and cocaine CPP in behaving rats both require glucocorticoid receptor activation during defeat episodes. These findings suggest that enhanced glutamatergic plasticity in the VTA may contribute, at least partially, to increased addiction vulnerability following repeated stressful experiences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15448.001 PMID:27374604

  9. Acceleration of Ab Initio QM/MM Calculations under Periodic Boundary Conditions by Multiscale and Multiple Time Step Approaches.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangho

    2014-10-14

    Development of multiscale ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (AI-QM/MM) method for periodic boundary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and their acceleration by multiple time step approach are described. The developed method achieves accuracy and efficiency by integrating the AI-QM/MM level of theory and the previously developed semiempirical (SE) QM/MM-Ewald sum method [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2005, 1, 2] extended to the smooth particle-mesh Ewald (PME) summation method. In the developed methods, the total energy of the simulated system is evaluated at the SE-QM/MM-PME level of theory to include long-range QM/MM electrostatic interactions, which is then corrected on the fly using the AI-QM/MM level of theory within the real space cutoff. The resulting energy expression enables decomposition of total forces applied to each atom into forces determined at the low-level SE-QM/MM method and correction forces at the AI-QM/MM level, to integrate the system using the reversible reference system propagator algorithm. The resulting method achieves a substantial speed-up of the entire calculation by minimizing the number of time-consuming energy and gradient evaluations at the AI-QM/MM level. Test calculations show that the developed multiple time step AI-QM/MM method yields MD trajectories and potential of mean force profiles comparable to single time step QM/MM results. The developed method, together with message passing interface (MPI) parallelization, accelerates the present AI-QM/MM MD simulations about 30-fold relative to the speed of single-core AI-QM/MM simulations for the molecular systems tested in the present work, making the method less than one order slower than the SE-QM/MM methods under periodic boundary conditions.

  10. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Camila; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-01-01

    Poor sleep quality due to sleep disorders and sleep loss is highly prevalent in the modern society. Underlying mechanisms show that stress is involved in the relationship between sleep and metabolism through hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activation. Sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are associated with maladaptive changes in the HPA axis, leading to neuroendocrine dysregulation. Excess of glucocorticoids increase glucose and insulin and decrease adiponectin levels. Thus, this review provides overall view of the relationship between sleep, stress, and metabolism from basic physiology to pathological conditions, highlighting effective treatments for metabolic disturbances. PMID:26779321

  11. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Castells-Roca, Laia; Pijuan, Jordi; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Bellí, Gemma; Herrero, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution) upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon). In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations.

  12. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Bellí, Gemma; Herrero, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution) upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon). In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations. PMID:26824473

  13. QTL mapping of protein content and seed characteristics under water-stress conditions in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, A; Maury, P; Berger, M; Calmon, A; Grieu, P; Sarrafi, A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genomic regions controlling seed protein content, kernel and hull weights, and seed density in water-stress conditions in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The experiments consisted of a split-plot design (water treatment and recombinant inbred lines) with three blocks in two environments (greenhouse and field). High significant variation was observed between genotypes for all traits as well as for water treatment x genotype interaction. Several specific and nonspecific QTLs were detected for all traits under well-watered and water-stress conditions. Two SSR markers, ORS671_2 and HA2714, linked to protein content were identified that have no interaction with water treatments in greenhouse conditions. We also detected the E35M60_4 marker associated with kernel weight that had no interaction with water treatments. A specific QTL for protein content was detected with important phenotypic variance (17%) under water-stress conditions. Overlapping QTLs for protein content and seed density were identified in linkage group 15. This region probably has a peliotropic effect on protein content and seed density. QTLs for protein content colocated with grain weight traits were also identified.

  14. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  15. Evaluation of viability and growth of Acetobacter senegalensis under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Rasoul; Delvigne, Frank; Babanezhad, Manoochehr; Thonart, Philippe

    2013-05-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are used in production of vinegars. During acetic acid fermentation, AAB encounter various aggressive conditions which may lead to a variety of cellular disorders. Previous researches mainly studied the influences of different carbon sources on tolerance of AAB to ethanol and acetic acid. In this study, different techniques were used comparatively to investigate the effects of preadaptation on the ability of A. senegalensis to tolerate ethanol and acetic acid. In general, the carbon sources used for preadaptation of A. senegalensis exhibited significant effects on the tolerance of cells to stressors. Flow-cytometric assessments of preadapted cells in ethanol showed that 87.3% of the cells perform respiration after exposure to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. However, 58.4% of these preadapted cells could keep their envelope integrity under the stress condition. They could also grow rapidly (μmax=0.39/h) in the stress medium (E5A3) with a high yield (>80%). A. senegalensis grown in glucose exhibited a low tolerance to acetic acid. Analysis of their respiration capacity, membrane integrity and culturability revealed that almost all the population were dead after exposure to 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. In contrast, exposure of A. senegalensis preadapted in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid, exhibited an intact respiration system and cellular membrane integrity in 80.3% and 50.01% of cells, respectively. Moreover, just 24% of these cells could keep their culturability under that stress condition. In summary, cell envelope integrity, growth and culturability are more susceptible to pH and acetic acid stresses whereas respiration system is less subjected to damages under stress condition. In addition, preadaptation of A. senegalensis in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid enables it to tolerate and grow in ethanol and

  16. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  17. Short photoperiod condition increases susceptibility to stress in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling-Zhi; Liu, Li-Jing; Yuan, Ming; Li, Su-Xia; Yue, Xiao-Dong; Lai, Ju-Lian; Lu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    The seasonality of depressive symptoms is prevalent in children and adolescents. However, the mechanisms that underlie such susceptibility to seasonal influences on mood disorders are unclear. We examined the effects of a short photoperiod condition on the susceptibility to subchronic unpredictable mild stress (SCUS) and rhythmic alterations of plasma corticosterone (CORT), melatonin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in adolescent male rats. Compared with the 12h/12h light/dark photoperiod control (CON) rats, the 8h/16h photoperiod SCUS rats exhibited significant anhedonia, a core symptom of human depression, together with a blunted diurnal rhythm and elevation of 24h CORT, melatonin, and NPY levels. The 8h/16h photoperiod condition also blunted the rhythmicity of CORT, caused a phase inversion of melatonin, and caused a phase delay of NPY compared with 12h/12h CON rats. Such abnormalities of plasma CORT, NPY, and melatonin might cause adolescent individuals to present higher stress reactivity and greater vulnerability to stress over their lifetimes. The present study provides evidence of the susceptibility to the seasonality of stress-related disorders in adolescence.

  18. Quantitative proteomic analyses of crop seedlings subjected to stress conditions; a commentary.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Yohei; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics is one of the analytical approaches used to clarify crop responses to stress conditions. Recent remarkable advances in proteomics technologies allow for the identification of a wider range of proteins than was previously possible. Current proteomic methods fall into roughly two categories: gel-based quantification methods, including conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and MS-based quantification methods consists of label-based and label-free protein quantification approaches. Although MS-based quantification methods have become mainstream in recent years, gel-based quantification methods are still useful for proteomic analyses. Previous studies examining crop responses to stress conditions reveal that each method has both advantages and disadvantages in regard to protein quantification in comparative proteomic analyses. Furthermore, one proteomics approach cannot be fully substituted by another technique. In this review, we discuss and highlight the basis and applications of quantitative proteomic analysis approaches in crop seedlings in response to flooding and osmotic stress as two environmental stresses.

  19. Tolerance of Mycorrhiza infected pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) seedling to drought stress under glasshouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, H; Saeidi-Sar, S; Afshari, H; Abdel-Wahhab, M A

    2012-05-01

    The influence of Glomus etunicatum colonization on plant growth and drought tolerance of 3-month-old Pistacia vera seedlings in potted culture was studied in two different water treatments. The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) inoculation and plant growth (including plant shoot and root weight, leaf area, and total chlorophyll) were higher for well-watered than for water-stressed plants. The growth of AM-treated seedlings was higher than non-AM-treatment regardless of water status. P, K, Zn and Cu contents in AM-treated shoots were greater than those in non-AM shoots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. N and Ca content were higher under drought stress, while AM symbiosis did not affect the Mg content. The contents of soluble sugars, proteins, flavonoid and proline were higher in mycorrhizal than non-mycorrhizal-treated plants under the whole water regime. AM colonization increased the activities of peroxidase enzyme in treatments, but did not affect the catalase activity in shoots and roots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. We conclude that AM colonization improved the drought tolerance of P. vera seedlings by increasing the accumulation of osmotic adjustment compounds, nutritional and antioxidant enzyme activity. It appears that AM formation enhanced the drought tolerance of pistachio plants, which increased host biomass and plant growth.

  20. Emotional stress evoked by classical fear conditioning induces yawning behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Natsuko; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Yanagita, Shinya; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2014-04-30

    Yawning is often observed not only in a state of boredom or drowsiness but also in stressful emotional situations, suggesting that yawning is an emotional behavior. However, the neural mechanisms for yawning during stressful emotional situations have not been fully determined, though previous studies have suggested that both parvocellular oxytocin (OT) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are responsible for induction of yawning. Thus, using ethological observations and c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we examined whether emotional stress evoked by classical fear conditioning is involved in induction of yawning behavior in freely moving rats. Emotional stress induced yawning behavior that was accompanied by anxiety-related behavior, and caused neuronal activation of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), as well as increases in activity of both OT and CRF neurons in the PVN. These results suggest that emotional stress may induce yawning behavior, in which the neuronal activation of the CeA may have a key role.

  1. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress.

  2. Aerobic condition increases carotenoid production associated with oxidative stress tolerance in Enterococcus gilvus.

    PubMed

    Hagi, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Miho; Nomura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that a part of lactic acid bacteria can produce carotenoid, little is known about the regulation of carotenoid production. The objective of this study was to determine whether aerobic growth condition influences carotenoid production in carotenoid-producing Enterococcus gilvus. Enterococcus gilvus was grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its growth was slower under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. The decrease in pH levels and production of lactic acid were also lower under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, the amount of carotenoid pigments produced by E. gilvus was significantly higher under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. Further, real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression level of carotenoid biosynthesis genes crtN and crtM when E. gilvus was grown under aerobic conditions was 2.55-5.86-fold higher than when it was grown under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, after exposure to 16- and 32-mM H2O2, the survival rate of E. gilvus grown under aerobic conditions was 61.5- and 72.5-fold higher, respectively, than when it was grown under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic growth conditions significantly induced carotenoid production and the expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes in E. gilvus, resulting in increased oxidative stress tolerance.

  3. Accelerated Resolution Therapy for treatment of pain secondary to symptoms of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Kevin E.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Hernandez, Diego F.; Shuman, Amy; Diamond, David M.; Girling, Sue Ann; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Wittenberg, Trudy; Witt, Ann M.; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Anderson, Brian; McMillan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background As many as 70% of veterans with chronic pain treated within the US Veterans Administration (VA) system may have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and conversely, up to 80% of those with PTSD may have pain. We describe pain experienced by US service members and veterans with symptoms of PTSD, and report on the effect of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), a new, brief exposure-based therapy, on acute pain reduction secondary to treatment of symptoms of PTSD. Methods A randomized controlled trial of ART versus an attention control (AC) regimen was conducted among 45 US service members/veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD. Participants received a mean of 3.7 sessions of ART. Results Mean age was 41.0 + 12.4 years and 20% were female. Most veterans (93%) reported pain. The majority (78%) used descriptive terms indicative of neuropathic pain, with 29% reporting symptoms of a concussion or feeling dazed. Mean pre-/post-change on the Pain Outcomes Questionnaire (POQ) was −16.9±16.6 in the ART group versus −0.7±14.2 in the AC group (p=0.0006). Among POQ subscales, treatment effects with ART were reported for pain intensity (effect size = 1.81, p=0.006), pain-related impairment in mobility (effect size = 0.69, p=0.01), and negative affect (effect size = 1.01, p=0.001). Conclusions Veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD have a high prevalence of significant pain, including neuropathic pain. Brief treatment of symptoms of combat-related PTSD among veterans by use of ART appears to acutely reduce concomitant pain. PMID:24959325

  4. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis - based on cellular components and biological process GO terms - was performed for these proteins through the SGD Gene Ontology Slim Mapper tool. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in "Stress responsive proteins of a flor yeast strain during the early stages of biofilm formation" [1].

  5. Micro-mechanical study of stress path and initial conditions in granular materials using DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Mirghasemi, Ali Asghar

    2016-03-01

    The macroscale response of granular materials under different loading conditions stems from the alteration of micromechanical properties during loading. Previous studies have used either physical experiments or discrete element method simulations to explore the effect of initial conditions and stress path on granular materials. However, microscale studies are not sufficient, especially for various loading paths. We study micromechanics of granular materials using the stress-force-fabric (SFF) relationship for a better understanding of the behavior of granular materials. Triaxial compression and extension tests are conducted on samples containing 1000 spherical particles, with periodic boundaries, and the effect of initial porosity is studied. In the next step, using the SFF relationship, we study the effect of anisotropic consolidation ratio. In addition to providing an appropriate explanation for shear strength out of evolution of anisotropy coefficients, our results show that anisotropic consolidation does not affect the micromechanical properties of granular materials in a way to change mobilized friction angle of sample at failure point.

  6. RSS1 regulates the cell cycle and maintains meristematic activity under stress conditions in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Abe, Kiyomi; Miyao, Akio; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Megumi; Morita, Haruka; Toda, Yosuke; Hobo, Tokunori; Sato, Yutaka; Hattori, Tsukaho; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takeda, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth and development are sustained by continuous cell division in the meristems, which is perturbed by various environmental stresses. For the maintenance of meristematic functions, it is essential that cell division be coordinated with cell differentiation. However, it is unknown how the proliferative activities of the meristems and the coordination between cell division and differentiation are maintained under stressful conditions. Here we show that a rice protein, RSS1, whose stability is controlled by cell cycle phases, contributes to the vigour of meristematic cells and viability under salinity conditions. These effects of RSS1 are exerted by regulating the G1–S transition, possibly through an interaction of RSS1 with protein phosphatase 1, and are mediated by the phytohormone, cytokinin. RSS1 is conserved widely in plant lineages, except eudicots, suggesting that RSS1-dependent mechanisms might have been adopted in specific lineages during the evolutionary radiation of angiosperms. PMID:21505434

  7. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Stress Convention in Nonisothermal Gases Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Reported here are our results of our numerical/theoretical investigation into the effects of thermal stress in nonisothermal gases under microgravity conditions. The first part of the report consists of a brief summary of the accomplishments and conclusions of our work. The second part consists of two manuscripts, one being a paper presented at the 1998 MSAD Fluid Physics workshop, and the other to appear in Physics of Fluids.

  8. Influence of temper condition on the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Herakovich, E. T.; Tenney, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of temper condition on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior for six boron-aluminum laminates was investigated. In addition to monotonic tension and compression tests, tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension--compression tests were conducted to study the effects of cyclic loading. Tensile strength results are a function of the laminate configuration; unidirectional laminates were affected considerably more than other laminates with some strength values increasing and others decreasing.

  9. An accelerated stress testing program for determining the reliability sensitivity of silicon solar cells to encapsulation and metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Davis, C. W.; Royal, E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of accelerated testing methods in a program to determine the reliability attributes of terrestrial silicon solar cells is discussed. Different failure modes are to be expected when cells with and without encapsulation are subjected to accelerated testing and separate test schedules for each are described. Unencapsulated test cells having slight variations in metallization are used to illustrate how accelerated testing can highlight different diffusion related failure mechanisms. The usefulness of accelerated testing when applied to encapsulated cells is illustrated by results showing that moisture related degradation may be many times worse with some forms of encapsulation than with no encapsulation at all.

  10. Overexpression of AtGRDP2, a novel glycine-rich domain protein, accelerates plant growth and improves stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Amaro, María A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Hernández-Lucero, Eloísa; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins with glycine-rich signatures have been reported in a wide variety of organisms including plants, mammalians, fungi, and bacteria. Plant glycine-rich protein genes exhibit developmental and tissue-specific expression patterns. Herein, we present the characterization of the AtGRDP2 gene using Arabidopsis null and knockdown mutants and, Arabidopsis and lettuce over-expression lines. AtGRDP2 encodes a short glycine-rich domain protein, containing a DUF1399 domain and a putative RNA recognition motif (RRM). AtGRDP2 transcript is mainly expressed in Arabidopsis floral organs, and its deregulation in Arabidopsis Atgrdp2 mutants and 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines produces alterations in development. The 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines grow faster than the WT, while the Atgrdp2 mutants have a delay in growth and development. The over-expression lines accumulate higher levels of indole-3-acetic acid and, have alterations in the expression pattern of ARF6, ARF8, and miR167 regulators of floral development and auxin signaling. Under salt stress conditions, 35S::AtGRDP2 over-expression lines displayed higher tolerance and increased expression of stress marker genes. Likewise, transgenic lettuce plants over-expressing the AtGRDP2 gene manifest increased growth rate and early flowering time. Our data reveal an important role for AtGRDP2 in Arabidopsis development and stress response, and suggest a connection between AtGRDP2 and auxin signaling. PMID:25653657

  11. Conditional Deletion of the Phd2 Gene in Articular Chondrocytes Accelerates Differentiation and Reduces Articular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Based on our findings that PHD2 is a negative regulator of chondrocyte differentiation and that hypoxia signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we investigated the consequence of disruption of the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes on the articular cartilage phenotype in mice. Immunohistochemistry detected high expression of PHD2 in the superficial zone (SZ), while PHD3 and HIF-1α (target of PHD2) are mainly expressed in the middle-deep zone (MDZ). Conditional deletion of the Phd2 gene (cKO) in chondrocytes accelerated the transition of progenitors to hypertrophic (differentiating) chondrocytes as revealed by reduced SZ thickness, and increased MDZ thickness, as well as increased chondrocyte hypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry further revealed decreased levels of progenitor markers but increased levels of hypertrophy markers in the articular cartilage of the cKO mice. Treatment of primary articular chondrocytes, in vitro, with IOX2, a specific inhibitor of PHD2, promoted articular chondrocyte differentiation. Knockdown of Hif-1α expression in primary articular chondrocytes using lentiviral vectors containing Hif-1α shRNA resulted in reduced expression levels of Vegf, Glut1, Pgk1, and Col10 compared to control shRNA. We conclude that Phd2 is a key regulator of articular cartilage development that acts by inhibiting the differentiation of articular cartilage progenitors via modulating HIF-1α signaling. PMID:28349987

  12. Damage and Plastic Deformation Modeling of Beishan Granite Under Compressive Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, J. F.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Based on experimental investigations, we propose a coupled elastoplastic damage model to simulate the mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. The granite is taken from the Beishan area, a preferable region for China's high-level radioactive waste repository. Using a 3D acoustic emission monitoring system in mechanical tests, we focus on the cracking process and its influence on the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the granite samples. It is verified that the crack propagation coupled with fractional sliding along the cracks is the principal mechanism controlling the failure process and nonlinear mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. Based on this understanding, the coupled elastoplastic damage model is formulated in the framework of the thermodynamics theory. In the model, the coupling between damage and plastic deformation is simulated by introducing the independent damage variable in the plastic yield surface. As a preliminary validation of the model, a series of numerical simulations are performed for compressive tests conducted under different confining pressures. Comparisons between the numerical and simulated results show that the proposed model can reproduce the main features of the mechanical behavior of Beishan granite, particularly the damage evolution under compressive stress conditions.

  13. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective.

  14. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  15. Conditional Reynolds stress in a strongly heated turbulent boundary layer with premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.K.; Ng, T.T.

    1985-02-01

    A two-color laser Doppler anemometry technique has been used to measure velocity statistics and Reynolds stress in a turbulent boundary layer over a strongly heated wall (T/sub w/ = 1100 K) with premixed ethylene--air combustion. Measurements in the isothermal and nonreacting heated wall turbulent boundary layers were also made for comparison. Conditional velocity covariance -approx.(uv) are deduced using the quadrant and ''hole'' analysis methods. The conditional data obtained in the isothermal layer are in exellent agreement with those deduced by others based on hot-wire data. The results obtained in the heated and reacting layers indicate that the decrease in mean Reynolds stress can be attributed to a reduction in the -approx.(uv) contributions associated with a burst of low momentum fluid form the wall. The reduction is much more significant in the reacting layer than in the heated layer. Comparison with previous density shows that the changes in conditional -approx.(uv) contributions occur mostly within the constant density sublayer of combustion products adjacent to the wall. In the region where combustion reaction takes place, no significant change in the turbulence intensities or Reynolds stress is found.

  16. Ascorbate and homoglutathione metabolism in common bean nodules under stress conditions and during natural senescence.

    PubMed

    Loscos, Jorge; Matamoros, Manuel A; Becana, Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Ascorbate and glutathione are major antioxidants and redox buffers in plant cells but also play key functions in growth, development, and stress responses. We have studied the regulation of ascorbate and homoglutathione biosynthesis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under stress conditions and during aging. The expression of five genes of the major ascorbate biosynthetic pathway was analyzed in nodules, and evidence was found that L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase, the last committed step of the pathway, is posttranscriptionally regulated. Also, in nodules under stress conditions, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase was translationally regulated, but homoglutathione synthetase (mRNA and activity) and homoglutathione (content and redox state) were not affected. Most interestingly, in nodules exposed to jasmonic acid, dehydroascorbate reductase activity was posttranslationally suppressed, ascorbate oxidase showed strong transcriptional up-regulation, and dehydroascorbate content increased moderately. These changes were not due to a direct effect of jasmonic acid on the enzyme activities but might be part of the signaling pathway in the response of nodules to stress. We determined ascorbate, homoglutathione, and ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzyme activities in two senescing stages of nodules undergoing oxidative stress. When all parameters were expressed on a nodule fresh weight basis, we found that in the first stage ascorbate decreased by 60% and homoglutathione and antioxidant activities remained fairly constant, whereas in the second stage ascorbate and homoglutathione, their redox states, and their associated enzyme activities significantly decreased. The coexistence in the same plants of nodules at different senescence stages, with different ascorbate concentrations and redox states, indicates that the life span of nodules is in part controlled by endogenous factors and points to ascorbate as one of the key players.

