Science.gov

Sample records for accelerated structured pathways

  1. Cornerstones of Completion: State Policy Support for Accelerated, Structured Pathways to College Credentials and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.

    2012-01-01

    In spring 2012, after a year of intensive data analysis and planning, the colleges participating in Completion by Design announced strategies for creating clear, structured routes through college for more students, often referred to as accelerated, structured pathways to completion. These strategies contain elements unique to each college, but all…

  2. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  3. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  4. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  5. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  6. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  7. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Gluckstern, R.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N. |

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  8. Medium Beta Superconducting Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2001-09-01

    While, originally, the development of superconducting structures was cleanly divided between low-beta resonators for heavy ions and beta=1 resonators for electrons, recent interest in protons accelerators (high and low current, pulsed and cw) has necessitated the development of structures that bridge the gap between the two. These activities have resulted both in new geometries and in the adaptation of well-known geometries optimized to this intermediate velocity range. Their characteristics and properties are reviewed.

  9. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  10. Acceleration of visually cued conditioned fear through the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Newton, Jessica R; Ellsworth, Charlene; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tonegawa, Susumu; Sur, Mriganka

    2004-09-01

    Defensive responses elicited by sensory experiences are critical for survival. Mice acquire a conditioned fear response rapidly to an auditory cue but slowly to a visual cue, a difference in learned behavior that is likely to be mediated by direct projections to the lateral amygdala from the auditory thalamus but mainly indirect ones from the visual thalamus. Here, we show that acquisition of visually cued conditioned fear is accelerated in 'rewired' mice that have retinal projections routed to the auditory thalamus. Visual stimuli induce expression of the immediate early gene Fos (also known as c-fos) in the auditory thalamus and the lateral amygdala in rewired mice, similar to the way auditory stimuli do in control mice. Thus, the rewired auditory pathway conveys visual information and mediates rapid activity-dependent plasticity in central structures that influence learned behavior.

  11. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  13. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  14. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway Development Using Publicly Available Data Sources.

    PubMed

    Oki, Noffisat O; Nelms, Mark D; Bell, Shannon M; Mortensen, Holly M; Edwards, Stephen W

    2016-03-01

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept links molecular perturbations with organism and population-level outcomes to support high-throughput toxicity (HTT) testing. International efforts are underway to define AOPs and store the information supporting these AOPs in a central knowledge base; however, this process is currently labor-intensive and time-consuming. Publicly available data sources provide a wealth of information that could be used to define computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs), which could serve as a basis for creating expert-derived AOPs in a much more efficient way. Computational tools for mining large datasets provide the means for extracting and organizing the information captured in these public data sources. Using cpAOPs as a starting point for expert-derived AOPs should accelerate AOP development. Coupling this with tools to coordinate and facilitate the expert development efforts will increase the number and quality of AOPs produced, which should play a key role in advancing the adoption of HTT testing, thereby reducing the use of animals in toxicity testing and greatly increasing the number of chemicals that can be tested. PMID:26809562

  15. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway Development via Systems Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway has emerged as an internationally harmonized mechanism for organizing biological information in a chemical agnostic manner. This construct is valuable for interpreting the results from high-throughput toxicity (HTT) assessment by providing a mechanisti...

  16. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Lemkin, M.

    1997-08-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronis circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or {approx} 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G {approx} 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  17. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway Development Using Publicly Available Data Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept links molecular perturbations with organism and population-level outcomes to support high-throughput toxicity testing. International efforts are underway to define AOPs and store the information supporting these AOPs in a central knowledg...

  18. Acceleration amplifications in nif structures subjected to earthquake base motions

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D

    1999-11-29

    NIF technical staff have questioned the possibility of obtaining acceleration amplifications (i.e. amplification of the ground acceleration values) in a structure which are significantly higher than the acceleration amplification exhibited across the period range in the input response spectrum. This note utilizes a simple example to illustrate that the acceleration amplification resulting from the dynamic response of a structural system can indeed be significantly higher than the amplifications indicated in the response spectrum, and that the GEMINI program is computing the appropriate acceleration levels for a simple MDOF system.

  19. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of high gradient ({ge} 1 GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented.

  20. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  1. Building Integrated Pathways to Sustainable Careers: An Introduction to the Accelerated Opportunity Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleasants, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    "Accelerating Opportunity" responds to the nation's growing need for improved pathways from Adult Basic Education (ABE) to credentials of value in the labor market. It builds on promising practices developed in "Breaking Through," an initiative of Jobs for the Future and the National Council for Workforce Education, and Washington State's…

  2. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  3. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  4. Investigations of the plasma and structure based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady

    2012-08-30

    The objective of our research during the reported period was three-fold: (a) theoretical investigation of novel mechanisms of injection into laser wake field accelerators; (b) theoretical investigation of single-shot frequency domain diagnostics of relativistic plasma wakes, specifically in the context of spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma bubble;(c) experimental and theoretical investigation of laser-driven accelerating structure, specifically in the context of the Surface Wave Accelerator Based on SiC (SWABSIC).

  5. ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR STRUCTURES USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S; Poole, B; Caporaso, G

    2007-06-15

    Proton accelerator structures for medical applications using Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) technology allow for the utilization of high electric field gradients on the order of 100 MV/m to accelerate the proton bunch. Medical applications involving cancer therapy treatment usually desire short bunch lengths on the order of hundreds of picoseconds in order to limit the extent of the energy deposited in the tumor site (in 3D space, time, and deposited proton charge). Electromagnetic simulations of the DWA structure, in combination with injections of proton bunches have been performed using 3D finite difference codes in combination with particle pushing codes. Electromagnetic simulations of DWA structures includes these effects and also include the details of the switch configuration and how that switch time affects the electric field pulse which accelerates the particle beam.

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Wakefield Acceleration in a Tunable Dielectric Loaded Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Antipov, S.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Gai, W.

    2011-04-22

    We report on a collinear wakefield experiment using the first tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure. By introducing an extra layer of nonlinear ferroelectric, which has a dielectric constant sensitive to temperature and dc bias, the frequency of a dielectric loaded accelerating structure can be tuned. During the experiment, the energy of a witness bunch at a fixed delay with respect to the drive beam was measured while the temperature of the structure was scanned over a 50 deg. C range. The energy change corresponded to a change of more than half of the nominal structure wavelength.

  7. Experimental demonstration of Wakefield acceleration in a tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Antipov, S.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.

    2011-04-21

    We report on a collinear wakefield experiment using the first tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure. By introducing an extra layer of nonlinear ferroelectric, which has a dielectric constant sensitive to temperature and dc bias, the frequency of a dielectric loaded accelerating structure can be tuned. During the experiment, the energy of a witness bunch at a fixed delay with respect to the drive beam was measured while the temperature of the structure was scanned over a 50 C range. The energy change corresponded to a change of more than half of the nominal structure wavelength.

  8. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Gu, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility. It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam, which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser. In this paper, a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility. Throughout the comprehensive simulation, we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  9. Structured career pathways in academic primary care.

    PubMed

    Foy, Robbie; Eccles, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Research in primary care has much to offer researchers and ultimately efforts to improve population health and health care. There is a need for capacity building and efforts to improve the science of research in this field. This article outlines a relatively structured career pathway for primary care researchers and offers advice on opportunities and commonly encountered pitfalls. It is largely based upon the authors' experiences and personal reflections as medically trained researchers but many of the implications and lessons are relevant to other clinical and research disciplines.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Woodpile Structures for Direct Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; England, R.J.; Ng, J.; Noble, R.J.; Peralta, E.; Soong, K.; Spencer, J.; Walz, D.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2010-08-26

    An eight and nine layer three dimensional photonic crystal with a defect designed specifically for accelerator applications has been fabricated. The structures were fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques, including low pressure chemical vapor deposition, optical lithography, and chemical mechanical polishing. Limits imposed by the optical lithography set the minimum feature size to 400 nm, corresponding to a structure with a bandgap centered at 4.26 {micro}m. Reflection spectroscopy reveal a peak in reflectivity about the predicted region, and good agreement with simulation is shown. The eight and nine layer structures will be aligned and bonded together to form the complete seventeen layer woodpile accelerator structure.

  11. Development of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2010-11-04

    This paper presents a progress report on the development and testing of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Recent tests on several quartz DLA structures with different inner diameters are reported. Designs for gap-free DLA structures are presented. Also, planned new experiments are discussed, including higher gradient traveling-wave and standing-wave structures and special grooved structures for multipactor suppression.

  12. EM Structure-Based Accelerators Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, W.D.; Lidia, S.M.

    2004-12-07

    This Working Group (WG) focused on EM Structure-Based Accelerators, which covers a broad area of mechanisms and experiments. Topics covered included dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWA), photonic bandgap accelerators (PBGA), inverse free electron lasers (IFEL), vacuum laser accelerators (VLA), other novel schemes, and supporting analysis and modeling. In addition, this WG was tasked at the Workshop with developing conceptual (strawman) designs for a 1-GeV accelerator system based upon any of the experimentally-proven approaches covered in this WG. Two strawmen designs were developed based upon IFELs and DWAs. The presentations given and strawmen designs indicate great progress has been made in many areas. Proof-of-principle experiments will occur shortly in PBGA and VLA. Other well-proven devices, such as IFELs, are becoming accepted as 'workhorse' providers of microbunches.

  13. A structural pathway for activation of the kinesin motor ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Mikyung; Zhang, Xiaohua; Park, Cheon-Gil; Park, Hee-Won; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors move along actin or microtubules by rapidly hydrolyzing ATP and undergoing changes in filament-binding affinity with steps of the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. It is generally accepted that motor binding to its filament greatly increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis, but the structural changes in the motor associated with ATPase activation are not known. To identify the conformational changes underlying motor movement on its filament, we solved the crystal structures of three kinesin mutants that decouple nucleotide and microtubule binding by the motor, and block microtubule-activated, but not basal, ATPase activity. Conformational changes in the structures include a disordered loop and helices in the switch I region and a visible switch II loop, which is disordered in wild-type structures. Switch I moved closer to the bound nucleotide in two mutant structures, perturbing water-mediated interactions with the Mg2+. This could weaken Mg2+ binding and accelerate ADP release to activate the motor ATPase. The structural changes we observe define a signaling pathway within the motor for ATPase activation that is likely to be essential for motor movement on microtubules. PMID:11387196

  14. Mutational Pathway Determines Whether Drug Gradients Accelerate Evolution of Drug-Resistant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Philip; Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2012-08-01

    Drug gradients are believed to play an important role in the evolution of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and tumors resistant to anticancer drugs. We use a statistical physics model to study the evolution of a population of malignant cells exposed to drug gradients, where drug resistance emerges via a mutational pathway involving multiple mutations. We show that a nonuniform drug distribution has the potential to accelerate the emergence of resistance when the mutational pathway involves a long sequence of mutants with increasing resistance, but if the pathway is short or crosses a fitness valley, the evolution of resistance may actually be slowed down by drug gradients. These predictions can be verified experimentally, and may help to improve strategies for combating the emergence of resistance.

  15. The structural response of a rail accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-1o) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected.

  16. The structural response of a rail acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-10) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35412

  17. Optimization of quasiperiodic structures in a linear resonance ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garashchenko, F. G.; Sokolov, L. S.; Tsulaya, A. V.

    1980-06-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the parameters of a linear ion accelerator with rectangular or trapezoidal shape of the accelerating voltage between the tubes, systematic allowance being made for the quasiperiodicity of their arrangement. Numerical calculations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the method and also the fairly simple structure of its realization. A detailed algorithm is given. An estimate is made of the interval of entrance phases, the maximal value of which exceeds by several percent the limits previously predicted.

  18. Transverse wake field simulations for the ILC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Details of wake potential simulation in the acceleration structure of ILC, including the RF cavities and input/HOM couplers are presented. Transverse wake potential dependence is described versus the bunch length. Beam emittance dilution caused by main and HOM couplers is estimated, followed by a discussion of possible structural modifications allowing a reduction of transverse wake potential.

  19. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  20. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  1. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  2. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  3. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  4. Psychiatric Disorders, Morbidity, and Mortality: Tracing Mechanistic Pathways to Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Wilson, Stephanie J

    2016-09-01

    A meta-analysis published in this issue of Psychosomatic Medicine provides convincing evidence that certain psychiatric populations have shorter telomeres than nonpsychiatric controls, in accord with the strong evidence linking psychiatric disorders with premature mortality. After addressing the clinical significance of shorter telomeres, this editorial describes mechanistic pathways that lead to telomere shortening. Additionally, two other novel methods for measuring biological markers of accelerated aging are briefly discussed: DNA methylation and cellular senescence based on p16. These innovative approaches could be used to confirm and extend our understanding of psychiatric patients' increased health and mortality risks.

  5. Grating-based deflecting, focusing, and diagnostic dielectric laser accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    Recent technological advances has made possible the realization of the first laser-driven particle accelerator structure to be fabricated lithographically. However, a complete particle accelerator requires more than just accelerating elements. In this paper, we present a grating-based design for three other quintessential accelerator elements: the focusing structure, the deflecting structure, and the diagnostic structure.

  6. Two-beam, Multi-mode Detuned Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A two-beam accelerator structure is described having several novel features including all metal construction, no transfer structures required between the drive and accelerator channels, symmetric fields at the axes of each channel, RF micropulse widths on cavity irises that are less than half those for a conventional cavity at the same fundamental frequency by virtue of using several harmonically-related cavity modes, and a transformer ratio much greater than unity by the use of detuned cavities. Detuning is also shown to allow either parallel or anti-parallel directions for the drive and accelerated beams. A preliminary calculation for the dilution of emittance due to short-range wakes for drive beam parameters similar to those for CLIC shows this effect to be acceptably small.

  7. Acceleration of stable interface structure searching using a kriging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Shin; Oda, Hiromi; Tsuda, Koji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2016-04-01

    Crystalline interfaces have a tremendous impact on the properties of materials. Determination of the atomic structure of the interface is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the interface properties. Despite this importance, extensive calculation is necessary to determine even one interface structure. In this study, we apply a technique called kriging, borrowed from geostatistics, to accelerate the determination of the interface structure. The atomic structure of simplified coincidence-site lattice interfaces were determined using the kriging approach. Our approach successfully determined the most stable interface structure with an efficiency almost 2 orders of magnitude better than the traditional “brute force” approach.

  8. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS

  9. Exploring ligand dissociation pathways from aminopeptidase N using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Tu, GuoGang; Lai, XiaoPing; Kuang, BinHai; Li, ShaoHua

    2016-10-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is a zinc-dependent ectopeptidase involved in cell proliferation, secretion, invasion, and angiogenesis, and is widely recognized as an important cancer target. However, the mechanisms whereby ligands leave the active site of APN remain unknown. Investigating ligand dissociation processes is quite difficult, both in classical simulation methods and in experimental approaches. In this study, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulation was used to investigate the potential dissociation pathways of ligand from APN. The results revealed three pathways (channels A, B and C) for ligand release. Channel A, which matches the hypothetical channel region, was the most preferred region for bestatin to dissociate from the enzyme, and is probably the major channel for the inner bound ligand. In addition, two alternative channels (channels B and C) were shown to be possible pathways for ligand egression. Meanwhile, we identified key residues controlling the dynamic features of APN channels. Identification of the dissociation routes will provide further mechanistic insights into APN, which will benefit the development of more promising APN inhibitors. Graphical Abstract The release pathways of bestatin inside active site of aminopeptidase N were simulated using RAMD simulation. PMID:27624165

  10. The signaling pathways by which the Fas/FasL system accelerates oocyte aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Lin, Fei-Hu; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Juan; Li, Hong; Li, You-Wei; Tan, Xiu-Wen; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    In spite of great efforts, the mechanisms for postovulatory oocyte aging are not fully understood. Although our previous work showed that the FasL/Fas signaling facilitated oocyte aging, the intra-oocyte signaling pathways are unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which oxidative stress facilitates oocyte aging and the causal relationship between Ca2+ rises and caspase-3 activation and between the cell cycle and apoptosis during oocyte aging need detailed investigations. Our aim was to address these issues by studying the intra-oocyte signaling pathways for Fas/FasL to accelerate oocyte aging. The results indicated that sFasL released by cumulus cells activated Fas on the oocyte by increasing reactive oxygen species via activating NADPH oxidase. The activated Fas triggered Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum by activating phospholipase C-γ pathway and cytochrome c pathway. The cytoplasmic Ca2+ rises activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and caspase-3. While activated CaMKII increased oocyte susceptibility to activation by inactivating maturation-promoting factor (MPF) through cyclin B degradation, the activated caspase-3 facilitated further Ca2+ releasing that activates more caspase-3 leading to oocyte fragmentation. Furthermore, caspase-3 activation and fragmentation were prevented in oocytes with a high MPF activity, suggesting that an oocyte must be in interphase to undergo apoptosis. PMID:26869336

  11. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Li, Carmen; Young, Rozlyn; Arocena, Joselito M.; Foght, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT) during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae, and Desulfobulbaceae) and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta) transformed FeIII minerals in MFT to amorphous FeII minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant FeIII minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators. PMID:24711806

  12. Evolution of branched regulatory genetic pathways: directional selection on pleiotropic loci accelerates developmental system drift.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Porter, Adam H

    2007-01-01

    Developmental systems are regulated by a web of interacting loci. One common and useful approach in studying the evolution of development is to focus on classes of interacting elements within these systems. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the evolution of traits controlled by branched developmental pathways involving three loci, where one locus regulates two different traits. We examined the system under a variety of selective regimes. In the case where one branch was under stabilizing selection and the other under directional selection, we observed "developmental system drift": the trait under stabilizing selection showed little phenotypic change even though the loci underlying that trait showed considerable evolutionary divergence. This occurs because the pleiotropic locus responds to directional selection and compensatory mutants are then favored in the pathway under stabilizing selection. Though developmental system drift may be caused by other mechanisms, it seems likely that it is accelerated by the same underlying genetic mechanism as that producing the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities that lead to speciation in both linear and branched pathways. We also discuss predictions of our model for developmental system drift and how different selective regimes affect probabilities of speciation in the branched pathway system.

  13. HEART Pathway Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol Implementation: Prospective Pre-Post Interrupted Time Series Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients presenting to US Emergency Departments (ED) with chest pain are hospitalized for comprehensive testing. These evaluations cost the US health system >$10 billion annually, but have a diagnostic yield for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) of <10%. The history/ECG/age/risk factors/troponin (HEART) Pathway is an accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP), designed to improve care for patients with acute chest pain by identifying patients for early ED discharge. Prior efficacy studies demonstrate that the HEART Pathway safely reduces cardiac testing, while maintaining an acceptably low adverse event rate. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of HEART Pathway ADP implementation within a health system. Methods This controlled before-after study will accrue adult patients with acute chest pain, but without ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction on electrocardiogram for two years and is expected to include approximately 10,000 patients. Outcomes measures include hospitalization rate, objective cardiac testing rates (stress testing and angiography), length of stay, and rates of recurrent cardiac care for participants. Results In pilot data, the HEART Pathway decreased hospitalizations by 21%, decreased hospital length (median of 12 hour reduction), without increasing adverse events or recurrent care. At the writing of this paper, data has been collected on >5000 patient encounters. The HEART Pathway has been fully integrated into health system electronic medical records, providing real-time decision support to our providers. Conclusions We hypothesize that the HEART Pathway will safely reduce healthcare utilization. This study could provide a model for delivering high-value care to the 8-10 million US ED patients with acute chest pain each year. ClinicalTrial Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02056964; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02056964 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ccajsgyu) PMID:26800789

  14. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  15. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  16. Improved input and output couplers for SC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Latina, A.; Lunin, A.; Poloubotko, V.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Different couplers are described that allow the reduction of both transverse wake potential and RF kick in the SC acceleration structure of ILC. A simple rotation of the couplers reducing the RF kick and transverse wake kick is discussed for both the main linac and bunch compressors, along with possible limitations of this method. Designs of a coupler unit are presented which preserve axial symmetry of the structure, and provide reduced both the RF kick and transverse wake field.

  17. Woodpile Structure Fabrication for Photonic Crystal Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; England, R. J.; Noble, R. J.; Sears, C. M.; Siemann, R.; Spencer, J.; Waltz, D.; Byer, R. L.; Plettner, T.; Cowan, B. M.

    2009-01-22

    We describe initial steps at fabricating a dielectric photonic bandgap accelerator structure designed to operate at near IR frequencies. Such a structure operating at these frequencies requires extremely small, sub-micron sized features, forcing one to use lithographic means for fabrication. A process based upon lithographic equipment at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility has been developed and a four layer test structure has been fabricated. Unexpected problems with the final etch step, and corresponding modifications to the process flow addressing these problems, are described. Spectroscopic measurements of the structure have been taken and are compared to simulations.

  18. Woodpile Structure Fabrication for Photonic Crystal Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.M.; England, R.J.; Noble, R.J.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.; Spencer, J.; Waltz, D.; /SLAC

    2010-06-30

    We describe initial steps at fabricating a dielectric photonic bandgap accelerator structure designed to operate at near IR frequencies. Such a structure operating at these frequencies requires extremely small, sub-micron sized features, forcing one to use lithographic means for fabrication. A process based upon lithographic equipment at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility has been developed and a four layer test structure has been fabricated. Unexpected problems with the final etch step, and corresponding modifications to the process flow addressing these problems, are described. Spectroscopic measurements of the structure have been taken and are compared to simulations.

  19. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  20. Comparison of the conditioning of high gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Wuensch, Walter; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV /m , at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous prototype CLIC accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of rf pulses and not with the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  1. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  2. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  3. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro. Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo. These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  4. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  5. Development of Dielectric-Based High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.; Kanareykin, A.; Kazakov, S.

    2006-11-27

    High gradient accelerating structures using dielectric-lined circular waveguides have been developed for a number of years at Argonne National Laboratory. In this article, we first report the experimental results of high power rf testing on the quartz based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure carried out on Feb. 2006 at the Naval Research Laboratory. The motivation for this experiment is to test the multipactor effect on different materials under high power and high vacuum condition. Up to 12 MW pulsed rf went through the tube without breakdown. Multipactor appeared during the experiment but with different features compared to other materials like alumina. Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) measurements were introduced into the experiment for the first time to observe the light emission time and intensity. In the second part of this paper, ways to achieve higher gradient for DLA structures are proposed: 1) smaller ID and longitudinal gap free DLA structures to reduce multipactor and obtain higher gradient; 2) new coaxial type coupler to avoid dielectric gap and improve impedance matching; 3) double layered DLA structure to reduce rf loss and enhance shunt impedance as well.

  6. The coupled dipole modes of the NLC accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Gluckstern, R.; Holtkamp, N.

    1992-03-01

    The proposed accelerator cavity of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is a disk-loaded structure composed of 200 cells, operating at 11.42 GHz. The proposed mode of operation is to accelerate bunches in trains of 10, with a bunch spacing of 42 cm. One problem is that one bunch in a train can excite transverse wakefields in the accelerator cavity which, in turn, can deflect following bunches and result in emittance growth. A method of curing this problem is to detune the transverse modes of the cavity. Beam dynamics simulations for the NLC have shown that by keeping the transverse wakefield at the positions of the nine trailing bunches at or below 1 MW/nC/m{sup 2} we can void emittance growth. Earlier, approximate calculations of the wakefields, which did not include the cell-to-cell coupling of the modes, have shown that by the proper Gaussian detuning the above level of cancellation can be achieved. A specific goal of this report is to see if this conclusion still holds when coupling is included in the calculation. Note that in this paper we focus on the modes belonging to the first dipole passband, which are the most important. A special feature of these modes in the detuned NLC cavity is that the cell-to-cell coupling changes sign somewhere in the middle of the structure.

  7. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Guobao; Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  8. An optimized slab-symmetric dielectric-based laser accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-10-21

    A slab-symmetric, partially dielectric filled, laser excited structure which maybe used to accelerate charged particles is analyzed theoretically and computationally. The fields associated with the accelerating mode are calculated, as are aspects of the resonant filling and impedance matching of the structure to the exciting laser. It is shown through computer simulation that the accelerating mode in this structure can be excited resonantly and with large quality factor Q. Practical aspects of implementing this structure as an accelerator are discussed.

  9. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  10. Multipactor discharge in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ang, L. K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a Monte-Carlo model to explain the multipactor discharge and its high-power absorption in a dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structure reported recently [J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004)]. Susceptibility diagrams are constructed. Dynamic calculations for beam loading and its power absorption by the multipactor discharge are performed. It is found that the fraction of power absorbed by multipactor discharge at saturation is much larger than the case of a simple rf window, and it is sensitive to the incident power, which confirms the prior experimental results. This enhanced power absorption is due to the fact that the length of a DLA structure is much larger than the radius of the structure. A resonant condition of a maximum growth region has also been determined numerically and analytically. The difference between the resonant condition and saturation (due to beam loading) is clarified.

  11. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Andrey M; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-06-12

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism-coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  12. Numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an rf electric field under vacuum conditions. MP may occur in various microwave and rf systems such as microwave tubes, rf windows and launchers, accelerating structures, and rf satellite payloads. In this work we present results of MP analysis in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. The starting point of our work was experimental and theoretical studies of DLA structures jointly done by Argonne National Laboratory and Naval Research Laboratory (J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004); J. G. Power et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 877, 362 (2006)). In the theoretical model developed during those studies the space-charge field due to the total number of particles is taken into account as a parameter. We perform our studies using a self-consistent approach with the help of time-dependent two-dimensional code developed at the University of Maryland (O. V. Sinitsyn et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 073102 (2009)). Results include analysis of MP evolution at an early stage, detailed studies of individual electron trajectories, analysis of MP onset time under various conditions and comparison of some results with the experimental data.

  13. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Nian; Wang, Shengru; Zhu, Shasha

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method. PMID:24454528

  14. Blood glucose fluctuation accelerates renal injury involved to inhibit the AKT signaling pathway in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ying, Changjiang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Chang, Zhenzhen; Ling, Hongwei; Cheng, Xingbo; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Blood glucose fluctuation is associated with diabetic nephropathy. However, the mechanism by which blood glucose fluctuation accelerates renal injury is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of blood glucose fluctuation on diabetic nephropathy in rats and investigate its underlying mechanism. Diabetes in the rats was induced by a high sugar, high-fat diet, and a single dose of STZ (35 mg/kg)-injected intraperitoneally. Unstable blood sugar models were induced by subcutaneous insulin injection and intravenous glucose injection alternately. Body weight, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbAlc), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and Creatinine clearance (Ccr) were assessed. T-SOD activity and MDA level were measured by assay kit. Change in renal tissue ultrastructure was observed by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Phosphorylated ser/thr protein kinase (p-AKT) (phosphor-Ser473), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (p-GSK-3β) (phosphor-Ser9), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), B cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (BCL-2), and cleaved-cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase-3 (caspase-3) levels were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. We observed that BUN and Scr were increased in diabetic rats, and Ccr was decreased. Furthermore, blood glucose fluctuations could exacerbate the Ccr changes. Renal tissue ultrastructure was also seriously injured by glucose variability in diabetic rats. In addition, glucose fluctuation increased the oxidative stress of renal tissue. Moreover, fluctuating blood glucose decreased p-AKT level and BCL-2, and increased p-GSK-3β, BAX, cleaved-caspase-3 levels, and ratio of BAX/BCL-2 in the kidneys of diabetic rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that blood glucose fluctuation accelerated renal injury is due, at least in part to its oxidative stress promoting and inhibiting the AKT signaling pathway in diabetic rats. PMID:26860515

  15. Investigation of Beam-RF Interactions in Twisted Waveguide Accelerating Structures Using Beam Tracking Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Yan; Kang, Yoon W; Galambos, John D; Hassan, Mohamed H; Wilson, Joshua L

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of the RF properties of certain twisted waveguide structures show that they support favorable accelerating fields. This makes them potential candidates for accelerating cavities. Using the particle tracking code, ORBIT, We examine the beam - RF interaction in the twisted cavity structures to understand their beam transport and acceleration properties. The results will show the distinctive properties of these new structures for particle transport and acceleration, which have not been previously analyzed.

  16. Sodium humate accelerates cutaneous wound healing by activating TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Aijun; Chen, Xiaobin; Che, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Sodium humate (HA-Na) has been topically used as a wound healing and anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. In the present study, HA-Na was investigated for cutaneous wound healing in Sprague–Dawley rats. HA-Na solution (1.0%, w/v) was topically administered to rats undergoing excision wound models. Healing was assessed with a recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor for external use as positive control. Wound healing rates were calculated on Day 3, 6, 9, 14 and 21 after injury, and tissues were also harvested after the same intervals for histological analysis. In addition, tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured. Furthermore, mRNA levels and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β1, 2, 3 (TGF-β1, 2, 3) were determined by RT-PCR and western blot. Protein expression levels of Smad-2, -3, -4 and -7 were also detected by western blot. Our study demonstrates that HA-Na has the capacity to promote wound healing in rats via accelerated wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content. More importantly, these wound healing effects of HA-Na might be mediated through the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. HA-Na may be an effective agent for enhanced wound healing. PMID:27006897

  17. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  18. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Neuro-fuzzy control of structures using acceleration feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurter, Kyle C.; Roschke, Paul N.

    2001-08-01

    This paper described a new approach for the reduction of environmentally induced vibration in constructed facilities by way of a neuro-fuzzy technique. The new control technique is presented and tested in a numerical study that involves two types of building models. The energy of each building is dissipated through magnetorheological (MR) dampers whose damping properties are continuously updated by a fuzzy controller. This semi-active control scheme relies on the development of a correlation between the accelerations of the building (controller input) and the voltage applied to the MR damper (controller output). This correlation forms the basis for the development of an intelligent neuro-fuzzy control strategy. To establish a context for assessing the effectiveness of the semi-active control scheme, responses to earthquake excitation are compared with passive strategies that have similar authority for control. According to numerical simulation, MR dampers are less effective control mechanisms than passive dampers with respect to a single degree of freedom (DOF) building model. On the other hand, MR dampers are predicted to be superior when used with multiple DOF structures for reduction of lateral acceleration.