  17. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  18. Homology-Based Modeling of Universal Stress Protein from Listeria innocua Up-Regulated under Acid Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tremonte, Patrizio; Succi, Mariantonietta; Coppola, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Elena; Tipaldi, Luca; Picariello, Gianluca; Pannella, Gianfranco; Fraternali, Franca

    2016-01-01

    An Universal Stress Protein (USP) expressed under acid stress condition by Listeria innocua ATCC 33090 was investigated. The USP was up-regulated not only in the stationary phase but also during the exponential growth phase. The three dimensional (3D) structure of USP was predicted using a combined proteomic and bioinformatics approach. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the USP from Listeria detected in our study was distant from the USPs of other bacteria (such as Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp.) and clustered in a separate and heterogeneous class including several USPs from Listeria spp. and Lactobacillus spp. An important information on the studied USP was obtained from the 3D-structure established through the homology modeling procedure. In detail, the Model_USP-691 suggested that the investigated USP had a homo-tetrameric quaternary structure. Each monomer presented an architecture analogous to the Rossmann-like α/β-fold with five parallel β-strands, and four α-helices. The analysis of monomer-monomer interfaces and quality of the structure alignments confirmed the model reliability. In fact, the structurally and sequentially conserved hydrophobic residues of the β-strand 5 (in particular the residues V146 and V148) were involved in the inter-chains contact. Moreover, the highly conserved residues I139 and H141 in the region α4 were involved in the dimer association and functioned as hot spots into monomer–monomer interface assembly. The hypothetical assembly of dimers was also supported by the large interface area and by the negative value of solvation free energy gain upon interface interaction. Finally, the structurally conserved ATP-binding motif G-2X-G-9X-G(S/T-N) suggested for a putative role of ATP in stabilizing the tetrameric assembly of the USP. Therefore, the results obtained from a multiple approach, consisting in the application of kinetic, proteomic, phylogenetic and modeling analyses, suggest that Listeria USP could

  19. Herbal Supplement Extends Life Span Under Some Environmental Conditions and Boosts Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Villeponteau, Bryant; Matsagas, Kennedy; Nobles, Amber C.; Rizza, Cristina; Horwitz, Marc; Benford, Gregory; Mockett, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate that aging is modulated by a great number of genetic pathways. We have used Drosophila longevity and stress assays to test a multipath intervention strategy. To carry out this strategy, we supplemented the flies with herbal extracts (SC100) that are predicted to modulate the expression of many genes involved in aging and stress resistance, such as mTOR, NOS, NF-KappaB, and VEGF. When flies were housed in large cages with SC100 added, daily mortality rates of both male and female flies were greatly diminished in mid to late life. Surprisingly, SC100 also stabilized midlife mortality rate increases so as to extend the maximum life span substantially beyond the limits previously reported for D. melanogaster. Under these conditions, SC100 also promoted robust resistance to partial starvation stress and to heat stress. Fertility was the same initially in both treated and control flies, but it became significantly higher in treated flies at older ages as the fertility of control flies declined. Mean and maximum life spans of flies in vials at the same test site were also extended by SC100, but the life spans were short in absolute terms. In contrast, at an independent test site where stress was minimized, the flies exhibited much longer mean life spans, but the survival curves became highly rectangular and the effects of SC100 on both mean and maximum life spans declined greatly or were abolished. The data indicate that SC100 is a novel herbal mix with striking effects on enhancing Drosophila stress resistance and life span in some environments, while minimizing mid to late life mortality rates. They also show that the environment and other factors can have transformative effects on both the length and distribution of survivorship, and on the ability of SC100 to extend the life span. PMID:25879540

  20. Reference gene selection for qRT-PCR in Caragana korshinskii Kom. under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Yin, Jiajia; Li, Gao; Qi, Liwang; Yang, Feiyun; Wang, Ruigang; Li, Guojing

    2014-01-01

    Caragana korshinskii Kom., which is widely distributed in the northwest China and Mongolia, is an important forage bush belonging to the legume family with high economic and ecological value. Strong tolerance ability to various stresses makes C. korshinskii Kom. a valuable species for plant stress research. In this study, suitable reference genes for quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) were screened from 11 candidate reference genes, including ACT, GAPDH, EF1α, UBQ, TUA, CAP, TUB, TUB3, SKIP1, SKIP5-1 and SKIP5-2. A total of 129 samples under drought, heat, cold, salt, ABA and high pH treatment were profiled, and software such as geNORM, NormFinder and BestKeeper were used for reference gene evaluation and selection. Different suitable reference genes were selected under different stresses. Across all 129 samples, GAPDH, EF1α and SKIP5-1 were found to be the most stable reference genes, and EF1α+SKIP5-1 is the most stable reference gene combination. Conversely, TUA, TUB and SKIP1 were not suitable for using as reference genes owing to their great expression variation under some stress conditions. The relative expression levels of CkWRKY1 were detected using the stable and unstable reference genes and their applicability was confirmed. These results provide some stable reference genes and reference gene combinations for qRT-PCR under different stresses in C. korshinskii Kom. for future research work, and indicate that CkWRKY1 plays essential roles in response to stresses in C. korshinskii.

  1. Development of stress resistance in Staphylococcus aureus after exposure to sublethal environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, G; Sagarzazu, N; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Mañas, P

    2010-05-30

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to develop stress resistance responses was investigated. Exponential growth phase cells of S. aureus CECT 4459 were exposed to sublethal conditions (acid and alkaline pH, hydrogen peroxide, and heat) and then the acquisition of resistance to acid (pH 2.5), alkali (pH 12.0), hydrogen peroxide (50mM), and heat (58 degrees C) was determined. Conditions resulting in the maximum development of homologous resistance (tolerance to the same stress), while preventing lethal effects in the population, were pH 4.5 (2h), pH 9.5 (30 min), 0.05 mM H(2)O(2) (30 min), and 45 degrees C (2h). Under these adaptation conditions, times for the first decimal reduction (TFDC) to a lethal treatment at acid pH, alkaline pH, hydrogen peroxide, and heat were increased by a factor of 1.6, 2, 2, and 6, respectively. The presence of chloramphenicol or rifampicin in the adaptation medium completely abolished the increase in homologous resistance to acid pH and to hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, the development of homologous resistance to alkaline pH resulted independently of the presence of either chloramphenicol or rifampicin. S. aureus heat resistance increased in the presence of the inhibitors during the heat shock, but only partially. In some cases, the exposure to a given stress induced cross-protection against other agents. Protective combinations of sublethal stress and lethal agents were: acid pH-heat, acid pH-hydrogen peroxide, alkaline pH-hydrogen peroxide, heat-acid pH, and heat-hydrogen peroxide. These combinations of agents applied sequentially should be avoided in food-processing environments.

  2. Changes in seed water status as characterized by NMR in developing soybean seed grown under moisture stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, P. Singh, Ravender; Verma, A.P.S.; Joshi, D.K.; Singh, Sheoraj

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • In developing soybean seeds, moisture stress resulted in more proportion of water to bound state. • These changes are further corroborated by concomitant changes in seed metabolites. • Thus there exists a moisture stress and development stage dependence of seed tissue water status. - Abstract: Changes in water status of developing seeds of Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill.) grown under different moisture stress conditions were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)- spin–spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}). A comparison of the seed development characteristics, composition and physical properties indicated that, characteristics like seed weight, seed number/ear, rate of seed filling increased with development stages but decreased with moisture stress conditions. The NMR- spin–spin relaxation (T{sub 2}) component like bound water increased with seed maturation (40–50%) but decreased with moisture stress conditions (30–40%). The changes in seed water status to increasing levels of moisture stress and seed maturity indicates that moisture stress resulted in more proportion of water to bound state and intermediate state and less proportion of water in free-state. These changes are further corroborated by significant changes in protein and starch contents in seeds under high moisture stress treatments. Thus seed water status during its development is not only affected by development processes but also by moisture stress conditions. This study strongly indicated a clear moisture stress and development stage dependence of seed tissue water status in developing soybean seeds.

  3. Inhibition of bacterial and leukocyte adhesion under shear stress conditions by material surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jasmine D; Ebert, Michael; Stokes, Ken; Ward, Robert; Anderson, James M

    2003-01-01

    Biomaterial-centered infections, initiated by bacterial adhesion, persist due to a compromised host immune response. Altering implant materials with surface modifying endgroups (SMEs) may enhance their biocompatibility by reducing bacterial and inflammatory cell adhesion. A rotating disc model, which generates shear stress within physiological ranges, was used to characterize adhesion of leukocytes and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polycarbonate-urethanes and polyetherurethanes modified with SMEs (polyethylene oxide, fluorocarbon and dimethylsiloxane) under dynamic flow conditions. Bacterial adhesion in the absence of serum was found to be mediated by shear stress and surface chemistry, with reduced adhesion exhibited on materials modified with polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs. In contrast, bacterial adhesion was enhanced on materials modified with fluorocarbon SMEs. In the presence of serum, bacterial adhesion was primarily neither material nor shear dependent. However, bacterial adhesion in serum was significantly reduced to < or = 10% compared to adhesion in serum-free media. Leukocyte adhesion in serum exhibited a shear dependency with increased adhesion occurring in regions exposed to lower shear-stress levels of < or = 7 dyne/cm2. Additionally, polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs reduced leukocyte adhesion on polyether-urethanes. In conclusion, these results suggest that surface chemistry and shear stress can mediate bacterial and cellular adhesion. Furthermore, materials modified with polyethylene oxide SMEs are capable of inhibiting bacterial adhesion, consequently minimizing the probability of biomaterial-centered infections.

  4. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  5. Pharmacological models and approaches for pathophysiological conditions associated with hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Farías, Jorge G; Herrera, Emilio A; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Cruz, Gonzalo; Morales, Paola; Castillo, Rodrigo L

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxia is the failure of oxygenation at the tissue level, where the reduced oxygen delivered is not enough to satisfy tissue demands. Metabolic depression is the physiological adaptation associated with reduced oxygen consumption, which evidently does not cause any harm to organs that are exposed to acute and short hypoxic insults. Oxidative stress (OS) refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability of endogenous antioxidant systems to scavenge ROS, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diseases related to hypoxia during intrauterine development and postnatal life. Thus, excessive ROS are implicated in the irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Here, we describe several pathophysiological conditions and in vivo and ex vivo models developed for the study of hypoxic and oxidative stress injury. We reviewed existing literature on the responses to hypoxia and oxidative stress of the cardiovascular, renal, reproductive, and central nervous systems, and discussed paradigms of chronic and intermittent hypobaric hypoxia. This systematic review is a critical analysis of the advantages in the application of some experimental strategies and their contributions leading to novel pharmacological therapies.

  6. Methionine residues around phosphorylation sites are preferentially oxidized in vivo under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Veredas, Francisco J.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Aledo, J. Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prevalent and well-understood protein modifications. Oxidation of protein-bound methionine, which has been traditionally perceived as an inevitable damage derived from oxidative stress, is now emerging as another modification capable of regulating protein activity during stress conditions. However, the mechanism coupling oxidative signals to changes in protein function remains unknown. An appealing hypothesis is that methionine oxidation might serve as a rheostat to control phosphorylation. To investigate this potential crosstalk between phosphorylation and methionine oxidation, we have addressed the co-occurrence of these two types of modifications within the human proteome. Here, we show that nearly all (98%) proteins containing oxidized methionine were also phosphoproteins. Furthermore, phosphorylation sites were much closer to oxidized methionines when compared to non-oxidized methionines. This proximity between modification sites cannot be accounted for by their co-localization within unstructured clusters because it was faithfully reproduced in a smaller sample of structured proteins. We also provide evidence that the oxidation of methionine located within phosphorylation motifs is a highly selective process among stress-related proteins, which supports the hypothesis of crosstalk between methionine oxidation and phosphorylation as part of the cellular defence against oxidative stress. PMID:28079140

  7. Methionine residues around phosphorylation sites are preferentially oxidized in vivo under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Veredas, Francisco J; Cantón, Francisco R; Aledo, J Carlos

    2017-01-12

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prevalent and well-understood protein modifications. Oxidation of protein-bound methionine, which has been traditionally perceived as an inevitable damage derived from oxidative stress, is now emerging as another modification capable of regulating protein activity during stress conditions. However, the mechanism coupling oxidative signals to changes in protein function remains unknown. An appealing hypothesis is that methionine oxidation might serve as a rheostat to control phosphorylation. To investigate this potential crosstalk between phosphorylation and methionine oxidation, we have addressed the co-occurrence of these two types of modifications within the human proteome. Here, we show that nearly all (98%) proteins containing oxidized methionine were also phosphoproteins. Furthermore, phosphorylation sites were much closer to oxidized methionines when compared to non-oxidized methionines. This proximity between modification sites cannot be accounted for by their co-localization within unstructured clusters because it was faithfully reproduced in a smaller sample of structured proteins. We also provide evidence that the oxidation of methionine located within phosphorylation motifs is a highly selective process among stress-related proteins, which supports the hypothesis of crosstalk between methionine oxidation and phosphorylation as part of the cellular defence against oxidative stress.

  8. Effects of developmental conditions on growth, stress, and telomeres in black-legged kittiwake chicks.

    PubMed

    Young, Rebecca C; Welcker, Jorg; Barger, Christopher P; Hatch, Scott A; Merkling, Thomas; Kitaiskaia, Evgenia V; Haussmann, Mark F; Kitaysky, Alexander S

    2017-03-30

    Early-life conditions can drive ageing patterns and life history strategies throughout the lifespan. Certain social, genetic, and nutritional developmental conditions are more likely to produce high-quality offspring: those with good likelihood of recruitment and productivity. Here we call such conditions "favored states" and explore their relationship with physiological variables during development in a long-lived seabird, the black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla). Two favored states were experimentally generated by manipulation of food availability and brood size, while hatching order and sex were also explored as naturally generating favored states. Thus, the favored states we explored were high food availability, lower levels of sibling competition, hatching first, and male sex. We tested the effects of favored developmental conditions on growth, stress, telomere length (a molecular marker associated with lifespan), and nestling survival. Generation of favored states through manipulation of both the nutritional and social environments furthered our understanding of their relative contributions to development and phenotype: increased food availability led to larger body size, reduced stress, and higher antioxidant status, while lower sibling competition (social environment) led to lower telomere loss and longer telomere lengths in fledglings. Telomere length predicted nestling survival, and wing growth was also positively correlated with telomere length, supporting the idea that telomeres may indicate individual quality, mediated by favored states. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  10. Metabolomic and network analysis of astaxanthin-producing Haematococcus pluvialis under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingxue; Wang, Jiangxin; Shi, Mengliang; Niu, Xiangfeng; Yu, Xinheng; Gao, Lianju; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-10-01

    Various combinations of acetate (Ac), Fe(2+) and high light (HL) stress conditions were evaluated to maximize astaxanthin accumulation and biomass production in Haematococcus pluvialis, and then GC-MS and LC-MS based metabolomics were applied to determine molecular mechanisms responsible for enhancing astaxanthin accumulation under the stress conditions. With the optimized analytical protocols, the GC-MS and LC-MS analyses allowed identification of 93 stable and 24 unstable intracellular metabolites from H. pluvialis, respectively. In addition, a metabolic network was constructed based on GC-MS metabolomic datasets using a weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) approach. The network analysis uncovered 2, 1 and 1 distinguished metabolic modules highly associated with HL, Fe(2+) & HL, and Ac & Fe(2+) & HL conditions, respectively. Finally, LC-MS analysis found that AKG, Glu and R5P may be metabolites associated with the Fe(2+) & HL condition. The study provided the first metabolomic view of cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Rock Fracturing under Laboratory True-Triaxial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Hazzard, Jim; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    simulated at the final stages of the experiment at higher effective stresses where an M-shaped form of through-going fractures was developed and their spatial orientations and angles were measured under various polyaxial loading conditions. This study enhances our understanding about the nature of initiation and propagation of fractures under true-triaxial stress states.

  12. Sex and ovarian steroids modulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in rat hippocampus under stressful and non-stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Tamara B; Perrot-Sinal, Tara S

    2006-01-01

    Abnormal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are associated with major depression, a disorder with a higher incidence in women than men. Stress affects BDNF levels in various brain regions and thus, a heightened stress response in females could contribute to the development of depression. As well, ovarian hormones directly affect brain levels of BDNF mRNA and protein. Two experiments were performed to investigate the effects of stress and sex and gonadal hormones on BDNF protein levels in CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. In the first experiment, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to one hour of restraint stress or control handling prior to sacrifice. In the second experiment, fifty-one female rats were ovariectomized and separated into stress and control conditions, as described for the first experiment. Stressed and handled groups received a single injection of estrogen (E; 53h prior to stress), estrogen and progesterone (EP; E given at 53h and P given 5h prior to stress), or vehicle (OVX). In both experiments BDNF protein was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent enzyme assay (ELISA) in micropunches of hippocampus. Gonadally intact females had significantly higher levels of BDNF in CA3, but significantly lower levels in DG, relative to males. In CA3, stress significantly decreased BDNF in both males and females. In DG of ovariectomized female rats, the effects of stress were significantly different following EP vs. vehicle treatment. Thus, stress increased BDNF levels in EP-treated rats but decreased BDNF levels in vehicle-treated rats. Reduced trophic support in DG in the presence of estrogen and progesterone could jeopardize neurogenesis and under certain conditions could be a contributing factor to the hippocampal atrophy associated with stress-induced affective disorders. These results emphasize the need to consider sex, gonadal steroids, and hippocampal subregion when examining the

  13. Distinct 5′ UTRs regulate XIAP expression under normal growth conditions and during cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Alura; Jordan, Lindsay E.; Holcik, Martin

    2010-01-01

    X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis, XIAP, is cellular caspase inhibitor and a key regulator of apoptosis. We and others have previously shown that XIAP expression is regulated primarily at the level of protein synthesis; the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of XIAP mRNA contains an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that supports cap-independent expression of XIAP protein during conditions of pathophysiological stress, such as serum deprivation or gamma irradiation. Here, we show that XIAP is encoded by two distinct mRNAs that differ in their 5′ UTRs. We further show that the dominant, shorter, 5′ UTR promotes a basal level of XIAP expression under normal growth conditions. In contrast, the less abundant longer 5′ UTR contains an IRES and supports cap-independent translation during stress. Our data suggest that the combination of alternate regulatory regions and distinct translational initiation modes is critical in maintaining XIAP levels in response to cellular stress and may represent a general mechanism of cellular adaptation. PMID:20385593

  14. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A; Leiva, Luisa F; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G; Worthington, Margaret L; Miles, John W; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress.

  15. Statistical optimization of pigment production by Monascus sanguineus under stress condition.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Rashmi; Tallapragada, Padmavathi

    2014-01-01

    Natural pigments are produced by the Monascus sp., which are used for coloring food substances. The intent of this study was to optimize the pigment yield and biomass produced from the unexplored Monascus sanguineus in submerged culture under stress conditions. For inducing thermal stress, the spores were incubated at various temperatures at higher ranges. For inducing osmotic stress, varied concentrations of NaCl, glycerol, and peptone were used. The medium components were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The combined effects of the four medium constituents mentioned were studied using a 2⁴ full factorial central composite design (CCD). The relationships between the predicted values and actual values, independent variable, and the response were calculated according to a second-order quadratic model. It was deduced that the variable with the leading effect was the linear effect of glycerol concentration. Furthermore, the quadratic effects of peptone and the interactive effects of temperature and glycerol were more noteworthy than other factors. The optimum values for the test variables in coded factors were found to be spores treated with 70°C for temperature, 0.25 M for glycerol, 0.51% (w/v) for peptone, and 1.25% (w/v) for NaCl, corresponding to a maximum red pigment yield of 55.67 color value units (CVU)/mL. With optimized conditions, the pigment yield was almost three times the yield observed with the control.

  16. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A.; Leiva, Luisa F.; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G.; Worthington, Margaret L.; Miles, John W.; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress. PMID:28243249

  17. Association between oxidative stress and contextual fear conditioning in Carioca high- and low-conditioned freezing rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Gomes, Vitor de Castro; Pinton, Simone; Batista Teixeira da Rocha, Joao; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2013-05-28

    We recently reported two novel breeding lines of rats known as Carioca high-and low-conditioned freezing (CHF and CLF), based on defensive freezing responses to contextual cues previously associated with electric footshock. The anxiety-like profile of these animals from the 7th generation was tested in the elevated plus maze. The results indicated that CHF animals presented a significantly more "anxious" phenotype compared with CLF animals. Animals from the 12th generation were used to evaluate the oxidative stress status of the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were evaluated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA; a sensor of reactive oxygen species [ROS]), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), an early marker of lipid peroxidation, were assessed. The results indicated that free radical concentrations and MDA levels were significantly higher in all three brain structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. Our data also showed that the hippocampus had the highest reactive species and MDA concentrations compared with the cortex and cerebellum in CHF rats. Animals from the 16th generation were used to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) within these three brain structures. The results indicated that CAT activity was lower in the cortex and hippocampus in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. No significant difference was observed in the cerebellum. The enzymatic activity of GPx was significantly decreased in all three structures in CHF rats compared with CLF rats. The hippocampus exhibited the highest GPx activity compared with the other two brain structures. These findings suggest the involvement of a redox system in these two bidirectional lines, and the hippocampus might be one of the prime brain structures involved in this state of oxidative stress imbalance.

  18. Estimation of diversity and combining abilities in Helianthus annuus L. under water stress and normal conditions.

    PubMed

    Saba, M; Khan, F A; Sadaqat, H A; Rana, I A

    2016-10-24

    Sunflower cannot produce high yields under water-limiting conditions. The aim of the present study was to prevent the impediments on yield and to develop varieties with high-yield potential under water scarce conditions. For achieving this objective, it is necessary to detect parents with desirable traits that mainly depend on the action of genes controlling the trait under improvement, combining ability, and genetic makeup of the parents. Heterosis can also be used to pool the desirable genes from genetically divergent varieties and these divergent parents could be detected by molecular studies. Ten tolerant and five susceptible tester lines were selected, crossed, and tested for genetic diversity using simple sequence repeat primers. We identified two parents (A-10.8 and G-60) that showed maximum (46.7%) genetic dissimilarity. On an average 3.1 alleles per locus were detected for twenty pair of primers. Evaluation of mean values revealed that under stress conditions the mean performances of the genotypes were reduced for all traits under study. Parent A-10.8 was consistent as a good general combiner for achene yield per plant under both non-stress and stress conditions. Line A-10.8 in the hybrid A-10.8 x G-60 proved to be a good combiner as it showed negative specific combining ability (SCA) effects for plant height and internodal length and positive SCA effects for head weight, achene yield per plant, and membrane stability index. Valuable information on gene action, combining ability, and heterosis was generated, which could be used in further breeding programs.

  19. Development of stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for the modeling of solids deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet-Grellier, Thomas; Pramanik, Ranjan; Pan, Kai; Albaiz, Abdulaziz; Jones, Bruce D.; Williams, John R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper develops a method for imposing stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) with and without the need for dummy particles. SPH has been used for simulating phenomena in a number of fields, such as astrophysics and fluid mechanics. More recently, the method has gained traction as a technique for simulation of deformation and fracture in solids, where the meshless property of SPH can be leveraged to represent arbitrary crack paths. Despite this interest, application of boundary conditions within the SPH framework is typically limited to imposed velocity or displacement using fictitious dummy particles to compensate for the lack of particles beyond the boundary interface. While this is enough for a large variety of problems, especially in the case of fluid flow, for problems in solid mechanics there is a clear need to impose stresses upon boundaries. In addition to this, the use of dummy particles to impose a boundary condition is not always suitable or even feasibly, especially for those problems which include internal boundaries. In order to overcome these difficulties, this paper first presents an improved method for applying stress boundary conditions in SPH with dummy particles. This is then followed by a proposal of a formulation which does not require dummy particles. These techniques are then validated against analytical solutions to two common problems in rock mechanics, the Brazilian test and the penny-shaped crack problem both in 2D and 3D. This study highlights the fact that SPH offers a good level of accuracy to solve these problems and that results are reliable. This validation work serves as a foundation for addressing more complex problems involving plasticity and fracture propagation.

  20. Reduced amygdala responsivity during conditioning to trauma-related stimuli in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Diener, Slawomira J; Nees, Frauke; Wessa, Michèle; Wirtz, Gustav; Frommberger, Ulrich; Penga, Tina; Ruttorf, Michaela; Ruf, Matthias; Schmahl, Christian; Flor, Herta

    2016-10-01

    Exaggerated conditioned fear responses and impaired extinction along with amygdala overactivation have been observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These fear responses might be triggered by cues related to the trauma through higher-order conditioning, where reminders of the trauma may serve as unconditioned stimuli (US) and could maintain the fear response. We compared arousal, valence, and US expectancy ratings and BOLD brain responses using fMRI in 14 traumatized persons with PTSD and 14 without PTSD (NPTSD) and 13 matched healthy controls (HC) in a differential aversive conditioning paradigm. The US were trauma-specific pictures for the PTSD and NPTSD group and equally aversive and arousing for the HC; the conditioned stimuli (CS) were graphic displays. During conditioning, the PTSD patients compared to the NPTSD and HC indicated higher arousal to the conditioned stimulus that was paired with the trauma picture (CS+) compared to the unpaired (CS-), increased dissociation during acquisition and extinction, and failure to extinguish the CS/US-association compared to NPTSD. During early and late acquisition, the PTSD patients showed a significantly lower amygdala activation to CS+ versus CS- and a negative interaction between activation in the amygdala and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), while NPTSD and HC displayed a negative interaction between amygdala and medial PFC. These findings suggest maladaptive anticipatory coping with trauma-related stimuli in patients with PTSD, indicated by enhanced conditioning, with related abnormal amygdala reactivity and connectivity, and delayed extinction.

  1. Thermal signature of fear conditioning in mild post traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Di Giacinto, A; Brunetti, M; Sepede, G; Ferretti, A; Merla, A

    2014-04-25

    Fear conditioning has been proposed as an important factor involved in the etiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We examined fear processing in PTSD patients with mild symptoms and in individuals who did not develop symptoms (both groups consisting of victims of a bank robbery), through the study of fear-conditioned response. Conditioned responses were quantified by the skin conductance response (SCR) and the facial thermal response, the latter being measured by high-resolution functional thermal infrared (fIR) imaging. We found: (a) a change of the physiological parameters with respect to the baseline condition in both control subjects and PTSD patients during the conditioning phase; (b) the permanence of the conditioning effect in the maintenance phase in both control and PTSD patients; (c) patients and controls did differ for the variation across the phases of the physiological parameters rather than for their absolute values, showing that PTSD patients had a prolonged excitation and higher tonic component of autonomic activity. These results, although preliminary, indicate that the analysis of SCR and facial thermal response during the conditioning paradigm is a promising psychometric method of investigation, even in the case of low level of PTSD symptom severity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to discriminate between control subjects and PTSD patients with mild symptoms through infrared thermal imaging. It may suggest feasible approaches for diagnostic screening in the early phases of the disorder and in the assessment of preventive measures and therapies.

  2. Influence of Bacillus spp. strains on seedling growth and physiological parameters of sorghum under moisture stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Grover, Minakshi; Madhubala, R; Ali, Sk Z; Yadav, S K; Venkateswarlu, B

    2014-09-01

    Microorganisms isolated from stressed ecosystem may prove as ideal candidates for development of bio-inoculants for stressed agricultural production systems. In the present study, moisture stress tolerant rhizobacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of sorghum, pigeonpea, and cowpea grown under semiarid conditions in India. Four isolates KB122, KB129, KB133, and KB142 from sorghum rhizosphere exhibited plant growth promoting traits and tolerance to salinity, high temperature, and moisture stress. These isolates were identified as Bacillus spp. by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The strains were evaluated for growth promotion of sorghum seedlings under two different moisture stress conditions (set-I, continuous 50% soil water holding capacity (WHC) throughout the experiment and set-II, 75% soil WHC for 27 days followed by no irrigation for 5 days) under greenhouse conditions. Plate count and scanning electron microscope studies indicated successful root surface colonization by inoculated bacteria. Plants inoculated with Bacillus spp. strains showed better growth in terms of shoot length and root biomass with dark greenish leaves due to high chlorophyll content while un-inoculated plants showed rolling of the leaves, stunted appearance, and wilting under both stress conditions. Inoculation also improved leaf relative water content and soil moisture content. However, variation in proline and sugar content in the different treatments under two stress conditions indicated differential effect of microbial treatments on plant physiological parameters under stress conditions.

  3. Conditioning-specific reflex modification of the rabbit's nictitating membrane response and heart rate: behavioral rules, neural substrates, and potential applications to posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Lauren B; Smith-Bell, Carrie; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2008-12-01

    Interest in classical conditioning is usually focused on anticipatory responses to a stimulus associated with a significant event, and it is assumed that responses to the event itself are reflexive, involuntary, and relatively invariant. However, there is compelling evidence that both the rabbit nictitating membrane response (NMR) and heart rate response (HR), well-known reflexive reactions to aversive events, can change quite dramatically as a function of learning when measured in the absence of the conditioned stimulus. In the case of NMR conditioning, a simple blink is transformed into a larger and more complex response. For HR conditioning, reflexive heart rate acceleration can actually change to heart rate deceleration. In both cases, the reflex comes to resemble the conditioned response and follows some of the same behavioral laws. This change in response to the aversive event itself or weaker forms of that event is called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM). CRM may force us to reevaluate the behavioral and neural consequences of classical conditioning and may have important consequences for the treatment of conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  4. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization.

  5. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors.

  6. Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis dampens the neuroendocrine response to stress in neonatal rats subjected to suboptimal rearing conditions.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Ryan Joseph; Verlezza, Silvanna; Gray, Jennifer Megan; Hill, Matthew Nicholas; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress during early development can exert profound effects on the maturation of the neuroendocrine stress axis. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has recently surfaced as a fundamental component of the neuroendocrine stress response; however, the effect of early-life stress on neonatal ECB signaling and the capacity to which ECB enhancement may modulate neonatal stress responses is relatively unknown. The present study assessed whether exposure to early-life stress in the form of limited access to nesting/bedding material (LB) from postnatal (PND) day 2 to 9 alters neuroendocrine activity and hypothalamic ECB content in neonatal rats challenged with a novel immobilization stressor. Furthermore, we examined whether inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for the degradation of anandamide (AEA) affects neuroendocrine responses in PND10 pups as a function of rearing conditions. Neonatal rats showed a robust increase in corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) secretion in response to immobilization stress, which was significantly blunted in pups reared in LB conditions. Accordingly, LB pups exhibited reduced stress-induced Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, with no significant differences in hypothalamic ECB content. Administration of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, ip) 90 min prior to immobilization stress significantly dampened stress-induced CORT release, but only in pups reared in LB conditions. These results suggest that rearing in restricted bedding conditions dampens the neuroendocrine response to stress, while augmenting AEA mitigates stress-induced alterations in glucocorticoid secretion preferentially in pups subjected to early-life stress.

  7. Association of hormonal responses and performance of student pilots during acceleration training on the human centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, D.; Rohleder, N.; Welsch, H.

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of student pilots' +Gz tolerance by stress hormone levels would be a useful tool in aviation medicine. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between neuroendocrine parameters with performance during acceleration training on the human centrifuge (HC).We investigated 21 student pilots during self-controlled acceleration training on the HC. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were measured after individual training sessions and at rest. Performance was defined by several characteristics including maximum tolerated acceleration. ACTH and cortisol, were significantly higher 20 minutes after acceleration training compared to the resting condition. Subjects tolerated a maximal acceleration of +6.69 Gz. HPA hormone levels and responses were associated with maximum tolerated acceleration +Gz. These findings support the expectation that acceleration- induced increases in stress hormones may enable the organism to tolerate a higher acceleration and could therefore be used as predictors for acceleration tolerance.

  8. The role of the hok/sok locus in bacterial response to stressful growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Chukwudi, Chinwe U; Good, Liam

    2015-02-01

    The hok/sok locus is renowned for its plasmid stabilization effect via post-segregational killing of plasmid-free daughter cells. However, the function(s) of the chromosome-encoded loci, which are more abundant in pathogenic strains of a broad range of enteric bacteria, are yet to be understood. Also, the frequent occurrence of this toxin/antitoxin addiction system in multi-drug resistance plasmids suggests additional roles. In this study, the effects of the hok/sok locus on the growth of bacteria in stressful growth-limiting conditions such as high temperature and antibiotic burden were investigated using hok/sok plasmids. The results showed that the hok/sok locus prolonged the lag phase of host cell cultures, thereby enabling the cells to adapt, respond to the stress and eventually thrive in these growth-limiting conditions by increasing the growth rate at exponential phase. The hok/sok locus also enhanced the survival and growth of cells in low cell density cultures irrespective of unfavourable growth conditions, and may complement existing or defective SOS mechanism. In addition to the plasmid stabilization function, these effects would enhance the ability of pathogenic bacteria to establish infections and propagate the antibiotic resistance elements carried on these plasmids, thereby contributing to the virulence of such bacteria.

  9. Dynamics of food availability, body condition and physiological stress response in breeding Black-legged Kittiwakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    1. The seasonal dynamics of body condition (BC), circulating corticosterone levels (baseline, BL) and the adrenocortical response to acute stress (SR) were examined in long-lived Black-legged Kittiwakes, Rissa tridactyla, breeding at Duck (food-poor colony) and Gull (food-rich colony) Islands in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska. It was tested whether the dynamics of corticosterone levels reflect a seasonal change in bird physiological condition due to reproduction and/or variation in foraging conditions. 2. BC declined seasonally, and the decline was more pronounced in birds at the food-poor colony. BL and SR levels of corticosterone rose steadily through the reproductive season, and BL levels were significantly higher in birds on Duck island compared with those on Gull Island. During the egg-laying and chick-rearing stages, birds had lower SR on Duck Island than on Gull Island. 3. The results suggest that, in addition to a seasonal change in bird physiology during reproduction, local ecological factors such as food availability affect circulating levels of corticosterone and adrenal response to acute stress.

  10. Rice Root Architectural Plasticity Traits and Genetic Regions for Adaptability to Variable Cultivation and Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Nitika; Raman, K Anitha; Torres, Rolando O; Audebert, Alain; Dardou, Audrey; Kumar, Arvind; Henry, Amelia

    2016-08-01

    Future rice (Oryza sativa) crops will likely experience a range of growth conditions, and root architectural plasticity will be an important characteristic to confer adaptability across variable environments. In this study, the relationship between root architectural plasticity and adaptability (i.e. yield stability) was evaluated in two traditional × improved rice populations (Aus 276 × MTU1010 and Kali Aus × MTU1010). Forty contrasting genotypes were grown in direct-seeded upland and transplanted lowland conditions with drought and drought + rewatered stress treatments in lysimeter and field studies and a low-phosphorus stress treatment in a Rhizoscope study. Relationships among root architectural plasticity for root dry weight, root length density, and percentage lateral roots with yield stability were identified. Selected genotypes that showed high yield stability also showed a high degree of root plasticity in response to both drought and low phosphorus. The two populations varied in the soil depth effect on root architectural plasticity traits, none of which resulted in reduced grain yield. Root architectural plasticity traits were related to 13 (Aus 276 population) and 21 (Kali Aus population) genetic loci, which were contributed by both the traditional donor parents and MTU1010. Three genomic loci were identified as hot spots with multiple root architectural plasticity traits in both populations, and one locus for both root architectural plasticity and grain yield was detected. These results suggest an important role of root architectural plasticity across future rice crop conditions and provide a starting point for marker-assisted selection for plasticity.

  11. Juvenile stress potentiates aversive 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and freezing during auditory fear conditioning in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nicole; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Fuchs, Eberhard; Wöhr, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic experiences that occur during adolescence can render individuals vulnerable to mood and anxiety disorders. A model in juvenile rats (age: 27-29 days) was developed previously to study the long-term effects of adolescent stress exposure on behaviour and physiology. This paradigm, termed juvenile stress, involves subjecting juvenile rats to different stressors on consecutive days over a 3-day period. Here, we investigated the effects of the juvenile stress paradigm on freezing behaviour and aversive 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during auditory fear conditioning in adult male rats (age: 68-90 days). We found that rats previously subjected to juvenile stress increased aversive 22-kHz USVs (total calls and time spent calling) compared with controls during fear-conditioning training. The acoustic USV parameters between control and juvenile stress rats were largely equivalent, including duration, peak frequency and amplitude. While rats did not differ in freezing behaviour during fear conditioning, juvenile stress rats exhibited greater cue-conditioned freezing upon testing 24 h later. Our results show that juvenile stress elicited different long-term changes in freezing and aversive USVs during fear conditioning. Furthermore, they highlight the importance of assessing USVs to detect experience-dependent differences between control and stress-exposed animals which are not detectable by measuring visible behaviour.

  12. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Fear Conditioning, and The Uncinate Fasciculus: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Britta K; Brunsch, Vincent; Gard, Tim; Greve, Douglas N; Koch, Kathrin; Sorg, Christian; Lazar, Sara W; Milad, Mohammed R

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness has been suggested to impact emotional learning, but research on these processes is scarce. The classical fear conditioning/extinction/extinction retention paradigm is a well-known method for assessing emotional learning. The present study tested the impact of mindfulness training on fear conditioning and extinction memory and further investigated whether changes in white matter fiber tracts might support such changes. The uncinate fasciculus (UNC) was of particular interest in the context of emotional learning. In this pilot study, 46 healthy participants were quasi-randomized to a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR, N = 23) or waitlist control (N = 23) group and underwent a two-day fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction memory protocol before and after the course or control period. Skin conductance response (SCR) data served to measure the physiological response during conditioning and extinction memory phases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were analyzed with probabilistic tractography and analyzed for changes of fractional anisotropy in the UNC. During conditioning, participants were able to maintain a differential response to conditioned vs. not conditioned stimuli following the MBSR course (i.e., higher sensitivity to the conditioned stimuli), while controls dropped the response. Extinction memory results were not interpretable due to baseline differences. MBSR participants showed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy in the UNC, while controls did not (group by time interaction missed significance). Pre-post changes in UNC were correlated with changes in the response to the conditioned stimuli. The findings suggest effects of mindfulness practice on the maintenance of sensitivity of emotional responses and suggest underlying neural plasticity. (ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT01320969, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01320969).

  13. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Fear Conditioning, and The Uncinate Fasciculus: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hölzel, Britta K.; Brunsch, Vincent; Gard, Tim; Greve, Douglas N.; Koch, Kathrin; Sorg, Christian; Lazar, Sara W.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness has been suggested to impact emotional learning, but research on these processes is scarce. The classical fear conditioning/extinction/extinction retention paradigm is a well-known method for assessing emotional learning. The present study tested the impact of mindfulness training on fear conditioning and extinction memory and further investigated whether changes in white matter fiber tracts might support such changes. The uncinate fasciculus (UNC) was of particular interest in the context of emotional learning. In this pilot study, 46 healthy participants were quasi-randomized to a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR, N = 23) or waitlist control (N = 23) group and underwent a two-day fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction memory protocol before and after the course or control period. Skin conductance response (SCR) data served to measure the physiological response during conditioning and extinction memory phases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were analyzed with probabilistic tractography and analyzed for changes of fractional anisotropy in the UNC. During conditioning, participants were able to maintain a differential response to conditioned vs. not conditioned stimuli following the MBSR course (i.e., higher sensitivity to the conditioned stimuli), while controls dropped the response. Extinction memory results were not interpretable due to baseline differences. MBSR participants showed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy in the UNC, while controls did not (group by time interaction missed significance). Pre-post changes in UNC were correlated with changes in the response to the conditioned stimuli. The findings suggest effects of mindfulness practice on the maintenance of sensitivity of emotional responses and suggest underlying neural plasticity. (ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT01320969, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01320969). PMID:27378875

  14. Conditioned Fear Extinction and Generalization in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION: Emory University Atlanta, GA 30322-1018 REPORT DATE: August 2012 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Report PREPARED FOR: U.S...To) 1 August 2011–31 July 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conditioned Fear Extinction and Generalization in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder...TT   100   RS4606   RGS2   CC   109   CG   88   GG   28   RS4680   COMT   AA   44   GA   99   GG   83   RS4875113

  15. Velocity and stress jump conditions between a porous medium and a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Aguilar-Madera, Carlos G.; Ochoa-Tapia, J. Alberto; Goyeau, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    Modeling transport phenomena in hierarchical systems can be carried out by either a one domain approach or a two domain approach. The first one involves assuming the system as a pseudo-continuum and is expressed in terms of position-dependent effective medium coefficients. In the two domain approach, the differential equations have position-independent coefficients but require accounting for the corresponding boundary conditions that couple the equations between each homogeneous region. For momentum transport between a porous medium and a fluid, stress boundary conditions have been derived in terms of a jump coefficient that needs to be predicted within a two-domain approach formulation. However, continuity of the velocity is postulated at the dividing surface. In this work, we propose a methodology for the derivation of boundary conditions for both the velocity and the stress. These conditions are expressed in terms of jump coefficients that are computed from the solution of an ancillary macroscopic closure problem. This problem accounts for the deviations from the one and two domain approaches. From the closure problem solution we were also able to determine the position at which the jump conditions should be applied, i.e., the dividing surface position. In addition, we used this methodology adopting the assumptions proposed by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker as well as those by Beavers and Joseph. We found that any version of the two domain approach was in agreement with the one domain approach in the bulk of the porous medium and the fluid. However, the same is not true for the process of capturing the essential information of the inter-region.

  16. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential.

  17. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  18. The weight gain response to stress during adulthood is conditioned by both sex and prenatal stress exposure.

    PubMed

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2010-04-01

    Food intake and weight gain are known to be affected by stress. However, the type and duration of the stress may have variable effects, with males and females responding differently. We report the short-term and long-term effects of prenatal and adult immobilization stress, as well as the combination of these two stresses, on weight gain and food intake in male and female rats and the role of post-pubertal gonadal hormones in this process. No long-term effect of prenatal stress on food intake or weight gain was found in either sex. However, during the period of adult stress [at postnatal day (P) 90; 10 days duration] stressed male rats gained significantly less weight than controls and previous exposure to prenatal stress attenuated this effect (control: 31.2+/-2.1g; prenatal stress: 24.6+/-3.8g; adult stress: 8.1+/-3.4g; prenatal and adult stress: 18.2+/-3.3g; p<0.0001). There was no change in food intake in response to either prenatal or adult stress. Adult stress increased circulating corticosterone levels during the initial part of the stress period, in both male and female rats with this rise being greater in male rats. No effect on corticosterone levels was observed on the last day of stress in either sex. No effect on weight gain or food intake was observed in female rats. Following adult stress, male rats increased their weight gain, with no change in food intake, such that 1 month later they reached control levels. At the time of sacrifice (P180), there were no differences in weight or circulating metabolic hormone levels between any of the male groups. Although castration alone modulated body weight in both male and female rats, it did not affect their weight gain response to adult stress. These results indicate that the weight gain response to adult stress is sexually dimorphic and that this is not dependent on post-pubertal gonadal steroids. Furthermore, the outcome of this response closely depends on the time at which the change in weight is analyzed

  19. The effect of three surface conditions, speed and running experience on vertical acceleration of the tibia during running.

    PubMed

    Boey, Hannelore; Aeles, Jeroen; Schütte, Kurt; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-09-05

    Research has focused on parameters that are associated with injury risk, e.g. vertical acceleration. These parameters can be influenced by running on different surfaces or at different running speeds, but the relationship between them is not completely clear. Understanding the relationship may result in training guidelines to reduce the injury risk. In this study, thirty-five participants with three different levels of running experience were recruited. Participants ran on three different surfaces (concrete, synthetic running track, and woodchip trail) at two different running speeds: a self-selected comfortable speed and a fixed speed of 3.06 m/s. Vertical acceleration of the lower leg was measured with an accelerometer. The vertical acceleration was significantly lower during running on the woodchip trail in comparison with the synthetic running track and the concrete, and significantly lower during running at lower speed in comparison with during running at higher speed on all surfaces. No significant differences in vertical acceleration were found between the three groups of runners at fixed speed. Higher self-selected speed due to higher performance level also did not result in higher vertical acceleration. These results may show that running on a woodchip trail and slowing down could reduce the injury risk at the tibia.

  20. Oxidative stress conditions increase the frequency of de novo formation of the yeast [PSI +] prion

    PubMed Central

    Doronina, Victoria A.; Staniforth, Gemma L.; Speldewinde, Shaun H.; Tuite, Mick F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Prions are self‐perpetuating amyloid protein aggregates which underlie various neurodegenerative diseases in mammals and heritable traits in yeast. The molecular basis of how yeast and mammalian prions form spontaneously into infectious amyloid‐like structures is poorly understood. We have explored the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a general trigger for prion formation using the yeast [PSI +] prion, which is the altered conformation of the Sup35 translation termination factor. We show that the frequency of [PSI +] prion formation is elevated under conditions of oxidative stress and in mutants lacking key antioxidants. We detect increased oxidation of Sup35 methionine residues in antioxidant mutants and show that overexpression of methionine sulphoxide reductase abrogates both the oxidation of Sup35 and its conversion to the [PSI +] prion. [PSI +] prion formation is particularly elevated in a mutant lacking the Sod1 Cu,Zn‐superoxide dismutase. We have used fluorescence microscopy to show that the de novo appearance of [PSI +] is both rapid and increased in frequency in this mutant. Finally, electron microscopy analysis of native Sup35 reveals that similar fibrillar structures are formed in both the wild‐type and antioxidant mutants. Together, our data indicate that oxidative stress is a general trigger of [PSI +] formation, which can be alleviated by antioxidant defenses. PMID:25601439

  1. Migratory management and environmental conditions affect lifespan and oxidative stress in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming H.; Strand, Micheline K.; Rueppell, Olav; Tarpy, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Most pollination in large-scale agriculture is dependent on managed colonies of a single species, the honey bee Apis mellifera. More than 1 million hives are transported to California each year just to pollinate the almonds, and bees are trucked across the country for various cropping systems. Concerns have been raised about whether such “migratory management” causes bees undue stress; however to date there have been no longer-term studies rigorously addressing whether migratory management is detrimental to bee health. To address this issue, we conducted field experiments comparing bees from commercial and experimental migratory beekeeping operations to those from stationary colonies to quantify effects on lifespan, colony health and productivity, and levels of oxidative damage for individual bees. We detected a significant decrease in lifespan of migratory adult bees relative to stationary bees. We also found that migration affected oxidative stress levels in honey bees, but that food scarcity had an even larger impact; some detrimental effects of migration may be alleviated by a greater abundance of forage. In addition, rearing conditions affect levels of oxidative damage incurred as adults. This is the first comprehensive study on impacts of migratory management on the health and oxidative stress of honey bees. PMID:27554200

  2. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K.; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D.; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L.; Hill, Richard P.; Jones, Russell G.; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O.; Thompson, Craig B.; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  3. Two-way shape memory behavior of semi-crystalline elastomer under stress-free condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Chen; Dong, Yubing; Zhu, Yaofeng; Fu, Yaqin

    2016-08-01

    Semi-crystalline shape memory polymers exhibit two-way shape memory effect (2W-SME) under constant stresses through crystallization-induced elongation upon cooling and melting-induced constriction upon heating. The applied constant stress influenced the prediction and usability of 2W-SME in practical applications without any external force. Here the reversible shape transition in EVA-shaped memory polymer was quantitative analyzed under a suitable temperature range and external stress-free condition. The fraction of reversible strain increased with increasing upper temperature (T high) within the temperature range and reached the maximum value of 13.62% at 70 °C. However, reversible strain transition was almost lost when T high exceeded 80 °C because of complete melting of crystalline scaffold, known as the latent recrystallization template. The non-isothermal annealing of EVA 2W-SMP under changing circulating temperatures was confirmed. Moreover, the orientation of crystallization was retained at high temperatures. These findings may contribute to design an appropriate shape memory protocol based on application-specific requirements.