  20. A Targeted Inhibitor of the Alternative Complement Pathway Accelerates Recovery From Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Jones, Bryan W.; Williamson, Tucker; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Morphologic and genetic evidence exists that an overactive complement system driven by the complement alternative pathway (AP) is involved in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Smoking is the only modifiable risk factor for AMD. As we have shown that smoke-related ocular pathology can be prevented in mice that lack an essential activator of AP, we ask here whether this pathology can be reversed by increasing inhibition in AP. Methods Mice were exposed to either cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 6 months). Smoke-exposed animals were then treated with the AP inhibitor (CR2-fH) or vehicle control (PBS) for the following 3 months. Spatial frequency and contrast sensitivity were assessed by optokinetic response paradigms at 6 and 9 months; additional readouts included assessment of retinal morphology by electron microscopy (EM) and gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The CS mice treated with CR2-fH showed significant improvement in contrast threshold compared to PBS-treated mice, whereas spatial frequency was unaffected by CS or pharmacologic intervention. Treatment with CR2-fH in CS animals reversed thinning of the retina observed in PBS-treated mice as analyzed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and reversed most morphologic changes in RPE and Bruch's membrane seen in CS animals by EM. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that AP inhibitors not only prevent, but have the potential to accelerate the clearance of complement-mediated ocular injury. Improving our understanding of the regulation of the AP is paramount to developing novel treatment approaches for AMD. PMID:27064393

  1. Empirical comparison of structure-based pathway methods

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Maria K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed to estimate pathway activities from expression profiles, and yet, there is not enough information available about the performance of those methods. This makes selection of a suitable tool for pathway analysis difficult. Although methods based on simple gene lists have remained the most common approach, various methods that also consider pathway structure have emerged. To provide practical insight about the performance of both list-based and structure-based methods, we tested six different approaches to estimate pathway activities in two different case study settings of different characteristics. The first case study setting involved six renal cell cancer data sets, and the differences between expression profiles of case and control samples were relatively big. The second case study setting involved four type 1 diabetes data sets, and the profiles of case and control samples were more similar to each other. In general, there were marked differences in the outcomes of the different pathway tools even with the same input data. In the cancer studies, the results of a tested method were typically consistent across the different data sets, yet different between the methods. In the more challenging diabetes studies, almost all the tested methods detected as significant only few pathways if any. PMID:26197809

  2. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  3. Comparisons of radio frequency technology for superconducting accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimber, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities, normal conducting as well as superconducting, there has been a need to drive them with RF power. At first glance, the function of an RF drive system may seem simple and straightforward, but this belies subtleties that greatly affect the performance of the cavity itself, diminishing efforts in perfecting techniques in design and manufacture. It can also contribute to a significant portion of the initial capital and ongoing running costs of a facility, maintenance labor, downtime and future expenditure as the system ages. The RF `system', should be thought of as just that, the entire collection of components from wall plug to cavity. Following this integrated approach will enable the system to meet or exceed its design goals. This paper seeks to review the current state of RF technology for superconducting structures and to compare these technologies, looking at what has traditionally been used, developments that have enabled higher efficiencies and higher reliabilities as well as looking towards future technologies. It will concentrate on superconducting applications, but much of the narrative is equally applicable to normal conducting structures as well.

  4. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. PMID:27236213

  5. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  6. Inositol triphosphate participates in an oestradiol nongenomic signalling pathway involved in accelerated oviductal transport in cycling rats.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Pedro A; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Zuñiga, Lidia M; Croxatto, Horacio B

    2006-03-01

    Oestradiol (E(2)) accelerates oviductal transport of oocytes in cycling rats through a nongenomic pathway that involves the cAMP-PKA signalling cascade. Here we examined the role of the inositol triphosphate (IP3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades in this nongenomic pathway. Oestrous rats were injected with E(2) s.c. and intrabursally (i.b) with the selective inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) ET-18-OCH(3) or MAPK PD98059. The number of eggs in the oviduct assessed 24 h later showed that ET-18-OCH(3) blocked E(2)-induced egg transport acceleration, whereas PD98059 had no effect. Other oestrous rats were treated with E(2) s.c. and 1, 3 or 6 h later oviducts were excised and the levels of IP3 and phosphorylated MAPK p44/42 (activated) were determined by radioreceptor assay and western blot, respectively. Oestradiol administration increased IP3 level at 1 and 6 h after treatment, whereas activated MAPK p44/42 level was unchanged. Finally, we explored whether cAMP-PKA and PLC-IP3 signalling cascades are coupled. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by i.b. injection of SQ 22536 blocked the increase of IP3 levels induced by E(2), while inhibition of PLC by ET-18-OCH(3) had no effect on E(2)-induced PKA activity. Furthermore, activation of adenylyl cyclase by Forskolin increased oviductal IP3 levels. Thus, activation of PLC-IP3 by E(2) requires previous stimulation of cAMP-PKA. We conclude that the nongenomic pathway utilised by E(2) to accelerate oviductal transport of oocytes in cycling rats involves successive activation of the cAMP-PKA and PLC-IP3 signalling cascades and does not require activation of MAPK. These findings clearly illustrate a non-genomic pathway triggered by E(2) that regulates a complex physiologic process accomplished by an entire organ.

  7. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Ishoey, Thomas; Brinza, Dumitru; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Coates, R Cameron; Liu, Wei-ting; Gerwick, Lena; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pevzner, Pavel; Lasken, Roger; Gerwick, William H

    2011-04-12

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  8. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  9. A semi-automated system for the characterization of NLC accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.M.; Bowden, G.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Loewen, R.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.

    1995-06-01

    *A system for characterizing the phase shift per cell of a long X-band accelerator structure is described. The fields within the structure are perturbed by a small cylindrical metal bead pulled along the axis. A computer controls the bead position and processes the data from a network analyzer connected to the accelerator section. Measurements made on prototype accelerator sections are described, and they are shown to be in good agreement with theory.

  10. Exploration of the antagonist CP-376395 escape pathway for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 by random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qifeng; Shi, Danfeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), plays an important role in the treatment of osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, migraine and anxiety. To explore the escape pathway of the antagonist CP-376395 in the binding pocket of CRF1R, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, dynamical network analysis, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations and adaptive biasing force (ABF) calculations were performed on the crystal structure of CRF1R in complex with CP-376395. The results of dynamical network analysis show that TM7 of CRF1R has the strongest edges during MD simulation. The bent part of TM7 forms a V-shape pocket with Gly356(7.50). Asn283(5.50) has high hydrogen bond occupancy during 100 ns MD simulations and is the key interaction residue with the antagonist in the binding pocket of CRF1R. RAMD simulation has identified three possible pathways (PW1, PW2 and PW3) for CP-376395 to escape from the binding pocket of CRF1R. The PW3 pathway was proved to be the most likely escape pathway for CP-376395. The free energy along the PW3 pathway was calculated by using ABF simulations. Two energy barriers were found along the reaction coordinates. Residues Leu323(6.49), Asn283(5.50) and Met206(3.47) contribute to the steric hindrance for the first energy barrier. Residues His199(3.40) and Gln355(7.49) contribute to the second energy barrier through the hydrogen bonding interaction between CP-376395 and CRF1R. The results of our study can not only provide useful information to understand the interaction mechanism between CP-376395 and CRF1R, but also provide the details about the possible escape pathway and the free energy profile of CP-376395 in the pocket of CRF1R.

  11. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-01

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+. PMID:17914902

  12. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  13. X-band dielectric loaded RF driven accelerator structures: Theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    An important area of application of high-power radio frequency (RF) and microwave sources is particle acceleration. A major challenge for the current worldwide research and development effort in linear accelerator is the search for a compact and affordable very-high-energy accelerator technology for the next generation supercolliders. It has been recognized for sometime that dielectric loaded accelerator structures are attractive candidates for the next generation very-high-energy linear accelerators, because they possess several distinct advantages over conventional metallic iris- loaded accelerator structures. However, some fundamental issues, such as RF breakdown in the dielectric, Joule heating, and vacuum properties of dielectric materials, are still the subjects of intense investigation, requiring the validation by experiments conducted at high power levels. An X-band traveling-wave accelerator based on dielectric-lined waveguide has been designed and constructed. Numerical calculation, bench measurements, and 3-D electromagnetic field simulation of this dielectric loaded accelerator are presented. One critical technical problem in constructing such dielectric loaded accelerator is efficient coupling of RF power into the dielectric-lined circular waveguide. A coupling scheme has been arrived at by empirical methods. Field distribution in this coupling configuration has been studied by numerical simulation. In the conventional iris-loaded accelerator structures, the peak surface electric field E s is in general found to be at least a factor of 2 higher than the axial acceleration field Ea. Because the peak surface electric field causes electric breakdown of the structure, it represents a direct limitation on the maximum acceleration gradient that can be obtained. A novel hybrid dielectric-iris-loaded periodic accelerator structure is proposed to utilize the advantages of both dielectric-lined waveguides and conventional iris-loaded structures. Numerical

  14. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  15. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  16. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) development via computationally predicted AOP networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. Ho...

  17. Simulation Studies of the Dielectric Grating as an Accelerating and Focusing Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Peralta, E.A.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A grating-based design is a promising candidate for a laser-driven dielectric accelerator. Through simulations, we show the merits of a readily fabricated grating structure as an accelerating component. Additionally, we show that with a small design perturbation, the accelerating component can be converted into a focusing structure. The understanding of these two components is critical in the successful development of any complete accelerator. The concept of accelerating electrons with the tremendous electric fields found in lasers has been proposed for decades. However, until recently the realization of such an accelerator was not technologically feasible. Recent advances in the semiconductor industry, as well as advances in laser technology, have now made laser-driven dielectric accelerators imminent. The grating-based accelerator is one proposed design for a dielectric laser-driven accelerator. This design, which was introduced by Plettner, consists of a pair of opposing transparent binary gratings, illustrated in Fig. 1. The teeth of the gratings serve as a phase mask, ensuring a phase synchronicity between the electromagnetic field and the moving particles. The current grating accelerator design has the drive laser incident perpendicular to the substrate, which poses a laser-structure alignment complication. The next iteration of grating structure fabrication seeks to monolithically create an array of grating structures by etching the grating's vacuum channel into a fused silica wafer. With this method it is possible to have the drive laser confined to the plane of the wafer, thus ensuring alignment of the laser-and-structure, the two grating halves, and subsequent accelerator components. There has been previous work using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (2D-FDTD) calculations to evaluate the performance of the grating accelerator structure. However, this work approximates the grating as an infinite structure and does not accurately model a

  18. Auroral ion acceleration from lower hybrid solitary structures: A summary of sounding rocket observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Schuck, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Coffey, V.

    In this paper we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen in nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) in lower hybrid solitary structures (LHSS). The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90° pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a few hundred meters across B. The acceleration process does not affect the thermal core of the ambient distribution and does not directly create a measurable effect on the ambient ion population outside the LHSS themselves. This precludes observation with these data of any nonlinear feedback between the ion acceleration and the existence or evolution of the density irregularities on which these LHSS events grow. Within the LHSS region the acceleration process creates a high-energy tail beginning at a few times the thermal ion speed. The ion acceleration events are closely associated with localized wave events. Accelerated ions bursts are also seen without a concurrent observation of a localized wave event, for two possible reasons. In some cases, the pitch angles of the accelerated tail ions are elevated above perpendicular; that is, the acceleration occurred below the observer and the mirror force has begun to act upon the distribution, moving it upward from the source. In other cases, the accelerated ion structure is spatially larger than the wave event structure, and the observation catches only the ion event. The occurrence rate of these ion acceleration events is related to the ambient environment in two ways: its altitude dependence can be modeled with the parameter B2/ne, and it is highest in regions of intense VLF activity. The cumulative ion outflow from these LHSS TAI is

  19. Designing the structure and folding pathway of modular topological bionanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ljubetič, A; Drobnak, I; Gradišar, H; Jerala, R

    2016-04-18

    Polypeptides and polynucleotides are programmable natural polymers whose linear sequence can be easily designed and synthesized by the cellular transcription/translation machinery. Nature primarily uses proteins as the molecular machines and nucleic acids as the medium for the manipulation of heritable information. A protein's tertiary structure and function is defined by multiple cooperative weak long-range interactions that have been optimized through evolution. DNA nanotechnology uses orthogonal pairwise interacting modules of complementary nucleic acids as a strategy to construct defined complex 3D structures. A similar approach has recently been applied to protein design, using orthogonal dimerizing coiled-coil segments as interacting modules. When concatenated into a single polypeptide chain, they self-assemble into the 3D structure defined by the topology of interacting modules within the chain. This approach allows the construction of geometric polypeptide scaffolds, bypassing the folding problem of compact proteins by relying on decoupled pairwise interactions. However, the folding pathway still needs to be optimized in order to allow rapid self-assembly under physiological conditions. Again the modularity of designed topological structures can be used to define the rules that guide the folding pathway of long polymers, such as DNA, based on the stability and topology of connected building modules. This approach opens the way towards incorporation of designed foldamers in biological systems and their functionalization. PMID:27001947

  20. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Aimidula, A.; Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S.; Welsch, C. P.; Xia, G.; Mete, O.; Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K.

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  1. Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar diamond accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Butler, J. E.; Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Gai, W.

    2012-03-26

    We have directly measured THz wakefields induced by a subpicosecond, intense relativistic electron bunch in a diamond loaded accelerating structure via the wakefield acceleration method. We present here the beam test results from the diamond based structure. Diamond has been chosen for its high breakdown threshold and unique thermoconductive properties. Fields produced by a leading (drive) beam were used to accelerate a trailing (witness) electron bunch, which followed the drive bunch at a variable distance. The energy gain of a witness bunch as a function of its separation from the drive bunch describes the time structure of the generated wakefield.

  2. SLAB symmetric dielectric micron scale structures for high gradient electron acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-06-12

    A class of planar microstructure is proposed which provide high accelerating gradients when excited by an infrared laser pulse. These structures consist of parallel dielectric slabs separated by a vacuum gap; the dielectric or the outer surface coating are spatially modulated at the laser wavelength along the beam direction so as to support a standing wave accelerating field. We have developed numerical and analytic models of the accelerating mode fields in the structure. We show an optimized coupling scheme such that this mode is excited resonantly with a large quality factor. The status of planned experiments on fabricating and measuring these planar structures will be described.

  3. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  4. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  5. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    1985-05-01

    In the 1970's major advances in the understanding of auroral processes were brought about by observations of plasmas and electric fields within the regions of space responsible for auroral particle acceleration. The major contribution of these observations was the verification of the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large regions of altitude (1000 to 20000 kilometers). These electric fields constitute potential drops of several kilovolts, accelerating magnetospheric electrons downward to form the aurora and ionospheric ions upward, where they contribute significantly to the magnetospheric hot ion population. Perpendicular spatial scales of about 100 kilometers are most common, although finer scales have been observed embedded, and individual small amplitude double layers occur on much smaller parallel spatial scales. More recently, the same data sets have revealed the existance of about 100 V electric potential drops directed downward in return current regions. Downward electric fields are in a direction to accelerate electrons out of the ionsphere and tend to retard the propagation of ions upward. An association between upflowing electron beams and transversely heated ions at low altitude has been noted, and a casual relationship between downward electric fields and ion conics is suggested.

  6. Refining the nuclear auxin response pathway through structural biology.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; Jez, Joseph M; Strader, Lucia C

    2015-10-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Classical molecular and genetic techniques employed over the past 20 years identified the major players in auxin-mediated gene expression and suggest a canonical auxin response pathway. In recent years, structural and biophysical studies clarified the molecular details of auxin perception, the recognition of DNA by auxin transcription factors, and the interaction of auxin transcription factors with repressor proteins. These studies refine the auxin signal transduction model and raise new questions that increase the complexity of auxin signaling.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Ziping; Bai, Xiufeng; Li, Gang; Zhang, Caidi; He, Sanhu; Li, Weihong; Lajud, Shayanne A; Duan, Yinzhong; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor)/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  8. Acceleration of the GAMESS-UK electronic structure package on graphical processing units.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Karl A; Sherwood, Paul; Guest, Martyn F; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2011-07-30

    The approach used to calculate the two-electron integral by many electronic structure packages including generalized atomic and molecular electronic structure system-UK has been designed for CPU-based compute units. We redesigned the two-electron compute algorithm for acceleration on a graphical processing unit (GPU). We report the acceleration strategy and illustrate it on the (ss|ss) type integrals. This strategy is general for Fortran-based codes and uses the Accelerator compiler from Portland Group International and GPU-based accelerators from Nvidia. The evaluation of (ss|ss) type integrals within calculations using Hartree Fock ab initio methods and density functional theory are accelerated by single and quad GPU hardware systems by factors of 43 and 153, respectively. The overall speedup for a single self consistent field cycle is at least a factor of eight times faster on a single GPU compared with that of a single CPU. PMID:21541963

  9. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O' Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  10. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    Observations of plasmas and electric field activity within regions of auroral particle acceleration have verified the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large altitude regions. Evidence is presented which indicates that small-ampliatude double layers along the auroral magnetic field lines may provide a mechanism for the maintenance of auroral ion potential. Evidence is also presented of downward-directed parallel electric fields along the magnetic field lines in the return current region. It is suggested that the downward electric fields may have significant effects on ion trajectories, and further theoretical investigation of the effects of downward parallel electric fields on ion conic formation is recommended.

  11. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2014-07-22

    This report consists of two parts. In the first part we describe a study of the heating of microprotrusions on surfaces of accelerating structures. This ;process is believed to lead to breakdown in these structures. Our study revealed that for current accelerator parameters melting should not occur due to space charge limitations of the current emitted by a protrusion. The second part describes a novel concept to develop THz range sources based on harmonic cyclotron masers for driving future colliders. This work was stimulated by a recent request of SLAC to develop high power, high-efficiency sources of sub-THz radiation for future high-gradient accelerators.

  12. Cold test results of a side-coupled standing-wave electron-accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ki Baek; Li, Yonggui; Lee, Sanghyun; Lee, Byeong-No; Park, Hyung Dal; Cha, Sung-Su; Lee, Byung Cheol

    2013-07-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) cavity for the dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator (LINAC) is designed for a cargo inspection system (CIS) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The cold test results of the electron accelerator structure, which has a side-coupled standing-wave interlaced-pulse dual-energy mode, are described. The design concept, basic structure, microwave-tuning method, and cold-test procedure are described as well. The measured dispersion curve, spectrum characteristics, ρ-f relation of the power coupler, and axial field distribution of the accelerating gradient are provided.

  13. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Arkell, Nicholas; Young, Rozlyn; Li, Carmen; Guigard, Selma; Underwood, Eleisha; Foght, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT) amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal) produced methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 vs. unamended MFT (pH 7.7). About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) and increasing bicarbonate (HCO−3) in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL) of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics. PMID:24711805

  14. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Arkell, Nicholas; Young, Rozlyn; Li, Carmen; Guigard, Selma; Underwood, Eleisha; Foght, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT) amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal) produced methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 vs. unamended MFT (pH 7.7). About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) and increasing bicarbonate (HCO(-) 3) in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL) of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics. PMID:24711805

  15. Glucocorticoids accelerate maturation of the heme pathway in fetal liver through effects on transcription and DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Khulan, Batbayar; Liu, Lincoln; Rose, Catherine M.; Boyle, Ashley K.; Manning, Jonathan R.; Drake, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucocorticoids are widely used in threatened preterm labor to promote maturation in many organ systems in preterm babies and have significant beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. We performed transcriptional profiling in fetal liver in a rat model of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and identified marked gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis, utilization, and degradation pathways in late gestation. These changes in gene expression associated with alterations in DNA methylation and with a reduction in hepatic heme concentration. There were no persistent differences in gene expression, DNA methylation, or heme concentrations at 4 weeks of age, suggesting that these are transient effects. Our findings are consistent with glucocorticoid-induced accelerated maturation of the haematopoietic system and support the hypothesis that glucocorticoids can drive changes in gene expression in association with alterations in DNA methylation. PMID:26889791

  16. A mm-wave planar microcavity structure for electron linear accelerator system

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.; Mills, F.; Mavrogenes, G.; Henke, H.

    1993-07-01

    The muffin-tin cavity structure is planar and well suited for mm-wave accelerator with silicon etching techniques. A constant impedance traveling-wave structure is considered for design simplicity. The RF parameters are calculated and the shunt impedance is compared with the shunt impedance of a disk loaded cylindrical structure.

  17. Rosiglitazone impedes Porphyromonas gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis by downregulating the TLR/NF-κB signaling pathway in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shengbo; Lei, Lang; Chen, Shuai; Li, Houxuan; Yan, Fuhua

    2014-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis,a predominant periodontal pathogen, is known to accelerate atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animals via aberrant inflammatory responses. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential protective role of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone in pathogen accelerated atherosclerosis in an apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mouse model. ApoE-/- mice were inoculated intravenously with live P. gingivalis (strain 33277) or the buffer vehicle and treated with rosiglitazone or saline over a 10-week period. Their atherosclerotic status in aortic artery was assessed through histomorphometric analysis, inflammatory agent and lipid profiles in blood was determined by ELISA, and levels of relevant cytokines and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in aortic tissues were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. P. gingivalis inoculation was associated with increased atherosclerotic plaque formation in the aorta and higher levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and interleukin-1β), but the serum lipid profile was not affected by P. gingivalis infection. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and TLRs were higher in the aortic tissues of mice exposed to P. gingivalis, and activation of nuclear factor-κB was also observed. In both P. gingivalis-treated and -untreated ApoE-/- mice, rosiglitazone treatment was associated with less atherosclerotic plaque formation; lower serum inflammatory cytokines, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol; higher levels of PPARγ, lower amounts of TLR2/4 and downregulated nuclear factor-κB activity in aortic tissues. These findings suggest that rosiglitazone mitigates or prevents P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis by

  18. Laser Acceleration in Vacuum with an Open Iris-Loaded Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1997-07-01

    An open iris-loaded waveguide structure is considered for laser acceleration of highly relativistic particle in vacuum. Complete characterization of eigenmodes are given in analytical form for the structure. In particular acceleration performance of the dominant TM mode is evaluated in detail. Transparent scaling laws are derived, and through which significant advantages over other vacuum laser acceleration schemes are demonstrated. The entire parameter space is searched and it is found that below the laser damage threshold of the structure an acceleration gradient around 1 GV/m can be obtained over a phase slippage length of 10s of cm with TWs laser in the wavelength range from 1 to 10 {micro}m.

  19. Progress toward externally powered x-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Kinead, A. K.; Tantawi, S. G.; Dolgashev, V.; Kanareykin, A.; Konecny, R.; Wanming, L.

    2010-06-01

    We summarize recent progress in a program to develop externally powered dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures that can sustain high accelerating gradients. High-power RF tests of earlier structures showed strong multipactor loading. In addition, arcing at dielectric joints between the uniform DLA structure and matching sections at either end limited the achievable gradient. In this paper, we study the onset of multipactor in a DLA structure. We also study the effect of thin-film TiN coatings applied by atomic layer deposition and the effect of a reduction in the inner diameter of the structure. Test results of these structures show significant decreases in multipactor loading. We also test new structure designs that eliminate separate dielectric matching sections and, thus, the requirement for dielectric joints, including a DLA structure using a coaxial coupler and a clamped DLA structure. The clamped structure demonstrated a significantly improved gradient without breakdown.

  20. Particle Acceleration at Filamentary Structures Downstream of Collisionless Shocks in the Heliosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shocks are an important feature in astrophysical, heliospheric and magnetospheric settings. At these structures plasma is heated, the properties of flows are changed, and particles are accelerated to high energies. Particles are accelerated throughout the heliosphere. There are no times or conditions where suprathermal ions forming tails are not present on the solar wind ion distribution, and given the low speeds of these particles they must be accelerated locally in the heliosphere. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) accelerate particles up to 10s of MeV/nucleon. The termination shock of the solar and the heliosheath produce energetic particles including the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), with energies in excess of 100 MeV. In the last few years' very interesting observations at low energies showing power laws that cannot be explained with commonly accepted acceleration mechanisms and thus increased the need for alternative acceleration processes. Fully consistent kinetic particle simulations such as hybrid simulations appear to be a powerful tool to investigated ion acceleration. Nowadays these simulations can be performed in 3D and relative large simulation domains covering up to hundreds of ion inertial length in size and thus representing the MHD scale. These 3D hybrid simulations show filamentary magnetic and density structures, which could be interpreted as small-scale flux ropes. The growth of these small-scale structures is also associated with ion acceleration. In this talk we will discuss properties of these filamentary structures, their spatial and temporal evolution and the particle dynamics during the acceleration process. The results of this study may be of particular importance for future high resolution magnetospheric and heliospheric mission such as THOR.

  1. Studies of Multipactor in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Structures: Comparison of Simulation Results with Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas Jr.

    2010-11-04

    In this paper new results of numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures are presented. The results are compared with experimental data obtained during recent studies of such structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs, LLC. Good agreement between the theory and experiment was observed for the structures with larger inner diameter, however the structures with smaller inner diameter demonstrated a discrepancy between the two. Possible reasons for such discrepancy are discussed.

  2. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype.

  3. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype. PMID:27100889

  4. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype. PMID:27100889

  5. Ras pathway signaling accelerates programmed cell death in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew J; Crowe, Jonathan D; Ramsdale, Mark

    2006-01-17

    A better understanding of the molecular basis of programmed cell death (PCD) in fungi could provide information that is useful in the design of antifungal drugs that combat life-threatening fungal infections. Harsh environmental stresses, such as acetic acid or hydrogen peroxide, have been shown to induce PCD in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. In this study, we show that dying cells progress from an apoptotic state to a secondary necrotic state and that the rate at which this change occurs is proportional to the intensity of the stimulus. Also, we found that the temporal response is modulated by Ras-cAMP-PKA signals. Mutations that block Ras-cAMP-PKA signaling (ras1Delta, cdc35Delta, tpk1Delta, and tpk2Delta) suppress or delay the apoptotic response, whereas mutations that stimulate signaling (RAS1(val13) and pde2Delta) accelerate the rate of entry of cells into apoptosis. Pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of Ras signaling reinforces these findings. Transient increases in endogenous cAMP occur under conditions that stimulate apoptosis but not growth arrest. Death-specific changes in the abundance of different isoforms of the PKA regulatory subunit, Bcy1p, are also observed. Activation of Ras signals may regulate PCD of C. albicans, either by inhibiting antiapoptotic functions (such as stress responses) or by activating proapoptotic functions. PMID:16407097

  6. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGES

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  7. Experimental studies of W-band accelerator structures at high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Marc Edward

    2001-06-01

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high- energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, higher than any collider. Also presented are the first measurements of the quadrapole component of the monopole accelerating field.

  8. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  9. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, A. O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity, the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  10. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  11. Variable frequency heavy-ion linac, RILAC I. Design, construction and operation of its accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Masatoshi; Chiba, Yoshiaki; Tonuma, Tadao; Hemmi, Masatake; Miyazawa, Yoshitoshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Kambara, Tadashi; Kase, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Fusako

    1984-11-01

    A variable frequency linear accelerator at RIKEN (IPCR), which is named RILAC, is designed to accelerate ions of almost every element in the periodic table. In this report, the design, construction and performance of the resonator cavities of this linac are described. A new accelerating structure was developed for the variable frequency scheme. The principal aim of the development was to obtain a configuration within the cavity to keep a uniform voltage distribution along the accelerating axis over the wide range of resonant frequencies required. The final form adopted is a coaxial quarter-wave type resonator with a race-track-like cross section for its coaxial inner and outer conductors. It has a movable shorting device as a frequency tuner and its open end is enlarged and loaded with drift tubes, connected to the inner and outer conductors alternatingly. The structure can maintain the required uniformity of the accelerating voltage within 10% in spite of resonant frequency tuning between 17 and 45 MHz. A relatively modest accelerating gradient was chosen so that cw operation could be realized. The RILAC is composed of six such cavities which are independently excited and it succeeded in the acceleration of a beam through all the cavities in 1981.

  12. Particle Acceleration: From Galaxies to Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady; Moiseenko, Sergej

    2005-09-28

    In this brief review we discuss current efforts to understand the origin of energetic particles, focussing here on the recent work on the physics of supernova explosions. Acceleration to the highest energy may come from jets and hot spots emanating from massive black holes. If the sky remains smooth in the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays to the highest energies, then we need new sources, and one extreme speculation would be to invoke Lorentz Invariance Violation, with proton decay, neutron survival, and no strong photomeson interaction to higher energy. For the Galactic cosmic rays explosions of red supergiant stars and Wolf Rayet stars may provide much of the cosmic rays. This is intimately connected with the physics of their explosion, and implies that the magneto-rotational mechanism is the main one chosen by Nature. This offers a consistent picture for the X-ray fans of Cas A, and gamma ray bursts. Each of these concepts leads to clear predictions. It will be quite an achievement to prove this or any other proposal -- none is without difficulties. We do have potentially a full theory to account for cosmic rays at all energies; crucial tests will be performed with the current new instruments.

  13. High-Power Testing of 11.424-GHz Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven; Gai, Wei

    2001-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has previously described the design, construction, and bench testing of an X-band traveling-wave accelerating structure loaded with a permittivity=20 dielectric (P. Zou et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2301, 2000.). We describe a new program to build a test accelerator using this structure. The accelerator will be powered by the high-power 11.424-GHz radiation from the magnicon facility at the Naval Research Laboratory ( O.A. Nezhevenko et al., Proc. PAC 2001, in press). The magnicon is expected to provide up to 30 MW from each of two WR-90 output waveguide arms in pulses of up to 1 microsecond duration, permitting tests up to a gradient of 40 MV/m. Still higher power pulses (100-500 MW) may be available at the output of an active pulse compressor driven by the magnicon ( A.L. Vikharev et al., Proc. 9th Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts.).