  4. Incubation of Conditioning-Specific Reflex Modification: Implications for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.; Smith-Bell, Carrie A.; Burhans, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    Incubation of fear has been used to account for the delayed manifestation of symptoms of fear and anxiety including the delayed onset of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). We have shown the utility of classical conditioning-specific modification of the rabbit nictitating membrane response (NMR) as a model of PTSD. This modification includes an exaggeration in the size and a change in the timing of the unconditioned NMR after several days of classical conditioning. To assess the effects of incubation on conditioning-specific modification, we measured changes in responding as a function of the time between classical conditioning and NMR testing. After just one day of classical conditioning resulting in modest levels of learning, increases in response size were an inverted-U shaped function of days of incubation with little if any change occurring one and ten days after training but significant change occurring after six days. The incubation effect persisted for a week. An unpaired control group showed no change in the size of the response confirming the incubation effect was associative. The results bear a striking resemblance to symptoms of PTSD that do not always occur immediately after trauma and become exacerbated over time and then persist. They point to a window when incubation can exacerbate symptoms and speak to the vulnerability of re-experiencing trauma too soon. This could be a serious problem for military or emergency personnel recalled to combat or a disaster site without sufficient time to deal with the effects of their initial experiences. PMID:21803372

  5. Effect of single aging on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of INCONEL X-750 under PWR conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Moore, J. J.

    1988-05-01

    Unfavorable morphology of precipitates and inclusions has been thought to be the cause of severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in double aged INCONEL* X-750 alloy used in reactor water environments. A single step aging treatment of 200 hours at 811 °C followed by furnace cooling after solution treating for 2 hours at 1075 °C has been found to provide an improved combination of strength, ductility, and resistance to SCC under simulated PWR test conditions. In this single aged condition a reprecipitated secondary carbide, together with γ' was produced at the grain boundary which resulted in a mixed fracture mode comprising dimple rupture and microvoid coalescence compared with a predominantly intergranular mode for the fully age hardened specimens. This improvement has been explained in terms of the morphology of the second phase precipitates which are produced in these heat treatment regimes.

  6. Selection against blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) homozygotes under various stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Myrand, B; Tremblay, R; Sévigny, J-M

    2002-01-01

    Three mussel groups differing in mean multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) were used to examine the MLH-fitness relationship. Mussels were submitted to aerobic and anaerobic stressful conditions in the laboratory, and their LT(50) was measured. Mortality was not random in two of the three groups and affected the homozygous individuals more. This selective mortality caused a significant increase in the mean MLH of the survivors, but only for the two groups characterized by the lowest initial MLH and significant deficits in heterozygotes at the onset of the experiments. While these experiments were ongoing, the same two groups also suffered a 40% mortality rate in lantern nets under field conditions. This mortality also increased the mean MLH in survivors. All groups showed strong inverse relationships between MLH and standard metabolism. Our results suggest that the higher resistance of more heterozygous individuals is related to their lower metabolic needs.

  7. Stressing conditions as tools to boost the biosynthesis of valuable plant natural products.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernanda Gomes; Horta, Lívia Pereira; de Oliveira Faria, Raquel; Stehmann, Joao Renato; Modolo, Luzia Valentina

    2014-01-01

    There is a consensus that plants are great sources of metabolites with a broad variety of functions. This is particularly important because plants cannot run away from environmental conditions that can threat their existence. The numerous biological activities exhibited by plant natural products prompted humanity to use such substances or their derivatives for the treatment and/or prevention of diseases. The more we know the flora around the world the higher is the chance to find new lead compounds for the design of more potent drugs or nutraceuticals. This review first deals with Brazilian flora, contextualizing the most studied medicinal species and related patents. It also describes a compilation of relevant works based on the use of stress conditions to enhance the biosynthesis of valuable metabolites in cell cultures, tissue cultures (hairy roots) and whole plants by using native or crop plants around the world.

  8. HflX is a ribosome-splitting factor rescuing stalled ribosomes under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqing; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Dejiu; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Qin, Yan; Mi, Kaixia; Lei, Jianlin; Sanyal, Suparna; Gao, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Adverse cellular conditions often lead to nonproductive translational stalling and arrest of ribosomes on mRNAs. Here, we used fast kinetics and cryo-EM to characterize Escherichia coli HflX, a GTPase with unknown function. Our data reveal that HflX is a heat shock-induced ribosome-splitting factor capable of dissociating vacant as well as mRNA-associated ribosomes with deacylated tRNA in the peptidyl site. Structural data demonstrate that the N-terminal effector domain of HflX binds to the peptidyl transferase center in a strikingly similar manner as that of the class I release factors and induces dramatic conformational changes in central intersubunit bridges, thus promoting subunit dissociation. Accordingly, loss of HflX results in an increase in stalled ribosomes upon heat shock. These results suggest a primary role of HflX in rescuing translationally arrested ribosomes under stress conditions.

  9. Changes in seed water status as characterized by NMR in developing soybean seed grown under moisture stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P; Singh, Ravender; Verma, A P S; Joshi, D K; Singh, Sheoraj

    2014-02-21

    Changes in water status of developing seeds of Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill.) grown under different moisture stress conditions were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)- spin-spin relaxation time (T2). A comparison of the seed development characteristics, composition and physical properties indicated that, characteristics like seed weight, seed number/ear, rate of seed filling increased with development stages but decreased with moisture stress conditions. The NMR- spin-spin relaxation (T2) component like bound water increased with seed maturation (40-50%) but decreased with moisture stress conditions (30-40%). The changes in seed water status to increasing levels of moisture stress and seed maturity indicates that moisture stress resulted in more proportion of water to bound state and intermediate state and less proportion of water in free-state. These changes are further corroborated by significant changes in protein and starch contents in seeds under high moisture stress treatments. Thus seed water status during its development is not only affected by development processes but also by moisture stress conditions. This study strongly indicated a clear moisture stress and development stage dependence of seed tissue water status in developing soybean seeds.

  10. Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in maize under field drought-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Habben, Jeffrey E; Bao, Xiaoming; Bate, Nicholas J; DeBruin, Jason L; Dolan, Dennis; Hasegawa, Darren; Helentjaris, Timothy G; Lafitte, Renee H; Lovan, Nina; Mo, Hua; Reimann, Kellie; Schussler, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    A transgenic gene-silencing approach was used to modulate the levels of ethylene biosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) and determine its effect on grain yield under drought stress in a comprehensive set of field trials. Commercially relevant transgenic events were created with down-regulated ACC synthases (ACSs), enzymes that catalyse the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis. These events had ethylene emission levels reduced approximately 50% compared with nontransgenic nulls. Multiple, independent transgenic hybrids and controls were tested in field trials at managed drought-stress and rain-fed locations throughout the US. Analysis of yield data indicated that transgenic events had significantly increased grain yield over the null comparators, with the best event having a 0.58 Mg/ha (9.3 bushel/acre) increase after a flowering period drought stress. A (genotype × transgene) × environment interaction existed among the events, highlighting the need to better understand the context in which the down-regulation of ACSs functions in maize. Analysis of secondary traits showed that there was a consistent decrease in the anthesis-silking interval and a concomitant increase in kernel number/ear in transgene-positive events versus nulls. Selected events were also field tested under a low-nitrogen treatment, and the best event was found to have a significant 0.44 Mg/ha (7.1 bushel/acre) yield increase. This set of extensive field evaluations demonstrated that down-regulating the ethylene biosynthetic pathway can improve the grain yield of maize under abiotic stress conditions.

  11. Cellular bioenergetics is regulated by PARP1 under resting conditions and during oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Gerő, Domokos; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szoleczky, Petra; DeWitt, Douglas; Szabo, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the current studies was to elucidate the role of the principal poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoform, PARP1 in the regulation of cellular energetics in endothelial cells under resting conditions and during oxidative stress. Methods We utilized bEnd.3 endothelial cells and A549 human transformed epithelial cells. PARP1 was inhibited either by pharmacological inhibitors or by siRNA silencing. The Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure indices of mitochondrial respiration (oxygen consumption rate) and of glycolysis (extracellular acidification rate). Cell viability, cellular and mitochondrial NAD+ levels and mitochondrial biogenesis were also measured. Results Silencing of PARP1 increased basal cellular parameters of oxidative phosphorylation, providing direct evidence that PARP1 is a regulator of mitochondrial function in resting cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 and siRNA silencing of PARP1 protected against the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated the respiratory reserve capacity in endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress. The observed effects were unrelated to an effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. Isolated mitochondria of A549 human transformed epithelial cells exhibited an improved resting bioenergetic status after stable lentiviral silencing of PARP1; these effects were associated with elevated resting mitochondrial NAD+ levels in PARP1 silenced cells. Conclusions PARP1 is a regulator of basal cellular energetics in resting endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells respond with a decrease in their mitochondrial reserve capacity during low-level oxidative stress, an effect, which is attenuated by PARP1 inhibition. While PARP1 is a regulator of oxidative phosphorylation in resting and oxidatively stressed cells, it only exerts a minor effect on glycolysis. PMID:22198485

  12. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  13. Adolescent traumatic stress experience results in less robust conditioned fear and post-extinction fear cue responses in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole L T; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2014-05-01

    Early exposure to a traumatic event may produce lasting effects throughout the lifespan. Traumatic stress during adolescence may deliver a distinct developmental insult compared with more-often studied neonatal or juvenile traumatic stress paradigms. The present study describes the lasting effects of adolescent traumatic stress upon adulthood fear conditioning. Adolescent rats were exposed to a traumatic stressor (underwater trauma, UWT), then underwent fear conditioning during adulthood. Fear extinction was tested over five conditioned suppression extinction sessions three weeks later. The efficacies of two potential extinction-enhancing compounds, endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor AM404 (10mg/kg) and M1 muscarinic positive allosteric modulator BQCA (10mg/kg), were also assessed. Finally, post-extinction fear responses were examined using a fear cue (light) as a prepulse stimulus. Rats traumatically stressed during adolescence showed blunted conditioned suppression on day 1 of extinction training, and AM404 reversed this effect. Post-extinction startle testing showed that fear conditioning eliminates prepulse inhibition to the light cue. Startle potentiation was observed only in rats without adolescent UWT exposure. AM404 and BQCA both ameliorated this startle potentiation, while BQCA increased startle in the UWT group. These results suggest that exposure to a traumatic stressor during adolescence alters developmental outcomes related to stress response and fear extinction compared to rats without adolescent traumatic stress exposure, blunting the adulthood fear response and reducing residual post-extinction fear expression. Efficacy of pharmacological interventions may also vary as a factor of developmental traumatic stress exposure.

  14. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  15. Distinct Redox Regulation in Sub-Cellular Compartments in Response to Various Stress Conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A.; Meyer, Andreas J.; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (EGSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. EGSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (−340 to −350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H+/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H+/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions. PMID:23762325

  16. Distinct redox regulation in sub-cellular compartments in response to various stress conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A; Meyer, Andreas J; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (-340 to -350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H(+)/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions.

  17. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  18. The role of NCAM in auditory fear conditioning and its modulation by stress: a focus on the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, R; Sandi, C

    2010-06-01

    Chronic stress in rodents was shown to induce structural shrinkage and functional alterations in the hippocampus that were linked to spatial memory impairments. Effects of chronic stress on the amygdala have been linked to a facilitation of fear conditioning. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood, increasing evidence highlights the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) as an important molecular mediator of stress-induced structural and functional alterations. In this study, we investigated whether altered NCAM expression levels in the amygdala might be related to stress-induced enhancement of auditory fear conditioning and anxiety-like behavior. In adult C57BL/6J wild-type mice, chronic unpredictable stress resulted in an isoform-specific increase of NCAM expression (NCAM-140 and NCAM-180) in the amygdala, as well as enhanced auditory fear conditioning and anxiety-like behavior. Strikingly, forebrain-specific conditional NCAM-deficient mice (NCAM-floxed mice that express the cre-recombinase under the control of the promoter of the alpha-subunit of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), whose amygdala NCAM expression levels are reduced, displayed impaired auditory fear conditioning which was not altered following chronic stress exposure. Likewise, chronic stress in these conditional NCAM-deficient mice did not modify NCAM expression levels in the amygdala or hippocampus, while they showed enhanced anxiety-like behavior, questioning the involvement of NCAM in this type of behavior. Together, our results strongly support the involvement of NCAM in the amygdala in the consolidation of auditory fear conditioning and highlight increased NCAM expression in the amygdala among the mechanisms whereby stress facilitates fear conditioning processes.

  19. Does habitat disturbance affect stress, body condition and parasitism in two sympatric lemurs?

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoniaina, Josué H.; Kappeler, Peter M.; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Pechouskova, Eva; Hämäläinen, Anni M.; Grass, Juliane; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Kraus, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how animals react to human-induced changes in their environment is a key question in conservation biology. Owing to their potential correlation with fitness, several physiological parameters are commonly used to assess the effect of habitat disturbance on animals’ general health status. Here, we studied how two lemur species, the fat-tailed dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) and the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), respond to changing environmental conditions by comparing their stress levels (measured as hair cortisol concentration), parasitism and general body condition across four habitats ordered along a gradient of human disturbance at Kirindy Forest, Western Madagascar. These two species previously revealed contrasting responses to human disturbance; whereas M. murinus is known as a resilient species, C. medius is rarely encountered in highly disturbed habitats. However, neither hair cortisol concentrations nor parasitism patterns (prevalence, parasite species richness and rate of multiple infections) and body condition varied across the gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Our results indicate that the effect of anthropogenic activities at Kirindy Forest is not reflected in the general health status of both species, which may have developed a range of behavioural adaptations to deal with suboptimal conditions. Nonetheless, a difference in relative density among sites suggests that the carrying capacity of disturbed habitat is lower, and both species respond differently to environmental changes, with C. medius being more negatively affected. Thus, even for behaviourally flexible species, extended habitat deterioration could hamper long-term viability of populations. PMID:27656285

  20. Eyeblink classical conditioning and post-traumatic stress disorder - a model systems approach.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Burhans, Lauren B

    2015-01-01

    Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  1. Wheel running can accelerate or delay extinction of conditioned place preference for cocaine in male C57BL/6J mice depending on timing of wheel access

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, Martina L.; Stobaugh, Derrick J.; Miller, Daniel S.; DeYoung, Erin K.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic exercise may represent a useful intervention for drug abuse in predisposed individuals. Exercise increases plasticity in the brain that could be used to reverse learned drug associations. Previous studies report that exposing mice to a complex environment including running wheels after drug conditioning abolishes conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine, whereas running can enhance CPP when administered before conditioning. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that timing of exercise relative to conditioning has opposing effects on cocaine CPP. Male C57BL/6J mice experienced 30 days of running or Sedentary treatments either before or after cocaine conditioning. Control animals always received saline and never cocaine but otherwise underwent the same conditioning and exercise treatments. Animals were administered BrdU injections at the onset of conditioning or exercise and euthanized at the end of the study to quantify survival of new neurons in the hippocampus as a marker of plasticity. Wheel running accelerated extinction of CPP when running occurred entirely after drug conditioning, whereas running delayed extinction when administered before conditioning. A single conditioning day after running was sufficient to abolish the accelerated extinction observed when all conditioning preceded running. Running approximately doubled adult hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas cocaine had no effect. Results suggest exercise-induced plasticity can facilitate learning that context is no longer associated with drug. However, if drug exposure occurs after exercise, running-induced plasticity may strengthen drug associations. Results provide insight into the interaction between exercise and drug conditioning that could have implications for drug abuse treatments. PMID:21864322

  2. Validation of reference genes from Eucalyptus spp. under different stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Eucalyptus consists of approximately 600 species and subspecies and has a physiological plasticity that allows some species to propagate in different regions of the world. Eucalyptus is a major source of cellulose for paper manufacturing, and its cultivation is limited by weather conditions, particularly water stress and low temperatures. Gene expression studies using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) require reference genes, which must have stable expression to facilitate the comparison of the results from analyses using different species, tissues, and treatments. Such studies have been limited in eucalyptus. Results Eucalyptus globulus Labill, Eucalyptus urograndis (hybrid from Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake X Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex-Maiden) and E. uroglobulus (hybrid from E. urograndis X E. globulus) were subjected to different treatments, including water deficiency and stress recovery, low temperatures, presence or absence of light, and their respective controls. Except for treatment with light, which examined the seedling hypocotyl or apical portion of the stem, the expression analyses were conducted in the apical and basal parts of the stem. To select the best pair of genes, the bioinformatics tools GeNorm and NormFinder were compared. Comprehensive analyses that did not differentiate between species, treatments, or tissue types, showed that IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase), SAND (SAND protein), ACT (actin), and A-Tub (α-tubulin) genes were the most stable. IDH was the most stable gene in all of the treatments. Conclusion Comparing these results with those of other studies on eucalyptus, we concluded that five genes are stable in different species and experimental conditions: IDH, SAND, ACT, A-Tub, and UBQ (ubiquitin). It is usually recommended a minimum of two reference genes is expression analysis; therefore, we propose that IDH and two others genes among the five identified genes in this study

  3. Using Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emission to Determine Solar Flare Accelerated Particle Spectra and Composition and the Conditions Within the Flare Magnetic Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    computer codes we have cal- culated the yields of deexcitation lines, escaping neutron spec- tra and the neutron capture line for monoenergetic ...USING GAMMA-RAYAND NEUTRON EMISSION TO DETERMINE SOLAR FLARE ACCELERATED PARTICLE SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION AND THE CONDITIONS WITHIN THE FLARE...California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA Received 2006 May 4; accepted 2006 August 23 ABSTRACT The measurable quantities associated with -ray and neutron

  4. Maxwell-Faraday Stresses in Electromagnetic Fields and the Self-Force on a Uniformly Accelerating Point Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The physical analysis of a uniformly accelerating point charge provides a rich problem to explore in advanced courses in electrodynamics and relativity since it brings together fundamental concepts in relation to electromagnetic radiation, Einstein's equivalence principle and the inertial mass of field energy in ways that reveal subtleties in each…

  5. Facilitating actions of an AMPA receptor potentiator upon extinction of contextually conditioned fear response in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Sekiguchi, Masayuki

    2011-01-25

    Extinction of conditioned fear response is thought to be a biological process underlying exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We have previously reported that an AMPA receptor potentiator, 4-[2-(phenylsulfonylamino)ethylthio]-2,6-difluorophenoxyacetamide (PEPA), facilitates extinction of fear memory formed through contextual fear conditioning in mice that had never been exposed to experimental stress. On the other hand, recent findings suggest that the fear extinction is impaired in stressed rats or mice. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether PEPA facilitates impaired extinction of fear in stressed mice. For this purpose, mice were applied stress (a 2h restraint, a 20min forced swim, and ether inhalation), and contextual fear conditioning was carried out 7 days later. After 1-3 days of conditioning, mice were re-exposed to the context for 6min, and behavioral freezing response was measured. The time mice spent frozen decreased following every extinction session, and the decrease was remarkably slower in the stressed mice than in control non-stressed mice. PEPA (3, 10, 30mg/kg body weight) or vehicle was intraperitoneally administered into stressed mice once before the first extinction session. The significant decrease of the freezing response in the extinction sessions was only seen in the 30mg/kg PEPA-administered stressed mice, compared with vehicle-administered stressed mice. A similar extent of decrease in the freezing response in the extinction sessions was observed in the PEPA-administered (30mg/kg) and d-cycloserine-administered (30mg/kg) mice. These results suggest that PEPA facilitates extinction of contextual fear in stressed mice.

  6. Simulated pond-aquifer interactions under natural and stressed conditions near Snake Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model was used to simulate pond-aquifer interactions under natural and stressed conditions near Snake Pond, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Simulation results show that pond-bottom hydraulic conductivity, which represents the degree of hydraulic connection between the pond and the aquifer, is an important control on these interactions. As this parameter was incrementally increased from 10 to 350 feet per day, the rate of ground-water inflow into the pond under natural conditions increased by about 250 percent, the associated residence times of water in the pond decreased by about 50 percent, and ground-water inflow to the pond shifted closer to the pond shore. Most ground-water inflow (90 to 98 percent) was in the upper model layer, which corresponded to shallow, near-shore areas of the pond, over the entire range of pond-bottom hydraulic conductivity. Ground-water flow paths into the pond became more vertical, the contributing area to the pond became larger, and the pond captured water from greater depths in the aquifer as the hydraulic conductivity of the pond bottom was increased. The pond level, however, remained nearly constant, and regional ground-water levels and gradients differed little over the range of pond-bottom hydraulic conductivity, indicating that calibrated models with similar head solutions can have different pond-aquifer interaction characteristics. Hydrologic stresses caused by a simulated plume-containment system that specifies the extraction and injection of large volumes of ground water near the pond increased the pond level by about 0.4 foot and ground-water inflow rates into the pond by about 25 percent. Several factors related to the operation of the simulated containment system are affected by the hydraulic conductivity of the pond bottom. With increasing pond-bottom hydraulic conductivity, the amount of injected water that flows into Snake Pond increased and the amount of water recirculated between extraction and injection wells

  7. Compulsive drug-seeking behavior and relapse. Neuroadaptation, stress, and conditioning factors.

    PubMed

    Weiss, F; Ciccocioppo, R; Parsons, L H; Katner, S; Liu, X; Zorrilla, E P; Valdez, G R; Ben-Shahar, O; Angeletti, S; Richter, R R

    2001-06-01

    The development of addiction and vulnerability to relapse following withdrawal is proposed to be the result of neuroadaptive processes within the central nervous system that oppose the acute reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse. These changes lead to impairment in the mechanisms that mediate positive reinforcement and the emergence of affective changes such as anxiety, dysphoria, and depression during withdrawal. Considerable evidence exists implicating perturbations in DA and 5-HT transmission in the nucleus accumbens--neurochemical systems that are activated by cocaine and ethanol self-administration and deficient during withdrawal--as potential substrates for these affective changes. In addition, growing evidence suggests that enhanced CRF release in the central nucleus of the amygdala represents a mechanism underlying the anxiogenic and stress-like consequences of withdrawal that are common to all drugs of abuse. A growing body of evidence also implicates dysregulation of the non-neuroendocrine CRF stress system within the central nucleus of the amygdala as a common factor in the anxiogenic and aversive consequences of withdrawal from drugs of abuse. Moreover, a possible link may exist between long-lasting abnormalities in CRF function in the CeA and vulnerability to relapse during protracted abstinence. Another presumably critical element contributing to the chronic relapsing nature of drug addiction is the learned responses to drug-related stimuli. The long-lasting efficacy of drug- and alcohol-associated contextual stimuli in eliciting drug-seeking behavior in animal models of relapse resembles the endurance of conditioned cue reactivity and cue-induced cocaine craving in humans and confirms a significant role of learning factors in the long-lasting addictive potential of cocaine. With cocaine, D1-dependent neural mechanisms within the medial prefrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala may be important substrates for the motivating effects of drug

  8. Timing of favorable conditions, competition and fertility interact to govern recruitment of invasive Chinese tallow tree in stressful environments.

    PubMed

    Gabler, Christopher A; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    The rate of new exotic recruitment following removal of adult invaders (reinvasion pressure) influences restoration outcomes and costs but is highly variable and poorly understood. We hypothesize that broad variation in average reinvasion pressure of Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree, a major invader) arises from differences among habitats in spatiotemporal availability of realized recruitment windows. These windows are periods of variable duration long enough to permit establishment given local environmental conditions. We tested this hypothesis via a greenhouse mesocosm experiment that quantified how the duration of favorable moisture conditions prior to flood or drought stress (window duration), competition and nutrient availability influenced Triadica success in high stress environments. Window duration influenced pre-stress seedling abundance and size, growth during stress and final abundance; it interacted with other factors to affect final biomass and germination during stress. Stress type and competition impacted final size and biomass, plus germination, mortality and changes in size during stress. Final abundance also depended on competition and the interaction of window duration, stress type and competition. Fertilization interacted with competition and stress to influence biomass and changes in height, respectively, but did not affect Triadica abundance. Overall, longer window durations promoted Triadica establishment, competition and drought (relative to flood) suppressed establishment, and fertilization had weak effects. Interactions among factors frequently produced different effects in specific contexts. Results support our 'outgrow the stress' hypothesis and show that temporal availability of abiotic windows and factors that influence growth rates govern Triadica recruitment in stressful environments. These findings suggest that native seed addition can effectively suppress superior competitors in stressful environments. We also describe

  9. Drought-induced oxidative stress in Canarian laurel forest tree species growing under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Tapia, Carolina; Antolín, M Carmen

    2007-10-01

    We studied photoprotection and antioxidative protection in the three major species of the Canarian laurel forest (Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco, Persea indica (L.) K. Spreng and Myrica faya Aiton). Trees were exposed to drought under controlled conditions by withholding water until leaf relative water content (RWC) reached 50-55%. Drought reduced photosynthetic rate (P(N)) and was associated with decreased quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) electron transport and increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in L. azorica and M. faya, but did not increase NPQ in P. indica. Drought-treated trees of L. azorica had the highest de-epoxidation state (DPS) of the xanthophyll cycle and the highest zeaxanthin (Z) concentration, suggesting that this species had more effective photoprotective mechanisms than M. faya and P. indica. Moreover, beta-carotene remained unaltered in L. azorica trees during drought, suggesting that the chloroplasts of this species are better protected against oxidative stress than those of M. faya and P. indica. Increased antioxidation by ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase in L. azorica removed activated oxygen species (AOS) generated during drought treatment. Although M. faya was able to increase its energy dissipation rate by forming Z and thus increasing the DPS of the xanthophyll cycle, it did not respond to drought-induced oxidative stress with the result that beta-carotene degradation occurred. Persea indica did not activate an energy dissipation mechanism in response to drought treatment, hence formation of AOS was likely high in the drought-treated trees. In general, L. azorica was most resistant and P. indica most sensitive to photoinhibition and oxidative stress during drought.

  10. Optimizing Leaf Stomatal Conductance for Maximum Carbon Gain Under Salt Stressed and Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Manzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how plants adapt to different stresses such as droughts, hypoxic or hyper-saline conditions is necessary to progress on the broader problem of how carbon and water exchange rates between the biosphere and atmosphere react to a changing climate. In this work, the effects of increased salinity on photosynthesis, stomatal and mesophyll conductances under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions are explored. A model based on stomatal optimization principles, according to which plants maximize carbon gain at a given water loss at the leaf scale, is generalized to include mesophyll conductance and its dependence on water salinity. The optimization problem is solved for both a non-linear and a linear biochemical demand function and both approaches are consistent with reported gas-exchange measurements in fresh water and in salt stressed conditions. It is shown here that an increase in salt stress causes an increase in the cost of water (and reduced stomatal conductance) for the plant as it does under water stress conditions. However, these reductions in photosynthetic rates observed under increased salt stress conditions cannot be attributed to limitation of CO2 diffusion alone since salt stress did reduce the photosynthetic capacity of plants by 30-40%.

  11. Impact of growth conditions on susceptibility of five microbial species to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Brändle, Nathalie; Zehnder, Matthias; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2008-05-01

    The effects of different growth conditions on the susceptibility of five taxa to alkaline stress were investigated. Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176, Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 were grown as planktonic cells, allowed to adhere to dentin for 24 hours, grown as monospecies or multispecies biofilms on dentin under anaerobic conditions with a serum-enriched nutrient supply at 37 degrees C for 5 days. In addition, suspended biofilm microorganisms and 5-day old planktonic multispecies cultures were used. Microbial recovery upon direct exposure to saturated calcium hydroxide solution (pH 12.5) for 10 and 100 minutes was compared with control exposure to physiologic saline. Planktonic microorganisms were most susceptible; only E. faecalis and C. albicans survived in saturated solution for 10 minutes, the latter also for 100 minutes. Dentin adhesion was the major factor in improving the resistance of E. faecalis and A. naeslundii to calcium hydroxide, whereas the multispecies context in a biofilm was the major factor in promoting resistance of S. sobrinus to the disinfectant. In contrast, the C. albicans response to calcium hydroxide was not influenced by the growth condition. Adherence to dentin and interspecies interactions in a biofilm appear to differentially affect the sensitivity of microbial species to calcium hydroxide.

  12. Trauma and Conditional Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annjeanette; Garroutte, Eva M.; Croy, Calvin; Jervis, Lori L.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities. Method Data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project, a cross-sectional population-based survey completed between 1997 and 2000. This study focused on 1,967 participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for trauma exposure. Traumas were grouped into interpersonal, non-interpersonal, witnessed, and “trauma to close others” categories. Analyses examined distribution of worst traumas, conditional rates of PTSD following exposure, and distributions of PTSD cases deriving from these events. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations of lifetime PTSD with trauma type. Results Overall, 15.9% of those exposed to DSM-IV trauma qualified for lifetime PTSD, a rate comparable to similar U.S. studies. Women were more likely to develop PTSD than were men. The majority (60%) of cases of PTSD among women derived from interpersonal trauma exposure (in particular, sexual and physical abuse); among men, cases were more evenly distributed across trauma categories. Conclusions Previous research has demonstrated higher rates of both trauma exposure and PTSD in American Indian samples compared to other Americans. This study shows that conditional rates of PTSD are similar to those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the elevated prevalence of this disorder in American Indian populations is largely due to higher rates of trauma exposure. PMID:23135256

  13. Microcystin production and regulation under nutrient stress conditions in toxic microcystis strains.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Juliana S M; Giani, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    Microcystin is a common and well-known cyanobacterial toxin whose intracellular role is still under investigation. Increasing knowledge on microcystin gene expression and regulation can contribute to the understanding of its putative cellular function. In this work, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the transcriptional response of the mcyD gene to nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) and phosphorus limitation in two toxic Microcystis strains. The existence of a direct correlation between transcripts of mcyD and ntcA genes was also identified. In previous studies, NtcA (global nitrogen regulator) has been described as a potential component in the control of microcystin biosynthesis. This research showed that stress agents linked to nutrient deprivation could lead to a significant increase of microcystin production in both strains studied. The more toxic strain proved to be more resistant to nutrient limitation. The similar outcomes of mcyD regulation observed for all nutrients suggest that this response can be linked to oxidative stress of cells undergoing adverse growth conditions.

  14. Takotsubo syndrome (stress cardiomyopathy): an intriguing clinical condition in search of its identity.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Greco, Cesare; Vitale, Cristiana; Rosano, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Carlo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a relatively frequent clinical entity presenting typically as an acute coronary syndrome in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease and characterized angiographically by transient left ventricular systolic dysfunction, sparing the basal segments of the left ventricle ("apical ballooning"). Takotsubo syndrome characteristically affects peri- or postmenopausal women, albeit recent series show that men also are at risk. Takotsubo syndrome is characteristically triggered by severe emotional or physical stress, which suggests a pathogenic role for increased sympathetic activity leading to myocardial perfusion abnormalities and ventricular dysfunction. The reasons why severe emotional and physical stress result in the development of takotsubo syndrome in certain individuals but not others is still a matter of speculation, but strongly suggests the existence of predisposing factors/mechanisms in certain subjects. The present article reviews the different factors that can play a role in the development of takotsubo syndrome in different patients. We propose that triggers (ie, emotional stressors, physical stressors, iatrogenic stressors, and neurologic triggers), pathogenic mechanisms (ie, increased catecholamine levels, coronary vasomotor abnormalities leading to myocardial ischemia), and predisposing factors (ie, cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction, comorbidities) all interact in a complex fashion and possibly differently in different patients to cause takotsubo syndrome. Identifying these factors may help in preventing and managing the condition more effectively.

  15. Stress and body condition in a population of largemouth bass: implications for red-sore disease

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1980-09-01

    The body conditions, K = 10/sup 5/(weight, g)/(standard length)/sup 3/, and various hematological characters were examined for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from Par Pond, a reservoir heated by effluent from a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Largemouth bass with K less than 2.0 had significantly lower (P < 0.05) hematocrits, hemoglobin concentrations, total red blood cell counts, total white blood cell counts, and lymphocyte fractions, and significantly higher granulocyte fractions and cortisol concentrations, than those with K greater than 2.0; monocyte, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte fractions were not different between the two K-factor groupings. When data were pooled, all blood variables except the reticulocyte fraction were significantly correlated with K. Hematocrit, the lymphocyte fraction, and cortisol concentration account for 20.5% of the variation in K. These data support a previous hypothesis that elevated water temperature promotes stress. Stress within the Par Pond largemouth bass population may play an important role in the epizootiology of red-sore disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila.

  16. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning and sensitization facilitates extinction-resistant and habituation-resistant fear behaviors in a novel animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Caruso, Michael J; Takahashi, Lorey K

    2012-01-18

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by stress-induced symptoms including exaggerated fear memories, hypervigilance and hyperarousal. However, we are unaware of an animal model that investigates these hallmarks of PTSD especially in relation to fear extinction and habituation. Therefore, to develop a valid animal model of PTSD, we exposed rats to different intensities of footshock stress to determine their effects on either auditory predator odor fear extinction or habituation of fear sensitization. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to acute footshock stress (no shock control, 0.4 mA, or 0.8 mA) immediately prior to auditory fear conditioning training involving the pairing of auditory clicks with a cloth containing cat odor. When presented to the conditioned auditory clicks in the next 5 days of extinction testing conducted in a runway apparatus with a hide box, rats in the two shock groups engaged in higher levels of freezing and head out vigilance-like behavior from the hide box than the no shock control group. This increase in fear behavior during extinction testing was likely due to auditory activation of the conditioned fear state because Experiment 2 demonstrated that conditioned fear behavior was not broadly increased in the absence of the conditioned auditory stimulus. Experiment 3 was then conducted to determine whether acute exposure to stress induces a habituation resistant sensitized fear state. We found that rats exposed to 0.8 mA footshock stress and subsequently tested for 5 days in the runway hide box apparatus with presentations of nonassociative auditory clicks exhibited high initial levels of freezing, followed by head out behavior and culminating in the occurrence of locomotor hyperactivity. In addition, Experiment 4 indicated that without delivery of nonassociative auditory clicks, 0.8 mA footshock stressed rats did not exhibit robust increases in sensitized freezing and locomotor hyperactivity, albeit head out vigilance

  17. Chronic Psychological Stress Disrupted the Composition of the Murine Colonic Microbiota and Accelerated a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yohei; Arase, Sohei; Nagaoka, Noriko; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of psychological stress on the gastrointestinal microbiota is widely recognized. Chronic psychological stress may be associated with increased disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, but the relationships among psychological stress, the gastrointestinal microbiota, and the severity of colitis is not yet fully understood. Here, we examined the impact of 12-week repeated water-avoidance stress on the microbiota of two inbred strains of T cell receptor alpha chain gene knockout mouse (background, BALB/c and C57BL/6) by means of next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In both mouse strains, knockout of the T cell receptor alpha chain gene caused a loss of gastrointestinal microbial diversity and stability. Chronic exposure to repeated water-avoidance stress markedly altered the composition of the colonic microbiota of C57BL/6 mice, but not of BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the relative abundance of genus Clostridium, some members of which produce the toxin phospholipase C, was increased, which was weakly positively associated with colitis severity, suggesting that expansion of specific populations of indigenous pathogens may be involved in the exacerbation of colitis. However, we also found that colitis was not exacerbated in mice with a relatively diverse microbiota even if their colonic microbiota contained an expanded phospholipase C-producing Clostridium population. Exposure to chronic stress also altered the concentration of free immunoglobulin A in colonic contents, which may be related to both the loss of bacterial diversity in the colonic microbiota and the severity of the colitis exacerbation. Together, these results suggest that long-term exposure to psychological stress induces dysbiosis in the immunodeficient mouse in a strain-specific manner and also that alteration of microbial diversity, which may be related to an altered pattern of immunoglobulin secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, might play a crucial role in the

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  19. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  20. A uniaxial stress capacitive dilatometer for high-resolution thermal expansion and magnetostriction under multiextreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Küchler, R; Stingl, C; Gegenwart, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction are directional dependent thermodynamic quantities. For the characterization of novel quantum phases of matter, it is required to study materials under multi-extreme conditions, in particular, down to very low temperatures, in very high magnetic fields or under high pressure. We developed a miniaturized capacitive dilatometer suitable for temperatures down to 20 mK and usage in high magnetic fields, which exerts a large spring force between 40 to 75 N on the sample. This corresponds to a uniaxial stress up to 3 kbar for a sample with cross section of (0.5 mm)(2). We describe design and performance test of the dilatometer which resolves length changes with high resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The miniaturized device can be utilized in any standard cryostat, including dilution refrigerators or the commercial physical property measurement system.

  1. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  2. Comparative profiles of gene expression in leaves and roots of maize seedlings under conditions of salt stress and the removal of salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qing, Dong-Jin; Lu, Hai-Feng; Li, Ning; Dong, Hai-Tao; Dong, Deng-Feng; Li, You-Zhi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the transcriptional profiles of leaves and roots of three-leaf stage seedlings of the maize inbred line YQ7-96 under conditions of salt stress (100 mM NaCl) and removal of salt stress (RSS). A total of 296 genes were regulated specifically by the stress, of which 206 were specific to leaves and 90 were specific to roots. Stress-regulated genes were classified into eight and seven expression patterns for leaves and roots, respectively. There were 60 genes which were regulated specifically by RSS, 27 of which were specific to leaves and 33 specific to roots. No genes were found to be co-regulated in tissues and to be regulated commonly by the stress and RSS. It can be concluded that (i) at the early stage of the stress, transcriptional responses are directed at water deficit in maize leaves but at both water deficit and Na+ accumulation in roots; (ii) at the later stage, the responses in leaves and roots result from dual effects of both water deficit and Na+ accumulation; (iii) the polyamine metabolic pathway is an important linker for the co-ordination between leaves and roots to accomplish the tolerance of the whole maize plant to the stress; (iv) the stress can lead to genomic restructuring and nuclear transport in maize; (v) maize leaves are distinct from roots in terms of molecular mechanisms for responses to and growth recovery from the stress; and (vi) mechanisms for the maize responses to the stress differ from those for their growth recovery during RSS.

  3. Alkaline phosphatase activity related to phosphorus stress of microphytoplankton in different trophic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivančić, Ingrid; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Godrijan, Jelena; Djakovac, Tamara; Marić Pfannkuchen, Daniela; Korlević, Marino; Gašparović, Blaženka; Najdek, Mirjana

    2016-08-01

    The northern Adriatic (NA) is a favorable basin for studying the adaptive strategies of plankton to a variety of conditions along the steep gradients of environmental parameters over the year. Earlier studies identified phosphorus (P)-limitation as one of the key stresses within the NA that shape the biological response in terms of biodiversity and metabolic adjustments. A wide range of reports supports the notion that P-limitation is a globally important phenomenon in aquatic ecosystems. In this study P stress of marine microphytoplankton was determined at species level along a trophic gradient in the NA. In P-limitation all species with considerable contributions to the diatom community expressed alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), compared to only a few marginal dinoflagellate species. Nevertheless, APA expressing species did not always dominate the phytoplankton community, suggesting that APA is also an important strategy for species to survive and maintain active metabolism outside of their mass abundances. A symbiotic relationship could be supposed for diatoms that did not express APA themselves and probably benefited from APA expressed by attached bacteria. APA was not expressed by any microphytoplankton species during the autumn when P was not limiting, while most of the species did express APA during the P-limitation. This suggests that APA expression is regulated by orthophosphate availability. The methods employed in this study allowed the microscopic detection of APA for each microphytoplankton cell with simultaneous morphologic/taxonomic analysis. This approach uncovered a set of strategies to compete in P-limited conditions within the marine microphytoplankton community. This study confirms the role of P-limitation as a shaping factor in marine ecosystems.

  4. Early postnatal stress alters the extinction of context-dependent conditioned fear in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Machiko; Togashi, Hiroko; Konno, Kohtaro; Koseki, Hiroyo; Hirata, Riki; Izumi, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Taku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2008-05-01

    Fear extinction is hypothesized to be a learning process based on a new inhibitory memory. The present study was conducted to elucidate the effect of early postnatal stress on the extinction of context-dependent fear memory in adult rats, with a focus on the serotonergic system. Extinction was estimated by the expression of freezing behavior during repeated extinction trials (i.e., repeated exposure to contextual fear conditioning) on consecutive days. The decrease in fear expression was attenuated in adult rats that had been subjected to footshock (FS) at the third postnatal week (3wFS), but not in those exposed to footshock at the second postnatal week (2wFS). The decreased attenuation of freezing behavior observed in 3wFS was abolished by repeated treatment with the partial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist D-cycloserine (15 mg/kg, i.p., for 4 days), which has been shown to facilitate cue-dependent extinction. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor agonist tandospirone (1 mg/kg, i.p., for 4 days) prevented the expression of freezing behavior in 3wFS, whereas diazepam treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p., for 4 days) in 3wFS did not. These results suggest that exposure to early postnatal stress at the third week is responsible for attenuating extinction of contextual fear conditioning and is mediated by a serotonergic 5-HT(1A) receptor mechanism. In other words, exposure to traumatic events during the early postnatal period might precipitate long-lasting alterations in synaptic function that underlie extinction processes of context-dependent fear memory.

  5. Severe early life stress hampers spatial learning and neurogenesis, but improves hippocampal synaptic plasticity and emotional learning under high-stress conditions in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Charlotte A; Soeters, Heleen; Audureau, Nathalie; Vermunt, Lisa; van Hasselt, Felisa N; Manders, Erik M M; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J; Krugers, Harm

    2010-05-12

    Early life stress increases the risk for developing stress-related pathologies later in life. Recent studies in rats suggest that mild early life stress, rather than being overall unfavorable, may program the hippocampus such that it is optimally adapted to a stressful context later in life. Here, we tested whether this principle of "adaptive programming" also holds under severely adverse early life conditions, i.e., 24 h of maternal deprivation (MD), a model for maternal neglect. In young adult male rats subjected to MD on postnatal day 3, we observed reduced levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis as measured by cell proliferation, cell survival, and neuronal differentiation. Also, mature dentate granule cells showed a change in their dendritic morphology that was most noticeable in the proximal part of the dendritic tree. Lasting structural changes due to MD were paralleled by impaired water maze acquisition but did not affect long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus. Importantly, in the presence of high levels of the stress hormone corticosterone, even long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of MD animals was facilitated. In addition to this, contextual learning in a high-stress environment was enhanced in MD rats. These morphological, electrophysiological, and behavioral observations show that even a severely adverse early life environment does not evolve into overall impaired hippocampal functionality later in life. Rather, adversity early in life can prepare the organism to perform optimally under conditions associated with high corticosteroid levels in adulthood.

  6. Differential impact of the first and second wave of a stress response on subsequent fear conditioning in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Antov, Martin I; Wölk, Christoph; Stockhorst, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    Stress is a process of multiple neuroendocrine changes over time. We examined effects of the first-wave and second-wave stress response on acquisition and immediate extinction of differential fear conditioning, assessed by skin conductance responses. In Experiment 1, we placed acquisition either close to the (second-wave) salivary cortisol peak, induced by a psychosocial stressor (experimental group, EG), or after non-stressful pretreatment (control group, CG). Contrary to predictions, groups did not differ in differential responding. In the EG only, mean differential responding was negatively correlated with cortisol increases. In Experiment 2, we placed conditioning near the first-wave stress response, induced by a cold pressor test (CPT), or after a warm-water condition (CG). CPT-stress increased extinction resistance. Moreover, acquisition performance after CPT was positively correlated with first-wave blood pressure increases. Data suggest that mediators of the first-wave stress response enhance fear maintenance whereas second-wave cortisol responsivity to stress might attenuate fear learning.

  7. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing.

  8. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning activates the amygdalar cholecystokinin system in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ting; Yang, Shengchang; Wen, Di; Sun, Qiming; Li, Yingmin; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a debilitating psychiatric disease characterized by invasive and persistent fear memories-induced stressful experience, is associated with numerous changes in neuroendocrine function. Here, we investigated whether PTSD-like symptoms are associated with changes in the cholecystokinin (CCK) system in the basolateral amygdala. We developed an animal model of PTSD using multiple foot shocks at 1.1 mA. The resulting conditioned fear response was severe (>80% freezing) and maintained for at least 28 days. The stress-associated neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine, and corticotrophin-releasing hormone were elevated at 1 day after foot shock. CCK immunoreactivity and extracellular concentration as well as the expression of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) increased progressively for 28 days following foot shock. Taken together, these results suggest that stress-induced activation of the CCK system in the BLA, which may contribute toward the development of PTSD-like symptoms.