  14. Circadian Disruption Accelerates Tumor Growth and Angio/Stromagenesis through a Wnt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Shimajiri, Shohei; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kawai, Kazuaki; Kasai, Hiroshi; Shimada, Takashi; Miyake, Koichi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Hirano, Gen; Kidani, Akihiko; Akiyama, Masaki; Han, Bin; Wu, Ying; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a high incidence of cancer in shift workers, suggesting a possible relationship between circadian rhythms and tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism played by circadian rhythms in tumor progression is not known. To identify the possible mechanisms underlying tumor progression related to circadian rhythms, we set up nude mouse xenograft models. HeLa cells were injected in nude mice and nude mice were moved to two different cases, one case is exposed to a 24-hour light cycle (L/L), the other is a more “normal” 12-hour light/dark cycle (L/D). We found a significant increase in tumor volume in the L/L group compared with the L/D group. In addition, tumor microvessels and stroma were strongly increased in L/L mice. Although there was a hypervascularization in L/L tumors, there was no associated increase in the production of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). DNA microarray analysis showed enhanced expression of WNT10A, and our subsequent study revealed that WNT10A stimulates the growth of both microvascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts in tumors from light-stressed mice, along with marked increases in angio/stromagenesis. Only the tumor stroma stained positive for WNT10A and WNT10A is also highly expressed in keloid dermal fibroblasts but not in normal dermal fibroblasts indicated that WNT10A may be a novel angio/stromagenic growth factor. These findings suggest that circadian disruption induces the progression of malignant tumors via a Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:21203463

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  18. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF PROTOCLUSTER GALAXIES: ACCELERATED STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Toft, Sune; Tanaka, Masayuki E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-01-10

    We present a high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging survey in the field of a known protocluster surrounding the powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262 at z = 2.16. Previously, we have shown that this field exhibits a substantial surface overdensity of red J-H galaxies. Here we focus on the stellar masses and galaxy effective radii in an effort to compare and contrast the properties of likely protocluster galaxies with their field counterparts and to look for correlations between galaxy structure and (projected) distance relative to the radio galaxy. We find a hint that quiescent, cluster galaxies are on average less dense than quiescent field galaxies of similar stellar mass and redshift. In fact, we find that only two (of eight) quiescent protocluster galaxies are of similar density to the majority of the massive, quiescent compact galaxies (Semi-Evolved Elephantine Dense galaxies; SEEDs) found in several field surveys. Furthermore, there is some indication that the structural Sersic n parameter is higher (n {approx} 3-4) on average for cluster galaxies compared to the field SEEDs (n {approx} 1-2). This result may imply that the accelerated galaxy evolution expected (and observed) in overdense regions also extends to structural evolution presuming that massive galaxies began as dense (low n) SEEDs and have already evolved to be more in line with local galaxies of the same stellar mass.

  19. Design and fabrication of a traveling-wave muffin-tin accelerating structure at 90 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.; Henke, H.

    1997-05-01

    A prototype of a muffin-tin accelerating structure operating at 32 times the SLAC frequency (2.856 GHz) was built for research in high gradient acceleration. A traveling-wave design with single input and output feeds was chosen for the prototype which was fabricated by wire electrodischarge machining. Features of the mechanical design for the prototype are described. Design improvements are presented including considerations of cooling and vacuum.

  20. Summary Report of Working Group 7: Electromagnetic-Structure Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.; Musumeci, P.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-02

    We detail the most pressing physics and technical issues confronting short-wavelength acceleration. We review new acceleration concepts that are proposed and under development, and recent progress on technical issues such as structure fabrication and material damage. We outline key areas where work is still needed before a reliable assessment of the value of working at wavelengths below 1 cm can be made. Possible ways to enhance collaboration and progress in this important area are also discussed.

  1. Structural basis for autoinhibition and its relief of MOB1 in the Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Tachioka, Yuka; Mori, Tomoyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    MOB1 protein is a key regulator of large tumor suppressor 1/2 (LATS1/2) kinases in the Hippo pathway. MOB1 is present in an autoinhibited form and is activated by MST1/2-mediated phosphorylation, although the precise mechanisms responsible for autoinhibition and activation are unknown due to lack of an autoinhibited MOB1 structure. Here, we report on the crystal structure of full-length MOB1B in the autoinhibited form and a complex between the MOB1B core domain and the N-terminal regulation (NTR) domain of LATS1. The structure of full-length MOB1B shows that the N-terminal extension forms a short β-strand, the SN strand, followed by a long conformationally flexible positively-charged linker and α-helix, the Switch helix, which blocks the LATS1 binding surface of MOB1B. The Switch helix is stabilized by β-sheet formation of the SN strand with the S2 strand of the MOB1 core domain. Phosphorylation of Thr12 and Thr35 residues structurally accelerates dissociation of the Switch helix from the LATS1-binding surface by the “pull-the-string” mechanism, thereby enabling LATS1 binding. PMID:27335147

  2. Random Walk Model for Cell-To-Cell Misalignments in Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2000-09-08

    Due to manufacturing and construction errors, cells in accelerator structures can be misaligned relative to each other. As a consequence, the beam generates a transverse wakefield even when it passes through the structure on axis. The most important effect is the long-range transverse wakefield that deflects the bunches and causes growth of the bunch train projected emittance. In this paper, the effect of the cell-to-cell misalignments is evaluated using a random walk model that assumes that each cell is shifted by a random step relative to the previous one. The model is compared with measurements of a few accelerator structures.

  3. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. Results In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Conclusions Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications. PMID:22369626

  4. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  5. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery

    2010-11-04

    We are investigating a standing wave structure with an rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  6. Update on the Development of Externally Powered Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2009-01-22

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  7. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  8. Update on the development of externally powered dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Kanareykin, A.; Gold, S.; Kinkead, A. K.; High Energy Physics; EuclidTechlabs,; Naval Research Lab.; Icarus Research

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  9. H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O'Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H-mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

  10. High power testing of a fused quartz-based dielectric-loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S. G.; Jing, C.; High Energy Physics; Euclid techlabs, LLC; LET Corp.; SLAC; NRL

    2008-01-01

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  11. High Power Testing of A Fused Quartz-based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  12. Experimental study of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chunguang

    A joint Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) program is under way to investigate X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, using high-power 11.424GHz radiation from the NRL Magnicon facility. As an advanced accelerator concepts, the dielectric-loaded accelerator offers the potential for a simple, inexpensive alternative to high-gradient RF linear accelerators. In this thesis, a comprehensive account of X-band DLA structure design, including theoretical calculation, numerical simulation, fabrication and testing, is presented in detail. Two types of loading dielectrics, alumina and MgxCa1-xTiO 3 (MCT), are investigated. For alumina (with dielectric constant 9.4), no RF breakdown has been observed up to 5 MW of drive power (equivalent to 8MV/m accelerating gradient) in the high power RF testing at NRL, but multipactor was observed to absorb a large fraction of the incident microwave power. Experimental results on suppression of multipactor using TiN coating on the inner surface of the dielectric are also reported. For MCT (with dielectric constant 20), although we did not observe dielectric breakdown in the structures, breakdown did occur at the ceramic joint, where the electric field is greatly enhanced (estimated to be around 100MV/m) due to the micro-scale vacuum gap. In addition, the MCT structure showed significantly less multipactor for the same level of RF field. The thesis also introduced a new design, a multilayered dielectric-loaded accelerating structure, to improve the performance over the conventional one layer DLA structure. Results of analysis for the case of a four layered DLA structure indicate a large reduction of RF power attenuation and an increase of shunt impedance for the structure. Beyond the main contents, the appendices of the thesis present two individual projects prompted by the experimental study of the dielectric-loaded accelerating structure. Appendix A shows a resonant loop technique that can

  13. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-08-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within +/-3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m-1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  14. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    DOE PAGES

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guidingmore » structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.« less

  15. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guiding structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.

  16. Comparisons of electron acceleration efficiency among different structures during magnetic reconnection: a Cluster multicase study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Li, T.; Deng, X.; Huang, S.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection has long been believed to be an efficient engine for energetic electrons production. Four different structures have been proposed for electrons being energized: flux pileup region, density cavity located around the separatrix, magnetic island and thin current sheet. In this paper, we compare the electron acceleration efficiency among these structures based on 12 magnetotail reconnection events observed by the Cluster spacecraft in 2001-2006. We used the flux ratio between the energetic electrons (> 50 keV) and lower energy electrons (< 26 keV) to quantify the electron acceleration efficiency. We do not find any specific sequence in which electrons are accelerated within these structures, though the flux pileup region, magnetic island and thin current sheet have higher probabilities to reach the maximum efficiency among the four structures than the density cavity. However, the most efficient electron energization usually occurs outside these structures. We suggest that other structures may also play important roles in energizing electrons. Our results could provide important constraints for the further modeling of electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection.

  17. Experimental measurements of rf breakdowns and deflecting gradients in mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study of a high gradient metallic accelerating structure at sub-THz frequencies, where we investigated the physics of rf breakdowns. Wakefields in the structure were excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam. We present the first quantitative measurements of gradients and metal vacuum rf breakdowns in sub-THz accelerating cavities. When the beam travels off axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement and changes in the shape of the electron bunch. This behavior can be exploited for subfemtosecond beam diagnostics.

  18. Three-dimensional Dielectric Photonic Crystal Structures for Laser-driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  19. Novel anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 accelerates wound healing via the PI3 kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Hideki; Nakagami, Hironori; Tenma, Akiko; Saito, Yoshimi; Kaga, Toshihiro; Kanamori, Toshihide; Tamura, Nao; Tomono, Kazunori; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel cationic antimicrobial peptide, AG30/5C, which demonstrates angiogenic properties similar to those of LL-37 or PR39. However, improvement of its stability and cost efficacy are required for clinical application. Therefore, we examined the metabolites of AG30/5C, which provided the further optimized compound, SR-0379. SR-0379 enhanced the proliferation of human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDFs) via the PI3 kinase-Akt-mTOR pathway through integrin-mediated interactions. Furthermore SR-0379 promoted the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in co-culture with NHDFs. This compound also displays antimicrobial activities against a number of bacteria, including drug-resistant microbes and fungi. We evaluated the effect of SR-0379 in two different would-healing models in rats, the full-thickness defects under a diabetic condition and an acutely infected wound with full-thickness defects and inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment with SR-0379 significantly accelerated wound healing when compared to fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). The beneficial effects of SR-0379 on wound healing can be explained by enhanced angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, proliferation of endothelial cells and fibroblasts and antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that SR-0379 may have the potential for drug development in wound repair, even under especially critical colonization conditions. PMID:24675668

  20. Comparison of accelerating structures for the first cavity of the main part of the INR linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, I. V.; Kalinin, Y. Z.; Leontev, V. N.; Naboka, A. N.; Paramonov, V. V.; Serov, V. L.; Feschenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    For the beam power improvement of the hydrogen-ion INR linac replacement of the first four-section cavity in the main part of linac is required. Existent cavity is realized using DAW structure on 991 MHz operating frequency. The new cavity should at least not lose in parameters to the current structure and essential changes in other linac systems are not wish able. Parameters of accelerating structures possible for such application are compared.

  1. Modelling the Structure and Dynamics of Biological Pathways

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; Livigni, Alessandra; Chen, Sz-Hau; Raza, Sobia; Digard, Paul; Smith, Lee B.; Freeman, Tom C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for formalised diagrams that both summarise current biological pathway knowledge and support modelling approaches that explain and predict their behaviour. Here, we present a new, freely available modelling framework that includes a biologist-friendly pathway modelling language (mEPN), a simple but sophisticated method to support model parameterisation using available biological information; a stochastic flow algorithm that simulates the dynamics of pathway activity; and a 3-D visualisation engine that aids understanding of the complexities of a system’s dynamics. We present example pathway models that illustrate of the power of approach to depict a diverse range of systems. PMID:27509052

  2. Modelling the Structure and Dynamics of Biological Pathways.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Livigni, Alessandra; Theo, Thanos; Boyer, Benjamin; Angus, Tim; Wright, Derek; Chen, Sz-Hau; Raza, Sobia; Barnett, Mark W; Digard, Paul; Smith, Lee B; Freeman, Tom C

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for formalised diagrams that both summarise current biological pathway knowledge and support modelling approaches that explain and predict their behaviour. Here, we present a new, freely available modelling framework that includes a biologist-friendly pathway modelling language (mEPN), a simple but sophisticated method to support model parameterisation using available biological information; a stochastic flow algorithm that simulates the dynamics of pathway activity; and a 3-D visualisation engine that aids understanding of the complexities of a system's dynamics. We present example pathway models that illustrate of the power of approach to depict a diverse range of systems. PMID:27509052

  3. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  4. Prospects for Accelerated Development of High Performance Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of key aspects for development of steels for fission and fusion energy applications, by linking material fabrication to thermo-mechanical properties through a physical understanding of microstructure evolution. Numerous design constraints (e.g. reduced activation, low ductile-brittle transition temperature, low neutron-induced swelling, good creep resistance, and weldability) need to be considered, which in turn can be controlled through material composition and processing techniques. Recent progress in the development of high-performance steels for fossil and fusion energy systems is summarized, along with progress in multiscale modeling of mechanical behavior in metals. Prospects for future design of optimum structural steels in nuclear applications by utilization of the hierarchy of multiscale experimental and computational strategies are briefly described.

  5. Comparison of accelerated T1-weighted whole-brain structural-imaging protocols.

    PubMed

    Falkovskiy, Pavel; Brenner, Daniel; Feiweier, Thorsten; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Kober, Tobias; Roche, Alexis; Thostenson, Kaely; Meuli, Reto; Reyes, Denise; Stoecker, Tony; Bernstein, Matt A; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Krueger, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in neuroscience, clinical research and pharmaceutical trials often employs the 3D magnetisation-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequence to obtain structural T1-weighted images with high spatial resolution of the human brain. Typical research and clinical routine MPRAGE protocols with ~1mm isotropic resolution require data acquisition time in the range of 5-10min and often use only moderate two-fold acceleration factor for parallel imaging. Recent advances in MRI hardware and acquisition methodology promise improved leverage of the MR signal and more benign artefact properties in particular when employing increased acceleration factors in clinical routine and research. In this study, we examined four variants of a four-fold-accelerated MPRAGE protocol (2D-GRAPPA, CAIPIRINHA, CAIPIRINHA elliptical, and segmented MPRAGE) and compared clinical readings, basic image quality metrics (SNR, CNR), and automated brain tissue segmentation for morphological assessments of brain structures. The results were benchmarked against a widely-used two-fold-accelerated 3T ADNI MPRAGE protocol that served as reference in this study. 22 healthy subjects (age=20-44yrs.) were imaged with all MPRAGE variants in a single session. An experienced reader rated all images of clinically useful image quality. CAIPIRINHA MPRAGE scans were perceived on average to be of identical value for reading as the reference ADNI-2 protocol. SNR and CNR measurements exhibited the theoretically expected performance at the four-fold acceleration. The results of this study demonstrate that the four-fold accelerated protocols introduce systematic biases in the segmentation results of some brain structures compared to the reference ADNI-2 protocol. Furthermore, results suggest that the increased noise levels in the accelerated protocols play an important role in introducing these biases, at least under the present study conditions. PMID:26297848

  6. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Gao, F.; Antipov, S.; Xu, P.; Zheng, S.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs LLC; Tsinghua Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM{sub 01}- and TM{sub 02}-like) and dipole (TM{sub 11}- and TM{sub 12}-like) modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be {approx}10 times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to {approx} 30 MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  7. International X-Band Linear Collider Accelerator Structure R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    For more than fifteen years before the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) decision in August, 2004, there were intensive R&D activities and broad international collaboration among the groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL, LLNL and other labs for the room temperature X-Band accelerator structures. The goal was to provide an optimized design of the main linac structure for the NLC (Next Linear Collider) or GLC (Global Linear Collider). There have been two major challenges in developing X-band accelerator structures for the linear colliders. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. More than thirty X-band accelerator structures with various RF parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 1989. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this talk including the structure design, manufacturing techniques, high power performance, and other structure related issues. Also, the new progress in collaborating with the CLIC, high gradient structures and X-Band structure applications for RF deflectors and others are briefly introduced.

  8. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  9. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, C.; Chang, C.; Gold, S. H.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-01

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  10. Theory of Generation of Alfvenic Non-Propagating Electromagnetic Plasma Structures and Acceleration of Charged Particles in Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In Earth's auroral acceleration regions, the nonlinear interaction of incident and reflected Alfven wave packets can collectively create non-propagating electromagnetic plasma structures, such as the Transverse Alfvenic Double Layer (TA-DL) and Charge Hole (TA-CH). These structures, such as TA-DL, encompass localized strong electrostatic electric fields, nested in low density cavities and surrounded by a local dynamo. Such structures constitute powerful high energy particle accelerators causing auroral particle acceleration and creating both Alfvenic and quasi-static discrete auroras. Similar electromagnetic plasma structures should also be generated by Alfvenic interaction in other inhomogenous cosmic plasma regions, and would constitute effective high energy particle accelerators.

  11. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; Chang, C.; Gold, S. H.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-18

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  12. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

  13. Proposal for a study of laser acceleration of electrons using micrograting structures at ATF (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Claus, J.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Kramer, H.; Li, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rogers, J.; Shrinvasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; Veligdan, J.; Warren, J.; Bigio, I.; Kurnit, N.; Shimada, T.; Wang, X.; McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA )

    1989-10-29

    We propose to investigate new methods of particle acceleration using a short-pulse CO{sub 2} laser as the power source and grating-like structures as accelerator cavities''. Phase I of this program is intended to demonstrate the principle of the method. We will focus the laser light to a 3 mm line on the surface of the microstructure. The structure is used to transform the electric field pattern of the incoming transversely polarized laser beam to a mode which has a component along the electron beam direction in the vicinity of the surface. With 6 mJ of laser energy and a 6 ps pulse length, the electric field in the spot will be around 1 GV/m. The electron beam from the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) will be focused transversely within the few micron transverse dimension of the microstructure. The maximum expected acceleration for a 1 GV/m field and a 3 mm acceleration length is 3 MeV. 17 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Design of 57.5 MHz cw RFQ structure for the rare isotope accelerator facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Tretyakova, T. E.

    2002-01-29

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver linac for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy-ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz four-meter long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance; (2) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation; (3) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. CW operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as, some aspects of the mechanical design of this low-frequency CW RFQ.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Acceleration Structures in the Auroral Return Current Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G. T.; Karlsson, T.; Figueiredo, S.; Johansson, T.; Buchert, S.

    2003-12-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of high-altitude auroral electric fields, and, in particular, those which are related to quasi-static auroral electric potential structures, are discussed using Cluster multi-point observations from auroral field line crossings at geocentric distances of about 5 RE. Intense and narrow-structured diverging electric fields, associated with upward accelerated electrons, being fingerprints of quasi-static acceleration structures in the auroral return current region, appear more frequently at these altitudes than their counterpart, converging electric fields, on auroral field lines, for reasons not yet understood. The time needed for evacuating ionospheric electrons at the ionospheric end of the return current flux tube, which depend on the field-aligned current density, represent one characteristic time scale for the accelerating electric fields. We present results from four Cluster encounters with such acceleration structures and how these and their associated field-aligned current and electron distributions, evolve on the different time scales given by different inter-spacecraft separation distances.

  16. Alignment tolerance of accelerating structures and corrections for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, K.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Thompson, K.A.

    1995-06-01

    The alignment tolerance of accelerating structures is estimated by tracking simulations. Both single-bunch and multi-bunch effects are taken into account. Correction schemes for controlling the single and multi-bunch emittance growth in the case of large misalignment are also tested by simulations.

  17. The C-Band accelerating structures for SPARC photoinjector energy upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Boni, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Lollo, V.; Marcellini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spizzo, V.; Mostacci, A.; Campogiani, G.; Persichelli, S.; Enomoto, A.; Higo, T.; Kakihara, K.; Kamitani, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Sugimura, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Verdú-Andrés, S.

    2013-05-01

    The use of C-Band structures for electron acceleration and production of high quality beams has been proposed and adopted in several linac projects all over the world. The two main projects that adopted such type of structures are the Japanese Free Electron Laser (FEL) project in Spring-8 and the SwissFEL project at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Also the energy upgrade of the SPARC photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Italy) from 150 to more than 240 MeV will be done by replacing a low gradient S-Band accelerating structure with two C-band structures. The structures are Traveling Wave (TW) and Constant Impedance (CI), have symmetric axial input couplers and have been optimized to work with a SLED RF input pulse. The paper presents the design criteria of the structures, the realization procedure and the low and high power RF test results on a prototype. The high power tests have been carried out by the Frascati INFN Laboratories in close collaboration with the Japanese Laboratory KEK. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of the operation of the prototype at 50 MV/m with about 10-6 breakdowns per pulse per meter. Such high gradients have not been reached before in C-Band systems and demonstrated the possibility to use C-band accelerators, if needed, at such high field level. The results of the internal inspection of the structure after the high power test are also presented.

  18. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectric structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.

  19. Simulation of variation characteristics at thermostabilization of 27 GHz biperiodical accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluchevskaya, Y. D.; Polozov, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    It was proposed to develop the biperiodical accelerating structure with operating frequency of 27 GHz to assess the possibility of design a compact accelerating structure for medical application. It is necessary to do the more careful simulation of variation characteristics this case because of decrease of wavelength 3-10 times in comparison with conventional structures 10 and 3 cm ranges. Results of such study are presented in the article. Also a combination of high electromagnetic fields and long pulses at a high operating frequency leads to the temperature increase in the structure, thermal deformation and significant change of the resonator characteristics, including the frequency of the RF pulse. Development results of three versions of system of temperature stabilization also discuses.

  20. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  1. RF measurements of a traveling-wave muffin-tin accelerating structure at 90 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.; Menegat, A.; Pritzkau, D.P.; Siemann, R.H.; Henke, H.

    1997-05-01

    A measuring system at the table-top scale was developed for RF measurements of a muffin-tin accelerating structure operating at 32 times the SLAC frequency (2.856 GHz). Both perturbation and non-perturbation methods are employed to characterize the RF properties of a muffin-tin structure. Conventional bead pull measurements are extended to millimeter wavelengths. Design of the measuring system and preliminary results of RF measurements are presented.

  2. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  3. Some problems on rf breakdown in room temperature accelerator structure, a possible criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    The discussion is confined to high gradient, room-temperature accelerators which have clean well-finished cavity surfaces and good vacuum conditions. Breakdown-initiating mechanisms due to ''cold'' field electron emission occurring at isolated sites on broad-area cavity surfaces, where the field is enhanced, are described. The influences of an alternating field and transition time tunneling are taken into account. The thermal instability resulting in vacuum voltage breakdown is hypothesized to derive a new criterion for room-temperature accelerator structure. 18 refs., 5 figs. (DWL)

  4. Construction and testing of an 11.4 GHz dielectric structure based travelling wave accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Wong, T.; Zou, P.

    1999-03-26

    One major challenge in constructing a dielectric loaded traveling wave accelerator powered by an external rf power source is the difficulty in achieving efficient coupling. In this paper, we report that we have achieved high efficiency broadband coupling by using a combination of a tapered dielectric section and a carefully adjusted coupling slot. We are currently constructing an 11.4 GHz accelerator structure loaded with a permitivity=20 dielectric. Bench testing has demonstrated a coupling efficiency in excess of 95% with bandwidth of 600 MHz. The final setup will be tested at high power at SLAC using an X-band klystron rf source.

  5. Construction and testing of an 11.4 GHz dielectric structure based traveling wave accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Sun, X.; Wong, T.; Kanareykin, A.

    2000-06-01

    We report on the design, numerical modeling, and experimental testing of a cylindrical dielectric loaded traveling wave structure for charged particle beam acceleration. This type of structure has similar accelerating properties to disk-loaded metal slow wave structures but with some distinct advantages in terms of simplicity of fabrication and suppression of parasitic wakefield effects. Efficient coupling of external rf power to the cylindrical dielectric waveguide is a technical challenge, particularly with structures of very high dielectric constant ɛ. We have designed and constructed an X-band structure loaded with a permittivity ɛ=20 dielectric to be powered by an external rf power source. We have attained high efficiency broadband rf coupling by using a combination of a tapered dielectric end section and a carefully adjusted coupling slot. Bench testing using a network analyzer has demonstrated a power coupling efficiency in excess of 95% with bandwidth of 30 MHz, thus providing a necessary basis for construction of an accelerator using this device. We have also simulated the parameters of this structure using a finite difference time domain electromagnetic solver. Within the limits of the approximations used, the results are in reasonable agreement with the bench measurements.

  6. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  7. The influence of acceleration forces on dendritic growth and grain structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. H.; Parr, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experiments on the tin-15 wt pct lead system are presented, showing the effects on microstructure of solidification in the presence of acceleration forces from 0.0001 to 5 g for three cooling rates. An increase in the acceleration level is shown to drive fluid flow and cause dendrite remelting, fragmentation, and macrosegregation. The cooling rate impacts the final structure through its control of dendrite arm spacings and permeability to fluid flow. At the low (0.0001 g) acceleration, dendrite arm spacings deviated from the predicted relationship to cooling rate. An explanation for this anomaly is given which considers the temperature and concentration gradients in the low-gravity environment.

  8. Particle Acceleration Affected by the Evolving Velocity Structures in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    It is accepted that high-energy particles are efficiently generated during their crossing of shocks in space, where the diffusive shock acceleration is the most standard process to explain the observed energy spectrum beyond the order of a gigaelectronvolt. In contrast, recent spacecraft observations have shown different characteristics in a lower energy range (a kilo- to megaelectronvolt): particles in the heliosphere have a power-law spectrum in particle speed with a spectral index of -5, which is commonly found in any solar wind conditions. This is a puzzling result that the shocks are not a necessary element responsible for accelerating particles. The alternative mechanism, a pump acceleration, is proposed where particles are accelerated in a region containing large-scale compressions and expansions (e.g., Fisk and Gloeckler, JGR 2014). In the present study, we elucidate the validity of this mechanism by performing hybrid simulations to investigate the particle, particularly pickup ions, dynamics in various situations of non-uniform velocity field, such as a simple fast/slow flow interaction, sinusoidal structures, or random profiles, and to compare the velocity spectrum of suprathermal particles in each case. We also study the scale dependence of acceleration processes by comparing the spectrum of the energetic H+, He+, and O+.

  9. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-04-30

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  10. New Features of Time Domain Electric-Field Structures in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F.S.; Ergun, R.; Temerin, M.; Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Wygant, J.

    1997-08-01

    The Polar Satellite carries the first three-axis electric field detector flown in the magnetosphere. Its direct measurement of electric field components perpendicular and parallel to the local magnetic field has revealed new classes and features of electric field structures associated with the plasma acceleration that produces discrete auroras and that populates the magnetosphere with plasma of ionospheric origin. These structures, associated with the hydrogen ion cyclotron mode, include very large solitary waves, spiky field structures, wave envelopes of parallel electric fields, and very large amplitude, nonlinear, coherent ion cyclotron waves. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Combinatorial biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics: a model for synthetic biology to accelerate the evolution of secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Baltz, Richard H

    2014-10-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are giant multi-enzymes that carry out sequencial assembly line couplings of amino acids to generate linear or cyclic peptides. NRPSs are composed of repeating enzyme domains with modular organization to activate and couple specific amino acids in a particular order. From a synthetic biology perspective, they can be considered as peptide assembly machines composed of devices to couple fatty acids to l-amino acids, l-amino acids to l-amino acids, and d-amino acids to l-amino acids. The coupling devices are composed of specific parts that contain two or more enzyme domains that can be exchanged combinatorially to generate novel peptide assembly machines to produce novel peptides. The potent lipopeptide antibiotics daptomycin and A54145E have identical cyclic depsipeptide ring structures and stereochemistry but have divergent amino acid sequences. As their biosynthetic gene clusters are derived from an ancient ancestral lipopetide pathway, these lipopeptides provided an attractive model to develop combinatorial biosynthesis to generate antibiotics superior to daptomycin. These studies on combinatorial biosynthesis have helped generate guidelines for the successful assembly of NRPS parts and devices that can be used to generate novel lipopeptide structures and have established a basis for future synthetic biology studies to further develop combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust approach to natural product drug discovery.

  12. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  13. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  14. Development of an S-band accelerating structure with quasi-symmetric single-feed racetrack couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Hoon; Joo, Young-Do; Park, Yong-Jung; Kang, Heung-Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Kyoung-Min; Seo, Hyung-Seok; Noh, Sung-Ju

    2015-03-01

    We developed an S-band traveling-wave accelerating structure for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory's X-ray free-electron laser (PAL-XFEL), and we fabricated and tested a full-scale prototype. In order to reduce the field asymmetry inside the coupler cavity, we used the SUPERFISH code and the CST MWS electromagnetic field solvers to design the constant-gradient traveling-wave accelerator to use quasi-symmetric single-feed racetrack couplers. The RF measurement results indicate that the accelerating gradient of the prototype structure is as high as 27 MV/m for an input RF power of 65 MW.

  15. Parallel Computation of Intergrated Electronmagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L-Q.; Li, Z.; Ng, C-K.; Xiao, L.; Ko, K.

    2008-07-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  16. One-Dimensional Electric Field Structure of an Outer Gap Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Bo; Zhang, Li

    2006-10-01

    We re-study the one-dimensional electric field structure of an outer gap accelerator by considering the physical limit of trans-field height. Inside the outer gap, the charge depletion creates a large electric field along the magnetic field lines. Electrons and/or positrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies by this longitudinal electric field, and then radiate γ-ray photons by curvature radiation. The collision of these γ-rays and ambient x-ray photons further produce radiating particles, resulting in a stationary gap. We solve the structure of this longitudinal electric field together with the distributions of electrons and positrons and γ-ray photons for an aligned rotator. Our results indicate that the outer gap can extend to the light cylinder using reasonable parameters.