  9. The Effect of Maternal Relaxation Training on Reactivity of Non-Stress Test, Basal Fetal Heart Rate, and Number of Fetal Heart Accelerations: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Rafiee, Bahare; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relaxation-training, as an anxiety-reducer intervention, plays an important role in fetal health. The present study aimed to analyze the effect of maternal relaxation on stress test (NST), basal fetal heart rate, and number of fetal heart accelerations. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 84 pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups of teaching relaxation and control groups in 2012. In the intervention group, 60-90 minute classes were held every week lasting for 4 weeks. Besides, home practice charts were given to the mothers and researchers controlled the home practices by phone calls every week. The control group received routine prenatal care. In the 4th week, NST was performed in the intervention group 30 minutes before and after the 4th session. In the control group, NST was done in the 4th week. The quantitative variables in the two groups were compared through ANOVA and Chi-square test. Results: The results of paired t-test showed that relaxation could improve the NST results (P=0.01). Mean and standard deviation of basal fetal heart rate was 138.95±8.18 before the intervention and 133.07±6.9 after the intervention. Paired t-test also showed that relaxation reduced the basal fetal heart rate (P=0.001). Mean and standard deviation of the number of fetal heart accelerations was 1.5±0.8 before the intervention and 2.2±0.9 after it. The results of paired t-test also showed that relaxation increased the number of fetal heart accelerations (P=0.001). Conclusions: Relaxation could improve the NST results, reduce the basal fetal heart rate, and increase the number of fetal heart accelerations. Therefore, relaxation is recommended during pregnancy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012072810418N1 PMID:25553334

  10. Lumen irregularity dominates the relationship between mechanical stress condition, fibrous-cap thickness, and lumen curvature in carotid atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Sadat, Umar; Ji, Guangyu; Zhu, Chengcheng; Young, Victoria E; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2011-03-01

    High mechanical stress condition over the fibrous cap (FC) has been widely accepted as a contributor to plaque rupture. The relationships between the stress, lumen curvature, and FC thickness have not been explored in detail. In this study, we investigate lumen irregularity-dependent relationships between mechanical stress conditions, local FC thickness (LT(FC)), and lumen curvature (LC(lumen)). Magnetic resonance imaging slices of carotid plaque from 100 patients with delineated atherosclerotic components were used. Two-dimensional structure-only finite element simulations were performed for the mechanical analysis, and maximum principal stress (stress-P₁) at all integral nodes along the lumen was obtained. LT(FC) and LC(lumen) were computed using the segmented contour. The lumen irregularity (L-δir) was defined as the difference between the largest and the smallest lumen curvature. The results indicated that the relationship between stress-P₁, LT(FC), and LC(lumen) is largely dependent on L-δir. When L-δir ≥ .31 (irregular lumen), stress-P₁ strongly correlated with lumen curvature and had a weak/no correlation with local FC thickness, and in 73.4% of magnetic resonance (MR) slices, the critical stress (maximum of stress-P₁ over the diseased region) was found at the site where the lumen curvature was large. When L-δir ≤ 0.28 (relatively round lumen), stress-P₁ showed a strong correlation with local FC thickness but weak/no correlation with lumen curvature, and in 71.7% of MR slices, the critical stress was located at the site of minimum FC thickness. Using lumen irregularity as a method of identifying vulnerable plaque sites by referring to the lumen shape is a novel and simple method, which can be used for mechanics-based plaque vulnerability assessment.

  11. Living under stressful conditions: Fish life history strategies across environmental gradients in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, Nils; Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The life history strategies of fishes can be defined by specific combinations of demographic traits that influence species performances depending on environmental features. Hence, the constraints imposed by the local conditions restrict the range of successful strategies by excluding species poorly adapted. In the present study, we compared the demographic strategies of fish caught in 47 estuaries of the North East Atlantic coast, aiming to determine the specific attributes of resident species and test for changes in trait associations along the environmental gradients. Eight demographic traits were considered to project our findings within a conceptual triangular model, composed on three endpoint strategies: (i) periodic (large size, long generation time, high fecundity); (ii) opportunistic (small size, short generation time, high reproductive effort); and (iii) equilibrium (low fecundity, large egg size, parental care). We demonstrated that various life history strategies co-exist in estuaries, but equilibrium species were scarce and restricted to euhaline open-water. Resident species form a specialised assemblage adapted to high spatiotemporal variability of estuarine conditions, i.e. opportunistic attributes associated with parental care. Even with these singular attributes, our findings revealed changes in distribution of resident species across the estuarine gradients linked to their life history traits. Among other patterns, the diversity of life history strategies significantly decreased from euhaline to oligohaline areas and along gradient of human disturbances. These trends were associated with a convergence of species traits toward short generation times, suggesting that long-lived species with late maturation are more severely impacted by disturbance and environmental stress.

  12. Transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to oxidative stress mimicking environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia M; He, Qiang; Xavier, António V; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Inês A C; Louro, Ricardo O

    2008-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defense pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that SRB are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. Three hundred and seven genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism was up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defense response concentrated on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down-regulation of the ferric uptake regulator operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the peroxide-sensing regulator operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  13. Effects of environmental stress on the condition of Littorina littorea along the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands).

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Heidi; De Wolf, Hans; Backeljau, Thierry; Blust, Ronny

    2007-04-15

    The condition of the periwinkle Littorina littorea, expressed in terms of its shell morphology, reproductive impairment (i.e. female sterility/intersex, male penis shedding), trematode infestation load, lipid reserves and dry/wet weight ratio, was determined in function of environmental stress along the polluted Western and relatively clean Eastern Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands). The upstream increasing pollution and decreasing salinity levels along the Western Scheldt estuary (Fig. 1) are reflected in the dry/wet weight ratio and lipid content of the periwinkles. Compared to the Eastern Scheldt, female intersex (i.e. indicator of TBT pollution) and sterility occurred more frequently in the Western Scheldt estuary, while male penis shedding was even restricted to the latter estuary. The highest population intersex and sterility incidence was found near the harbour of Vlissingen and reflects potential nautical activities. The number of trematode infested periwinkles did not differ between both estuaries, although local sampling site differences were detected within each estuary, reflecting the complex interactions that exist among parasites, hosts and the local environment. Finally, both estuaries were maximally discriminated from each other based on the shell weight of the periwinkles using a canonical discriminant analysis. Periwinkles with the heaviest shells were found in the Western Scheldt estuary and may reflect growth rate or structural population differences caused by the less favourable living conditions in the Western Scheldt estuary.

  14. Exposure to tebuconazol in rice field and laboratory conditions induces oxidative stress in carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Toni, Cândida; Loro, Vania Lucia; Santi, Adriana; de Menezes, Charlene Cavalheiro; Cattaneo, Roberta; Clasen, Bárbara Estevão; Zanella, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides can have an effect on the biochemical and physiological functions of living organisms. The changes seen in fish and their response to pesticides can be used as an example for vertebrate toxicity. In this study, carp fish (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to different concentrations of tebuconazol fungicide, by rice field (31.95 μg/L) and laboratory (33.47 and 36.23 μg/L) conditional testing, during a 7 day period. Parameters such thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels (TBARS), protein carbonyl, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and acetylcholinesterase activities were studied, using the liver, brain and white muscle of the fish. The field experiment showed that the TBARS levels were increased in all the analyzed tissues. Similarly, the protein carbonyl of the liver and the brain AChE activity increased after 7 days. The laboratory experiment demonstrated that the TBARS levels in the liver were increased in both of the concentration tests. TBARS levels in the muscle increased only by the lowest test concentration. On the other hand, the protein carbonyl was increased only by the highest concentration. The results indicate that the tebuconazol exposure from the field and laboratory conditions directly affected the health of the fish, showing the occurrence of oxidative stress.

  15. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  16. Effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin under conditions of high production and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lotan, E; Sturman, H; Weller, J I; Ezra, E

    1993-05-01

    The effect of bST injection on milk production of Israeli Holsteins was tested under conditions of mean production > 9000 kg/yr and climatic stress; mean maximum and minimum summer temperatures are 38 and 25 degrees C, respectively, in the Jordan Valley, located 200 m below sea level. In 1989, 111 cows were injected, and 115 cows were recorded as controls. In 1990, 108 cows were injected, and 93 cows were included as controls. Fifty-nine of the cows injected in 1990 were also injected in 1989. Production records were corrected for parity, calving month, days to first injection, and days in milk. Injection with bST increased total lactation milk production by 12%, fat production by 15%, and protein production by 13%. Injection also resulted in slight increases in fat and protein percentages. Daily milk production during the injection period was increased by 4.4 kg. Injection during the previous lactation slightly decreased production of cows injected during the following lactation. Advancing the commencement of injection from the 4th to the 2nd mo in milk did not affect total lactation production. Weight gains and dry matter intake were higher for injected cows, but body condition score was higher for the control group. Injection had no discernible effect on fertility variables.

  17. Osmosis-induced swelling of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in constant total stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcke, E.; Marien, A.; Smets, S.; Li, X.; Mokni, N.; Olivella, S.; Sillen, X.

    2010-11-01

    In geological disposal conditions, contact of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste, which contains high amounts of the hygroscopic and highly soluble NaNO 3, with groundwater will result in water uptake and swelling of the waste, and in subsequent leaching of the embedded NaNO 3 and radionuclides. The swelling of and the NaNO 3 leaching from non-radioactive Eurobitum samples, comprised between two stainless steel filters and in contact with 0.1 M KOH, was studied in restricted (semi-confined) swelling conditions, i.e. under a constant total stress, or counterpressure, of 2.2, 3.3, or 4.4 MPa ( i.e. oedometer conditions). Four tests were stopped after hydration times between 800 and 1500 days, and the samples were analyzed by micro-focus X-ray Computer Tomography (μCT) and by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The complete set of data enabled a consistent interpretation of the observations and lead to an improved understanding of the phenomenology of the water uptake, swelling, and NaNO 3 leaching in restricted swelling conditions. Under the studied conditions, the bituminous matrix surrounding the NaNO 3 crystals and pores with NaNO 3 solution behaved as a highly efficient semi-permeable membrane, i.e. osmotic processes occurred. In the main part of the leached layers, a high average NaNO 3 concentration and related to this a high osmotic pressure prevailed, explaining why in the studied range the swelling was not measurably affected by the counterpressure. At the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer was formed, contributing to the slow release of NaNO 3 compared to the water uptake rate. A fully coupled Chemo-Hydro-Mechanical (CHM) constitutive model has been developed that integrates the key processes involved and that reproduces satisfactorily the results; this is presented in another work. Combination of the experimental and the modelling study allow to conclude that under semi

  18. Modulation of antioxidant machinery in α-tocopherol-enriched transgenic Brassica juncea plants tolerant to abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Singh, Preeti; Sardar, Meryam; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-10-01

    The antioxidant machinery in plants consists of several components with unique or overlapping functions that combat the deleterious production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by stress conditions. Tocopherols are a group of powerful antioxidants having additional roles in signaling and gene expression, with α-tocopherol being the most potent form. In the present study, we used wild-type (WT) and α-tocopherol-enriched transgenic (TR) Brassica juncea plants grown under salt, heavy metal, and osmotic stress to compare their relative tolerance to these stresses and to assess the effects of increased α-tocopherol content on the other antioxidative enzymes and molecules. The oxidative damage caused by induced stress was lower in TR plants compared to WT plants as assessed by their higher relative water content and lower electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde content as well as H(2)O(2) accumulation. Lesser superoxide and H(2)O(2) accumulation was also observed by histochemical staining in TR seedlings exposed to stress. Though no significant differences were evident under normal growth conditions, TR plants showed higher activities and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase than WT plants under similar stress conditions. A decrease in ascorbate and glutathione content with marginally higher reductive ratios of these compounds was also observed in TR plants under the stress conditions. Our findings implicate the role of higher α-tocopherol levels in conferring better tolerance against salt, heavy metal, and osmotic stresses and also establish the existence of interplay between this lipid-soluble antioxidant and other water-soluble components of plant antioxidant defense.

  19. Selection of reference genes for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction normalization in Brassica napus under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yu; Fang, Hedi; Shi, Haifeng; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Tan, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    Data normalization is essential for reliable output of quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, as the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s), whose expression might be influenced by exogenous treatments in plant tissues, could cause misinterpretation of results. To date, no systematic studies on reference genes have been performed in stressed Brassica napus. In this study, we investigated the expression variations of nine candidate reference genes in 40 samples of B. napus leaves subjected to various exogenous treatments. Parallel analyses by geNorm and NormFinder revealed that optimal reference genes differed across the different sets of samples. The best-ranked reference genes were PP2A and TIP41 for salt stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for heavy metal (Cr(6+)) stress, PP2A and UBC21 for drought stress, F-box and SAND for cold stress, F-box and ZNF for salicylic acid stress, TIP41, ACT7, and PP2A for methyl jasmonate stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for abscisic acid stress, and TIP41, UBC21, and PP2A for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum stress. Two newly employed reference genes, TIP41 and PP2A, showed better performances, suggesting their suitability in multiple conditions. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes, the expression patterns of BnWRKY40 and BnMKS1 were studied in parallel. This study is the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in B. napus, an agriculturally important crop, under different stress conditions. The results will contribute toward more accurate and widespread use of qRT-PCR in gene analysis of the genus Brassica.

  20. Predicted limits for evaporative cooling in heat stress relief of cattle in warm conditions.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2009-10-01

    Evaporative cooling of ambient air (EC) is a main path for heat stress relief in cattle kept in the shade of semi-confining structures. Evaporative cooling is particularly efficient in hot dry climates. We examined the potential of EC for heat stress relief in cattle in moderately warm and humid climates. The feasibility was examined by the reduction in ambient temperature (T(ac)) produced by EC as a function of ambient temperature (T(a)) and humidity (RH(a)). A data set (n = 139) of temperature and relative humidity (RH) produced by EC over a range of air temperature (25 to 50 degrees C) and humidity (10 to 70% RH) was analyzed by polynomial second order regressions. The analyses produced equations for the relations between ambient air temperature and ambient humidity and between respective conditions in air cooled by EC (T(c), RH(c)). Linear regressions were computed for a narrower temperature range (30 to 40 degrees C). In all equations, R(2) were >0.94 and regression terms were statistically significant. The T(ac) obtained by EC diminished by 0.3 degrees C per degrees C rise in T(a), indicating a reduced efficiency of EC with rising T(a). The T(ac) obtained by EC also was markedly reduced by rising ambient humidity and increased by RH(c). An attempt to sustain T(ac) at greater RH(a) by allowing a rise in RH(c) would only restore 2/3 of the reduction in T(ac) because the coefficient for the RH(a) effect on T(ac) is 1.5 larger than that of RH(c). The T(ac) attained by EC partially depends on the humidity in the cooled environment. Elevated RH(c) may impede animal skin and respiratory evaporative heat loss and lead to moisture accumulation in bedding. If the upper desired limit for RH(c) is 70%, at RH(a) smaller than 45% (typical for hot-dry environments) the T(ac) is larger than 7.5 degrees C, at RH(a) greater than 55% T(ac) is reduced to less than 5 degrees C, and at RH(a) of 57.5 to 60% T(ac) is about 2.5 degrees C. Coupling EC with forced air movement when T

  1. Photosystem II stress tolerance in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii under space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertalan, Ivo; Esposito, Dania; Torzillo, Giuseppe; Faraloni, Cecilia; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2007-09-01

    Photosynthesis was established on the earth 3.5 billion years ago. Due to the absence of the ozone layer in the early atmosphere it was most likely adapted to the presence of ionizing radiation continuously emitted by solar and stellar flares. That complex radiation spectrum comprises protons, alpha particles, heavy charged particle-HZE, electrons, X-ray and neutrons. Such spectrum has a significant impact on biological systems which capture light energy for e.g. photosynthesis. Oxygenic photosynthesis of plants, algae and cyanobacteria initiates at the level of photosystem II (PSII), a multisubunit protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane inside chloroplasts. PSII uses sunlight to power the unique photo-induced oxidation of water to atmospheric oxygen which is indispensable for most life forms. It is an especially sensitive component if exposed to space radiation and thus an important target for research aimed at improving bioregenerative life-support systems. The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a long standing model organism for photosynthesis research. It was exposed to ionizing radiation in the ESA facility Biopan located in the Foton capsule brought to space by the Russian Soyuzfor 15 days. The algae were tested in space under shielded conditions in the past, but they were never exposed to direct ionizing radiation such as in Biopan. Conditions for survival were identified. It was observed that the effect of space stress on the survival of the algae varied depending on the light conditions to which they were exposed during the flight. In some cases the flight experience caused a stimulation of the photosystem II oxygen evolution of the cells.

  2. Objective measurement of human tolerance to +G sub z acceleration stress. Ph.D. Thesis - Univ. of N. Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rositano, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efficacy of a new objective technique using a transcutaneous Doppler flowmeter to monitor superficial temporal artery blood flow velocity during acceleration was investigated. The results were correlated with current objective and subjective G tolerance end points. In over 1300 centrifuge runs, retrograde eye level blood flow leading to total flow cessation was consistently recorded and preceded visual field deterioration leading to blackout by 3 to 23 seconds. The new method was successfully applied as an objective indication of tolerance in a variety of test situations including evaluation of g-suits, straining maneuvers, and 13 deg, 45 deg and 65 deg set back angles.

  3. Pituitary-adrenocortical adjustments to transport stress in horses with previous different handling and transport conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, E.; Medica, P.; Cravana, C.; Ferlazzo, and A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The changes of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis response to a long distance transportation results in increase of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels. The purpose of the study was to quantify the level of short-term road transport stress on circulating ACTH and cortisol concentrations, related to the effect of previous handling and transport experience of horses. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 56 healthy horses after short-term road transport of 30 km. The horses were divided into four groups, Groups A, B, C, and D, with respect to the handling quality: Good (Groups A and B), bad (Group D), and minimal handling (Group C) conditions. According to the previous transport, experience horses were divided as follows: Horses of Groups A and D had been experienced long-distance transportation before; horses of Groups B and C had been limited experience of transportation. Results: One-way RM-ANOVA showed significant effects of transport on ACTH changes in Groups B and C and on cortisol changes in both Groups A and B. Groups A and B showed lower baseline ACTH and cortisol values than Groups C and D; Groups A and B showed lower post-transport ACTH values than Groups C and D. Groups A, B, and C showed lower post-transport cortisol values than Group D. Only Groups A and B horses have shown an adequate capacity of stress response to transportation. Conclusion: The previous transport experience and quality of handling could influence the HPA axis physiological responses of horses after short-term road transport. PMID:27651674

  4. Effect of potassium chloride supplementation in drinking water on broiler performance under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, T; Khalid, T; Mushtaq, T; Mirza, M A; Nadeem, A; Babar, M E; Ahmad, G

    2008-07-01

    The effect of water supplementation of KCl on performance of heat-stressed Hubbard broilers was evaluated in the present experiment. The 3 experimental treatments (i.e., control, 0.3 and 0.6% KCl) were allocated to 3 replicates of 15 birds each. The control group was kept on dugout tap water, whereas the other 2 groups were supplied water supplemented with 0.3 and 0.6% KCl (wt/vol) by supplementing 3 and 6 g of KCl, respectively, per liter of drinking water. Broilers were provided ad libitum access to feed and water for the experimental period of 7 to 42 d of age and kept in open-sided house. The birds were reared under continuous thermostress (minimum 28.2 +/- 1.02 and maximum 37.5 +/- 0.78 degrees C) environment. Supplementing drinking water with 0.6% KCl reduced panting-phase blood pH to 7.31 and significantly increased live BW gain by 14.5 (P = 0.036) and 7.9% (P = 0.029) at 28 and 42 d of age, respectively, relative to control. An improved (P = 0.04) feed:gain and lowered body temperature were noted in groups supplemented with 0.6% KCl as compared with control and 0.3% KCl. Enhanced physiological adaptation with 0.6% KCl was evidenced by a more favorable pH during the panting phase in the present study. These findings demonstrated a possibility of better broiler live performance through KCl supplementation under conditions of severe heat stress (35 to 38 degrees C).

  5. Plasma cortisol activity in rats under conditions of chronic stress supplemented with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado Salazar, Alejandro; Uribe-Velásquez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the activity of cortisol in rats treated with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and a resveratrol supplement. Methods: Forty-eight adult female rats and 16 male rats of the strain (Rattus norvegicus) that were three months old and with body weights ranging from 200 to 250 g for females and 300 to 350 g for males were used and kept in controlled environmental conditions: temperature of 20±2° C and light-dark cycles of 14 and 10 hours. They were fed a balanced diet and had free access to water. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: group 1 - was treated with 5 µg/kg of ACTH i.p. every twelve hours; group 2 - received the same treatment with ACTH plus a grape extract supplement (resveratrol) of 40 mg/kg; group 3 - only received grape extract (resveratrol); and group 4 - received a saline solution (0.9%) i.p. and oral, and served as controls. The experimental design was a 2×2 factorial with two levels ACTH and two polyphenol levels (grape extract). Results: No significant differences were found in blood cortisol concentrations, by day and gender, or by treatment effects (0.75 µg/dL ± 0.11; p <0.001). Conclusion: Results suggest that chronic stress and consumption of resveratrol did not directly alter levels of plasmatic cortisol in either stressed or unstressed rats. It was concluded that the given dosage levels of ACTH possibly did not produce sufficient stimulation of the adrenal gland for these animals. PMID:24893196

  6. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress.

  7. [Effect of exogenous sucrose on growth and active ingredient content of licorice seedlings under salt stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-zhi; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Licorice seedlings were taken as experimental materials, an experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous sucrose on growth and active ingredient content of licorice seedlings under NaCl stress conditions. The results of this study showed that under salt stress conditions, after adding a certain concentration of exogenous sucrose, the licorice seedlings day of relative growth rate was increasing, and this stress can be a significant weakening effect, indicating that exogenous sucrose salt stress-relieving effect. The total flavonoids and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity were significantly increased, the exogenous sucrose can mitigated the seedling roots under salt stress, the licorice flavonoid content in the enhanced growth was largely due to the activity of PAL an increased, when the concentration of exogenous sucrose wae 10 mmol x L(-1), PAL activity reaching a maximum, when the concentration of exogenous sucrose was 15 mmol x L(-1), PAL activity turned into a downward trend, the results indicating that this mitigation has concentration effect. After applying different concentrations of exogenous sugar, the contents of liquiritin changes with the change of flavonoids content was similar. After applying different concentrations of exogenous sucrose, the content of licorice acid under salt stress was higher than the levels were not reached during salt stress, the impact of exogenous sucrose concentration gradient of licorice acid accumulation was not obvious.

  8. The impact of FOXO on dopamine and octopamine metabolism in Drosophila under normal and heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Adonyeva, Natalya V.; Burdina, Elena V.; Karpova, Evgenia K.; Andreenkova, Olga V.; Gladkikh, Daniil V.; Ilinsky, Yury Y.; Rauschenbach, Inga Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The forkhead boxO transcription factor (FOXO) is a component of the insulin signalling pathway and plays a role in responding to adverse conditions, such as oxidative stress and starvation. In stressful conditions, FOXO moves from the cytosol to the nucleus where it activates gene expression programmes. Here, we show that FOXO in Drosophila melanogaster responds to heat stress as it does to other stressors. The catecholamine signalling pathway is another component of the stress response. In Drosophila, dopamine and octopamine levels rise steeply under heat, nutrition and mechanical stresses, which are followed by a decrease in the activity of synthesis enzymes. We demonstrate that the nearly twofold decline of FOXO expression in foxoBG01018 mutants results in dramatic changes in the metabolism of dopamine and octopamine and the overall response to stress. The absence of FOXO increases tyrosine decarboxylase activity, the first enzyme in octopamine synthesis, and decreases the enzymatic activity of enzymes in dopamine synthesis, alkaline phosphatase and tyrosine hydroxylase, in young Drosophila females. We identified the juvenile hormone as a mediator of FOXO regulation of catecholamine metabolism. Our findings suggest that FOXO is a possible trigger for endocrinological stress reactions. PMID:27754851

  9. Stress Symptoms among Adolescents: The Role of Subjective Psychosocial Conditions, Lifestyle, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraml, Karin; Perski, Aleksander; Grossi, Giorgio; Simonsson-Sarnecki, Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Stress-related problems are increasing among Swedish adolescents, especially among females. The aims of this study were to survey the incidence of stress symptoms among 16-year-olds, to investigate the related gender differences, and to understand the factors that may contribute to stress symptoms. The study is questionnaire based, and the sample…

  10. Oxidative stress induced by pure and iron-doped amorphous silica nanoparticles in subtoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Napierska, Dorota; Rabolli, Virginie; Thomassen, Leen C J; Dinsdale, David; Princen, Catherine; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Poels, Katrien L C; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique; Martens, Johan A; Hoet, Peter H

    2012-04-16

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiO₂-NPs) have found broad applications in industry and are currently intensively studied for potential uses in medical and biomedical fields. Several studies have reported cytotoxic and inflammatory responses induced by SiO₂-NPs in different cell types. The present study was designed to examine the association of oxidative stress markers with SiO₂-NP induced cytotoxicity in human endothelial cells. We used pure monodisperse amorphous silica nanoparticles of two sizes (16 and 60 nm; S16 and S60) and a positive control, iron-doped nanosilica (16 nm; SFe), to study the generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO·) in cellular-free conditions and oxidative stress in cellular systems. We investigated whether SiO₂-NPs could influence intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels, increase lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenal (HAE) concentrations), and up-regulate heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression in the studied cells. None of the particles, except SFe, produced ROS in cell-free systems. We found significant modifications for all parameters in cells treated with SFe nanoparticles. At cytotoxic doses of S16 (40-50 μg/mL), we detected weak alterations of intracellular glutathione (4 h) and a marked induction of HO-1 mRNA (6 h). Cytotoxic doses of S60 elicited similar responses. Preincubation of cells being exposed to SiO₂-NPs with an antioxidant (5 mM N-acetylcysteine, NAC) significantly reduced the cytotoxic activity of S16 and SFe (when exposed up to 25 and 50 μg/mL, respectively) but did not protect cells treated with S60. Preincubation with NAC significantly reduced HO-1 mRNA expression in cells treated with SFe but did not have any effect on HO-1 mRNA level in cell exposed to S16 and S60. Our study demonstrates that the chemical composition of the silica nanoparticles is a dominant factor in inducing oxidative stress.

  11. [Activation of the neuroendocrine system during changes in homeostasis during stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Jezová, D

    1996-02-01

    Neuroendocrine response to stress stimuli is aimed to maintain body homeostasis. The activation of the neuroendocrine system is accomplished mainly by two ways: by feedback regulation based on the recognition of altered metabolic homeostasis by appropriate receptors sending the signal into the CNS, and by forward regulation involving a direct stimulation of the neuroendocrine system by a central command coming from an activated brain regulatory center. With regard to mechanisms of neuroendocrine activation, the signal specificity and site of its origin are of particular importance. The significance of the signal in neuroendocrine responses has been evaluated in three different stress conditions: hypoglycemia, surgical trauma and dynamic physical exercise. The stimulus inducing neuroendocrine response during hypoglycemia is the glucopenia. The signal for the activation of the neuroendocrine response is generated in glucosensitive cells which are not located in a single brain structure (hypothetical glucostat). The signal for growth hormone, vasopressin and oxytocin release is produced in brain structures protected by the blood-brain barrier, that for ACTH release in regions both protected and unprotected by the barrier, while the signal for prolactin release is generated in tissues lacking the blood-brain barrier. The neuroendocrine response during surgical trauma is activated by a signal formed in the damaged tissue reaching the CNS by neural pathways. Moreover, cytokins may participate on endocrine stimulation in those surgical interventions in which a large amount of bacterial endotoxins is released. During a complicated surgery, e.g. during a bypass other signals and modifying factors, such as hypothermia, dilution of blood, hypoperfusion of organs, rewarming of the body and hormone degradation in the oxygenator are important. On the On the other hand, during a short-term dynamic exercise, a forward regulation by a central signal from the activated CNS motor

  12. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  13. Temporal versus spatial variation in leaf reflectance under changing water stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Warren B.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf reflectance changes associated with changes in water stress were analyzed in two separate experiments. Results indicate that the variation in reflectance among collections of leaves of a given species all at the same level of water stress is at least as great as the variation in reflectance associated with changes in water stress for a given leaf collection of that species. The implications is that results from leaf reflectance-water stress studies have only limited applicability to the remote sensing of plant canopy water stress.

  14. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  15. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  16. Conditions for efficient and stable ion acceleration by moderate circularly polarized laser pulses at intensities of 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Kar, S.; Geissler, M.; Gibbon, P.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-04-15

    Conditions for efficient and stable ion radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) from thin foils by circularly polarized laser pulses at moderate intensities are theoretically and numerically investigated. It is found that the unavoidable decompression of the co-moving electron layer in Light-Sail RPA leads to a change of the local electrostatic field from a ''bunching'' to a ''debunching'' profile, ultimately resulting in premature termination of ion acceleration. One way to overcome this instability is the use of a multispecies foil where the high-Z ions act as a sacrificial species to supply excess co-moving electrons for preserving stable acceleration of the lower-Z ion species. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that 100 MeV/u monoenergetic C{sup 6+} ion beams are produced by irradiation of a Cu-C-mixed foil with laser pulses at intensities 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, which can be easily achieved by current day lasers.

  17. MECHANICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS USING γ-2CaO.SiO2 UNDER THE SEVERAL CONDITIONS IN ACCELERATED CARBONATION CURING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenzo; Yokozeki, Kosuke; Torichigai, Takeshi; Sakai, Etsuo

    The experiments have been conducted in order to investigate the mechanical and chemical properties of mortar with three different binders under the several conditions in accelerated carbonation curing. As the results, the depth of carbonation varied among each mix proportion. It is proven that by increasing CO2 density in the mortar having γ-2CaO.SiO2, the CaCO3 production will increase, which leads to the increase of filling ability in the pore of mortar. Furthermore, as a result from the calculation of Tritium permeation, it shows that the permeation decreases with an increase of CO2 density.

  18. Report on Proton and Ion Beam measurements at the Matter in Extreme Condition (MCC) end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Maxence

    2016-02-16

    We report on MeV ion beams produced with high-repetition rates of 1 Hz at the MEC end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These data were obtained during the commissioning beam time of the new 30TW laser. After describing the experimental set-up, the laser conditions and the target diagnostics, ion beam spectra measured for different foil thicknesses and laser intensities will be presented and discussed. These results are subsequently compared with results from cryogenic hydrogen jets at MEC in January 2015.

  19. Expression profiling of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia CCY9414 under light and oxidative stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Matthias; Möke, Fred; Bauwe, Hermann; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hagemann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Massive blooms of toxic cyanobacteria frequently occur in the central Baltic Sea during the summer. In the surface scum, cyanobacterial cells are exposed to high light (HL) intensity, high oxygen partial pressure and other stresses. To mimic these conditions, cultures of Nodularia spumigena CCY9414, which is a strain isolated from a cyanobacterial summer bloom in the Baltic Sea, were incubated at a HL intensity of 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 or a combination of HL and increased oxygen partial pressure. Using differential RNA sequencing, we compared the global primary transcriptomes of control and stressed cells. The combination of oxidative and light stresses induced the expression of twofold more genes compared with HL stress alone. In addition to the induction of known stress-responsive genes, such as psbA, ocp and sodB, Nodularia cells activated the expression of genes coding for many previously unknown light- and oxidative stress-related proteins. In addition, the expression of non-protein-coding RNAs was found to be stimulated by these stresses. Among them was an antisense RNA to the phycocyanin-encoding mRNA cpcBAC and the trans-encoded regulator of photosystem I, PsrR1. The large genome capacity allowed Nodularia to harbor more copies of stress-relevant genes such as psbA and small chlorophyll-binding protein genes, combined with the coordinated induction of these and many additional genes for stress acclimation. Our data provide a first insight on how N. spumigena became adapted to conditions relevant for a cyanobacterial bloom in the Baltic Sea. PMID:25689027

  20. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV Using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Flight certification is dependent on the reliability analysis to quantify the risk of stress rupture failure in existing flight vessels. Full certification of this reliability model would require a statistically significant number of lifetime tests to be performed and is impractical given the cost and limited flight hardware for certification testing purposes. One approach to confirm the reliability model is to perform a stress rupture test on a flight COPV. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49 (Dupont)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the database and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio model is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one "nine," that is, reducing the predicted probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several vessels would be necessary.

  1. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Numerical modeling of physical vapor transport under microgravity conditions: Effect of thermal creep and stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of microgravity (micro-g) environments is the manufacture of exotic and high-quality crystals in closed cylindrical ampoules using physical vapor transport (PVT) processes. The quality enhancements are believed to be due to the absence of buoyant convection in the weightless environment - resulting in diffusion-limited transport of the vapor. In a typical experiment, solid-phase sample material is initially contained at one end of the ampoule. The sample is made to sublime into the vapor phase and deposit onto the opposite end by maintaining the source at an elevated temperature with respect to the deposit. Identification of the physical factors governing both the rates and uniformity of crystal growth, and the optimization of the micro-g technology, will require an accurate modeling of the vapor transport within the ampoule. Previous micro-g modeling efforts have approached the problem from a 'classical' convective/diffusion formulation, in which convection is driven by the action of buoyancy on thermal and solutal density differences. The general conclusion of these works have been that in low gravity environments the effect of buoyancy on vapor transport is negligible, and vapor transport occurs in a diffusion-limited mode. However, it has been recently recognized than in the non-isothermal (and often low total pressure) conditions encountered in ampoules, the commonly-assumed no-slip boundary condition to the differential equations governing fluid motion can be grossly unrepresentative of the actual situation. Specifically, the temperature gradients can give rise to thermal creep flows at the ampoule side walls. In addition, temperature gradients in the vapor itself can, through the action of thermal stress, lead to bulk fluid convection.

  3. Global analysis of protein aggregation in yeast during physiological conditions and arsenite stress

    PubMed Central

    Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sideri, Theodora C.; Grant, Chris M.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein aggregation is a widespread phenomenon in cells and associated with pathological conditions. Yet, little is known about the rules that govern protein aggregation in living cells. In this study, we biochemically isolated aggregation-prone proteins and used computational analyses to identify characteristics that are linked to physiological and arsenite-induced aggregation in living yeast cells. High protein abundance, extensive physical interactions, and certain structural properties are positively correlated with an increased aggregation propensity. The aggregated proteins have high translation rates and are substrates of ribosome-associated Hsp70 chaperones, indicating that they are susceptible for aggregation primarily during translation/folding. The aggregation-prone proteins are enriched for multiple chaperone interactions, thus high protein abundance is probably counterbalanced by molecular chaperones to allow soluble expression in vivo. Our data support the notion that arsenite interferes with chaperone activity and indicate that arsenite-aggregated proteins might engage in extensive aberrant protein–protein interactions. Expression of aggregation-prone proteins is down-regulated during arsenite stress, possibly to prevent their toxic accumulation. Several aggregation-prone yeast proteins have human homologues that are implicated in misfolding diseases, suggesting that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings. PMID:25217615

  4. Context-dependent memory under stressful conditions: the case of skydiving.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L A; Williams, K L; L'Esperance, P; Cornelius, J

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of differing levels of emotional arousal on learning and memory for words in matching and mismatching contexts. In Experiment 1, experienced skydivers learned words either in the air or on the ground and recalled them in the same context or in the other context. Experiment 2 replicated the stimuli and design of the first experiment except that participants were shown a skydiving video in lieu of skydiving. Recall was poor in air-learning conditions with actual skydiving, but when lists were learned on land, recall was higher in the matching context than in the mismatching context. In the skydiving video experiment, recall was higher in matching learn-recall contexts regardless of the situation in which learning occurred. We propose that under extremely emotionally arousing circumstances, environmental and/or mood cues are unlikely to become encoded or linked to newly acquired information and thus cannot serve as cues to retrieval. Results can be applied to understanding variations in context-dependent memory in occupations (e.g., police, military special operations, and Special Weapons and Tactics teams) in which the worker experiences considerable emotional stress while learning or recalling new information.

  5. Examination of the interaction of different lighting conditions and chronic mild stress in animal model.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Gal, N; Betlehem, J; Fuller, N; Acs, P; Kovacs, G L; Fusz, K; Jozsa, R; Olah, A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the effects of different shift work schedules and chronic mild stress (CMS) on mood using animal model. The most common international shift work schedules in nursing were applied by three groups of Wistar-rats and a control group with normal light-dark cycle. One subgroup from each group was subjected to CMS. Levels of anxiety and emotional life were evaluated in light-dark box. Differences between the groups according to independent and dependent variables were examined with one- and two-way analysis of variance, with a significance level defined at p < 0.05. Interaction of lighting regimen and CMS was proved to be significant according to time spent in the light compartment and the average number of changes between the light and dark compartments. Results of our examination confirm that the changes of lighting conditions evocate anxiety more prominently than CMS. No significant differences were found between the results of the low rotating group and the control group, supposing that this schedule is the least harmful to health. Our results on the association between the use of lighting regimens and the level of CMS provide evidence that the fast rotating shift work schedule puts the heaviest load on the organism of animals.

  6. A Review on the Assessment of Stress Conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Amritpreet K.; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J.; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids) under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C) such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions. PMID:27199903

  7. Comparative Metabolome Profile between Tobacco and Soybean Grown under Water-Stressed Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how plants respond to water deficit is important in order to develop crops tolerant to drought. In this study, we compare two large metabolomics datasets where we employed a nontargeted metabolomics approach to elucidate metabolic pathways perturbed by progressive dehydration in tobacco and soybean plants. The two datasets were created using the same strategy to create water deficit conditions and an identical metabolomics pipeline. Comparisons between the two datasets therefore reveal common responses between the two species, responses specific to one of the species, responses that occur in both root and leaf tissues, and responses that are specific to one tissue. Stomatal closure is the immediate response of the plant and this did not coincide with accumulation of abscisic acid. A total of 116 and 140 metabolites were observed in tobacco leaves and roots, respectively, while 241 and 207 were observed in soybean leaves and roots, respectively. Accumulation of metabolites is significantly correlated with the extent of dehydration in both species. Among the metabolites that show increases that are restricted to just one plant, 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid (KHG) in tobacco roots and coumestrol in soybean roots show the highest tissue-specific accumulation. The comparisons of these two large nontargeted metabolomics datasets provide novel information and suggest that KHG will be a useful marker for drought stress for some members of Solanaceae and coumestrol for some legume species. PMID:28127554

  8. Optical stimulation of the hearing and deaf cochlea under thermal and stress confinement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M.; Baumhoff, P.; Kallweit, N.; Sato, M.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.; Lenarz, T.; Kral, A.

    2014-03-01

    There is a controversy, to which extend cochlear stimulation with near infrared laser pulses at a wavelength of 1860 nm is based on optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells or -in contrast- is based on direct stimulation of the nerve cells in absence of functional hair cells. Thermal and stress confinement conditions apply, because of the pulse duration range (5 ns, 10 μs-20 ms) of the two lasers used. The dependency of the signal characteristics on pulse peak power and pulse duration was investigated in this study. The compound action potential (CAP) was measured during stimulation of the cochlea of four anaesthetized guinea pigs, which were hearing at first and afterwards acutely deafened using intracochlear neomycin-rinsing. For comparison hydrophone measurements in a water tank were performed to investigate the optoacoustic signals at different laser interaction regimes. With rising pulse peak power CAPs of the hearing animals showed first a threshold, then a positively correlated and finally a saturating dependency. CAPs also showed distinct responses at laser onset and offset separated with the pulse duration. At pulse durations shorter than physiological response times the signals merged. Basically the same signal characteristics were observed in the optoacoustic hydrophone measurements, scaled with the sensitivity and response time of the hydrophone. Taking together the qualitative correspondence in the signal response and the absence of any CAPs in deafened animals our results speak in favor of an optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells rather than a direct stimulation of nerve cells.

  9. Fracture properties of hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding in recrystallization and stress-relief anneal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the stress-relieved (SRA) and recrystallized (RXA) Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were hydrogen-charged to the target concentration of 300 wppm and then manufactured into X-specimens for fracture toughness test. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens in both SRA and RXA conditions were investigated. At the hydrogen concentration level of 300 wppm, J-integral values for RXA cladding were higher than those for SRA cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. The formation of brittle zirconium hydrides had a significant impact on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding in both SRA and RXA states, especially at 25 °C. Among all the tests, SRA cladding tested at 25 °C exhibited a great loss of the fracture toughness. The micrographic and fractographic observations further demonstrated that the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding would be improved by the coarse grains in RXA cladding, but degraded by zirconium hydrides precipitated along the grain boundary.

  10. Proteins involved in biophoton emission and flooding-stress responses in soybean under light and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-01

    To know the molecular systems basically flooding conditions in soybean, biophoton emission measurements and proteomic analyses were carried out for flooding-stressed roots under light and dark conditions. Photon emission was analyzed using a photon counter. Gel-free quantitative proteomics were performed to identify significant changes proteins using the nano LC-MS along with SIEVE software. Biophoton emissions were significantly increased in both light and dark conditions after flooding stress, but gradually decreased with continued flooding exposure compared to the control plants. Among the 120 significantly identified proteins in the roots of soybean plants, 73 and 19 proteins were decreased and increased in the light condition, respectively, and 4 and 24 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively, in the dark condition. The proteins were mainly functionally grouped into cell organization, protein degradation/synthesis, and glycolysis. The highly abundant lactate/malate dehydrogenase proteins were decreased in flooding-stressed roots exposed to light, whereas the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme was increased in both light and dark conditions. Notably, however, specific enzyme assays revealed that the activities of these enzymes and biophoton emission were sharply increased after 3 days of flooding stress. This finding suggests that the source of biophoton emission in roots might involve the chemical excitation of electron or proton through enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation and reduction reactions. Moreover, the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme may play important roles in responses in flooding stress of soybean under the light condition and as a contributing factor to biophoton emission.

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation-Scavenging and Signaling during Plant-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Piriformospora indica Interaction under Stress Condition

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Manoj; Bhatt, Deepesh; Prasad, Ram; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    A defined balance between the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential to utilize ROS as an adaptive defense response of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Moreover, ROS are not only a major determinant of stress response but also act as signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes including plant-microbe interaction. In particular, rhizosphere constitutes the biologically dynamic zone for plant–microbe interactions which forms a mutual link leading to reciprocal signaling in both the partners. Among plant–microbe interactions, symbiotic associations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal-like fungus especially Piriformospora indica with plants are well known to improve plant growth by alleviating the stress-impacts and consequently enhance the plant fitness. AMF and P. indica colonization mainly enhances ROS-metabolism, maintains ROS-homeostasis, and thereby averts higher ROS-level accrued inhibition in plant cellular processes and plant growth and survival under stressful environments. This article summarizes the major outcomes of the recent reports on the ROS-generation, scavenging and signaling in biotic-abiotic stressed plants with AMF and P. indica colonization. Overall, a detailed exploration of ROS-signature kinetics during plant-AMF/P. indica interaction can help in designing innovative strategies for improving plant health and productivity under stress conditions. PMID:27818671

  12. FoxO3a regulates hematopoietic homeostasis through a negative feedback pathway in conditions of stress or aging

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kana; Kato, Reiko; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Motoyama, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Stress or aging of tissue-specific stem cells is considered central to the decline of tissue homeostasis in the elderly, although little is known of molecular mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging and stress resistance. Here, we report that mice lacking the transcription factor forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) develop neutrophilia associated with inhibition of the up-regulation of negative regulator of cell proliferation, Sprouty-related Ena/VASP homology 1 domain-containing proteins 2 (Spred2) and AKT and ERK activation, in HSCs during hematopoietic recovery following myelosuppressive stress conditions. Compared with aged wild-type mice, more severe neutrophilia was also observed in aged Foxo3a-deficient mice. AKT and ERK activation and inhibition of Spred2 were detected in HSCs from aged FoxO3a-deficient mice. Spred2-deficient mice also developed neutrophilia during hematopoietic recovery following myelosuppressive stress, indicating that FoxO3a plays a pivotal role in maintenance, integrity, and stress resistance of HSCs through negative feedback pathways for proliferation. This will provide new insight into the hematopoietic homeostasis in conditions of aging and stress. PMID:18799725

  13. Effects of Extinction Treatments on the Reduction of Conditioned Responding and Conditioned Hyperarousal in a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    PubMed Central

    Burhans, Lauren B.; Smith-Bell, Carrie A.; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously characterized a model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), based on classical conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane response (NMR), that focuses on 2 key PTSD-like features: conditioned responses to trauma-associated cues and hyperarousal. In addition to the development of conditioned NMRs (CRs) to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a periorbital shock unconditioned stimulus (US), we have observed that rabbits also exhibit a conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) of the NMR that manifests as an exaggerated and more complex reflexive NMR to presentations of the US by itself, particularly to intensities that elicited little response prior to conditioning. Previous work has demonstrated that unpaired presentations of the CS and US are successful at extinguishing CRs and CRM simultaneously, even when a significantly weakened version of the US is utilized. In the current study, additional extinction treatments were tested, including continued pairings of the CS with a weakened US and exposure to the training context alone, and these treatments were contrasted with the effects of unpaired extinction with a weakened US and remaining in home cages with no further treatment. Results showed that continued pairings only slightly decreased CRs and CRM, while context exposure had no effect on CRs and marginal effects on reducing CRM. Unpaired extinction was still the most effective treatment for reducing both. Findings are discussed in terms of applications to cognitive–behavioral therapies for treatment of PTSD, such as incorporating mild, innately stressful stimuli into virtual reality therapy. PMID:26348715

  14. Peptide Selank Enhances the Effect of Diazepam in Reducing Anxiety in Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Conditions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kolomin, Timur; Andreeva, Lyudmila; Bondarenko, Elena; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Slominsky, Petr; Shadrina, Maria

    2017-01-01

    It was shown that the anxiolytic effect of Selank is comparable to that of classical benzodiazepine drugs and that the basis of their mechanism of action may be similar. These data suggest that the presence of Selank may change the action of classical benzodiazepine drugs. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the anxiolytic activity of Selank and diazepam in rats both under conditions of unpredictable chronic mild stress and in its absence, after the individual and combined administration of these compounds using the elevated plus maze test. We found that, even in the absence of chronic stress, the administration of a course of test substances changed anxiety indicators toward their deterioration, but the changes after the administration of a course of Selank were less pronounced. In conditions of chronic stress, anxiety indicator values after the simultaneous use of diazepam and Selank did not differ from the respective values observed before chronic stress exposure. The data obtained indicate that the individual administration of Selank was the most effective in reducing elevated levels of anxiety, induced by the administration of a course of test substances, whereas the combination of diazepam with Selank was the most effective in reducing anxiety in unpredictable chronic mild stress conditions. PMID:28280289

  15. High Shear Stresses under Exercise Condition Destroy Circulating Tumor Cells in a Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Sagar; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the primary targets of cancer treatment as they cause distal metastasis. However, how CTCs response to exercise-induced high shear stress is largely unknown. To study the effects of hemodynamic microenvironment on CTCs, we designed a microfluidic circulatory system that produces exercise relevant shear stresses. We explore the effects of shear stresses on breast cancer cells with different metastatic abilities, cancer cells of ovarian, lung and leukemic origin. Three major findings were obtained. 1) High shear stress of 60 dynes/cm2 achievable during intensive exercise killed more CTCs than low shear stress of 15 dynes/cm2 present in human arteries at the resting state. 2) High shear stress caused necrosis in over 90% of CTCs within the first 4 h of circulation. More importantly, the CTCs that survived the first 4 h-circulation, underwent apoptosis during 16–24 h of post-circulation incubation. 3) Prolonged high shear stress treatment effectively reduced the viability of highly metastatic and drug resistant breast cancer cells. As high shear stress had much less damaging effects on leukemic cells mimicking the white blood cells, we propose that intensive exercise may be a good strategy for generating high shear stress that can destroy CTCs and prevent cancer metastasis. PMID:28054593

  16. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.