  17. Parallel Computation of Integrated Electromagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  18. BEAM ACCELERATION BY A MULTICELL RF CAVITY STRUCTURE PROPOSED FOR AN IMPROVED YIELD IN HYDROFORMING

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Shin, Ki; Fathy, A. E.; Holmes, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    We study the accelerating properties of a new multicell cavity structure with irises forming a rectangular aperture between the cavity cells. We are interested in this structure because, from a mechanical point of view, it may be possible to manufacture with high quality using a hydroforming process. RF analysis shows that the rectangular iris shape provides some asymmetric transverse focusing per half RF period, particularly for low beam energies. If the horizontal and vertical rectangular irises are interleaved, the net transverse focusing could be increased. Here we present studies of the acceleration and transport properties of these cavities by tracking particles using the ORBIT Code through time-dependent 3D cavity fields taken from CST MWS.

  19. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  20. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  1. Advances in X-Band TW Accelerator Structures Operating in the 100 MV/M Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, Toshiyasu; Higashi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Shuji; Yokoyama, Kazue; Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Jensen, Aaron; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, Juwen; Dobert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensch, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; /CERN

    2012-07-05

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band accelerator structure development for CLIC has been ongoing for three years. The major outcome has been the demonstration of stable 100 MV/m gradient operation of a number of CLIC prototype structures. These structures were fabricated using the technology developed from 1994 to 2004 for the GLC/NLC linear collider initiative. One of the goals has been to refine the essential parameters and fabrication procedures needed to realize such a high gradient routinely. Another goal has been to develop structures with stronger dipole mode damping than those for GLC/NLC. The latter requires that the surface temperature rise during the pulse be higher, which may increase the breakdown rate. One structure with heavy damping has been RF processed and another is nearly finished. The breakdown rates of these structures were found to be higher by two orders of magnitude compared to those with equivalent acceleration mode parameters but without the damping features. This paper presents these results together with some of the earlier results from non-damped structures.

  2. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, C E; Adli, E; Allen, J; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Xu, X; Yakimenko, V

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m(-1) to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity. PMID:27527569

  3. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; et al

    2016-08-16

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.).more » Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m–1 to a similar degree of accuracy. Lastly, these results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.« less

  4. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m−1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity. PMID:27527569

  5. GPU-accelerated analysis and visualization of large structures solved by molecular dynamics flexible fitting.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally-determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-à-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods. PMID:25340325

  6. GPU-accelerated analysis and visualization of large structures solved by molecular dynamics flexible fitting.

    PubMed

    Stone, John E; McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally-determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-à-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods.

  7. Studies of beam induced dipole-mode signals in accelerating structures at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, M.

    1997-06-01

    Beam emittance dilution by self induced transverse fields (wakefields) in accelerating structures is a key problem in linear accelerators. To minimize the wakefield effects the beam trajectory must be precisely centered within the structures. An efficient way to achieve this is to detect beam induced microwave signals in the lowest dipole mode band and to steer the beam by minimizing these signals. This paper briefly covers some experiences from SLC S-band structures, but mainly concentrates on results of a wakefield instrumentation scheme applied to a NLC prototype X-band structure and tested with beam in the SLC linac. A beam based in-situ structure straightness measurement is shown as well as results of beam steering experiments based on phase and amplitude detection of two separated modes in the structure. After centering the beam the reduction of the wakefield was demonstrated independently by probing it with a test bunch that is deflected by the residual wakefield at a short distance behind the drive bunch.

  8. Effect of the accelerating growth of communications networks on their structure.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Mendes, J F

    2001-02-01

    Motivated by data on the evolution of the Internet and World Wide Web we consider scenarios of self-organization of nonlinearly growing networks into free-scale structures. We find that the accelerating growth of networks establishes their structure. For growing networks with preferential linking and increasing density of links, two scenarios are possible. In one of them, the value of the exponent gamma of the distribution of the number of incoming links is between 3/2 and 2. In the other scenario, gamma>2 and the distribution is necessarily nonstationary.

  9. DEPOSITION DISTRICUTION AMONG THE PARALLEL PATHWAYS IN THE HUMAN LUNG CONDUCTING AIRWAY STRUCTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEPOSITION DISTRIBUTION AMONG THE PARALLEL PATHWAYS IN THE HUMAN LUNG CONDUCTING AIRWAY STRUCTURE. Chong S. Kim*, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711; Z. Zhang and C. Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North C...

  10. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Kishek, Rami

    2014-07-25

    This final report summarizes the research performed during the time period from 8/1/2010 to 7/31/2013. It consists of two parts describing our studies in two directions: (a) analysis of factors limiting operation of dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures where the main problem is the occurrence of multipactor on dielectric surfaces, and (b) studies of effects associated with either RF magnetic or RF electric fields which may cause the RF breakdown in high-gradient metallic accelerating structures. In the studies of DLA structures, at least, two accomplishments should be mentioned: the development of a 3D non-stationary, self-consistent code describing the multipactor phenomena and yielding very good agreement with some experimental data obtained in joint ANL/NRL experiments. In the metallic structures, such phenomena as the heating and melting of micro-particles (metallic dust) by RF electric and magnetic fields in single-shot and rep-rate regimes is analyzed. Also, such processes in micro-protrusions on the structure surfaces as heating and melting due to the field emitted current and the Nottingham effect are thoroughly investigated with the account for space charge of emitted current on the field emission from the tip.

  11. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-07

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  12. Vibration absorption in a building like structure by means of piezoelectric patches and positive acceleration feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios-Gutierrez, Max A.; Silva-Navarro, Gerardo

    2010-04-01

    This paper is about mechanical vibration suppression in a three story building like structure. The experimental platform is a laboratory prototype made of aluminum alloy with bolted joints and an elctromagnetic shaker used as a disturbance source. This prototype can be used as a representation of a civil structure as well as an industrial machinery element. This structure is modeled and validated by the application of finite element methods and experimental modal analysis. The system response is controlled by a piezoelectric actuator, properly located on the structure, and with the synthesis of a feedback control law based on the well-known positive acceleration feedback control scheme. Some numerical simulations and experiments results are performed to illustrate the overall system performance in presence of several types of excitation.

  13. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  14. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    DOE PAGES

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectricmore » structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.« less

  15. Discovery of new enzymes and metabolic pathways by using structure and genome context.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suwen; Kumar, Ritesh; Sakai, Ayano; Vetting, Matthew W; Wood, B McKay; Brown, Shoshana; Bonanno, Jeffery B; Hillerich, Brandan S; Seidel, Ronald D; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Gerlt, John A; Cronan, John E; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2013-10-31

    Assigning valid functions to proteins identified in genome projects is challenging: overprediction and database annotation errors are the principal concerns. We and others are developing computation-guided strategies for functional discovery with 'metabolite docking' to experimentally derived or homology-based three-dimensional structures. Bacterial metabolic pathways often are encoded by 'genome neighbourhoods' (gene clusters and/or operons), which can provide important clues for functional assignment. We recently demonstrated the synergy of docking and pathway context by 'predicting' the intermediates in the glycolytic pathway in Escherichia coli. Metabolite docking to multiple binding proteins and enzymes in the same pathway increases the reliability of in silico predictions of substrate specificities because the pathway intermediates are structurally similar. Here we report that structure-guided approaches for predicting the substrate specificities of several enzymes encoded by a bacterial gene cluster allowed the correct prediction of the in vitro activity of a structurally characterized enzyme of unknown function (PDB 2PMQ), 2-epimerization of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline betaine (tHyp-B) and cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline betaine (cHyp-B), and also the correct identification of the catabolic pathway in which Hyp-B 2-epimerase participates. The substrate-liganded pose predicted by virtual library screening (docking) was confirmed experimentally. The enzymatic activities in the predicted pathway were confirmed by in vitro assays and genetic analyses; the intermediates were identified by metabolomics; and repression of the genes encoding the pathway by high salt concentrations was established by transcriptomics, confirming the osmolyte role of tHyp-B. This study establishes the utility of structure-guided functional predictions to enable the discovery of new metabolic pathways.

  16. Structural disorder provides increased adaptability for vesicle trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Pietrosemoli, Natalia; Pancsa, Rita; Tompa, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking systems play essential roles in the communication between the organelles of eukaryotic cells and also between cells and their environment. Endocytosis and the late secretory route are mediated by clathrin-coated vesicles, while the COat Protein I and II (COPI and COPII) routes stand for the bidirectional traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. Despite similar fundamental organizations, the molecular machinery, functions, and evolutionary characteristics of the three systems are very different. In this work, we compiled the basic functional protein groups of the three main routes for human and yeast and analyzed them from the structural disorder perspective. We found similar overall disorder content in yeast and human proteins, confirming the well-conserved nature of these systems. Most functional groups contain highly disordered proteins, supporting the general importance of structural disorder in these routes, although some of them seem to heavily rely on disorder, while others do not. Interestingly, the clathrin system is significantly more disordered (~23%) than the other two, COPI (~9%) and COPII (~8%). We show that this structural phenomenon enhances the inherent plasticity and increased evolutionary adaptability of the clathrin system, which distinguishes it from the other two routes. Since multi-functionality (moonlighting) is indicative of both plasticity and adaptability, we studied its prevalence in vesicle trafficking proteins and correlated it with structural disorder. Clathrin adaptors have the highest capability for moonlighting while also comprising the most highly disordered members. The ability to acquire tissue specific functions was also used to approach adaptability: clathrin route genes have the most tissue specific exons encoding for protein segments enriched in structural disorder and interaction sites. Overall, our results confirm the general importance of structural disorder in vesicle trafficking and suggest

  17. Structure-activity relationship of caffeoylquinic acids on the accelerating activity on ATP production.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Kurisu, Manami; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) is one of the phenylpropanoids which have various bioactivities such as antioxidant, antibacterial, anticancer, antihistamic, and other biological effects. We previously reported that 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid inhibited amyloid β(1-42)-induced cellular toxicity on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and increased the mRNA expression level of glycolytic enzymes and the intracellular ATP level. To investigate structure-activity relationship on the accelerating activity on ATP production, we synthesized 1,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and other derivatives. Additionally, we evaluated intracellular ATP level in SH-SY5Y treated with each CQA derivative. As a result, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid showed the highest accelerating activity on ATP production among tested compounds. It was suggested that caffeoyl groups bound to quinic acid are important for activity and the more caffeoyl groups are bound to quinic acid, the higher accelerating activity on ATP production exhibits.

  18. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors.

  19. Accelerating universe and the time-dependent fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    I start with assuming a gravitational scalar field as the dark-energy supposed to be responsible for the accelerating universe. Also from the point of view of unification, a scalar field implies a time-variability of certain “constants” in Nature. In this context I once derived a relation for the time-variability of the fine-structure constant α: Δα/α =ζ Ƶ(α/π) Δσ, where ζ and Ƶ are the constants of the order one, while σ on the right-hand side is the scalar field in action in the accelerating universe. I use the reduced Planckian units with c=ℏ =MP(=(8π G)-1/2)=1. I then compared the dynamics of the accelerating universe, on one hand, and Δα/α derived from the analyses of QSO absorption lines, Oklo phenomenon, also different atomic clocks in the laboratories, on the other hand. I am here going to discuss the theoretical background of the relation, based on the scalar-tensor theory invented first by Jordan in 1955.

  20. LIGA fabrication of mm-wave accelerating cavity structures at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Bajikar, S.; Kang, Y.W.

    1997-08-01

    Recent microfabrication technologies based on the LIGA (German acronym for Lithographe, Galvanoformung, und Abformung) process have been applied to build high-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric planar structures suitable for high-frequency rf cavity structures. The cavity structures would be used as parts of linear accelerators, microwave undulators, and mm-wave amplifiers. The microfabrication process includes manufacture of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist x-rays through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Prototypes of a 32-cell, 108-GHz constant-impedance cavity and a 66-cell, 94-GHz constant-gradient cavity were fabricated with the synchrotron radiation sources at APS and NSLS. This paper will present an overview of the new technology and details of the mm-wave cavity fabrication.

  1. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerating Structure as a Source of Terahertz Coherent Cerenkov Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A. M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Badakov, H.; Travish, G.; Tikhoplav, R.; Williams, O. B.; England, R. J.; Thompson, M. C.

    2006-11-27

    We discuss future experimental work proposed to study the performance of a cylindrical dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a coherent Cerenkov radiation source at the Neptune laboratory at UCLA. The Cerenkov wakefield acceleration experiment carried out recently by UCLA/SLAC/USC, using the ultrashort and high charge beam (Q = 3 nC, {sigma}z = 20 micron) at the SLAC FFTB, demonstrated electromagnetic wakes at the few GV/m level. The motivation of our prospective experiment is to investigate the operation of a similar scenario using the comparatively long pulse, low charge beam (Q = 0.5 nC, {sigma}z = 200 micron) at UCLA Neptune. The field amplitude produced in this setup would be one to two orders of magnitude lower, at the few tens to few 100 MV/m level. Such a decelerating field would extract a significant amount of energy from a low-energy beam in a distance on the order of a few centimeters, allowing the use of short dielectric structures. We discuss details of the geometry and composition of the structures to be used in the experiment. We also examine the possibility of a future dedicated facility at UCLA Neptune based on a hybrid photoinjector currently in development. The intrinsic bunch compression capabilities and improved beam parameters ({sigma}z = 100 micron, Q = 1 nC) of the photoinjector would allow the creation of a high power radiation source in the terahertz regime.

  2. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E.; Garza, K.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D. O.; Dandouras, I. S.; Fornacon, K.; Lucek, E. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modelling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  3. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E. J.; Garza, K. J.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D.; Dandouras, I.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; Lucek, E.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2012-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modeling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  4. Structuring Contexts: Pathways toward Un-Obstructing Race-Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berchini, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This research is situated in second-wave White Teacher Identity studies and investigates the ways context structures a high school English teacher's white identity, practices, and race-consciousness. Working with detailed data and vignettes from a single case study, the author highlights the teaching of a unit on the Holocaust. Using the required…

  5. INOH: ontology-based highly structured database of signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Noriko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Ken; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    The Integrating Network Objects with Hierarchies (INOH) database is a highly structured, manually curated database of signal transduction pathways including Mammalia, Xenopus laevis, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and canonical. Since most pathway knowledge resides in scientific articles, the database focuses on curating and encoding textual knowledge into a machine-processable form. We use a hierarchical pathway representation model with a compound graph, and every pathway component in the INOH database is annotated by a set of uniquely developed ontologies. Finally, we developed the Similarity Search using the combination of a compound graph and hierarchical ontologies. The INOH database is to be a good resource for many users who want to analyze a large protein network. INOH ontologies and 73 signal transduction and 29 metabolic pathway diagrams (including over 6155 interactions and 3395 protein entities) are freely available in INOH XML and BioPAX formats. Database URL: http://www.inoh.org/ PMID:22120663

  6. Reduced Structural Connectivity of Frontolimbic Pathway in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tromp, Do P.M.; Grupe, Daniel W.; Oathes, Desmond J.; McFarlin, Daniel R.; Hernandez, Patric J.; Kral, Tammi R.A.; Lee, Jee Eun; Adams, Marie; Alexander, Andrew L.; Nitschke, Jack B.

    2012-01-01

    Context Emotion regulation deficits figure prominently in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as well as other anxiety and mood disorders. Research examining emotion regulation and top-down modulation has implicated reduced coupling of the amygdala with prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), suggesting altered frontolimbic white matter connectivity in GAD. Objective To investigate structural connectivity between ventral prefrontal/ACC areas and the amygdala in GAD, and to assess associations with functional connectivity between those areas. Design Participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. Setting University magnetic resonance imaging facility. Participants Forty-nine GAD patients and 39 healthy volunteers, including a subset of 21 patients without comorbid Axis I diagnoses and 21 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, and education. Main Outcome Measure Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left and right uncinate fasciculus, as measured by tract-based analysis for DTI data. Results Lower mean FA values in bilateral uncinate fasciculus indicated reduced frontolimbic structural connectivity in GAD. This reduction in uncinate fasciculus integrity was most pronounced for patients without comorbidity and was not observed in other white matter tracts. Across all subjects, higher FA values were associated with more negative functional coupling between the pregenual ACC and amygdala during the anticipation of aversion. Conclusions Decreased frontolimbic structural connectivity suggests a neural basis for emotion regulation deficits in GAD. The functional significance of these structural differences is underscored by decreased functional connectivity between the ACC and amygdala in subjects with reduced structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus. PMID:22945621

  7. High power experimental studies of hybrid photonic band gap accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, JieXi; Munroe, Brian J.; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the first high power tests of hybrid photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator structures. Three hybrid PBG (HPBG) structures were designed, built and tested at 17.14 GHz. Each structure had a triangular lattice array with 60 inner sapphire rods and 24 outer copper rods sandwiched between copper disks. The dielectric PBG band gap map allows the unique feature of overmoded operation in a TM02 mode, with suppression of both lower order modes, such as the TM11 mode, as well as higher order modes. The use of sapphire rods, which have negligible dielectric loss, required inclusion of the dielectric birefringence in the design. The three structures were designed to sequentially reduce the peak surface electric field. Simulations showed relatively high surface fields at the triple point as well as in any gaps between components in the clamped assembly. The third structure used sapphire rods with small pin extensions at each end and obtained the highest gradient of 19 MV /m , corresponding to a surface electric field of 78 MV /m , with a breakdown probability of 5 ×10-1 per pulse per meter for a 100-ns input power pulse. Operation at a gradient above 20 MV /m led to runaway breakdowns with extensive light emission and eventual damage. For all three structures, multipactor light emission was observed at gradients well below the breakdown threshold. This research indicated that multipactor triggered at the triple point limited the operational gradient of the hybrid structure.

  8. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K.; Markidis, S.; Eliasson, B.; Strumik, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  9. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249.

  10. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P.; Koppelman, David M.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J.; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  11. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  12. Loss of CAR promotes migration and proliferation of HaCaT cells, and accelerates wound healing in rats via Src-p38 MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Linlin; Fu, Lanqing; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xue; Li, Yan; Bai, Xiaozhi; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule mostly localized to cell-cell contacts in epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR is known to regulate tumor progression, however, its physiological role in keratinocyte migration and proliferation, two essential steps in re-epithelialization during wound healing, has less been investigated. Here we showed that CAR was predominantly expressed in the epidermis of human skin, CAR knockdown by RNAi significantly accelerated HaCaT cell migration and proliferation. In addition, knockdown of CAR in vitro increased p-Src, p-p38, and p-JNK protein levels; however, Src inhibitor PP2 prevented the increase of p-Src and p-p38 induced by CAR RNAi, but not p-JNK, and decelerated cell migration and proliferation. More intriguingly, in vivo CAR RNAi on the skin area surrounding the wounds on rat back visually accelerated wound healing and re-epithelialization process, while treatment with PP2 or p38 inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited these effects. By contrast, overexpressing CAR in HaCaT cells significantly decelerated cell migration and proliferation. Above results demonstrate that suppression of CAR could accelerate HaCaT cell migration and proliferation, and promote wound healing in rat skin, probably via Src-p38 MAPK pathway. CAR thus might serve as a novel therapeutic target for facilitating wound healing. PMID:26804208

  13. Accelerated Tumor Growth Mediated by Sub-lytic Levels of Antibody-Induced Complement Activation is Associated with Activation of the PI3K/AKT Survival Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ragupathi, Govind; Panageas, Katherine; Hong, Feng; Livingston, Philip O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We addressed the possibility that low levels of tumor cell bound antibodies targeting gangliosides might accelerate tumor growth. Experimental Design To test this hypothesis, we treated mice with a range of mAb doses against GM2, GD2, GD3 and CD20 after challenge with tumors expressing these antigens and tested the activity of the same mAbs in-vitro. We also explored the mechanisms behind the complement-mediated tumor growth acceleration that we observed and an approach to overcome it. Results Serologically detectable levels of IgM-mAb against GM2 are able to delay or prevent tumor growth of high GM2-expressing cell lines both in-vitro and in a SCID mouse model, while very low levels of this mAb resulted in slight but consistent acceleration of tumor growth in both settings. Surprisingly, this is not restricted to IgM antibodies targeting GM2 but consistent against IgG-mAb targeting GD3 as well. These findings were mirrored by in-vitro studies with antibodies against these antigens as well as GD2 and CD20 (with Rituxan), and shown to be complement-dependent in all cases. Complement-mediated accelerated growth of cultured tumor cell lines initiated by low mAb levels was associated with activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway and significantly elevated levels of both p-AKT and p-PRAS40. This complement-mediated PI3K-activation and accelerated tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo are eliminated by PI3K-inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and Wortmannin. These PI3K-inhibitors also significantly increased efficacy of high doses of these 4 mAbs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that manipulation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and its signaling network can significantly increase the potency of passively administered mAbs and vaccine-induced-antibodies targeting a variety of tumor-cell-surface-antigens. PMID:23833306

  14. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  15. Methodology for the structural design of single spoke accelerating cavities at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Donato; Wands, Robert H.; Merio, Margherita; Ristori, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Fermilab is planning to upgrade its accelerator complex to deliver a more powerful and intense proton-beam for neutrino experiments. In the framework of the so-called Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), we are designing and developing a cryomodule containing superconducting accelerating cavities, the Single Spoke Resonators of type 1 (SSR1). In this paper, we present the sequence of analysis and calculations performed for the structural design of these cavities, using the rules of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC). The lack of an accepted procedure for addressing the design, fabrication, and inspection of such unique pressure vessels makes the task demanding and challenging every time. Several factors such as exotic materials, unqualified brazing procedures, limited nondestructive examination, and the general R&D nature of these early generations of cavity design, conspire to make it impractical to obtain full compliance with all ASME BPVC requirements. However, the presented approach allowed us to validate the design of this new generation of single spoke cavities with values of maximum allowable working pressure that exceeds the safety requirements. This set of rules could be used as a starting point for the structural design and development of similar objects.

  16. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  17. Methodology for the structural design of single spoke accelerating cavities at Fermilab

    DOE PAGES

    Passarelli, Donato; Wands, Robert H.; Merio, Margherita; Ristori, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Fermilab is planning to upgrade its accelerator complex to deliver a more powerful and intense proton-beam for neutrino experiments. In the framework of the so-called Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), we are designing and developing a cryomodule containing superconducting accelerating cavities, the Single Spoke Resonators of type 1 (SSR1). In this paper, we present the sequence of analysis and calculations performed for the structural de- sign of these cavities, using the rules of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC). The lack of an accepted procedure for addressing the design, fabrication, and inspection of suchmore » unique pressure vessels makes the task demanding and challenging every time. Several factors such as exotic materials, unqualified brazing procedures, limited nondestructive examination, and the general R&D nature of these early generations of cavity design, conspire to make it impractical to obtain full compliance with all ASME BPVC requirements. However, the presented approach allowed us to validate the design of these new generation of single spoke cavities with values of maximum allowable working pressure that exceed the safety requirements. This set of rules could be used as a starting point for the structural design and development of similar objects.« less

  18. On using moving windows in finite element time domain simulation for long accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.-Q.; Candel, Arno; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok

    2010-12-10

    A finite element moving window technique is developed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves induced by the transit of a charged particle beam inside large and long structures. The window moving along with the beam in the computational domain adopts high-order finite element basis functions through p refinement and/or a high-resolution mesh through h refinement so that a sufficient accuracy is attained with substantially reduced computational costs. Algorithms to transfer discretized fields from one mesh to another, which are the keys to implementing a moving window in a finite element unstructured mesh, are presented. Numerical experiments are carried out using the moving window technique to compute short-range wakefields in long accelerator structures. The results are compared with those obtained from the normal finite element time domain (FETD) method and the advantages of using the moving window technique are discussed.

  19. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juwen; Lewandowski, James; Van Pelt, John; Yoneda, Charles; Gudkov, Boris; Riddone, Germana; Higo, Toshiyasu; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  20. Acceleration of bone development and regeneration through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β

    SciTech Connect

    Arioka, Masaki; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Sasaki, Masanori; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Morimoto, Sachio; Takashima, Akihiko; Mori, Yoshihide; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was activated in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. •The cortical and trabecular bone volumes were increased in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. •Regeneration of a partial bone defect was accelerated in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β plays an important role in osteoblastogenesis by regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therefore, we investigated whether GSK-3β deficiency affects bone development and regeneration using mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β (GSK-3β{sup +/−}). The amounts of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1, and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) in the bone marrow cells of GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice were significantly increased compared with those of wild-type mice, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin signals were enhanced in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. Microcomputed tomography of the distal femoral metaphyses demonstrated that the volumes of both the cortical and trabecular bones were increased in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice compared with those in wild-type mice. Subsequently, to investigate the effect of GSK-3β deficiency on bone regeneration, we established a partial bone defect in the femur and observed new bone at 14 days after surgery. The volume and mineral density of the new bone were significantly higher in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice than those in wild-type mice. These results suggest that bone formation and regeneration in vivo are accelerated by inhibition of GSK-3β, probably through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  1. Convergence acceleration for partitioned simulations of the fluid-structure interaction in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Lars; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Düster, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We present a partitioned approach to fluid-structure interaction problems arising in analyses of blood flow in arteries. Several strategies to accelerate the convergence of the fixed-point iteration resulting from the coupling of the fluid and the structural sub-problem are investigated. The Aitken relaxation and variants of the interface quasi-Newton -least-squares method are applied to different test cases. A hybrid variant of two well-known variants of the interface quasi-Newton-least-squares method is found to perform best. The test cases cover the typical boundary value problem faced when simulating the fluid-structure interaction in arteries, including a strong added mass effect and a wet surface which accounts for a large part of the overall surface of each sub-problem. A rubber-like Neo Hookean material model and a soft-tissue-like Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden material model are used to describe the artery wall and are compared in terms of stability and computational expenses. To avoid any kind of locking, high-order finite elements are used to discretize the structural sub-problem. The finite volume method is employed to discretize the fluid sub-problem. We investigate the influence of mass-proportional damping and the material model chosen for the artery on the performance and stability of the acceleration strategies as well as on the simulation results. To show the applicability of the partitioned approach to clinical relevant studies, the hemodynamics in a pathologically deformed artery are investigated, taking the findings of the test case simulations into account.

  2. Comparative metabolomics and structural characterizations illuminate colibactin pathway-dependent small molecules.

    PubMed

    Vizcaino, Maria I; Engel, Philipp; Trautman, Eric; Crawford, Jason M

    2014-07-01

    The gene cluster responsible for synthesis of the unknown molecule "colibactin" has been identified in mutualistic and pathogenic Escherichia coli. The pathway endows its producer with a long-term persistence phenotype in the human bowel, a probiotic activity used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, and a carcinogenic activity under host inflammatory conditions. To date, functional small molecules from this pathway have not been reported. Here we implemented a comparative metabolomics and targeted structural network analyses approach to identify a catalog of small molecules dependent on the colibactin pathway from the meningitis isolate E. coli IHE3034 and the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917. The structures of 10 pathway-dependent small molecules are proposed based on structural characterizations and network relationships. The network will provide a roadmap for the structural and functional elucidation of a variety of other small molecules encoded by the pathway. From the characterized small molecule set, in vitro bacterial growth inhibitory and mammalian CNS receptor antagonist activities are presented. PMID:24932672

  3. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  4. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  5. Acceleration Data Reveal Highly Individually Structured Energetic Landscapes in Free-Ranging Fishers (Pekania pennanti)

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Anne K.; LaPoint, Scott; Wikelski, Martin; Safi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Investigating animal energy expenditure across space and time may provide more detailed insight into how animals interact with their environment. This insight should improve our understanding of how changes in the environment affect animal energy budgets and is particularly relevant for animals living near or within human altered environments where habitat change can occur rapidly. We modeled fisher (Pekania pennanti) energy expenditure within their home ranges and investigated the potential environmental and spatial drivers of the predicted spatial patterns. As a proxy for energy expenditure we used overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) that we quantified from tri-axial accelerometer data during the active phases of 12 individuals. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to investigate the spatial distribution of ODBA by associating the acceleration data to the animals' GPS-recorded locations. We related the spatial patterns of ODBA to the utilization distributions and habitat suitability estimates across individuals. The ODBA of fishers appears highly structured in space and was related to individual utilization distribution and habitat suitability estimates. However, we were not able to predict ODBA using the environmental data we selected. Our results suggest an unexpected complexity in the space use of animals that was only captured partially by re-location data-based concepts of home range and habitat suitability. We suggest future studies recognize the limits of ODBA that arise from the fact that acceleration is often collected at much finer spatio-temporal scales than the environmental data and that ODBA lacks a behavioral correspondence. Overcoming these limits would improve the interpretation of energy expenditure in relation to the environment. PMID:26840399

  6. Acceleration Data Reveal Highly Individually Structured Energetic Landscapes in Free-Ranging Fishers (Pekania pennanti).

    PubMed

    Scharf, Anne K; LaPoint, Scott; Wikelski, Martin; Safi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Investigating animal energy expenditure across space and time may provide more detailed insight into how animals interact with their environment. This insight should improve our understanding of how changes in the environment affect animal energy budgets and is particularly relevant for animals living near or within human altered environments where habitat change can occur rapidly. We modeled fisher (Pekania pennanti) energy expenditure within their home ranges and investigated the potential environmental and spatial drivers of the predicted spatial patterns. As a proxy for energy expenditure we used overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) that we quantified from tri-axial accelerometer data during the active phases of 12 individuals. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to investigate the spatial distribution of ODBA by associating the acceleration data to the animals' GPS-recorded locations. We related the spatial patterns of ODBA to the utilization distributions and habitat suitability estimates across individuals. The ODBA of fishers appears highly structured in space and was related to individual utilization distribution and habitat suitability estimates. However, we were not able to predict ODBA using the environmental data we selected. Our results suggest an unexpected complexity in the space use of animals that was only captured partially by re-location data-based concepts of home range and habitat suitability. We suggest future studies recognize the limits of ODBA that arise from the fact that acceleration is often collected at much finer spatio-temporal scales than the environmental data and that ODBA lacks a behavioral correspondence. Overcoming these limits would improve the interpretation of energy expenditure in relation to the environment. PMID:26840399

  7. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  8. SOFIA-EXES: Probing the Thermal Structure of M Supergiant Wind Acceleration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team, EXES Science Team

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard model for mass loss from cool evolved stars, particularly for non-pulsating giants and supergiants. For the early-M supergiants, radiation pressure, convective ejections, magnetic fields, and Alfven waves have all been put forward as potential mass loss mechanisms. A potential discriminator between these ideas is the thermal structure resulting from the heating-cooling balance in the acceleration zone - the most important region to study mass loss physics.We present mid-IR [Fe II] emission line profiles of Betelgeuse and Antares obtained with NASA-DLR SOFIA-EXES and NASA IRTF-TEXES that were obtained as part of a GO program (Harper: Cycle 2-0004) and EXES instrument commissioning observations. The intra-term transitions sample a range of excitation conditions, Texc=540K, 3,400K, and 11,700K, i.e., from the warm chromospheric plasma, that also emits in the cm-radio and ultraviolet, to the cold inner circumstellar envelope. The spectrally-resolved profiles, when combined with VLA cm-radio observations, provide new constraints on the temperature and flow velocity in the outflow accelerating region. The semi-empirical energy balance can be used to test theoretical predictions of wind heating.

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PLASMOID EJECTIONS DERIVED FROM RADIO DRIFTING PULSATING STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, N.; Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Janvier, M.

    2015-02-01

    We report observations of slowly drifting pulsating structures (DPSs) in the 0.8-4.5 GHz frequency range of the RT4 and RT5 radio spectrographs at Ondřejov Observatory, between 2002 and 2012. We found 106 events of DPSs, which we classified into four cases: (I) single events with a constant frequency drift (12 events), (II) multiple events occurring in the same flare with constant frequency drifts (11 events), (III) single or multiple events with increasing or decreasing frequency drift rates (52 events), and (IV) complex events containing multiple events occurring at the same time in a different frequency range (31 events). Many DPSs are associated with hard X-ray (HXR) bursts (15-25 keV) and soft X-ray (SXR) gradient peaks, as they typically occurred at the beginning of HXR peaks. This indicates that DPS events are related to the processes of fast energy release and particle acceleration. Furthermore, interpreting DPSs as signatures of plasmoids, we measured their ejection velocity, their width, and their height from the DPS spectra, from which we also estimated the reconnection rate and the plasma beta. In this interpretation, constant frequency drift indicates a constant velocity of a plasmoid, and an increasing/decreasing frequency drift indicates a deceleration/acceleration of a plasmoid ejection. The reconnection rate shows a good positive correlation with the plasmoid velocity. Finally we confirmed that some DPS events show plasmoid counterparts in Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images.

  10. Muscle mass, structural and functional investigations of senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, An Yun; Leung, Kwok Sui; Siu, Parco Ming Fai; Qin, Jiang Hui; Chow, Simon Kwoon Ho; Qin, Ling; Li, Chi Yu; Cheung, Wing Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-related systemic syndrome with progressive deterioration in skeletal muscle functions and loss in mass. Although the senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) was reported valid for muscular ageing research, there was no report on the details such as sarcopenia onset time. Therefore, this study was to investigate the change of muscle mass, structure and functions during the development of sarcopenia. Besides the average life span, muscle mass, structural and functional measurements were also studied. Male SAMP8 animals were examined at month 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, in which the right gastrocnemius was isolated and tested for ex vivo contractile properties and fatigability while the contralateral one was harvested for muscle fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA) and typing assessments. Results showed that the peak of muscle mass appeared at month 7 and the onset of contractility decline was observed from month 8. Compared with month 8, most of the functional parameters at month 10 decreased significantly. Structurally, muscle fiber type IIA made up the largest proportion of the gastrocnemius, and the fiber size was found to peak at month 8. Based on the altered muscle mass, structural and functional outcomes, it was concluded that the onset of sarcopenia in SAMP8 animals was at month 8. SAMP8 animals at month 8 should be at pre-sarcopenia stage while month 10 at sarcopenia stage. It is confirmed that SAMP8 mouse can be used in sarcopenia research with established time line in this study. PMID:26193895

  11. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  12. Structure of mycobacterial maltokinase, the missing link in the essential GlgE-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Joana; Maranha, Ana; Mendes, Vitor; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Empadinhas, Nuno; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A novel four-step pathway identified recently in mycobacteria channels trehalose to glycogen synthesis and is also likely involved in the biosynthesis of two other crucial polymers: intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides and exposed capsular glucan. The structures of three of the intervening enzymes - GlgB, GlgE, and TreS - were recently reported, providing the first templates for rational drug design. Here we describe the structural characterization of the fourth enzyme of the pathway, mycobacterial maltokinase (Mak), uncovering a eukaryotic-like kinase (ELK) fold, similar to methylthioribose kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. The 1.15 Å structure of Mak in complex with a non-hydrolysable ATP analog reveals subtle structural rearrangements upon nucleotide binding in the cleft between the N- and the C-terminal lobes. Remarkably, this new family of ELKs has a novel N-terminal domain topologically resembling the cystatin family of protease inhibitors. By interfacing with and restraining the mobility of the phosphate-binding region of the N-terminal lobe, Mak's unusual N-terminal domain might regulate its phosphotransfer activity and represents the most likely anchoring point for TreS, the upstream enzyme in the pathway. By completing the gallery of atomic-detail models of an essential pathway, this structure opens new avenues for the rational design of alternative anti-tubercular compounds. PMID:25619172

  13. Influence of solidification accelerators on structure formation of anhydrite-containing binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikanova, L.; Volkova, O.; Kudyakov, A.; Sarkisov, Y.; Tolstov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of scientific analysis of chemical additives influence on acid fluoride binder. It was found that the influence of sulfate nature additives on the process of hydration and solidification of the binder is similar to influence of additives on indissoluble anhydrite. Additives with SO42- anion NO- are more efficient. The mentioned additives according to accelerating effect belong to the following succession: K2SO4 > Na2SO4 > FeSO4 > MgSO4. Facilitation of the process of hydration and solidification of the binder, increase in density and durability of the binder (32 MPa) is to the greatest extent achieved with the introduction of 2% sodium sulfate additive of the binder's mass into the composition of the binder along with the ultrasonic treatment of water solution. Directed crystal formation process with healing of porous structure by new growths presented as calcium sulfate dehydrate and hydroglauberite provides positive effect.

  14. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  15. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  16. Pathway-level acceleration of glycogen catabolism by a response regulator in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-04-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  17. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells. PMID:27513630

  18. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  19. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  20. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  1. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways--structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Pär

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  2. The downregulation of thioredoxin accelerated Neuro2a cell apoptosis induced by advanced glycation end product via activating several pathways.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang; Ma, Haiying; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Bo; Qi, Hui; Li, Zeyu; Kong, Hui; Kong, Li

    2015-08-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx), a 12 kDa protein, has different functions in different cellular environments, playing important anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic roles and regulating the expression of transcription factors. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts from glucose-protein condensation reactions and are considered crucial to the development of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, neurodegeneration and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to use a Trx inhibitor to investigate the effects and mechanism of Trx down-regulation on AGE-induced Neuro2a cell apoptosis. Neuro2a cells were cultured in vitro and treated with different conditions. The apoptosis and proliferation of Neuro2a cells were detected using flow cytometry, DNA-Ladder and CCK8 assays. Rho 123 was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential. ROS generation and caspase3 activity were detected using a DCFH-DA probe and micro-plate reader. Western blotting and real-time PCR were used to detect the expression of proteins and genes. We found that the down-regulation of thioredoxin could accelerate AGE-induced apoptosis in Neuro2a cells. A possible underlying mechanism is that the down-regulation of thioredoxin stimulated the up-regulation of ASK1, p-JNK, PTEN, and Txnip, as well as the down-regulation of p-AKT, ultimately increasing ROS levels and caspase3 activity.

  3. The downregulation of thioredoxin accelerated Neuro2a cell apoptosis induced by advanced glycation end product via activating several pathways.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang; Ma, Haiying; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Bo; Qi, Hui; Li, Zeyu; Kong, Hui; Kong, Li

    2015-08-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx), a 12 kDa protein, has different functions in different cellular environments, playing important anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic roles and regulating the expression of transcription factors. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts from glucose-protein condensation reactions and are considered crucial to the development of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, neurodegeneration and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to use a Trx inhibitor to investigate the effects and mechanism of Trx down-regulation on AGE-induced Neuro2a cell apoptosis. Neuro2a cells were cultured in vitro and treated with different conditions. The apoptosis and proliferation of Neuro2a cells were detected using flow cytometry, DNA-Ladder and CCK8 assays. Rho 123 was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential. ROS generation and caspase3 activity were detected using a DCFH-DA probe and micro-plate reader. Western blotting and real-time PCR were used to detect the expression of proteins and genes. We found that the down-regulation of thioredoxin could accelerate AGE-induced apoptosis in Neuro2a cells. A possible underlying mechanism is that the down-regulation of thioredoxin stimulated the up-regulation of ASK1, p-JNK, PTEN, and Txnip, as well as the down-regulation of p-AKT, ultimately increasing ROS levels and caspase3 activity. PMID:26142569

  4. Analysis of a Symmetric Terahertz Dielectric-Lined Rectangular Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    We study, using computational methods based on analytic theory as well as a PIC code, the wakefields set up in a seven-zone symmetric rectangular THZ structure, and find that for overall transverse x/y dimensions 2.121 mmx0.6 mm, two 5-GeV drive bunches (3 nC, with x/y/z dimensions 0.3/0.3/0.12 mm{sup 3} as available at SLAC) will set up an axial wakefield {approx}350 MV/m in the witness channel, with a transformer ratio {approx}18-20. The symmetry of the structure ensures not only that small transverse forces are imposed on the witness bunch, but also that the two components of transverse force are equal and opposite at the bunch location so as to enable dynamical stabilization in an accelerator comprising many modules. Transverse forces on the drive bunch tails may allow bunches to move {approx}0.5-1 m without suffering excessive erosion.

  5. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  6. CAVER 3.0: A Tool for the Analysis of Transport Pathways in Dynamic Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Ondrej; Brezovsky, Jan; Kozlikova, Barbora; Gora, Artur; Sustr, Vilem; Klvana, Martin; Medek, Petr; Biedermannova, Lada; Sochor, Jiri; Damborsky, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Tunnels and channels facilitate the transport of small molecules, ions and water solvent in a large variety of proteins. Characteristics of individual transport pathways, including their geometry, physico-chemical properties and dynamics are instrumental for understanding of structure-function relationships of these proteins, for the design of new inhibitors and construction of improved biocatalysts. CAVER is a software tool widely used for the identification and characterization of transport pathways in static macromolecular structures. Herein we present a new version of CAVER enabling automatic analysis of tunnels and channels in large ensembles of protein conformations. CAVER 3.0 implements new algorithms for the calculation and clustering of pathways. A trajectory from a molecular dynamics simulation serves as the typical input, while detailed characteristics and summary statistics of the time evolution of individual pathways are provided in the outputs. To illustrate the capabilities of CAVER 3.0, the tool was applied for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation of the microbial enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase DhaA. CAVER 3.0 safely identified and reliably estimated the importance of all previously published DhaA tunnels, including the tunnels closed in DhaA crystal structures. Obtained results clearly demonstrate that analysis of molecular dynamics simulation is essential for the estimation of pathway characteristics and elucidation of the structural basis of the tunnel gating. CAVER 3.0 paves the way for the study of important biochemical phenomena in the area of molecular transport, molecular recognition and enzymatic catalysis. The software is freely available as a multiplatform command-line application at http://www.caver.cz. PMID:23093919

  7. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  8. Effect of gravitational acceleration, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the structure of the intestinal vascular bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitin, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments comparing single and combined effects of hypokinesia and gravitational acceleration on morphology of intestinal blood vessels are discussed. Results indicate that hypokinesia has a whole body nonspecific effect reflected even in an organ whose activity shows little or no change due to hypokinesia. In early hypokinetic stages blood redistribution caused anorexia, intestinal atonia, and secretory disruption. Destructive changes from further exposure include aneurisms, varicoses, extravascular movement of blood elements, and vascular wall muscle fiber degeneration. The effect of acceleration is greatest in the ventrodorsal direction. Changes due to acceleration then hypokinesia are like those due to hypokinesia alone; changes due to acceleration before and after hypokinesia are like those due to acceleration. Adaptation raises acceleration tolerance but the effects do not survive four-week hypokinesia.

  9. De novo prediction of protein folding pathways and structure using the principle of sequential stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the relationship between the folding mechanism and the native structure, we develop a unified approach for predicting folding pathways and tertiary structure using only the primary sequence as input. Simulations begin from a realistic unfolded state devoid of secondary structure and use a chain representation lacking explicit side chains, rendering the simulations many orders of magnitude faster than molecular dynamics simulations. The multiple round nature of the algorithm mimics the authentic folding process and tests the effectiveness of sequential stabilization (SS) as a search strategy wherein 2° structural elements add onto existing structures in a process of progressive learning and stabilization of structure found in prior rounds of folding. Because no a priori knowledge is used, we can identify kinetically significant non-native interactions and intermediates, sometimes generated by only two mutations, while the evolution of contact matrices is often consistent with experiments. Moreover, structure prediction improves substantially by incorporating information from prior rounds. The success of our simple, homology-free approach affirms the validity of our description of the primary determinants of folding pathways and structure, and the effectiveness of SS as a search strategy. PMID:23045636

  10. Titanium α -ω phase transformation pathway and a predicted metastable structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-01-01

    As titanium is a highly utilized metal for structural lightweighting, its phases, transformation pathways (transition states), and structures have scientific and industrial importance. Using a proper solid-state nudged elastic band method employing two climbing images combined with density functional theory DFT + U methods for accurate energetics, we detail the pressure-induced α (ductile) to ω (brittle) transformation at the coexistence pressure. We find two transition states along the minimal-enthalpy path and discover a metastable body-centered orthorhombic structure, with stable phonons, a lower density than the end-point phases, and decreasing stability with increasing pressure.

  11. Titanium α-ω phase transformation pathway and a predicted metastable structure

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkevich, Nickolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-01-15

    A titanium is a highly utilized metal for structural lightweighting and its phases, transformation pathways (transition states), and structures have scientific and industrial importance. Using a proper solid-state nudged elastic band method employing two climbing images combined with density functional theory DFT + U methods for accurate energetics, we detail the pressure-induced α (ductile) to ω (brittle) transformation at the coexistence pressure. We also find two transition states along the minimal-enthalpy path and discover a metastable body-centered orthorhombic structure, with stable phonons, a lower density than the end-point phases, and decreasing stability with increasing pressure.

  12. ConnectViz: Accelerated Approach for Brain Structural Connectivity Using Delaunay Triangulation.

    PubMed

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality and long-term disability in the world. Normal functioning of the brain is dependent on the adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients to the brain complex network through the blood vessels. Stroke, occasionally a hemorrhagic stroke, ischemia or other blood vessel dysfunctions can affect patients during a cerebrovascular incident. Structurally, the left and the right carotid arteries, and the right and the left vertebral arteries are responsible for supplying blood to the brain, scalp and the face. However, a number of impairment in the function of the frontal lobes may occur as a result of any decrease in the flow of the blood through one of the internal carotid arteries. Such impairment commonly results in numbness, weakness or paralysis. Recently, the concepts of brain's wiring representation, the connectome, was introduced. However, construction and visualization of such brain network requires tremendous computation. Consequently, previously proposed approaches have been identified with common problems of high memory consumption and slow execution. Furthermore, interactivity in the previously proposed frameworks for brain network is also an outstanding issue. This study proposes an accelerated approach for brain connectomic visualization based on graph theory paradigm using compute unified device architecture, extending the previously proposed SurLens Visualization and computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma frameworks. The accelerated brain structural connectivity framework was evaluated with stripped brain datasets from the Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. Significantly, our proposed framework is able to generate and extract points and edges of datasets, displays nodes and edges in the datasets in form of a network and clearly maps data volume to the corresponding brain surface. Moreover, with the framework, surfaces of the dataset were simultaneously displayed with the

  13. Representation of Gravity-Aligned Scene Structure in Ventral Pathway Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Siavash; Connor, Charles E

    2016-03-21

    The ventral visual pathway in humans and non-human primates is known to represent object information, including shape and identity [1]. Here, we show the ventral pathway also represents scene structure aligned with the gravitational reference frame in which objects move and interact. We analyzed shape tuning of recently described macaque monkey ventral pathway neurons that prefer scene-like stimuli to objects [2]. Individual neurons did not respond to a single shape class, but to a variety of scene elements that are typically aligned with gravity: large planes in the orientation range of ground surfaces under natural viewing conditions, planes in the orientation range of ceilings, and extended convex and concave edges in the orientation range of wall/floor/ceiling junctions. For a given neuron, these elements tended to share a common alignment in eye-centered coordinates. Thus, each neuron integrated information about multiple gravity-aligned structures as they would be seen from a specific eye and head orientation. This eclectic coding strategy provides only ambiguous information about individual structures but explicit information about the environmental reference frame and the orientation of gravity in egocentric coordinates. In the ventral pathway, this could support perceiving and/or predicting physical events involving objects subject to gravity, recognizing object attributes like animacy based on movement not caused by gravity, and/or stabilizing perception of the world against changes in head orientation [3-5]. Our results, like the recent discovery of object weight representation [6], imply that the ventral pathway is involved not just in recognition, but also in physical understanding of objects and scenes.

  14. Dynamic Transmission of Protein Allostery without Structural Change: Spatial Pathways or Global Modes?

    PubMed Central

    McLeish, Tom C.B.; Cann, Martin J.; Rodgers, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the contrast between mechanisms for allosteric signaling that involve structural change, and those that do not, from the perspective of allosteric pathways. In particular we treat in detail the case of fluctuation-allostery by which amplitude modulation of the thermal fluctuations of the elastic normal modes conveys the allosteric signal, and address the question of what an allosteric pathway means in this case. We find that a perturbation theory of thermal elastic solids and nonperturbative approach (by super-coarse-graining elasticity into internal bending modes) have opposite signatures in their structure of correlated pathways. We illustrate the effect from analysis of previous results from GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum, an example of the CRP/FNR transcription family of allosteric homodimers. We find that the visibility of both correlated pathways and disconnected sites of correlated motion in this protein suggests that mechanisms of local elastic stretch and bend are recruited for the purpose of creating and controlling allosteric cooperativity. PMID:26338443

  15. Dynamic Transmission of Protein Allostery without Structural Change: Spatial Pathways or Global Modes?

    PubMed

    McLeish, Tom C B; Cann, Martin J; Rodgers, Thomas L

    2015-09-15

    We examine the contrast between mechanisms for allosteric signaling that involve structural change, and those that do not, from the perspective of allosteric pathways. In particular we treat in detail the case of fluctuation-allostery by which amplitude modulation of the thermal fluctuations of the elastic normal modes conveys the allosteric signal, and address the question of what an allosteric pathway means in this case. We find that a perturbation theory of thermal elastic solids and nonperturbative approach (by super-coarse-graining elasticity into internal bending modes) have opposite signatures in their structure of correlated pathways. We illustrate the effect from analysis of previous results from GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum, an example of the CRP/FNR transcription family of allosteric homodimers. We find that the visibility of both correlated pathways and disconnected sites of correlated motion in this protein suggests that mechanisms of local elastic stretch and bend are recruited for the purpose of creating and controlling allosteric cooperativity. PMID:26338443

  16. A piezo-driven micro-inclination stage for calibration of a micro-acceleration transducer: structure and control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shubao; Song, Siyang; Xu, Minglong; Xie, Shilin; Li, Liang

    2016-02-01

    In some space applications, such as space navigation and vibration control of the large space structures, micro-acceleration transducers are required and have to be calibrated accurately. Unfortunately, providing extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) for the calibration of the micro-acceleration transducer has been a challenging task. This paper proposes a novel piezo-driven micro-inclination stage (PMIS) that can produce both discrete and continuous tumbles in a gravity field so that extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) can be obtained from a tiny component of the gravity constant. The proposed PMIS, which is driven by the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stack, employs a rhombic mechanism to provide the PZT stack with a proper preload for the purpose of outputting a bidirectional force. To produce accurate static and quasi-static stimuli, the hysteresis non-linearity inherent in PZT stack is compensated by employing the strain feedback based adaptive control where the hysteresis property is identified online using the controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Furthermore, to improve the resolution of strain feedback, the strain sensitivity is maximized through structure optimization of the rhombic mechanism. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed PMIS can produce minimal micro-inclination of {{0.1}\\prime \\prime} (corresponding to the induced micro-acceleration of 0.5μ g ) with the frequency ranging from 0 (DC) to 2 Hz.

  17. Design, realization and test of C-band accelerating structures for the SPARC_LAB linac energy upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M. E.; Boni, R.; Brönnimann, M.; Cardelli, F.; Chimenti, P.; Clementi, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Kalt, R.; Lollo, V.; Palumbo, L.; Piersanti, L.; Schilcher, T.

    2016-11-01

    The energy upgrade of the SPARC_LAB photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy) has been originally conceived replacing one low gradient (13 MV/m) 3 m long SLAC type S-band traveling wave (TW) section with two 1.4 m long C-band accelerating sections. Due to the higher gradients reached by such structures, a higher energy beam can be obtained within the same accelerator footprint length. The use of C-band structures for electron acceleration has been adopted in a few FEL linacs in the world, among others, the Japanese Free Electron Laser at SPring-8 and the SwissFEL at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The C-band sections are traveling wave, constant impedance structures with symmetric input and output axial couplers. Their design has been optimized for the operation with a SLED RF pulse compressor. In this paper we briefly review their design criteria and we focus on the construction, tuning, low and high-power RF tests. We also illustrate the design and realization of the dedicated low level RF system that has been done in collaboration with PSI in the framework of the EU TIARA project. Preliminary experimental results appear to confirm the operation of such structures with accelerating gradients larger than 35 MV/m.

  18. Ion Acceleration at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and its Global Impact on Magnetospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2016-07-01

    The ion plasma pressures at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter are significant players in the electrodynamic force-balance that governs the structure and dynamics of these magnetospheres. There are many similarities between the physical mechanisms that are thought to heat the ion plasma to temperatures that even exceed those of the solar corona. In this presentation we compare the ion acceleration mechanisms at the three planetary magnetospheres and discuss their global impacts on magnetopsheric structure. At Earth, bursty-bulk flows, or "bubbles", have been shown to accelerate protons and O+ to high energies by the earthward moving magnetic dipolarization fronts. O+ ions display a more non-adiabatic energization in response to these fronts than protons do as they are energized and transported in to the ring-current region where they reach energies of several 100's keV. We present both in-situ measurements from the NASA Van Allen Probes Mission and global Energetic Neutral (ENA) images from the High-Energy Neutral Atom (HENA) Camera on board the IMAGE Mission, that illustrate these processes. The global impact on the magnetospheric structure is explored by comparing the empirical magnetic field model TS07d for given driving conditions with global plasma pressure distributions derived from the HENA images. At Saturn, quasi-periodic energization events, or large-scale injections, occur beyond about 9 RS around the post-midnight sector, clearly shown by the Ion and Neutral Atom Camera (INCA) on board the Cassini mission. In contrast to Earth, the corotational drift dominates even the energetic ion distributions. The large-scale injections display similar dipolarization front features can be found and there are indications that like at Earth the O+ responds more non-adiabatically than protons do. However, at Saturn there are also differences in that there appears to be energization events deep in the inner magnetosphere (6-9 RS) preferentially occurring in the pre

  19. GPU-accelerated model for fast, three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computations.

    PubMed

    Nita, Cosmin; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Rapaka, Saikiran

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a methodology for performing one-way Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI), i.e. where the motion of the wall boundaries is imposed. We use a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) implementation and present an efficient workflow for embedding the moving geometry, given as a set of polygonal meshes, in the LBM computation. The proposed method is first validated in a synthetic experiment: a vessel which is periodically expanding and contracting. Next, the evaluation focuses on the 3D Peristaltic flow problem: a fluid flows inside a flexible tube, where a periodic wave-like deformation produces a fluid motion along the centerline of the tube. Different geometry configurations are used and results are compared against previously published solutions. The efficient approach leads to an average execution time of approx. one hour per computation, whereas 50% of it is required for the geometry update operations. Finally, we also analyse the effect of changing the Reynolds number on the flow streamlines: the flow regime is significantly affected by the Reynolds number. PMID:26736424

  20. Magnetic and Structural Design of a 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ Accelerator Depole Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Hadron Colliders (HC) are the most powerful discovery tools in modern high energy physics. A 100 TeV scale HC with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era. The choice of a 15 T nominal field requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance. The experience gained during the 11-T dipole R&D campaign is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model.

  1. Aggressive, accelerated subdomain smoothers for Stokes flow with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanan, Patrick; May, Dave; Schenk, Olaf; Rupp, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Scalable solvers for mantle convection and lithospheric dynamics with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure typically require the use of a multigrid method. To leverage new hybrid CPU-accelerator architectures on leadership compute clusters, multigrid hierarchies which can reduce communication and use high available arithmetic intensity are at a premium, motivating more aggressive coarsening schemes and smoothers. We present results of a comparative study of two competitive GPU-enabled subdomain smoothers within an additive Schwarz method. Chebyshev-Jacobi smoothing has been shown to be an effective smoother, and its nature as a low-communication method built from basic linear algebra routines allows its use on a wide range of devices with current libraries. ILU smoothing is also of interest and is known to provide robust smoothing in some cases, but has traditionally been difficult to use in a fine-grained parallel environment. However, a recently-introduced variant by Chow and Patel allows for incomplete factorizations to be computed and applied in these environments, hence allowing us to study them as well. We use and extend the pTatin3D, PETSc, and ViennaCL libraries to integrate promising methods into a realistic application framework.

  2. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  3. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-20

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  4. Beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactive granular structures in the brain of senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M.; Nakamura, S.; Akiguchi, I.; Ueno, M.; Oka, N.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimada, A.; Kimura, J.; Takeda, T.

    1993-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of amyloid beta/A4 protein in the senescence-accelerated mouse brain was studied using six different antisera against human amyloid precursor protein peptides. beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactivity was observed in the form of granular structures (beta-LIGS) in various regions, including the medial septum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and some cranial nerve roots. beta-LIGS were 1.5 to 2.5 mu in diameter and irregularly shaped. They increased significantly in number with aging, predominantly in animals with a phenotype of age-related deterioration of memory and learning abilities. Congo red and thioflavine S did not stain the granules. On immunoblots, the main immunoreactive bands were observed at 14 to 18 kd. The staining intensities of these bands also increased with advancing age. We consider that beta-LIGS are not only a new morphological manifestation of senescence in mice, but also a pertinent clue in understanding the mechanisms of amyloid deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8506956

  5. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  6. Biological effectiveness of accelerated particles for the induction of chromosome damage: track structure effects.

    PubMed

    George, Kerry A; Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2013-07-01

    We have investigated how radiation quality affects the induction of chromosomal aberrations in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated high charge and energy (HZE) particles including oxygen, neon, silicon, titanium and iron. Chromosome damage was assessed using three-color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced premature chromosome condensation samples collected at first cell division after irradiation. The LET values for these particles ranged from 30 to 195 keV/μm, and their energies ranged from about 55 MeV/u to more than 1,000 MeV/u. The 89 and 142 MeV/u neon particles produced the most simple-type reciprocal exchanges per unit dose. For complex-type exchanges, 64 MeV/u neon and 450 MeV/u iron were equally effective and induced the greatest amount of complex damage. Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number (Z) will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z, and that a saturation cross section will be observed for different radiation qualities. Our results are consistent with model expectations within the limitation of experimental error, and provide the most extensive data that have been reported on the radiation quality dependences of chromosomal aberrations. PMID:23692480

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  9. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  10. Structural inhibition and reactivation of Escherichia coli septation by elements of the SOS and TER pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Dopazo, A.; Tormo, A.; Aldea, M.; Vicente, M.

    1987-04-01

    The inhibition of cell division caused by induction of the SOS pathway in Escherichia coli structurally blocks septation, as deduced from two sets of results. Potential septation sites active at the time of SOS induction became inactivated, while those initiated during the following doubling time were active. Penicillin resistance increased in wild-type UV light-irradiated cells, a behavior similar to that observed in mutants in which structural blocks were introduced by inactivation of FtsA. Potential septation sites that have been structurally blocked by either the SOS division inhibitor, furazlocillin inhibition of PBP3, or inactivation of a TER pathway component, FtsA3, could be reactivated one doubling time after removal of the inhibitory agent in the presence of an active lon gene product. Reactivation of potential septation sites blocked by the presence of an inactivated FtsA3 was significantly lower when the lon protease was not active, suggesting that Lon plays a role in the removal of inactivated TER pathway products from the blocked potential septation sites.

  11. L2-Proficiency-Dependent Laterality Shift in Structural Connectivity of Brain Language Pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Huadong; van Leeuwen, Tessa Marije; Dediu, Dan; Roberts, Leah; Norris, David G; Hagoort, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a longitudinal language learning approach were applied to investigate the relationship between the achieved second language (L2) proficiency during L2 learning and the reorganization of structural connectivity between core language areas. Language proficiency tests and DTI scans were obtained from German students before and after they completed an intensive 6-week course of the Dutch language. In the initial learning stage, with increasing L2 proficiency, the hemispheric dominance of the Brodmann area (BA) 6-temporal pathway (mainly along the arcuate fasciculus) shifted from the left to the right hemisphere. With further increased proficiency, however, lateralization dominance was again found in the left BA6-temporal pathway. This result is consistent with reports in the literature that imply a stronger involvement of the right hemisphere in L2 processing especially for less proficient L2 speakers. This is the first time that an L2 proficiency-dependent laterality shift in the structural connectivity of language pathways during L2 acquisition has been observed to shift from left to right and back to left hemisphere dominance with increasing L2 proficiency. The authors additionally find that changes in fractional anisotropy values after the course are related to the time elapsed between the two scans. The results suggest that structural connectivity in (at least part of) the perisylvian language network may be subject to fast dynamic changes following language learning.

  12. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities.

  13. Structural changes in the O-decay accelerated mutants of pharaonis phoborhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Yuki; Furutani, Yuji; Iwamoto, Masayuki; Kamo, Naoki; Kandori, Hideki

    2008-03-01

    pharaonis phoborhodopsin ( ppR, also called pharaonis sensory rhodopsin II, psRII) is a receptor for negative phototaxis in Natronomonas pharaonis. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ppR is very similar to those of the ion-pumping rhodopsins, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (hR). However, the decay processes of the photocycle intermediates such as M and O are much slower than those of BR and hR, which is advantageous for the sensor function of ppR. Iwamoto et al. previously found that, in a quadruple mutant (P182S/P183E/V194T/T204C; denoted as SETC) of ppR, the decay of the O intermediate was accelerated by approximately 100 times ( t 1/2 approximately 6.6 ms vs 690 ms for the wild type of ppR), being almost equal to that of BR (Iwamoto, M., et al. (2005) Biophys. J. 88, 1215-1223). The mutated residues are located on the extracellular surface (Pro182, Pro183, and Val194) and near the Schiff base (Thr204). The present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of SETC revealed that protein structural changes in the K and M states were similar to those of the wild type. In contrast, the ppR O minus ppR infrared difference spectra of SETC are clearly different from those of the wild type in amide-I (1680-1640 cm (-1)) and S-H stretching (2580-2520 cm (-1)) vibrations. The 1673 (+) and 1656 (-) cm (-1) bands newly appear for SETC in the frequency region typical for the amide-I vibration of the alpha II- and alpha I-helices, respectively. The intensities of the 1673 (+) cm (-1) band of various mutants were well correlated with their O-decay half-times. Since the alpha II-helix possesses a considerably distorted structure, the result implies that distortion of the helix is required for fast O-decay. In addition, the characteristic changes in the S-H stretching vibration of Cys204 were different between SETC and T204C, suggesting that structural change near the Schiff base was induced by mutations of the extracellular surface. We conclude that the

  14. Existence of Different Structural Intermediates on the Fibrillation Pathway of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Josué; Taboada, Pablo; Mosquera, Víctor

    2009-01-01

    The fibrillation propensity of the multidomain protein human serum albumin (HSA) was analyzed under different solution conditions. The aggregation kinetics, protein conformational changes upon self-assembly, and structure of the different intermediates on the fibrillation pathway were determined by means of thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and Congo Red absorbance; far- and near-ultraviolet circular dichroism; tryptophan fluorescence; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; x-ray diffraction; and transmission electron, scanning electron, atomic force, and microscopies. HSA fibrillation extends over several days of incubation without the presence of a lag phase, except for HSA samples incubated at acidic pH and room temperature in the absence of electrolyte. The absence of a lag phase occurs if the initial aggregation is a downhill process that does not require a highly organized and unstable nucleus. The fibrillation process is accompanied by a progressive increase in the β-sheet (up to 26%) and unordered conformation at the expense of α-helical conformation, as revealed by ThT fluorescence and circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, but changes in the secondary structure contents depend on solution conditions. These changes also involve the presence of different structural intermediates in the aggregation pathway, such as oligomeric clusters (globules), bead-like structures, and ring-shaped aggregates. We suggest that fibril formation may take place through the role of association-competent oligomeric intermediates, resulting in a kinetic pathway via clustering of these oligomeric species to yield protofibrils and then fibrils. The resultant fibrils are elongated but curly, and differ in length depending on solution conditions. Under acidic conditions, circular fibrils are commonly observed if the fibrils are sufficiently flexible and long enough for the ends to find themselves regularly in close proximity to each other. These fibrils

  15. Microbial structures, functions, and metabolic pathways in wastewater treatment bioreactors revealed using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Taitao; Fang, Zhiwei

    2012-12-18

    The objective of this study was to explore microbial community structures, functional profiles, and metabolic pathways in a lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors. In order to do this, over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data and 600,000 paired-end sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, using DNA extracted from activated sludge in the two bioreactors. Three kinds of sequences (16S rRNA gene amplicons, 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from metagenomic sequencing, and predicted proteins) were used to conduct taxonomic assignments. Specially, relative abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), metagenomic sequencing was demonstrated to be a better approach to quantify AOA and AOB in activated sludge samples. It was found that AOB were more abundant than AOA in both reactors. Furthermore, the analysis of the metabolic profiles indicated that the overall patterns of metabolic pathways in the two reactors were quite similar (73.3% of functions shared). However, for some pathways (such as carbohydrate metabolism and membrane transport), the two reactors differed in the number of pathway-specific genes.

  16. Microbial structures, functions, and metabolic pathways in wastewater treatment bioreactors revealed using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Taitao; Fang, Zhiwei

    2012-12-18

    The objective of this study was to explore microbial community structures, functional profiles, and metabolic pathways in a lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors. In order to do this, over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data and 600,000 paired-end sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, using DNA extracted from activated sludge in the two bioreactors. Three kinds of sequences (16S rRNA gene amplicons, 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from metagenomic sequencing, and predicted proteins) were used to conduct taxonomic assignments. Specially, relative abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), metagenomic sequencing was demonstrated to be a better approach to quantify AOA and AOB in activated sludge samples. It was found that AOB were more abundant than AOA in both reactors. Furthermore, the analysis of the metabolic profiles indicated that the overall patterns of metabolic pathways in the two reactors were quite similar (73.3% of functions shared). However, for some pathways (such as carbohydrate metabolism and membrane transport), the two reactors differed in the number of pathway-specific genes. PMID:23151157

  17. Structures of the ozonolysis products and ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Diao, Enjie; Shan, Changpo; Hou, Hanxue; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Minghua; Dong, Haizhou

    2012-09-12

    The ozonolysis of aflatoxin B(1) (400 μg/mL) in acetonitrile solution was conducted with an ozone concentration of 6.28 mg/L at the flow rate of 60 mL/min for different times. The results showed that ozone was an effective detoxification agent because of its powerful oxidative role. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectra were applied to confirm and identify the ozonolysis products of aflatoxin B(1). A total of 13 products were identified, and 6 of them were main products. The structural identification of these products provided effective information for understanding the ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B(1). Two ozonolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the accurate mass and molecular formulas of these product ions. Nine ozonolysis products came from the first oxidative pathway based on the Criegee mechanism, and the other four products were produced from the second pathway based on the oxidative and electrophilic reactions of ozone. According to the toxicity mechanism of aflatoxin B(1) to animals, the toxicity of aflatoxin B(1) was significantly reduced because of the disappearance of the double bond on the terminal furan ring or the lactone moiety on the benzene ring.

  18. Simplified Protein Models: Predicting Folding Pathways and Structure Using Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing nativelike substructures or “foldons.” Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R. O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that nativelike propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the molecular dynamics study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo.

  19. Simplified protein models can rival all atom simulations in predicting folding pathways and structure

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing native-like substructures or "foldons". Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R.O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that native-like propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the MD study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo. PMID:23889448

  20. The Origins and Pathways of RADON-222 Entering Into Basement Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadd, Milan Steven

    The entry rate of ^{222} Rn into a basement structure was measured continuously. These measurements demonstrated that radon entry did not vanish even when the structure was slightly pressurized. This persistent entry has been determined to be dominated by diffusion through the floor and walls and a combination of diffusion and convection through the floor-wall joint. The highest indoor radon concentrations occurred during calm periods when the pressure differentials between the inside and outside of the structure were small. The objectives of this work were to identify the origins of the radon and investigate the entry pathways. The radon could originate either in the concrete or in the soil surrounding the structure. Entry pathways into the basement were through the concrete floor and walls as well as through the floor-wall joint. The contributions of the origins and entry pathways were determined by continuously measuring the radon entry rate into the basement, using a trace gas system, and the flux density through portions of the floor and walls. Radon entry through the floor-wall joint could be controlled using a baseboard barrier system. Results indicated that, during calm conditions with wind speeds less than 1 m s^{ -1}, 25% of the radon enters through the floor -wall joint and 75% enters through the concrete. About 30% of the radon originated in the concrete floor and walls. A method for in-situ determination of the diffusion length and emanation fraction of radon in concrete was developed. For the concrete used in the structure, the average diffusion length and emanation fraction were 27 +/- 4 cm and 0.19 +/- 0.02 respectively.

  1. Magnetized Plasma-filled Waveguide: A New High-Gradient Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Avitzour, Yoav; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-01-22

    Electromagnetic waves confined between the metal plates of a plasma-filled waveguide are investigated. It is demonstrated that when the plasma is magnetized along the metallic plates, there exists a luminous accelerating wave propagating with a very slow group velocity. It is shown that the magnetized plasma 'isolates' the metal wall from the transverse electric field, thereby reducing potential breakdown problems. Applications of the metallic plasma-filled waveguide to particle accelerations and microwave pulse manipulation are described.

  2. Genomic instability: Crossing pathways at the origin of structural and numerical chromosome changes.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonella; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cimini, Daniela; Ganem, Neil J; Genescà, Anna; Natarajan, Adayapalam T; Pavanello, Sofia; Valle, Giorgio; Degrassi, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Genomic instability leads to a wide spectrum of genetic changes, including single nucleotide mutations, structural chromosome alterations, and numerical chromosome changes. The accepted view on how these events are generated predicts that separate cellular mechanisms and genetic events explain the occurrence of these types of genetic variation. Recently, new findings have shed light on the complexity of the mechanisms leading to structural and numerical chromosome aberrations, their intertwining pathways, and their dynamic evolution, in somatic as well as in germ cells. In this review, we present a critical analysis of these recent discoveries in this area, with the aim to contribute to a deeper knowledge of the molecular networks leading to adverse outcomes in humans following exposure to environmental factors. The review illustrates how several technological advances, including DNA sequencing methods, bioinformatics, and live-cell imaging approaches, have contributed to produce a renewed concept of the mechanisms causing genomic instability. Special attention is also given to the specific pathways causing genomic instability in mammalian germ cells. Remarkably, the same scenario emerged from some pioneering studies published in the 1980s to 1990s, when the evolution of polyploidy, the chromosomal effects of spindle poisons, the fate of micronuclei, were intuitively proposed to share mechanisms and pathways. Thus, an old working hypothesis has eventually found proper validation.

  3. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  4. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m−1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  5. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  6. Can Delta-V be Adjusted with Structural and Occupant Restraint Performance to Improve Prediction of Chest Acceleration?

    PubMed Central

    Gabauer, Douglas J.; Gabler, Hampton C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether delta-V can be modified with a measure of vehicle structure performance and occupant restraint performance to better predict occupant peak chest acceleration during a frontal crash. A total of 619 full-scale frontal crash tests, with impact speeds ranging from 14 to 42 mph, were analyzed. Multiple linear regression was used to correlate combinations of crash severity, vehicle structure performance, and occupant restraint performance descriptors to the maximum measured crash test dummy chest acceleration. Using an adjusted R2 selection method, the best combination of metrics were selected and then compared to a baseline model that used only delta-V to predict occupant chest kinematics. The combination of delta-V, ridedown efficiency, and the kinetic energy factor was found to provide the best prediction of the occupant chest acceleration. This combination accounted for approximately 4 times the variation in the maximum chest acceleration when compared to a model based solely on vehicle delta-V. PMID:19026233

  7. Structural analysis of mevalonate-3-kinase provides insight into the mechanisms of isoprenoid pathway decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M; Korman, Tyler P; Sawaya, Michael R; Collazo, Michael; Cascio, Duillio; Bowie, James U

    2015-01-01

    In animals, cholesterol is made from 5-carbon building blocks produced by the mevalonate pathway. Drugs that inhibit the mevalonate pathway such as atorvastatin (lipitor) have led to successful treatments for high cholesterol in humans. Another potential target for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate diphosphate, followed by decarboxylation to yield isopentenyl pyrophosphate. We recently discovered an MDD homolog, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the identical phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate, but without concomitant decarboxylation. Thus, M3K catalyzes half the reaction of the decarboxylase, allowing us to separate features of the active site that are required for decarboxylation from features required for phosphorylation. Here we determine the crystal structure of M3K in the apo form, and with bound substrates, and compare it to MDD structures. Structural and mutagenic analysis reveals modifications that allow M3K to bind mevalonate rather than mevalonate diphosphate. Comparison to homologous MDD structures show that both enzymes employ analogous Arg or Lys residues to catalyze phosphate transfer. However, an invariant active site Asp/Lys pair of MDD previously thought to play a role in phosphorylation is missing in M3K with no functional replacement. Thus, we suggest that the invariant Asp/Lys pair in MDD may be critical for decarboxylation rather than phosphorylation. PMID:25422158

  8. Structural analysis of mevalonate-3-kinase provides insight into the mechanisms of isoprenoid pathway decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M; Korman, Tyler P; Sawaya, Michael R; Collazo, Michael; Cascio, Duillio; Bowie, James U

    2015-02-01

    In animals, cholesterol is made from 5-carbon building blocks produced by the mevalonate pathway. Drugs that inhibit the mevalonate pathway such as atorvastatin (lipitor) have led to successful treatments for high cholesterol in humans. Another potential target for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate diphosphate, followed by decarboxylation to yield isopentenyl pyrophosphate. We recently discovered an MDD homolog, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the identical phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate, but without concomitant decarboxylation. Thus, M3K catalyzes half the reaction of the decarboxylase, allowing us to separate features of the active site that are required for decarboxylation from features required for phosphorylation. Here we determine the crystal structure of M3K in the apo form, and with bound substrates, and compare it to MDD structures. Structural and mutagenic analysis reveals modifications that allow M3K to bind mevalonate rather than mevalonate diphosphate. Comparison to homologous MDD structures show that both enzymes employ analogous Arg or Lys residues to catalyze phosphate transfer. However, an invariant active site Asp/Lys pair of MDD previously thought to play a role in phosphorylation is missing in M3K with no functional replacement. Thus, we suggest that the invariant Asp/Lys pair in MDD may be critical for decarboxylation rather than phosphorylation. PMID:25422158

  9. Computational inference of the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway in Panicum virgatum

    DOE PAGES

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Fonseca, Luis L.; Escamilla-Treviño, Luis; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-09-17

    Switchgrass is a prime target for biofuel production from inedible plant parts and has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Yet, one of the main obstacles to effective biofuel production remains to be the major problem of recalcitrance. Recalcitrance emerges in part from the 3-D structure of lignin as a polymer in the secondary cell wall. Lignin limits accessibility of the sugars in the cellulose and hemicellulose polymers to enzymes and ultimately decreases ethanol yield. Monolignols, the building blocks of lignin polymers, are synthesized in the cytosol and translocated to the plant cell wall, where they undergomore » polymerization. The biosynthetic pathway leading to monolignols in switchgrass is not completely known, and difficulties associated with in vivo measurements of these intermediates pose a challenge for a true understanding of the functioning of the pathway. In this study, a systems biological modeling approach is used to address this challenge and to elucidate the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway through a computational characterization of alternate candidate topologies. The analysis is based on experimental data characterizing stem and tiller tissue of four transgenic lines (knock-downs of genes coding for key enzymes in the pathway) as well as wild-type switchgrass plants. These data consist of the observed content and composition of monolignols. The possibility of a G-lignin specific metabolic channel associated with the production and degradation of coniferaldehyde is examined, and the results support previous findings from another plant species. The computational analysis suggests regulatory mechanisms of product inhibition and enzyme competition, which are well known in biochemistry, but so far had not been reported in switchgrass. By including these mechanisms, the pathway model is able to represent all observations. In conclusion, the results show that the presence of the coniferaldehyde channel is

  10. Computational inference of the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway in Panicum virgatum

    SciTech Connect

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Fonseca, Luis L.; Escamilla-Treviño, Luis; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-09-17

    Switchgrass is a prime target for biofuel production from inedible plant parts and has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Yet, one of the main obstacles to effective biofuel production remains to be the major problem of recalcitrance. Recalcitrance emerges in part from the 3-D structure of lignin as a polymer in the secondary cell wall. Lignin limits accessibility of the sugars in the cellulose and hemicellulose polymers to enzymes and ultimately decreases ethanol yield. Monolignols, the building blocks of lignin polymers, are synthesized in the cytosol and translocated to the plant cell wall, where they undergo polymerization. The biosynthetic pathway leading to monolignols in switchgrass is not completely known, and difficulties associated with in vivo measurements of these intermediates pose a challenge for a true understanding of the functioning of the pathway. In this study, a systems biological modeling approach is used to address this challenge and to elucidate the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway through a computational characterization of alternate candidate topologies. The analysis is based on experimental data characterizing stem and tiller tissue of four transgenic lines (knock-downs of genes coding for key enzymes in the pathway) as well as wild-type switchgrass plants. These data consist of the observed content and composition of monolignols. The possibility of a G-lignin specific metabolic channel associated with the production and degradation of coniferaldehyde is examined, and the results support previous findings from another plant species. The computational analysis suggests regulatory mechanisms of product inhibition and enzyme competition, which are well known in biochemistry, but so far had not been reported in switchgrass. By including these mechanisms, the pathway model is able to represent all observations. In conclusion, the results show that the presence of the coniferaldehyde channel is necessary

  11. Interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train with a W-band accelerating structure: High power and high gradient

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; et al

    2016-02-05

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to themore » interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. As a result, measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.« less

  12. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W-Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Antipov, S; Jing, C; Power, J G; Conde, M; Wisniewski, E; Liu, W; Qiu, J; Ha, G; Dolgashev, V; Tang, C; Gai, W

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method. PMID:26894715

  13. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E.; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. These results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:26586190

  14. Pathways of information transmission among wild songbirds follow experimentally imposed changes in social foraging structure.

    PubMed

    Firth, Josh A; Sheldon, Ben C; Farine, Damien R

    2016-06-01

    Animals regularly use information from others to shape their decisions. Yet, determining how changes in social structure affect information flow and social learning strategies has remained challenging. We manipulated the social structure of a large community of wild songbirds by controlling which individuals could feed together at automated feeding stations (selective feeders). We then provided novel ephemeral food patches freely accessible to all birds and recorded the spread of this new information. We demonstrate that the discovery of new food patches followed the experimentally imposed social structure and that birds disproportionately learnt from those whom they could forage with at the selective feeders. The selective feeders reduced the number of conspecific information sources available and birds subsequently increased their use of information provided by heterospecifics. Our study demonstrates that changes to social systems carry over into pathways of information transfer and that individuals learn from tutors that provide relevant information in other contexts. PMID:27247439

  15. Pathways of information transmission among wild songbirds follow experimentally imposed changes in social foraging structure

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Ben C.

    2016-01-01

    Animals regularly use information from others to shape their decisions. Yet, determining how changes in social structure affect information flow and social learning strategies has remained challenging. We manipulated the social structure of a large community of wild songbirds by controlling which individuals could feed together at automated feeding stations (selective feeders). We then provided novel ephemeral food patches freely accessible to all birds and recorded the spread of this new information. We demonstrate that the discovery of new food patches followed the experimentally imposed social structure and that birds disproportionately learnt from those whom they could forage with at the selective feeders. The selective feeders reduced the number of conspecific information sources available and birds subsequently increased their use of information provided by heterospecifics. Our study demonstrates that changes to social systems carry over into pathways of information transfer and that individuals learn from tutors that provide relevant information in other contexts. PMID:27247439

  16. Structure, biosynthesis, and function of bacterial capsular polysaccharides synthesized by ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Willis, Lisa M; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-08-30

    Bacterial capsules are formed primarily from long-chain polysaccharides with repeat-unit structures. A given bacterial species can produce a range of capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) with different structures and these help distinguish isolates by serotyping, as is the case with Escherichia coli K antigens. Capsules are important virulence factors for many pathogens and this review focuses on CPSs synthesized via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent processes in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacteria utilizing this pathway are often associated with urinary tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis, and E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis provide well-studied examples. CPSs from ABC transporter-dependent pathways are synthesized at the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane through the concerted action of glycosyltransferases before being exported across the inner membrane and translocated to the cell surface. A hallmark of these CPSs is a conserved reducing terminal glycolipid composed of phosphatidylglycerol and a poly-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) linker. Recent discovery of the structure of this conserved lipid terminus provides new insights into the early steps in CPS biosynthesis.

  17. Pathway structure determination in complex stochastic networks with non-exponential dwell times

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Valleriani, Angelo

    2014-05-14

    Analysis of complex networks has been widely used as a powerful tool for investigating various physical, chemical, and biological processes. To understand the emergent properties of these complex systems, one of the most basic issues is to determine the structure and topology of the underlying networks. Recently, a new theoretical approach based on first-passage analysis has been developed for investigating the relationship between structure and dynamic properties for network systems with exponential dwell time distributions. However, many real phenomena involve transitions with non-exponential waiting times. We extend the first-passage method to uncover the structure of distinct pathways in complex networks with non-exponential dwell time distributions. It is found that the analysis of early time dynamics provides explicit information on the length of the pathways associated to their dynamic properties. It reveals a universal relationship that we have condensed in one general equation, which relates the number of intermediate states on the shortest path to the early time behavior of the first-passage distributions. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by extensive Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  19. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  20. Acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a dielectric grating structure: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, John; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2012-12-21

    We report on an experiment aiming at a proof-of-concept of a non-relativistic direct laser accelerator. The system is based on a fused-silica transmission grating illuminated by Titanium:sapphire femtosecond pulses in order to excite evanescent spatial modes, which propagate synchronously with 28 keV electrons originating from an electron column of a scanning electron microscope. The grating period is 750 nm, and we use the third spatial harmonic to continuously accelerate the non-relativistic electrons. With a laser pulse energy of about 150 nJ numerical simulations show expected accelerating gradients of up to 60 MeV/m and an energy gain of around 300 eV at a distance of 100 nm away from the grating surface. The current status of the experiment is reported.

  1. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  2. Structure and function of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Narges; Epler, Chelsea R; Shao, Paul P; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here, we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared with colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and with P-fimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to unwind, followed by CS20 fimbriae and then P-fimbriae, which require the highest unwinding force. We conclude from our electron microscopy reconstructions, modeling and force spectroscopy data that the target niche plays a central role in the biophysical properties of fimbriae that are critical for bacterial pathophysiology. PMID:25355550

  3. Aberrant T cell ERK pathway signaling and chromatin structure in lupus

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Gabriela; Richardson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibodies to nuclear components with subsequent immune complex formation and deposition in multiple organs. A combination of genetic and environmental factors is required for disease development, but how the environment interacts with the immune system in genetically predisposed hosts to cause lupus is unclear. Recent evidence suggests that environmental agents may alter T cell chromatin structure and gene expression through effects on DNA methylation, a repressive epigenetic mechanism promoting chromatin inactivation, to cause lupus in people with the appropriate genetic background. DNA methylation is regulated by ERK pathway signaling, and abnormalities in ERK pathway signaling may contribute to immune dysfunction in lupus through epigenetic effects on gene expression. This article reviews current evidence for epigenetic abnormalities, and in particular DNA demethylation, in the pathogenesis of idiopathic and some forms of drug induced lupus, and how impaired ERK pathway signaling may contribute to the development of human lupus through effects on T cell DNA methylation. PMID:18723128

  4. Structural Correlates of Efficient GABAergic Transmission in the Basal Ganglia-Thalamus Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, Ágnes L.; Giber, Kristóf; Rovó, Zita; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2009-01-01

    Giant inhibitory terminals with multiple synapses, the counterparts of excitatory “detonator” or “driver” terminals, have not been described in the forebrain. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of electron microscopic images, we quantitatively characterize a GABAergic pathway that establishes synaptic contacts exclusively via multiple synapses. Axon terminals of the nigrothalamic pathway formed, on average, 8.5 synapses on large-diameter dendrites and somata of relay cells in the ventromedial nucleus of the rat thalamus. All synapses of a given terminal converged on a single postsynaptic element. The vast majority of the synapses established by a single terminal were not separated by astrocytic processes. Nigrothalamic terminals in the macaque monkey showed the same ultrastructural features both in qualitative and quantitative terms (the median number of synapse per target was also 8.5). The individual synapses were closely spaced in both species. The nearest-neighbor synaptic distances were 169 nm in the rat and 178 nm in the monkey. The average number of synapses within 0.75 μm from any given synapse was 3.8 in the rat and 3.5 in the monkey. The arrangement of synapses described in this study creates favorable conditions for intersynaptic spillover of GABA among the multiple synapses of a single bouton, which can result in larger charge transfer. This could explain faithful and efficient GABAergic signal transmission in the nigrothalamic pathway in the healthy condition and during Parkinson’s disease. In addition, our structural data suggest that the rodent nigrothalamic pathway can be a valid model of the primate condition, when the mechanism of GABAergic transmission is studied. PMID:18354012

  5. Structural correlates of efficient GABAergic transmission in the basal ganglia-thalamus pathway.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Agnes L; Giber, Kristóf; Rovó, Zita; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2008-03-19

    Giant inhibitory terminals with multiple synapses, the counterparts of excitatory "detonator" or "driver" terminals, have not been described in the forebrain. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of electron microscopic images, we quantitatively characterize a GABAergic pathway that establishes synaptic contacts exclusively via multiple synapses. Axon terminals of the nigrothalamic pathway formed, on average, 8.5 synapses on large-diameter dendrites and somata of relay cells in the ventromedial nucleus of the rat thalamus. All synapses of a given terminal converged on a single postsynaptic element. The vast majority of the synapses established by a single terminal were not separated by astrocytic processes. Nigrothalamic terminals in the macaque monkey showed the same ultrastructural features both in qualitative and quantitative terms (the median number of synapse per target was also 8.5). The individual synapses were closely spaced in both species. The nearest-neighbor synaptic distances were 169 nm in the rat and 178 nm in the monkey. The average number of synapses within 0.75 microm from any given synapse was 3.8 in the rat and 3.5 in the monkey. The arrangement of synapses described in this study creates favorable conditions for intersynaptic spillover of GABA among the multiple synapses of a single bouton, which can result in larger charge transfer. This could explain faithful and efficient GABAergic signal transmission in the nigrothalamic pathway in the healthy condition and during Parkinson's disease. In addition, our structural data suggest that the rodent nigrothalamic pathway can be a valid model of the primate condition, when the mechanism of GABAergic transmission is studied.

  6. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William M.; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such “addressable complexity,” we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  7. Development of millimeter-wave accelerating structures using precision metal forming technology

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    High gradients in radio-frequency (RF) driven accelerators require short wavelengths that have the concomitant requirements of small feature size and high tolerances, 1-2 {micro}m for millimeter wavelengths. Precision metal-forming stampling has the promise of meeting those tolerances with high production rates. This STI will evaluate that promise.

  8. X-band accelerator structures: On going R&D at the INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, G.; Marcelli, A.; Spataro, B.; Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Tantawi, S. G.; Yeremian, A. D.; Higashi, Y.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sarti, S.; Caliendo, C.; Castorina, G.; Cibin, G.; Carfora, L.; Leonardi, O.; Rigato, V.; Campostrini, M.

    2016-09-01

    The next generation of accelerators, from the compact to the large infrastructure dedicated to high energy physics, is highly demanding in terms of accelerating gradients. To upgrade performances of X band linacs at 11.424 GHz many resources are devoted to achieve high accelerating gradients and at the same time to obtain a high reliability. In the framework of a three-year funded project by the Vth Committee of the INFN to the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) and to the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL). Within a broad international collaboration the LNF has been involved in the design, manufacture and test of compact high power standing wave (SW) sections operating at high frequency while LNL is actively involved in the development of new materials and multilayers using PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) methods. We will report about the status of the accelerating device and of the different ongoing R&D activities and characterization procedures such as tests of different materials and metallic coatings.

  9. 805 MHz Beta = 0.47 Elliptical Accelerating Structure R & D

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bricker; C. Compton; W. Hartung; M. Johnson; F. Marti; J. Popierlarski; R. C. York; et al

    2008-09-22

    A 6-cell 805 MHz superconducting cavity for acceleration in the velocity range of about 0.4 to 0.53 times the speed of light was designed. After single-cell prototyping, three 6-cell niobium cavities were fabricated. In vertical RF tests of the 6-cell cavities, the measured quality factors (Q{sub 0}) were between 7 {center_dot} 10{sup 9} and 1.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 10} at the design field (accelerating gradient of 8 to 10 MV/m). A rectangular cryomodule was designed to house 4 cavities per cryomodule. The 4-cavity cryomodule could be used for acceleration of ions in a linear accelerator, with focusing elements between the cryomodules. A prototype cryomodule was fabricated to test 2 cavities under realistic operating conditions. Two of the 6-cell cavities were equipped with helium tanks, tuners, and input coupler and installed into the cryomodule. The prototype cryomodule was used to verify alignment, electromagnetic performance, frequency tuning, cryogenic performance, low-level RF control, and control of microphonics.

  10. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P.

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  11. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  12. Harnessing the complexity of gene expression data from cancer: from single gene to structural pathway methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional gene expression data provide a rich source of information because they capture the expression level of genes in dynamic states that reflect the biological functioning of a cell. For this reason, such data are suitable to reveal systems related properties inside a cell, e.g., in order to elucidate molecular mechanisms of complex diseases like breast or prostate cancer. However, this is not only strongly dependent on the sample size and the correlation structure of a data set, but also on the statistical hypotheses tested. Many different approaches have been developed over the years to analyze gene expression data to (I) identify changes in single genes, (II) identify changes in gene sets or pathways, and (III) identify changes in the correlation structure in pathways. In this paper, we review statistical methods for all three types of approaches, including subtypes, in the context of cancer data and provide links to software implementations and tools and address also the general problem of multiple hypotheses testing. Further, we provide recommendations for the selection of such analysis methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Byung-Soo Kim and Joel Bader. PMID:23227854

  13. Structural Snapshots of Escherichia coli Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase along the Reaction Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Proteau, A.; Wagner, J.; Hung, M.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.

    2006-01-01

    HisB from Escherichia coli is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the sixth and eighth steps of L-histidine biosynthesis. The N-terminal domain (HisB-N) possesses histidinol phosphate phosphatase activity, and its crystal structure shows a single domain with fold similarity to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) enzyme family. HisB-N forms dimers in the crystal and in solution. The structure shows the presence of a structural Zn{sup 2+} ion stabilizing the conformation of an extended loop. Two metal binding sites were also identified in the active site. Their presence was further confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. HisB-N is active in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, or Zn{sup 2+}, but Ca{sup 2+} has an inhibitory effect. We have determined structures of several intermediate states corresponding to snapshots along the reaction pathway, including that of the phosphoaspartate intermediate. A catalytic mechanism, different from that described for other HAD enzymes, is proposed requiring the presence of the second metal ion not found in the active sites of previously characterized HAD enzymes, to complete the second half-reaction. The proposed mechanism is reminiscent of two-Mg{sup 2+} ion catalysis utilized by DNA and RNA polymerases and many nucleases. The structure also provides an explanation for the inhibitory effect of Ca{sup 2+}.

  14. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  15. 3D visualization of deformation structures and potential fluid pathways at the Grimsel Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeberger, Raphael; Kober, Florian; Berger, Alfons; Spillmann, Thomas; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on the ability of fluids to infiltrate subsurface rocks is of major importance for underground constructions, geothermal or radioactive waste disposal projects. In this study, we focus on the characterization of water infiltration pathways, their 3D geometries and origins. Based on surface and subsurface mapping in combination with drill core data, we developed by the use of MoveTM (Midland Valley Exploration Ltd.) a 3D structural model of the Grimsel Test Site (GTS). GTS is an underground laboratory operated by NAGRA, the Swiss organisation responsible for the management of nuclear waste. It is located within a suite of post-Variscan magmatic bodies comprising former granitic and granodioritic melts, which are dissected by mafic and aplitic dikes. During Alpine orogeny, the suite was tectonically overprinted within two stages of ductile deformation (Wehrens et al., in prep.) followed by brittle overprint of some of the shear zones during the retrograde exhumation history. It is this brittle deformation, which controls today's water infiltration network. However, the associated fractures, cataclasites and fault gouges are controlled themselves by aforementioned pre-existing mechanical discontinuities, whose origin ranges back as far as to the magmatic stage. For example, two sets of vertically oriented mafic dikes (E-W and NW-SE striking) and compositional heterogeneities induced by magmatic segregation processes in the plutonic host rocks served as nucleation sites for Alpine strain localization. Subsequently, NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE striking ductile shear zones were formed, in combination with high temperature fracturing while dissecting the host rocks in a complex 3D pattern (Wehrens et al, in prep.). Whether the ductile shear zones have been subjected to brittle reactivation and can serve as infiltration pathways or not, depends strongly on their orientations with respect to the principal stress field. Especially where deformation structures intersect

  16. Structure determination of LpxA from the lipopolysaccharide-synthesis pathway of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Badger, John; Chie-Leon, Barbara; Logan, Cheyenne; Sridhar, Vandana; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Nienaber, Vicki

    2012-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium which is resistant to most currently available antibiotics and that poses a significant health threat to hospital patients. LpxA is a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the lipopolysaccharides that are components of the bacterial outer membrane. It is a potential target for antibacterial agents that might be used to fight A. baumannii infections. This paper describes the structure determination of the apo form of LpxA in space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1) and P6(3). These crystal forms contained three and one protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.8 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. A comparison of the conformations of the independent protein monomers within and between the two crystal asymmetric units revealed very little structural variation across this set of structures. In the P6(3) crystal form the enzymatic site is exposed and is available for the introduction of small molecules of the type used in fragment-based drug discovery and structure-based lead optimization. PMID:23192027

  17. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E; Crewther, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies. PMID:27625591

  18. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies. PMID:27625591

  19. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies.

  20. Bidirectional Expression of Metabolic, Structural, and Immune Pathways in Early Myopia and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Giummarra, Loretta; Hall, Nathan E; Crewther, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Myopia (short-sightedness) affects 1.45 billion people worldwide, many of whom will develop sight-threatening secondary disorders. Myopic eyes are characterized by excessive size while hyperopic (long-sighted) eyes are typically small. The biological and genetic mechanisms underpinning the retina's local control of these growth patterns remain unclear. In the present study, we used RNA sequencing to examine gene expression in the retina/RPE/choroid across 3 days of optically-induced myopia and hyperopia induction in chick. Data were analyzed for differential expression of single genes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was used to identify gene sets correlated with ocular axial length and refraction across lens groups. Like previous studies, we found few single genes that were differentially-expressed in a sign-of-defocus dependent manner (only BMP2 at 1 day). Using GSEA, however, we are the first to show that more subtle shifts in structural, metabolic, and immune pathway expression are correlated with the eye size and refractive changes induced by lens defocus. Our findings link gene expression with the morphological characteristics of refractive error, and suggest that physiological stress arising from metabolic and inflammatory pathway activation could increase the vulnerability of myopic eyes to secondary pathologies.

  1. Crystal structure of paprika ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase. Implications for the electron transfer pathway.

    PubMed

    Dorowski, A; Hofmann, A; Steegborn, C; Boicu, M; Huber, R

    2001-03-23

    cDNA of Capsicum annuum Yolo Wonder (paprika) has been prepared from total cellular RNA, and the complete gene encoding paprika ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (pFNR) precursor was sequenced and cloned from this cDNA. Fusion to a T7 promoter allowed expression in Escherichia coli. Both native and recombinant pFNR were purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystal structure of pFNR has been solved by Patterson search techniques using the structure of spinach ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase as search model. The structure was refined at 2.5-A resolution to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.8% (R(free) = 26.5%). The overall structure of pFNR is similar to other members of the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase family, the major differences concern a long loop (residues 167-177) that forms part of the FAD binding site and some of the variable loops in surface regions. The different orientation of the FAD binding loop leads to a tighter interaction between pFNR and the adenine moiety of FAD. The physiological redox partners [2Fe-2S]-ferredoxin I and NADP(+) were modeled into the native structure of pFNR. The complexes reveal a protein-protein interaction site that is consistent with existing biochemical data and imply possible orientations for the side chain of tyrosine 362, which has to be displaced by the nicotinamide moiety of NADP(+) upon binding. A reasonable electron transfer pathway could be deduced from the modeled structures of the complexes. PMID:11053431

  2. Expression of Wnt pathway genes in polyps and medusa-like structures of Ectopleura larynx (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Annalise M; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2013-01-01

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is conserved in its role in axial patterning throughout Metazoa. In some hydrozoans (Phylum Cnidaria), Wnt signaling is implicated in oral-aboral patterning of the different life cycle stages-the planula, polyp and medusa. Unlike most hydrozoans, members of Aplanulata lack a planula larva and the polyp instead develops directly from a brooded or encysted embryo. The Aplanulata species Ectopleura larynx broods such embryos within gonophores. These gonophores are truncated medusae that remain attached to the polyps from which they bud, and retain evolutionary remnants of medusa structures. In E. larynx, gonophores differ between males and females in their degree of medusa truncation, making them an ideal system for examining truncated medusa development. Using next-generation sequencing, we isolated genes from Wnt signaling pathways and examined their expression in E. larynx. Our data are consistent with the Wnt pathway being involved in axial patterning of the polyp and truncated medusa. Changes in the spatial expression of Wnt pathway genes are correlated with the development of different oral structures in male and female gonophores. The absence of expression of components of the Wnt pathway and presence of a Wnt pathway antagonist SFRP in the developing anterior end of the gonophore suggest that downregulation of the Wnt pathway could play a role in medusa reduction in E. larynx.

  3. Signature of recent ice flow acceleration in the radar attenuation and temperature structure of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Dustin; Seroussi, Helene; Chu, Winnie; Young, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Englacial temperature structure exerts significant control on the rheology and flow of glaciers and ice sheets. It is however logistically prohibitive to directly measure at the glacier-catchment scale. As a result, numerical ice sheet models often make broad assumptions about englacial temperatures based on contemporary ice surface velocities. However, this assumption might break down in regions - like the Amundsen Sea Embayment - that have experienced recent acceleration since temperature and rheology do not respond instantaneously to changes in ice flow regime. To address this challenge, we present a new technique for estimating englacial attenuation rates using bed echoes from radar sounding data. We apply this technique to an airborne survey of Thwaites Glacier and compare the results to temperature and attenuation structures modeled using the numerical Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) for three surface velocity scenarios. These include contemporary surface velocities, surface velocities from the early 1970s, and ice-sheet balance velocities. We find that the observed attenuation structure is much closer to those modeled with pre-acceleration surface velocities. This suggests that ice sheet models initialized with contemporary surface velocities are likely overestimating the temperature and underestimating the rheology of the fast-flowing trunk and grounding zone of Thwaites Glacier.

  4. Structure determination of LpxD from the lipopolysaccharide-synthesis pathway of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Badger, John; Chie-Leon, Barbara; Logan, Cheyenne; Sridhar, Vandana; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Nienaber, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium that is resistant to many currently available antibiotics. The protein LpxD is a component of the biosynthetic pathway for lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane of this bacterium and is a potential target for new antibacterial agents. This paper describes the structure determination of apo forms of LpxD in space groups P2(1) and P4(3)22. These crystals contained six and three copies of the protein molecule in the asymmetric unit and diffracted to 2.8 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively. A comparison of the multiple protein copies in the asymmetric units of these crystals reveals a common protein conformation and a conformation in which the relative orientation between the two major domains in the protein is altered. PMID:23295477

  5. A Structure-Toxicity Study of Aß42 Reveals a New Anti-Parallel Aggregation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vignaud, Hélène; Bobo, Claude; Lascu, Ioan; Sörgjerd, Karin Margareta; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Salin, Benedicte; Lecomte, Sophie; Cullin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides produced by APP cleavage are central to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. Despite widespread interest in this issue, the relationship between the auto-assembly and toxicity of these peptides remains controversial. One intriguing feature stems from their capacity to form anti-parallel ß-sheet oligomeric intermediates that can be converted into a parallel topology to allow the formation of protofibrillar and fibrillar Aβ. Here, we present a novel approach to determining the molecular aspects of Aß assembly that is responsible for its in vivo toxicity. We selected Aß mutants with varying intracellular toxicities. In vitro, only toxic Aß (including wild-type Aß42) formed urea-resistant oligomers. These oligomers were able to assemble into fibrils that are rich in anti-parallel ß-sheet structures. Our results support the existence of a new pathway that depends on the folding capacity of Aß . PMID:24244667

  6. Production of Multi-Terawatt Time-Structured CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses for Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Haberberger, Dan; Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong Chao; Joshi, Chan

    2010-11-04

    The UCLA Neptune Laboratory CO{sub 2} laser system has been recently upgraded to produce 3ps multi-terawatt 10{mu}m laser pulses. The laser energy is distributed over several 3 ps pulses separated by 18 ps. These temporally structured pulses are applied for laser driven ion acceleration in an H{sub 2} gas jet at a measured plasma density of 2x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Protons in excess of 20 MeV have been observed in the forward direction and with energy spreads ({Delta}E/E{approx}10%).

  7. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  8. Structural Plasticity in Globins: Role of Protein Dynamics in Defining Ligand Migration Pathways.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, C; Capece, L; Seira, C; Bidon-Chanal, A; Estrin, D A; Luque, F J

    2016-01-01

    Globins are a family of proteins characterized by the presence of the heme prosthetic group and involved in variety of biological functions in the cell. Due to their biological relevance and widespread distribution in all kingdoms of life, intense research efforts have been devoted to disclosing the relationships between structural features, protein dynamics, and function. Particular attention has been paid to the impact of differences in amino acid sequence on the topological features of docking sites and cavities and to the influence of conformational flexibility in facilitating the migration of small ligands through these cavities. Often, tunnels are carved in the interior of globins, and ligand exchange is regulated by gating residues. Understanding the subtle intricacies that relate the differences in sequence with the structural and dynamical features of globins with the ultimate aim of rationalizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding continues to be a major challenge in the field. Due to the evolution of computational techniques, significant advances into our understanding of these questions have been made. In this review we focus our attention on the analysis of the ligand migration pathways as well as the function of the structural cavities and tunnels in a series of representative globins, emphasizing the synergy between experimental and theoretical approaches to gain a comprehensive knowledge into the molecular mechanisms of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:27567484

  9. Crystal structure and functional mapping of human ASMT, the last enzyme of the melatonin synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Botros, Hany Goubran; Legrand, Pierre; Pagan, Cecile; Bondet, Vincent; Weber, Patrick; Ben-Abdallah, Mariem; Lemière, Nathalie; Huguet, Guillaume; Bellalou, Jacques; Maronde, Erik; Beguin, Pierre; Haouz, Ahmed; Shepard, William; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a synchronizer of many physiological processes. Abnormal melatonin signaling is associated with human disorders related to sleep, metabolism, and neurodevelopment. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of human N-acetyl serotonin methyltransferase (ASMT), the last enzyme of the melatonin biosynthesis pathway. The polypeptide chain of ASMT consists of a C-terminal domain, which is typical of other SAM-dependent O-methyltransferases, and an N-terminal domain, which intertwines several helices with another monomer to form the physiologically active dimer. Using radioenzymology, we analyzed 20 nonsynonymous variants identified through the 1000 genomes project and in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. We found that the majority of these mutations reduced or abolished ASMT activity including one relatively frequent polymorphism in the Han Chinese population (N17K, rs17149149). Overall, we estimate that the allelic frequency of ASMT deleterious mutations ranges from 0.66% in Europe to 2.97% in Asia. Mapping of the variants on to the 3-dimensional structure clarifies why some are harmful and provides a structural basis for understanding melatonin deficiency in humans.

  10. Accelerating Rates of Discontinuous Permafrost Thaw Associated with Ground Surface Morphology and Changing Vegetation Structures Determined from Multi-Temporal LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasmer, L.; Hopkinson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Rates of permafrost thaw within the discontinuous permafrost zone are expected to accelerate with permafrost fragmentation. However quantification of drivers of permafrost change remain elusive due to the non-linearity of feedbacks in space and time. Given the extent of permafrost in Canada, there is significant interest in the mechanisms associated with land cover change as climate change and disturbance intensifies.We quantify the variability of rates of thaw associated with structural characteristics of the land surface within a discontinuous permafrost watershed in the NWT, Canada. Results are compared to an isolated permafrost watershed in Alberta, which may exemplify the northern discontinuous landscape in ~350 years. Three airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) datasets have been collected in 2008, 2011 and 2015, coincident with digital photogrammetry (2008), thermal infrared (2011) and bathymetry (2015) within both watersheds. Rates of change of land elevation associated with permafrost thaw within plateaus and peatlands are quantified using non-linear spatial regression, and compared with topographic and vegetation derivatives. Results indicate that increasing fragmentation of discontinuous permafrost plateaus results in exponential thaw. Rates of thaw become linear with decreasing complexity. Accelerating thaw is related to substantial Picea mariana mortality (up to 45%), increased gap fraction within 1-2 m of plateau edges, and shrub succession (average growth ~0.2 m yr—1) at the 0-2m boundary within the 7-year period. Thaw rate in parts is also complicated by understory succession within the area of local convexity between the plateau and slope edge and linear thaw pathways. Greatest rates of thaw and vegetation mortality (~30-50%) are found on plateaus with populous tremuloides. In the central boreal watershed, vegetation succession at peatland margins is associated with increased drying and changes to runoff trends over the last 40 years

  11. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  12. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  13. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  14. An investigation into the acceleration response of a damaged beam-type structure to a moving force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Hester, D.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years there have been a growing number of publications on procedures for damage detection in beams from analysing their dynamic response to the passage of a moving force. Most of this research demonstrates their effectiveness by showing that a singularity that did not appear in the healthy structure is present in the response of the damaged structure. This paper elucidates from first principles how the acceleration response can be assumed to consist of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the beam has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. The combination of these components establishes how the damage singularity will appear in the total response. For a given damage severity, the amplitude of the 'damage' component will depend on how close the damage location is to the sensor, and its frequency content will increase with higher velocities of the moving force. The latter has implications for damage detection because if the frequency content of the 'damage' component includes bridge and/or vehicle frequencies, it becomes more difficult to identify damage. The paper illustrates how a thorough understanding of the relationship between the 'static' and 'damage' components contributes to establish if damage has occurred and to provide an estimation of its location and severity. The findings are corroborated using accelerations from a planar finite element simulation model where the effects of force velocity and bridge span are examined.

  15. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  16. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  17. Measurement of Magnetic-Field Structures in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluza, M. C.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Dangor, A. E.; Najmudin, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K. M.; Schwoerer, H.; Mori, W. B.

    2010-09-10

    Experimental measurements of magnetic fields generated in the cavity of a self-injecting laser-wakefield accelerator are presented. Faraday rotation is used to determine the existence of multimegagauss fields, constrained to a transverse dimension comparable to the plasma wavelength {approx}{lambda}{sub p} and several {lambda}{sub p} longitudinally. The fields are generated rapidly and move with the driving laser. In our experiment, the appearance of the magnetic fields is correlated with the production of relativistic electrons, indicating that they are inherently tied to the growth and wave breaking of the nonlinear plasma wave. This evolution is confirmed by numerical simulations, showing that these measurements provide insight into the wakefield evolution with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  19. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  20. Crystal structure of SEL1L: Insight into the roles of SLR motifs in ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hanbin; Sim, Hyo Jung; Song, Eun Kyung; Lee, Hakbong; Ha, Sung Chul; Jun, Youngsoo; Park, Tae Joo; Lee, Changwook

    2016-01-01

    Terminally misfolded proteins are selectively recognized and cleared by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. SEL1L, a component of the ERAD machinery, plays an important role in selecting and transporting ERAD substrates for degradation. We have determined the crystal structure of the mouse SEL1L central domain comprising five Sel1-Like Repeats (SLR motifs 5 to 9; hereafter called SEL1Lcent). Strikingly, SEL1Lcent forms a homodimer with two-fold symmetry in a head-to-tail manner. Particularly, the SLR motif 9 plays an important role in dimer formation by adopting a domain-swapped structure and providing an extensive dimeric interface. We identified that the full-length SEL1L forms a self-oligomer through the SEL1Lcent domain in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the SLR-C, comprising SLR motifs 10 and 11, of SEL1L directly interacts with the N-terminus luminal loops of HRD1. Therefore, we propose that certain SLR motifs of SEL1L play a unique role in membrane bound ERAD machinery. PMID:27064360

  1. Structural and functional evolution of isopropylmalate dehydrogenases in the leucine and glucosinolate pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yan; Galant, Ashley; Pang, Qiuying; Strul, Johanna M.; Balogun, Sherifat F.; Jez, Joseph M.; Chen, Sixue

    2012-10-24

    The methionine chain-elongation pathway is required for aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants and evolved from leucine biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases (AtIPMDHs) play key roles in methionine chain-elongation for the synthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates (e.g. AtIPMDH1) and leucine (e.g. AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3). Here we elucidate the molecular basis underlying the metabolic specialization of these enzymes. The 2.25 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of AtIPMDH2 was solved to provide the first detailed molecular architecture of a plant IPMDH. Modeling of 3-isopropylmalate binding in the AtIPMDH2 active site and sequence comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic IPMDH suggest that substitution of one active site residue may lead to altered substrate specificity and metabolic function. Site-directed mutagenesis of Phe-137 to a leucine in AtIPMDH1 (AtIPMDH1-F137L) reduced activity toward 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate by 200-fold, but enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-isopropylmalate to levels observed with AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3. Conversely, the AtIPMDH2-L134F and AtIPMDH3-L133F mutants enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate {approx}100-fold and reduced activity for 3-isopropylmalate. Furthermore, the altered in vivo glucosinolate profile of an Arabidopsis ipmdh1 T-DNA knock-out mutant could be restored to wild-type levels by constructs expressing AtIPMDH1, AtIPMDH2-L134F, or AtIPMDH3-L133F, but not by AtIPMDH1-F137L. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution results in functional divergence of IPMDH in planta to affect substrate specificity and contributes to the evolution of specialized glucosinolate biosynthesis from the ancestral leucine pathway.

  2. Molecular Crowding of Collagen: A Pathway to Produce Highly-Organized Collagenous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn N.; Paten, Jeffrey. A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    organizational control of structure not only makes de novo tissue engineering a possibility, but also suggests a clearer pathway to organization for fibroblasts than direct matrix printing. PMID:22846420

  3. Theoretical Studies on Structures, Properties and Dominant Debromination Pathways for Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyun; Hu, Jiwei; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian; Luo, Jin; Wei, Xionghui

    2016-01-01

    The B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method, which considers the relativistic effect of bromine, was adopted for the calculations of the selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the present study, in which the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was also applied. The calculated values and experimental data for structural parameters of the selected PBDEs were compared to find the suitable theoretical methods for their structural optimization. The results show that the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method can give the better results (with the root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.0268 for the C-Br bond and 0.0161 for the C-O bond) than the B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method. Then, the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was applied to predict the structures for the other selected PBDEs (both neutral and anionic species). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the electron affinity are of a close relationship. The electron affinities (vertical electron affinity and adiabatic electron affinity) were discussed to study their electron capture abilities. To better estimate the conversion of configuration for PBDEs, the configuration transition states for BDE-5, BDE-22 and BDE-47 were calculated at the B3LYP/ 6-311+G(d) level in both gas phase and solution. The possible debromination pathway for BDE-22 were also studied, which have bromine substituents on two phenyl rings and the bromine on meta-position prefers to depart from the phenyl ring. The reaction profile of the electron-induced reductive debromination for BDE-22 were also shown in order to study its degradation mechanism. PMID:27322242

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into an extracytoplasmic copper trafficking pathway in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Katie L I M; Hough, Michael A; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2014-05-01

    In Streptomyces lividans an extracytoplasmic copper-binding Sco protein plays a role in two unlinked processes: (i) initiating a morphological development switch and (ii) facilitating the co-factoring of the CuA domain of CcO (cytochrome c oxidase). How Sco obtains copper once secreted to the extracytoplasmic environment is unknown. In the present paper we report on a protein possessing an HX₆MX₂₁HXM motif that binds a single cuprous ion with subfemtomolar affinity. High-resolution X-ray structures of this extracytoplasmic copper chaperone-like protein (ECuC) in the apo- and Cu(I)-bound states reveal that the latter possesses a surface-accessible cuprous-ion-binding site located in a dish-shaped region of β-sheet structure. A cuprous ion is transferred under a favourable thermodynamic gradient from ECuC to Sco with no back transfer occurring. The ionization properties of the cysteine residues in the Cys⁸⁶xxxCys⁹⁰ copper-binding motif of Sco, together with their positional locations identified from an X-ray structure of Sco, suggests a role for Cys⁸⁶ in initiating an inter-complex ligand-exchange reaction with Cu(I)-ECuC. Generation of the genetic knockouts, Δsco, Δecuc and Δsco/ecuc, and subsequent in vivo assays lend support to the existence of a branched extracytoplasmic copper-trafficking pathway in S. lividans. One branch requires both Sco and to a certain extent ECuC to cofactor the CuA domain, whereas the other uses only Sco to deliver copper to a cuproenzyme to initiate morphological development.

  5. Theoretical Studies on Structures, Properties and Dominant Debromination Pathways for Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingyun; Hu, Jiwei; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian; Luo, Jin; Wei, Xionghui

    2016-01-01

    The B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method, which considers the relativistic effect of bromine, was adopted for the calculations of the selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the present study, in which the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was also applied. The calculated values and experimental data for structural parameters of the selected PBDEs were compared to find the suitable theoretical methods for their structural optimization. The results show that the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method can give the better results (with the root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.0268 for the C–Br bond and 0.0161 for the C–O bond) than the B3LYP/6-311+G(d)-SDD method. Then, the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) method was applied to predict the structures for the other selected PBDEs (both neutral and anionic species). The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the electron affinity are of a close relationship. The electron affinities (vertical electron affinity and adiabatic electron affinity) were discussed to study their electron capture abilities. To better estimate the conversion of configuration for PBDEs, the configuration transition states for BDE-5, BDE-22 and BDE-47 were calculated at the B3LYP/ 6-311+G(d) level in both gas phase and solution. The possible debromination pathway for BDE-22 were also studied, which have bromine substituents on two phenyl rings and the bromine on meta-position prefers to depart from the phenyl ring. The reaction profile of the electron-induced reductive debromination for BDE-22 were also shown in order to study its degradation mechanism. PMID:27322242

  6. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    organizational control of structure not only makes de novo tissue engineering a possibility, but also suggests a clearer pathway to organization for fibroblasts than direct matrix printing.

  7. The structural alteration of gut microbiota in low-birth-weight mice undergoing accelerated postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Tang, Huang; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Chenhong; Zhang, Menghui; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The transient disruption of gut microbiota in infancy by antibiotics causes adult adiposity in mice. Accelerated postnatal growth (A) leads to a higher risk of adult metabolic syndrome in low birth-weight (LB) humans than in normal birth-weight (NB) individuals, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we set up an experiment using LB + A mice, NB + A mice, and control mice with NB and normal postnatal growth. At 24 weeks of age (adulthood), while NB + A animals had a normal body fat content and glucose tolerance compared with controls, LB + A mice exhibited excessive adiposity and glucose intolerance. In infancy, more fecal bacteria implicated in obesity were increased in LB + A pups than in NB + A pups, including Desulfovibrionaceae, Enterorhabdus, and Barnesiella. One bacterium from the Lactobacillus genus, which has been implicated in prevention of adult adiposity, was enhanced only in NB + A pups. Besides, LB + A pups, but not NB + A pups, showed disrupted gut microbiota fermentation activity. After weaning, the fecal microbiota composition of LB + A mice, but not that of NB + A animals, became similar to that of controls by 24 weeks. In infancy, LB + A mice have a more dysbiotic gut microbiome compared to NB + A mice, which might increase their risk of adult metabolic syndrome. PMID:27277748

  8. The structural alteration of gut microbiota in low-birth-weight mice undergoing accelerated postnatal growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Tang, Huang; Wang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Chenhong; Zhang, Menghui; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The transient disruption of gut microbiota in infancy by antibiotics causes adult adiposity in mice. Accelerated postnatal growth (A) leads to a higher risk of adult metabolic syndrome in low birth-weight (LB) humans than in normal birth-weight (NB) individuals, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we set up an experiment using LB + A mice, NB + A mice, and control mice with NB and normal postnatal growth. At 24 weeks of age (adulthood), while NB + A animals had a normal body fat content and glucose tolerance compared with controls, LB + A mice exhibited excessive adiposity and glucose intolerance. In infancy, more fecal bacteria implicated in obesity were increased in LB + A pups than in NB + A pups, including Desulfovibrionaceae, Enterorhabdus, and Barnesiella. One bacterium from the Lactobacillus genus, which has been implicated in prevention of adult adiposity, was enhanced only in NB + A pups. Besides, LB + A pups, but not NB + A pups, showed disrupted gut microbiota fermentation activity. After weaning, the fecal microbiota composition of LB + A mice, but not that of NB + A animals, became similar to that of controls by 24 weeks. In infancy, LB + A mice have a more dysbiotic gut microbiome compared to NB + A mice, which might increase their risk of adult metabolic syndrome. PMID:27277748

  9. Cornerstones of Completion: State Policy Support for Accelerated, Structured Pathways to College Credentials and Transfer. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.

    2012-01-01

    Completion by Design, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is a partnership between participating colleges and state-level policy organizations. The initiative's strong policy component seeks both to change policies in ways that support the colleges' change strategies and to spread the learning and ideas stemming from Completion by…

  10. Is structured observation a valid technique to measure handwashing behavior? Use of acceleration sensors embedded in soap to assess reactivity to structured observation.

    PubMed

    Ram, Pavani K; Halder, Amal K; Granger, Stewart P; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3-10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0-18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior.

  11. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  12. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  13. Molecule-optimized basis sets and Hamiltonians for accelerated electronic structure calculations of atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-01-16

    Molecule-optimized basis sets, based on approximate natural orbitals, are developed for accelerating the convergence of quantum calculations with strongly correlated (multireferenced) electrons. We use a low-cost approximate solution of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) for the one- and two-electron reduced density matrices (RDMs) to generate an approximate set of natural orbitals for strongly correlated quantum systems. The natural-orbital basis set is truncated to generate a molecule-optimized basis set whose rank matches that of a standard correlation-consistent basis set optimized for the atoms. We show that basis-set truncation by approximate natural orbitals can be viewed as a one-electron unitary transformation of the Hamiltonian operator and suggest an extension of approximate natural-orbital truncations through two-electron unitary transformations of the Hamiltonian operator, such as those employed in the solution of the ACSE. The molecule-optimized basis set from the ACSE improves the accuracy of the equivalent standard atom-optimized basis set at little additional computational cost. We illustrate the method with the potential energy curves of hydrogen fluoride and diatomic nitrogen. Relative to the hydrogen fluoride potential energy curve from the ACSE in a polarized triple-ζ basis set, the ACSE curve in a molecule-optimized basis set, equivalent in size to a polarized double-ζ basis, has a nonparallelity error of 0.0154 au, which is significantly better than the nonparallelity error of 0.0252 au from the polarized double-ζ basis set.

  14. Structural elements of the signal propagation pathway in squid rhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Minoru; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Suwa, Makiko

    2011-05-19

    Squid and bovine rhodopsins are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate Gq- and Gt-type G-proteins, respectively. To understand the structural elements of the signal propagation pathway, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of squid and bovine rhodopsins plus a detailed sequence analysis of class A GPCRs. The computations indicate that although the geometry of the retinal is similar in bovine and squid rhodopsins, the important interhelical hydrogen bond networks are different. In squid rhodopsin, an extended hydrogen bond network that spans ∼13 Å to Tyr315 on the cytoplasmic site is present regardless of the protonation state of Asp80. In contrast, the extended hydrogen bond network is interrupted at Tyr306 in bovine rhodopsin. Those differences in the hydrogen bond network may play significant functional roles in the signal propagation from the retinal binding site to the cytoplasmic site, including transmembrane helix (TM) 6 to which the G-protein binds. The MD calculations demonstrate that the elongated conformation of TM6 in squid rhodopsin is stabilized by salt bridges formed with helix (H) 9. Together with the interhelical hydrogen bonds, the salt bridges between TM6 and H9 stabilize the protein conformation of squid rhodopsin and may hinder the occurrence of large conformational changes that are observed upon activation of bovine rhodopsin.

  15. Macrophage Receptor with Collagenous Structure (MARCO) Is Processed by either Macropinocytosis or Endocytosis-Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Seishiro; Kanno, Sanae

    2015-01-01

    The Macrophage Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO) protein is a plasma membrane receptor for un-opsonized or environmental particles on phagocytic cells. Here, we show that MARCO was internalized either by ruffling of plasma membrane followed by macropinocytosis or by endocytosis followed by fusion with autophagosome in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with GFP-MARCO. The macropinocytic process generated large vesicles when the plasma membrane subsided. The endocytosis/autophagosome (amphisome) generated small fluorescent puncta which were visible in the presence of glutamine, chloroquine, bafilomycin, ammonia, and other amines. The small puncta, but not the large vesicles, co-localized with LC3B and lysosomes. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio increased in the presence of glutamine, ammonia, and chloroquine in various cells. The small puncta trafficked between the peri-nuclear region and the distal ends of cells back and forth at rates of up to 2–3 μm/sec; tubulin, but not actin, regulated the trafficking of the small puncta. Besides phagocytosis MARCO, an adhesive plasma membrane receptor, may play a role in incorporation of various extracellular materials into the cell via both macropinocytic and endocytic pathways. PMID:26545255

  16. Structural Requirements for Yersinia YopJ Inhibition of MAP Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Dara; Mukherjee, Sohini; Keitany, Gladys; Goldsmith, Elizabeth; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    MAPK signaling cascades are evolutionally conserved. The bacterial effector, YopJ, uses the unique activity of Ser/Thr acetylation to inhibit the activation of the MAPK kinase (MKK) and prevent activation by phosphorylation. YopJ is also able to block yeast MAPK signaling pathways using this mechanism. Based on these observations, we performed a genetic screen to isolate mutants in the yeast MKK, Pbs2, that suppress YopJ inhibition. One suppressor contains a mutation in a conserved tyrosine residue and bypasses YopJ inhibition by increasing the basal activity of Pbs2. Mutations on the hydrophobic face of the conserved G α-helix in the kinase domain prevent both binding and acetylation by YopJ. Corresponding mutants in human MKKs showed that they are conserved not only structurally, but also functionally. These studies reveal a conserved binding site found on the superfamily of MAPK kinases while providing insight into the molecular interactions required for YopJ inhibition. PMID:18167536

  17. Aerenchyma tissue development and gas-pathway structure in root of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh.

    PubMed

    Purnobasuki, Hery; Suzuki, Mitsuo

    2005-08-01

    The aerenchyma differentiation in cable roots, pneumatophores, anchor roots, and feeding roots of the mangrove plant, Avicennia marina (Verbenaceae) was analyzed using a light microscope and scanning electron microscope. In all types, cortex cells were arranged in longitudinal columns extending from the endodermis to the epidermis. No cells in the cortex had intercellular spaces at the root tip (0-150 microm), and aerenchyma started developing at 200 microm from the root apex. The aerenchyma formation was due to cell separation (schizogeny) rather than cell lysis. The cell separation occurred between the longitudinal cell columns, forming long intercellular spaces along the root axis. During aerenchyma formation, the cortex cells enlarged longitudinally by 1.8-3.9 times and widened horizontally by 2.2-2.9 times. As a result, the aerenchyma had a pronounced tubular structure that was radially long, elliptical or oval in cross section and that ran parallel to the root axis. The tube had tapering ends, as did vessel elements, although there were no perforated plates. The interconnection between neighboring tubes was made by abundant small pores or canals that were schizogenous intercellular spaces between the wall cells. All aerenchyma tubes in the root were interconnected by these small pores serving as a gas pathway.

  18. Circuit and Scattering Matrix Analysis of the Wire Measurement Method of Beam Impedance in Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-05-23

    In order to measure the wakefield left behind multiple bunches of energetic electrons we have previously used the ASSET facility in the SLC [1]. However, in order to produce a more rapid and cost-effective determination of the wakefields we have designed a wire experimental method to measure the beam impedance and from the Fourier transform thereof, the wakefields. In this paper we present studies of the wire effect on the properties of X-band structures in study for the JLC/NLC (Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider) project. Simulations are made on infinite and finite periodical structures. The results are discussed.

  19. The measurement results of carbon ion beam structure extracted by bent crystal from U-70 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Barnov, E. V.; Britvich, G. I.; Chesnokov, Yu A.; Chirkov, P. N.; Durum, A. A.; Kostin, M. Yu; Maisheev, V. A.; Pitalev, V. I.; Reshetnikov, S. F.; Yanovich, A. A.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Kubankin, A. S.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The carbon ion +6C beam with energy 25 GeV/nucleon was extracted by bent crystal from the U-70 ring. The bent angle of silicon crystal was 85 mrad. About 2×105 particles for 109 circulated ions in the ring were observed in beam line 4a after bent crystal. Geometrical parameters, time structure and ion beam structure were measured. The ability of the bent monocrystal to extract and generate ion beam with necessary parameters for regular usage in physical experiments is shown in the first time.

  20. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells as well as resting CD4+ T cells by reducing the cellular deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate (dNTP) concentration to a level at which the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs), SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell's ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell's protection against these viruses has not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the human E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the carboxy-terminal region of human SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle stabilized by a zinc finger motif, and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C terminus, making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure reported here provides a molecular description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell's normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system.

  1. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  2. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  3. Structural basis of Ornithine Decarboxylase inactivation and accelerated degradation by polyamine sensor Antizyme1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Donghui; Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Tang, Xuhua; He, Yang; Vanessa Tan, Qianmin; Zhang, Neng; Song, Haiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of polyamine biosynthesis in humans. Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation and are implicated in cellular processes, ranging from DNA replication to apoptosis. Excessive accumulation of polyamines has a cytotoxic effect on cells and elevated level of ODC activity is associated with cancer development. To maintain normal cellular proliferation, regulation of polyamine synthesis is imposed by Antizyme1 (AZ1). The expression of AZ1 is induced by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism in response to increased intracellular polyamines. AZ1 regulates polyamine homeostasis by inactivating ODC activity and enhancing its degradation. Here, we report the structure of human ODC in complex with N-terminally truncated AZ1 (cAZ1). The structure shows cAZ1 binding to ODC, which occludes the binding of a second molecule of ODC to form the active homodimer. Consequently, the substrate binding site is disrupted and ODC is inactivated. Structural comparison shows that the binding of cAZ1 to ODC causes a global conformational change of ODC and renders its C-terminal region flexible, therefore exposing this region for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Our structure provides the molecular basis for the inactivation of ODC by AZ1 and sheds light on how AZ1 promotes its degradation. PMID:26443277

  4. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellite Observations of Parallel Electron Acceleration in Magnetic Field Reconnection by Fermi Reflection from Time Domain Structures.

    PubMed

    Mozer, F S; Agapitov, O A; Artemyev, A; Burch, J L; Ergun, R E; Giles, B L; Mourenas, D; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Vasko, I

    2016-04-01

    The same time domain structures (TDS) have been observed on two Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites near Earth's dayside magnetopause. These TDS, traveling away from the X line along the magnetic field at 4000  km/s, accelerated field-aligned ∼5  eV electrons to ∼200  eV by a single Fermi reflection of the electrons by these overtaking barriers. Additionally, the TDS contained both positive and negative potentials, so they were a mixture of electron holes and double layers. They evolve in ∼10  km of space or 7 ms of time and their spatial scale size is 10-20 km, which is much larger than the electron gyroradius (<1  km) or the electron inertial length (4 km at the observation point, less nearer the X line). PMID:27104714

  5. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  6. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  7. Earthworms modify microbial community structure and accelerate maize stover decomposition during vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxiang; Zhang, Yufen; Zhang, Quanguo; Xu, Lixin; Li, Ran; Luo, Xiaopei; Zhang, Xin; Tong, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, maize stover was vermicomposted with the epigeic earthworm Eisenia fetida. The results showed that, during vermicomposting process, the earthworms promoted decomposition of maize stover. Analysis of microbial communities of the vermicompost by high-throughput pyrosequencing showed more complex bacterial community structure in the substrate treated by the earthworms than that in the control group. The dominant microbial genera in the treatment with the earthworms were Pseudoxanthomonas, Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Streptomyces, Cryptococcus, Guehomyces, and Mucor. Compared to the control group, the relative abundance of lignocellulose degradation microorganisms increased. The results indicated that the earthworms modified the structure of microbial communities during vermicomposting process, activated the growth of lignocellulose degradation microorganisms, and triggered the lignocellulose decomposition. PMID:26139410

  8. Earthworms modify microbial community structure and accelerate maize stover decomposition during vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxiang; Zhang, Yufen; Zhang, Quanguo; Xu, Lixin; Li, Ran; Luo, Xiaopei; Zhang, Xin; Tong, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, maize stover was vermicomposted with the epigeic earthworm Eisenia fetida. The results showed that, during vermicomposting process, the earthworms promoted decomposition of maize stover. Analysis of microbial communities of the vermicompost by high-throughput pyrosequencing showed more complex bacterial community structure in the substrate treated by the earthworms than that in the control group. The dominant microbial genera in the treatment with the earthworms were Pseudoxanthomonas, Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Streptomyces, Cryptococcus, Guehomyces, and Mucor. Compared to the control group, the relative abundance of lignocellulose degradation microorganisms increased. The results indicated that the earthworms modified the structure of microbial communities during vermicomposting process, activated the growth of lignocellulose degradation microorganisms, and triggered the lignocellulose decomposition.

  9. Compressed binary bit trees: a new data structure for accelerating database searching.

    PubMed

    Smellie, Andrew

    2009-02-01

    Molecules are often represented as bit string fingerprints in databases. These bit strings are used for similarity searching using the Tanimoto coefficient and rapid indexing. A new data structure is introduced, the compressed bit binary tree, that rapidly increases search and indexing times by up to a factor of 30. Results will be shown for databases of up to 1 M compounds with a variety of search parameters.

  10. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Sample, Christine; Dementieva, Yulia; Medeiros, Ruben C; Paoletti, Christopher; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-02-01

    Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  11. Structure and mechanism of PhnP, a phosphodiesterase of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Shu-Mei; Wathier, Matthew; Podzelinska, Kateryna; Wong, Matthew; McSorley, Fern R; Asfaw, Alemayehu; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Jia, Zongchao; Zechel, David L

    2011-10-11

    PhnP is a phosphodiesterase that plays an important role within the bacterial carbon-phosphorus lyase (CP-lyase) pathway by recycling a "dead-end" intermediate, 5-phospho-α-d-ribosyl 1,2-cyclic phosphate, that is formed during organophosphonate catabolism. As a member of the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily, PhnP is most homologous in sequence and structure to tRNase Z phosphodiesterases. X-ray structural analysis of PhnP complexed with orthovanadate to 1.5 Å resolution revealed this inhibitor bound in a tetrahedral geometry by the two catalytic manganese ions and the putative general acid residue H200. Guided by this structure, we probed the contributions of first- and second-sphere active site residues to catalysis and metal ion binding by site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic analysis, and ICP-MS. Alteration of H200 to alanine resulted in a 6-33-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(M) with substituted methyl phenylphosphate diesters with leaving group pK(a) values ranging from 4 to 8.4. With bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate as a substrate, there was a 10-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(M), primarily the result of a large increase in K(M). Moreover, the nickel ion-activated H200A PhnP displayed a bell-shaped pH dependence for k(cat)/K(M) with pK(a) values (pK(a1) = 6.3; pK(a2) = 7.8) that were comparable to those of the wild-type enzyme (pK(a1) = 6.5; pK(a2) = 7.8). Such modest effects are counter to what is expected for a general acid catalyst and suggest an alternate role for H200 in this enzyme. A Brønsted analysis of the PhnP reaction with a series of substituted phenyl methyl phosphate esters yielded a linear correlation, a β(lg) of -1.06 ± 0.1, and a Leffler α value of 0.61, consistent with a synchronous transition state for phosphoryl transfer. On the basis of these data, we propose a mechanism for PhnP. PMID:21830807

  12. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81

  13. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  14. Hydrophobin Film Structure for HFBI and HFBII and Mechanism for Accelerated Film Formation

    PubMed Central

    Magarkar, Aniket; Mele, Nawel; Abdel-Rahman, Noha; Butcher, Sarah; Torkkeli, Mika; Serimaa, Ritva; Paananen, Arja; Linder, Markus; Bunker, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobins represent an important group of proteins from both a biological and nanotechnological standpoint. They are the means through which filamentous fungi affect their environment to promote growth, and their properties at interfaces have resulted in numerous applications. In our study we have combined protein docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and electron cryo-microscopy to gain atomistic level insight into the surface structure of films composed of two class II hydrophobins: HFBI and HFBII produced by Trichoderma reesei. Together our results suggest a unit cell composed of six proteins; however, our computational results suggest P6 symmetry, while our experimental results show P3 symmetry with a unit cell size of 56 Å. Our computational results indicate the possibility of an alternate ordering with a three protein unit cell with P3 symmetry and a smaller unit cell size, and we have used a Monte Carlo simulation of a spin model representing the hydrophobin film to show how this alternate metastable structure may play a role in increasing the rate of surface coverage by hydrophobin films, possibly indicating a mechanism of more general significance to both biology and nanotechnology. PMID:25079355

  15. Effective seismic acceleration measurements for low-cost Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentaris, Fragkiskos; Makris, John P.

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing demand on cost effective Structural Health Monitoring systems for buildings as well as important and/or critical constructions. The front end for all these systems is the accelerometer. We present a comparative study of two low cost MEMS accelaration sensors against a very sensitive, high dynamic range strong motion accelerometer of force balance type but much more expensive. A real experiment was realized by deploying the three sesnors in a reinforced concrete building of the premises of TEI of Crete at Chania Crete, an earthquake prone region. The analysis of the collected accelararion data from many seismic events indicates that all sensors are able to efficiently reveal the seismic response of the construction in terms of PSD. Furthermore, it is shown that coherence diagrams between excitation and response of the building under study, depict structural characteristics but also the seismic energy distribution. This work is supported by the Archimedes III Program of the Ministry of Education of Greece, through the Operational Program "Educational and Lifelong Learning", in the framework of the project entitled "Interdisciplinary Multi-Scale Research of Earthquake Physics and Seismotectonics at the front of the Hellenic Arc (IMPACT-ARC)" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds.

  16. Theoretical Investigations of Plasma-Based Accelerators and Other Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Shuets, G.

    2004-05-21

    Theoretical investigations of plasma-based accelerators and other advanced accelerator concepts. The focus of the work was on the development of plasma based and structure based accelerating concepts, including laser-plasma, plasma channel, and microwave driven plasma accelerators.

  17. Morphometric changes in subcortical structures of the central auditory pathway in mice with bilateral nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Truong, Dongnhu T; Rendall, Amanda R; Rosen, Glenn D; Fitch, R Holly

    2015-04-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) have been observed in human reading and language impaired populations. Injury-induced MCD in rodent models of reading disability show morphological changes in the auditory thalamic nucleus (medial geniculate nucleus; MGN) and auditory processing impairments, thus suggesting a link between MCD, MGN, and auditory processing behavior. Previous neuroanatomical examination of a BXD29 recombinant inbred strain (BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J) revealed MCD consisting of bilateral subcortical nodular heterotopia with partial callosal agenesis. Subsequent behavioral characterization showed a severe impairment in auditory processing-a deficient behavioral phenotype seen across both male and female BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J mice. In the present study we expanded upon the neuroanatomical findings in the BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J mutant mouse by investigating whether subcortical changes in cellular morphology are present in neural structures critical to central auditory processing (MGN, and the ventral and dorsal subdivisions of the cochlear nucleus; VCN and DCN, respectively). Stereological assessment of brain tissue of male and female BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J mice previously tested on an auditory processing battery revealed overall smaller neurons in the MGN of BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J mutant mice in comparison to BXD29/Ty coisogenic controls, regardless of sex. Interestingly, examination of the VCN and DCN revealed sexually dimorphic changes in neuronal size, with a distribution shift toward larger neurons in female BXD29-Tlr4(lps-2J)/J brains. These effects were not seen in males. Together, the combined data set supports and further expands the observed co-occurrence of MCD, auditory processing impairments, and changes in subcortical anatomy of the central auditory pathway. The current stereological findings also highlight sex differences in neuroanatomical presentation in the presence of a common auditory behavioral phenotype.

  18. Structure and Function of Vps15 in the Endosomal G Protein Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Heenan, Erin J.; Vanhooke, Janeen L.; Temple, Brenda R.; Betts, Laurie; Sondek, John E.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2009-09-11

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cellular responses to a wide variety of stimuli, including taste, light, and neurotransmitters. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, activation of the pheromone pathway triggers events leading to mating. The view had long been held that the G protein-mediated signal occurs principally at the plasma membrane. Recently, it has been shown that the G protein {alpha} subunit Gpa1 can promote signaling at endosomes and requires two components of the sole phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in yeast, Vps15 and Vps34. Vps15 contains multiple WD repeats and also binds to Gpa1 preferentially in the GDP-bound state; these observations led us to hypothesize that Vps15 may function as a G protein {beta} subunit at the endosome. Here we show an X-ray crystal structure of the Vps15 WD domain that reveals a seven-bladed propeller resembling that of typical G{beta} subunits. We show further that the WD domain is sufficient to bind Gpa1 as well as to Atg14, a potential G{gamma} protein that exists in a complex with Vps15. The Vps15 kinase domain together with the intermediate domain (linking the kinase and WD domains) also contributes to Gpa1 binding and is necessary for Vps15 to sustain G protein signaling. These findings reveal that the Vps15 G{beta}-like domain serves as a scaffold to assemble Gpa1 and Atg14, whereas the kinase and intermediate domains are required for proper signaling at the endosome.

  19. Building an innovation electronic nursing record pilot structure with nursing clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Angelica Te-Hui; Huang, Li-Fang; Wu, Li-Bin; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Mei-Show; Jian, Wen-Shan; Chang, Her-Kung; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2006-01-01

    The nursing process consists of five interrelated steps: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. In the nursing process, the nurse confronts a great deal of data and information. The amount of data and information may exceed the amount the nurse can process efficiently and correctly. Thus, the nurse needs assistance to become proficient in the planning of nursing care, due to the difficulty of simultaneously processing a large set of information. Thus, some form of assistance will be needed to help nurses to become more proficient in planning nursing care. Using computer technology to support clinicians' decision making may provide high-quality, patient-centered, and efficient healthcare. Although some existing nursing information systems aid in the nursing process, they only provide the most rudimentary decision support--i.e., standard care plans associated with common nursing diagnoses. Such a computerized decision support system helps the nurse develop a care plan step-by-step. But it does not assist the nurse in the decision-making process. The decision process about how to derive nursing diagnoses from data and how to individualize the care plans still remains in the mind of the nurse. The purpose of this study is to develop a pilot structure in an electronic nursing record system integrated with international nursing standards for improving the proficiency and accuracy of the plan of care in the clinical pathway process. The pilot system has shown promise in assisting both student nurses and beginner nurses. It also shows promise in helping experts who need to work in a practice area that is outside of their immediate domain.

  20. Resistive foil edge grading for accelerator and other high voltage structures

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen F.; Sanders, David M.

    2014-06-10

    In a structure or device having a pair of electrical conductors separated by an insulator across which a voltage is placed, resistive layers are formed around the conductors to force the electric potential within the insulator to distribute more uniformly so as to decrease or eliminate electric field enhancement at the conductor edges. This is done by utilizing the properties of resistive layers to allow the voltage on the electrode to diffuse outwards, reducing the field stress at the conductor edge. Preferably, the resistive layer has a tapered resistivity, with a lower resistivity adjacent to the conductor and a higher resistivity away from the conductor. Generally, a resistive path across the insulator is provided, preferably by providing a resistive region in the bulk of the insulator, with the resistive layer extending over the resistive region.

  1. Accelerating aging of zirconia femoral head implants: change of surface structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Vohra, Yogesh K; Lemons, Jack E; Ueno, Masaru; Ikeda, Junji

    2007-05-01

    Recently, alternations of zirconia ceramic femoral heads of total hip prostheses during in vivo conditions have caused concern in the medical disciplines regarding phase transformation of zirconia prosthetic components. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical and structural properties of different laboratory aged zirconia femoral heads and correlated changes in mechanical properties with the phase compositions of the sample. From laser microscope observation, cross-sectional Scanning electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray diffraction analysis on the surface of the zirconia femoral heads, we found monoclinic to tetragonal phase transformation in zirconia prostheses over time during the aging process in the laboratory. Mechanical properties, mainly hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) values, were measured by nanoindentation technique on the surface of these implants. The results showed that both H and E values decreased with increased monoclinic phase in zirconia, thus confirming a phase transformation over time during aging.

  2. Accelerated structure-based design of chemically diverse allosteric modulators of a muscarinic G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Goldfeld, Dahlia Anne; Moo, Ee Von; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; McCammon, J Andrew; Valant, Celine

    2016-09-20

    Design of ligands that provide receptor selectivity has emerged as a new paradigm for drug discovery of G protein-coupled receptors, and may, for certain families of receptors, only be achieved via identification of chemically diverse allosteric modulators. Here, the extracellular vestibule of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) is targeted for structure-based design of allosteric modulators. Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations were performed to construct structural ensembles that account for the receptor flexibility. Compounds obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were docked to the receptor ensembles. Retrospective docking of known ligands showed that combining aMD simulations with Glide induced fit docking (IFD) provided much-improved enrichment factors, compared with the Glide virtual screening workflow. Glide IFD was thus applied in receptor ensemble docking, and 38 top-ranked NCI compounds were selected for experimental testing. In [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine radioligand dissociation assays, approximately half of the 38 lead compounds altered the radioligand dissociation rate, a hallmark of allosteric behavior. In further competition binding experiments, we identified 12 compounds with affinity of ≤30 μM. With final functional experiments on six selected compounds, we confirmed four of them as new negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) and one as positive allosteric modulator of agonist-mediated response at the M2 mAChR. Two of the NAMs showed subtype selectivity without significant effect at the M1 and M3 mAChRs. This study demonstrates an unprecedented successful structure-based approach to identify chemically diverse and selective GPCR allosteric modulators with outstanding potential for further structure-activity relationship studies. PMID:27601651

  3. Structural and biochemical characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 supports that menaquinone synthesis occurs through the futalosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Barta, Michael L; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Schramm, Vern L; Hefty, P Scott

    2014-11-14

    The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5'-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5'-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

  4. Structural insights into how Yrb2p accelerates the assembly of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masako; Shirai, Natsuki; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Proteins and ribonucleoproteins containing a nuclear export signal (NES) assemble with the exportin Xpo1p (yeast CRM1) and Gsp1p-GTP (yeast Ran-GTP) in the nucleus and exit through the nuclear pore complex. In the cytoplasm, Yrb1p (yeast RanBP1) displaces NES from Xpo1p. Efficient export of NES-cargoes requires Yrb2p (yeast RanBP3), a primarily nuclear protein containing nucleoporin-like phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats and a low-affinity Gsp1p-binding domain (RanBD). Here, we show that Yrb2p strikingly accelerates the association of Gsp1p-GTP and NES to Xpo1p. We have solved the crystal structure of the Xpo1p-Yrb2p-Gsp1p-GTP complex, a key assembly intermediate that can bind cargo rapidly. Although the NES-binding cleft of Xpo1p is closed in this intermediate, our data suggest that preloading of Gsp1p-GTP onto Xpo1p by Yrb2p, conformational flexibility of Xpo1p, and the low affinity of RanBD enable active displacement of Yrb2p RanBD by NES to occur effectively. The structure also reveals the major binding sites for FG repeats on Xpo1p.

  5. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators.

  6. Micro-structured, spontaneously eroding hydrogels accelerate endothelialization through presentation of conjugated growth factors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bettina E B; Edlund, Katrine; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2015-05-01

    Growth factors represent highly potent and highly efficacious means of communication to cells. At the same time, these proteins are fragile and relatively small sized--rendering their immobilization and controlled release from biomaterials challenging. In this work, we establish a method to incorporate growth factors into the physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA. The latter have a long and successful history of biomedical applications and approval for diverse use in human patients, but are also characterized with scant opportunities for bioconjugation and functionalization. Herein, we develop the conjugation of growth factors to the micro-structured, spontaneously eroding physical hydrogels based on PVA. Protein conjugation was elaborated using model substrates, albumin and lysozyme, which aided to reveal specificity of chemical reactions and benign, non-harmful nature of the established protocols. Surface-adhered format of hydrogel analyses allowed to quantify bioconjugation reactions and enzymatic activity of the immobilized proteins and to visualize the hydrogels with immobilized cargo. In cell culture, immobilized growth factors were effective in communicating to adhering cells and specifically enhanced proliferation rates of the cells containing the corresponding receptors. At the same time, proliferation of the cells devoid of these receptors was un-altered. PMID:25725560

  7. Accelerated decolorization of structurally different azo dyes by newly isolated bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-02-01

    Wastewater effluents from the textile and other dye-stuff industries contain significant amounts of synthetic dyes that require treatment to prevent groundwater contamination. In research aimed at biotechnology for treatment of azo dyes, this study examined 288 strains of azo-dye degrading bacteria to identify efficient strains and determine incubation times required for decolorization. Initial enrichment cultures were carried out using a mixture of four structurally different dyes (Acid Red 88, Reactive Black 5, Direct Red 81, and Disperse Orange 3) as the sole source of C and N to isolate the bacteria from soil, activated sludge, and natural asphalt. Six strains were selected for further study based on their prolific growth and ability to rapidly decolorize the dyes individually or in mixtures. Treatment times required by the most efficient strain, AS96 (Shewanella putrefaciens) were as short as 4 h for complete decolorization of 100 mg l(-1) of AR-88 and DR-81 dyes under static conditions, and 6 and 8 h, respectively, for complete decolorization of RB-5 and DO-3. To our knowledge, these bacterial strains are the most efficient azo-dye degrading bacteria that have been described and may have practical application for biological treatment of dye-polluted wastewater streams.

  8. Micro-structured, spontaneously eroding hydrogels accelerate endothelialization through presentation of conjugated growth factors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bettina E B; Edlund, Katrine; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2015-05-01

    Growth factors represent highly potent and highly efficacious means of communication to cells. At the same time, these proteins are fragile and relatively small sized--rendering their immobilization and controlled release from biomaterials challenging. In this work, we establish a method to incorporate growth factors into the physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA. The latter have a long and successful history of biomedical applications and approval for diverse use in human patients, but are also characterized with scant opportunities for bioconjugation and functionalization. Herein, we develop the conjugation of growth factors to the micro-structured, spontaneously eroding physical hydrogels based on PVA. Protein conjugation was elaborated using model substrates, albumin and lysozyme, which aided to reveal specificity of chemical reactions and benign, non-harmful nature of the established protocols. Surface-adhered format of hydrogel analyses allowed to quantify bioconjugation reactions and enzymatic activity of the immobilized proteins and to visualize the hydrogels with immobilized cargo. In cell culture, immobilized growth factors were effective in communicating to adhering cells and specifically enhanced proliferation rates of the cells containing the corresponding receptors. At the same time, proliferation of the cells devoid of these receptors was un-altered.

  9. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  10. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shichun; Geng, Rongli

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  11. Accelerating atomic orbital-based electronic structure calculation via pole expansion and selected inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion and selected inversion (PEXSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating the charge density, the total energy, the Helmholtz free energy and the atomic forces (including both the Hellmann-Feynman force and the Pulay force) without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEXSI is that it has a computational complexity much lower than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEXSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEXSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEXSI are modest. This even makes it possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10 000-atom nanotubes with a sequential implementation of the selected inversion algorithm. We also perform an accurate geometry optimization calculation on a truncated (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube system containing 1024 atoms. Numerical results indicate that the use of PEXSI does not lead to loss of the accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  12. Induction of Cytoplasmic Rods and Rings Structures by Inhibition of the CTP and GTP Synthetic Pathway in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carcamo, Wendy C.; Satoh, Minoru; Kasahara, Hideko; Terada, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Takashi; Chan, Jason Y. F.; Yao, Bing; Tamayo, Stephanie; Covini, Giovanni; von Mühlen, Carlos A.; Chan, Edward K. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic filamentous rods and rings (RR) structures were identified using human autoantibodies as probes. In the present study, the formation of these conserved structures in mammalian cells and functions linked to these structures were examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Distinct cytoplasmic rods (∼3–10 µm in length) and rings (∼2–5 µm in diameter) in HEp-2 cells were initially observed in immunofluorescence using human autoantibodies. Co-localization studies revealed that, although RR had filament-like features, they were not enriched in actin, tubulin, or vimentin, and not associated with centrosomes or other known cytoplasmic structures. Further independent studies revealed that two key enzymes in the nucleotide synthetic pathway cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) were highly enriched in RR. CTPS1 enzyme inhibitors 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and Acivicin as well as the IMPDH2 inhibitor Ribavirin exhibited dose-dependent induction of RR in >95% of cells in all cancer cell lines tested as well as mouse primary cells. RR formation by lower concentration of Ribavirin was enhanced in IMPDH2-knockdown HeLa cells whereas it was inhibited in GFP-IMPDH2 overexpressed HeLa cells. Interestingly, RR were detected readily in untreated mouse embryonic stem cells (>95%); upon