    1999-01-01

    The project has sought to ascertain the veracity of the Burnett relations, as applied to slow moving, highly nonisothermal gases, by comparison of convection and stress predictions with those generated by the DSMC method. The Burnett equations were found to provide reasonable descriptions of the pressure distribution and normal stress in stationary gases with a 1-D temperature gradient. Continuum/Burnett predictions of thermal stress convection in 2-D heated enclosures, however, are not quantitatively supported by DSMC results. For such situations, it appears that thermal creep flows, generated at the boundaries of the enclosure, will be significantly larger than the flows resulting from thermal stress in the gas.

  17. Turbulence significantly increases pressure and fluid shear stress in an aortic aneurysm model under resting and exercise flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil M; Bull, Joseph L; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Berguer, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    The numerical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in use do not take into account the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the development of local turbulence. This study examines the influence of pulsatile, turbulent, non-Newtonian flow on fluid shear stresses and pressure changes under rest and exercise conditions. We numerically analyzed pulsatile turbulent flow, using simulated physiological rest and exercise waveforms, in axisymmetric-rigid aortic aneurysm models (AAMs). Discretization of governing equations was achieved using a finite element scheme. Maximum turbulence-induced shear stress was found at the distal end of an AAM. In large AAMs (dilated to undilated diameter ratio = 3.33) at peak systolic flow velocity, fluid shear stress during exercise is 70.4% higher than at rest. Our study provides a numerical, noninvasive method for obtaining detailed data on the forces generated by pulsatile turbulent flow in AAAs that are difficult to study in humans and in physical models. Our data suggest that increased flow turbulence results in increased shear stress in aneurysms. While pressure readings are fairly uniform along the length of an aneurysm, the kinetic energy generated by turbulence impacting on the wall of the distal half of the aneurysm increases fluid and wall shear stress at this site. If the increased fluid shear stress results in further dilation and hence further turbulence, wall stress may be a mechanism for aneurysmal growth and eventual rupture.

  18. Influence of linear profile modification and loading conditions on the dynamic tooth load and stress of high contact ratio gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chinwai; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation for the dynamic response of high-contact-ratio spur gear transmissions is presented. High contact ratio gears have the potential to produce lower dynamic tooth loads and minimum root stress but they can be sensitive to tooth profile errors. The analysis presented examines various profile modifications under realistic loading conditions. The effect of these modifications on the dynamic load (force) between mating gear teeth and the dynamic root stress is presented. Since the contact stress is dependent on the dynamic load, minimizing dynamic loads will also minimize contact stresses. It is shown that the combination of profile modification and the applied load (torque) carried by a gear system has a significant influence on gear dynamics. The ideal modification at one value of applied load will not be the best solution for a different load. High-contact-ratio gears were found to require less modification than standard low-contact-ratio gears. High-contact-ratio gears are more adversely affected by excess modification than by under modification. In addition, the optimal profile modification required to minimize the dynamic load (hence the contact stress) on a gear tooth differs from the optimal modification required to minimize the dynamic root (bending) stress. Computer simulation can help find the design tradeoffs to determine the best profile modification to satisfy the conflicting constraints of minimizing both the load and root stress in gears which must operate over a range of applied loads.

  19. Warburg Meets Autophagy: Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Accelerate Tumor Growth and Metastasis via Oxidative Stress, Mitophagy, and Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Stephanos; Vera, Iset; Gandara, Ricardo; Sneddon, Sharon; Pestell, Richard G.; Mercier, Isabelle; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Here, we review certain recent advances in oxidative stress and tumor metabolism, which are related to understanding the contributions of the microenvironment in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In the early 1920s, Otto Warburg, a Nobel Laureate, formulated a hypothesis to explain the “fundamental basis” of cancer, based on his observations that tumors displayed a metabolic shift toward glycolysis. In 1963, Christian de Duve, another Nobel Laureate, first coined the phrase auto-phagy, derived from the Greek words “auto” and “phagy,” meaning “self” and “eating.” Recent Advances: Now, we see that these two ideas (autophagy and aerobic glycolysis) physically converge in the tumor stroma. First, cancer cells secrete hydrogen peroxide. Then, as a consequence, oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts drives autophagy, mitophagy, and aerobic glycolysis. Critical Issues: This “parasitic” metabolic coupling converts the stroma into a “factory” for the local production of recycled and high-energy nutrients (such as L-lactate)—to fuel oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. We believe that Warburg and de Duve would be pleased with this new two-compartment model for understanding tumor metabolism. It adds a novel stromal twist to two very well-established cancer paradigms: aerobic glycolysis and autophagy. Future Directions: Undoubtedly, these new metabolic models will foster the development of novel biomarkers, and corresponding therapies, to achieve the goal of personalized cancer medicine. Given the central role that oxidative stress plays in this process, new powerful antioxidants should be developed in the fight against cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1264–1284. PMID:21883043

  20. Supervisors' attitudes and skills for active listening with regard to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinate workers.

    PubMed

    Mineyama, Sachiko; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Takao, Soshi; Nishiuchi, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito

    2007-03-01

    We investigated whether supervisors' listening attitudes and skills were related to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among their subordinates. The subjects included 41 male supervisors and their immediate subordinates (n=203). The supervisors completed a short version of the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS) consisting of two subscales: Listening Attitude and Listening Skill for Active Listening. The subordinates rated working conditions and their psychological stress reactions using selected scales of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill reported a more favorable psychological stress reaction than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Skill reported higher worksite support than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude reported higher job control than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude. A supervisor's listening attitude and skill appeared to affect psychological stress reactions predominantly among male subordinates than among female subordinates. Psychological stress reactions were lower among younger subordinates who worked under supervisors with high listening skill, while no statistically difference was observed among older subordinates. These findings suggest that a supervisor's listening attitude and skill have an effect on working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinates and that the effects vary according to the subordinates' sex and age.

  1. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  2. Characterization of degradation products of amorphous and polymorphic forms of clopidogrel bisulphate under solid state stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Raijada, Dhara K; Prasad, Bhagwat; Paudel, Amrit; Shah, Ravi P; Singh, Saranjit

    2010-07-08

    The present study deals with the stress degradation studies on amorphous and polymorphic forms of clopidogrel bisulphate. The objective was to characterize the degradation products and postulate mechanism of decomposition of the drug under solid state stress conditions. For that, amorphous form, polymorph I and polymorph II of the drug were exposed to 40 degrees C/75% relative humidity (RH), with and without stressors for 3 months. The samples were analyzed by HPLC, and the relative extent of degradation as well as nature of decomposition was compared among three solid forms. In total, eight degradation products were observed under various stress conditions. The structures of all of them were elucidated using LC-MS/TOF and LC-MS(n) studies. While one matched the known hydrolytic decomposition product of the drug in solution, seven others were new. The postulated degradation pathway and mechanism of decomposition are discussed.

  3. Permeability of coal to CH4 under fixed volume boundary conditions: the effect of stress-strain-sorption behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Fokker, Peter; Spiers, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Permeability evolution in coal reservoirs during CO2-Enhanced Coalbed Methane (ECBM) production is strongly influenced by swelling/shrinkage effects related to sorption and desorption of CO2 and CH4, respectively. Numerous permeability models, coupling the swelling response of coal to gas sorption, have been developed to predict in-situ coal seam permeability evolution during (E)CBM. However, experimental studies, aimed at testing such models, have mainly focused on the permeability changes occurring under constant lateral stress conditions, which are inconsistent with the in-situ boundary condition of (near) zero lateral strain. We performed CH4 permeability measurements, using the steady-state method, on a cylindrical sample of high volatile bituminous coal (25mm in diameter), under (near) fixed volume versus fixed stress conditions. The sample possessed a clearly visible cleat system. To isolate the effect of sorption on permeability evolution, helium (non-sorbing gas) was used as a control fluid. The bulk sample permeability to helium, under stress control conditions, changed from 4.07×10-17to 7.5×10-18m2, when the effective stress increased from 19.1 to 35.2MPa. Sorption of CH4 at a constant pressure of 10MPa, under fixed volume boundary conditions, resulted in a confining pressure increase from a poroelastically supported value of 29.3MPa to a near-equilibrium value of 38.6MPa over 171 hours. This is caused by the combined effect of the sorption-induced swelling and the self-compression of the sample. The concentration of CH4 adsorbed by the sample was 0.113 mmol/gcoal. During the adsorption process, the permeability to CH4 also decreased from 2.38×10-17 to 4.91×10-18m2, proving a strong influence of stress-strain-sorption behavior (c.f. Hol et al., 2012) on fracture permeability evolution. The CH4 permeability subsequently measured under stress controlled conditions varied from 1.37×10-17 to 4.33×10-18m2, for same change in confining pressure, i.e. 28

  4. Constitutive gp130 activation rapidly accelerates the transformation of human hepatocytes via an impaired oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Herden, Johannes; Parplys, Ann Christin; Borgmann, Kerstin; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk; Lohse, Ansgar W.; Rose-John, Stefan; Wege, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory signaling pathways, especially interleukin 6 (IL-6), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote carcinogenesis in the liver. In order to elucidate the underlying oncogenic mechanism, we activated the IL-6 signal transducer glycoprotein 130 (gp130) via stable expression of a constitutively active gp130 construct (L-gp130) in untransformed telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes (FH-hTERT). As known from hepatocellular adenomas, forced gp130 activation alone was not sufficient to induce malignant transformation. However, additional challenge of FH-hTERT L-gp130 clones with oxidative stress resulted in 2- to 3-fold higher ROS levels and up to 6-fold more DNA-double strand breaks (DSB). Despite increased DNA damage, ROS-challenged FH-hTERT L-gp130 clones displayed an enhanced proliferation and rapidly developed colony growth capabilities in soft agar. As driving gp130-mediated oncogenic mechanism, we detected a decreased expression of antioxidant genes, in particular glutathione peroxidase 3 and apolipoprotein E, and an absence of P21 upregulation following ROS-conferred induction of DSB. In summary, an impaired oxidative stress response in hepatocytes with gp130 gain-of-function mutations, as detected in dysplastic intrahepatic nodules and hepatocellular adenomas, is one of the central oncogenic mechanisms in chronic liver inflammation. PMID:27489351

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. Statistical analysis of short-term water stress conditions at Riggs Creek OzFlux tower site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Mohammad; Rüdiger, Christoph; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2016-08-01

    A large range of indices and proxies are available to describe the water stress conditions of an area subject to different applications, which have varying capabilities and limitations depending on the prevailing local climatic conditions and land cover. The present study uses a range of spatio-temporally high-resolution (daily and within daily) data sources to evaluate a number of drought indices (DIs) for the Riggs Creek OzFlux tower site in southeastern Australia. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to evaluate the statistical characteristics of individual DIs subject to short-term water stress conditions. In order to derive a more general and therefore representative DI, a new criterion is required to specify the statistical similarity between each pair of indices to allow determining the dominant drought types along with their representative DIs. The results show that the monitoring of water stress at this case study area can be achieved by evaluating the individual behaviour of three clusters of (i) vegetation conditions, (ii) water availability and (iii) water consumptions. This indicates that it is not necessary to assess all individual DIs one by one to derive a comprehensive and informative data set about the water stress of an area; instead, this can be achieved by analysing one of the DIs from each cluster or deriving a new combinatory index for each cluster, based on established combination methods.

  7. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  8. Adaptive Coping under Conditions of Extreme Stress: Multilevel Influences on the Determinants of Resilience in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of resilience in maltreated children reveals the possibility of coping processes and resources on multiple levels of analysis as children strive to adapt under conditions of severe stress. In a maltreating context, aspects of self-organization, including self-esteem, self-reliance, emotion regulation, and adaptable yet reserved…

  9. Relationship between biomass production and nitrogen fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genoytpes with different levels of drought resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between biomass production and N2 fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genotypes with different levels of drought resistance is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation by evaluating t...

  10. Contribution of loading conditions and material properties to stress shielding near the tibial component of total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony G; James Raso, V; Liggins, A B; Amirfazli, A

    2007-01-01

    This communication reports important preliminary results of a parametric analysis into the stress shielding effects of loading conditions and material properties of a total knee replacement (TKR) prosthesis. A previously developed finite element (FE) model of the proximal tibia that incorporated orthotropic and heterogeneous bone properties was used. Tibiofemoral joint compression and soft tissue (ligament and muscle) forces were also included to better represent the loading condition in the tibia. Stress shielding effects were studied for a prosthesis similar to a commercially available model. Results from the model show that the hypothesis of relatively higher Young's modulus of implant compared to bone as the primary cause of stress shielding is not sufficiently descriptive. Loading conditions as a result of altered bone or implant condylar surface geometry, load placement on the condylar surface, and load pattern created by the TKR are at least as important or, in some cases, more important factors in observed stress shielding immediately post-operation. This finding can be used to focus new implant design on altered loading conditions as well as material selection.

  11. The Invasion of Coastal Areas in South China by Ipomoea cairica May Be Accelerated by the Ecotype Being More Locally Adapted to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Gao, Yang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Yuan, Ming-Yue; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity are two alternative mechanisms used by invasive plants for range expansion. We conducted a series of experiments to investigate the role of these mechanisms in the recent expansion of the invasive Ipomoea cairica from non-saline to salt-stressed coastal habitats. A comparison of the plant’s photosynthetic traits and construction costs across habitats was conducted through a field survey. Meanwhile, a full factorial greenhouse experiment was conducted with two ecotypes (non-saline and coastal) of I. cairica and two salinity gradients (water and 4 g L-1 NaCl solution) to evaluate the roles of the two strategies by comparing their main traits. The results revealed that the construction cost and Amax of I. cairica did not change with the habitat type. The ecotype and saline treatments, however, significantly influenced the plant growth. The non-saline ecotype (NE) generally showed higher or equal plasticity of biomass-allocation and functional traits compared to the coastal ecotype (CE). However, the fitness and biomass of the NE significantly decreased with salinity, whereas those aspects of the CE did not change. Our results indicate that the recent expansion of I. cairica into coastal areas may be accelerated by the local adaptation of the CE to salt stress. Additionally, in South China, the CE will most likely evolve adaptations to both saline and non-saline environments, which will further broaden the invasion range of I. cairica in the future. PMID:26867222

  12. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes in Fiskeby III under ozone stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the global climate changes, plants will be challenged by environmental stresses that are more extreme and more frequent leading to increased yield loss. Specifically, ozone stress is an increasing problem in both urban and rural areas. Soybeans are one of the plant species that are quite ozone se...

  14. Effect of citrocard on functional reserves of the heart under conditions of chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N; Lebedeva, S A; Volotova, E V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2007-07-01

    Chronic stress exposure produces a damaging effect on the myocardium and reduces its functional (inotropic) reserves. Citrocard (50 mg/kg) and fenibut (50 mg/kg) prevent stress effects: animals receiving these preparations demonstrate higher contraction and relaxation rates and higher left-ventricular pressure during functional tests (volume load and maximum isometric load).

  15. Silicon: a duo synergy for regulating crop growth and hormonal signaling under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as salinity, heavy metals and drought, are some of the most devastating factors hindering sustainable crop production today. Plants use their own defensive strategies to cope with the adverse effects of these stresses, via the regulation of the expression of essential phytohormones, such as gibberellins (GA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonates (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene (ET). However, the efficacy of the endogenous defensive arsenals of plants often falls short if the stress persists over an extended period. Various strategies are developed to improve stress tolerance in plants. For example, silicon (Si) is widely considered to possess significant potential as a substance which ameliorate the negative effects of abiotic stresses, and improves plant growth and biomass accumulation. This review aims to explain how Si application influences the signaling of the endogenous hormones GA, SA, ABA, JA and ET during salinity, wounding, drought and metal stresses in crop plants. Phytohormonal cross talk plays an important role in the regulation of induced defences against stress. However, detailed molecular and proteomic research into these interactions is needed in order to identify the underlying mechanisms of stress tolerance that is imparted by Si application and uptake.

  16. Acute social defeat stress increases the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine in adult but not in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Montagud-Romero, S; Aguilar, M A; Maldonado, C; Manzanedo, C; Miñarro, J; Rodríguez-Arias, M

    2015-08-01

    Stressful experiences modify activity in areas of the brain involved in the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. In the present study we evaluated the influence of acute social defeat (ASD) on the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine in adolescent (PND 29-32) and adult (PND 50-53) male mice in the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Experimental mice were exposed to social defeat in an agonistic encounter before each session of conditioning with 1mg/kg or 25mg/kg of cocaine. The effects of social defeat on corticosterone levels were also evaluated. Adult mice exposed to ASD showed an increase in the conditioned reinforcing effects of cocaine. Only these mice developed cocaine-induced CPP with the subthreshold dose of cocaine, and they needed a higher number of extinction sessions for the 25mg/kg cocaine-induced CPP to be extinguished. In adolescent mice, on the other hand, ASD reduced the conditioned reinforcing effects of cocaine, since CPP was not produced with the lower dose of cocaine and was extinguished faster when they were conditioned with 25mg/kg. Adult mice exposed to social defeat displayed higher levels of corticosterone than their controls and adolescent mice. Our results confirm that the effect of social defeat stress on the acquisition and reinstatement of the CPP induced by cocaine varies depending on the age at which this stress is experienced.

  17. Negative effects of stress immediately before slaughter on pork quality are aggravated by suboptimal transport and lairage conditions.

    PubMed

    Hambrecht, E; Eissen, J J; Newman, D J; Smits, C H M; den Hartog, L A; Verstegen, M W A

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the present experiment were 1) to study the effects of transport conditions and lairage duration on stress level, muscle glycolytic potential, and pork quality; and 2) to investigate whether the negative effects of high stress immediately preslaughter are affected by preceding handling factors (transport and lairage). In a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design, halothane-free pigs (n = 384) were assigned to either short (50 min) and smooth or long (3 h) and rough transport; long (3 h) or short (<45 min) lairage; and minimal or high preslaughter stress. Pigs were processed in eight groups (48 pigs per group) on various days at a commercial plant. Blood samples were taken at exsanguination to measure plasma cortisol and lactate concentrations. Muscle pH and temperature were measured at 30 and 40 min, respectively, and both were measured at 3 h, postmortem. A LM sample was taken 135 min postmortem to estimate glycogen content and rate of glycolysis. Pork quality attributes were assessed 23 h postmortem. Short transport increased cortisol when followed by short lairage (transport x lairage; P < 0.01). Long transport, but not lairage (P > 0.30), tended to increase (P = 0.06) muscle glycolytic potential. Long transport tended to increase (P = 0.08) electrical conductivity, and decreased a* (P < 0.01) and b* (P < 0.02) values. Decreasing lairage from 3 h to <45 min decreased (P < 0.05) the L* value, but it did not (P > 0.10) affect other pork quality traits. High stress decreased (P < 0.001) muscle glycolytic potential, and increased (P < 0.001) plasma lactate, cortisol, muscle temperature, rate of pH decline, and ultimate pH. Except for decreased (P < 0.001) b* values, pork color was not (P > 0.40) affected by high stress, but water-holding properties (measured by electrical conductivity, filter paper moisture, and drip loss) were impaired (P < 0.001) by high stress. Fiber optic-measured light scattering and Warner-Bratzler shear force were not (P > 0.12) affected

  18. Condition assessment of concrete pavements using both ground penetrating radar and stress-wave based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengxing; Anderson, Neil; Sneed, Lesley; Torgashov, Evgeniy

    2016-12-01

    Two stress-wave based techniques, ultrasonic surface wave (USW) and impact echo (IE), as well as ground penetrating radar (GPR) were used to assess the condition of a segment of concrete pavement that includes a layer of concrete, a granular base and their interface. Core specimens retrieved at multiple locations were used to confirm the accuracy and reliability of each non-destructive testing (NDT) result. Results from this study demonstrate that the GPR method is accurate for estimating the pavement thickness and locating separations (air voids) between the concrete and granular base layers. The USW method is a rapid way to estimate the in-situ elastic modulus (dynamic elastic modulus) of the concrete, however, the existence of air voids at the interface could potentially affect the accuracy and reliability of the USW test results. The estimation of the dynamic modulus and the P-wave velocity of concrete was improved when a shorter wavelength range (3 in. to 8.5 in.) corresponding to the concrete layer thickness was applied instead of the full wavelength rage (3 in. to 11 in.) based on the standard spacing of the receiver transducers. The IE method is proved to be fairly accurate in estimating the thickness of concrete pavements. However, the flexural mode vibration could affect the accuracy and reliability of the test results. Furthermore, the existence of air voids between the concrete and granular base layers could affect the estimation of the compression wave velocity of concrete when the full wavelength range was applied (3 in. to 11 in.). Future work is needed in order to improve the accuracy and reliability of both USW and IE test results.

  19. The influence of boundary conditions on wall shear stress distribution in patients specific coronary trees.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Alina G; Groen, Harald C; Doriot, Pierre-André; de Feyter, Pim J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van de Vosse, Frans N; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2011-04-07

    Patient specific geometrical data on human coronary arteries can be reliably obtained multislice computer tomography (MSCT) imaging. MSCT cannot provide hemodynamic variables, and the outflow through the side branches must be estimated. The impact of two different models to determine flow through the side branches on the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in patient specific geometries is evaluated. Murray's law predicts that the flow ratio through the side branches scales with the ratio of the diameter of the side branches to the third power. The empirical model is based on flow measurements performed by Doriot et al. (2000) in angiographically normal coronary arteries. The fit based on these measurements showed that the flow ratio through the side branches can best be described with a power of 2.27. The experimental data imply that Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. We applied the two models to study the WSS distribution in 6 coronary artery trees. Under steady flow conditions, the average WSS between the side branches differed significantly for the two models: the average WSS was 8% higher for Murray's law and the relative difference ranged from -5% to +27%. These differences scale with the difference in flow rate. Near the bifurcations, the differences in WSS were more pronounced: the size of the low WSS regions was significantly larger when applying the empirical model (13%), ranging from -12% to +68%. Predicting outflow based on Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. Especially near side branches, the regions where atherosclerotic plaques preferentially develop, the differences are significant and application of Murray's law underestimates the size of the low WSS region.

  20. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    PubMed

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis.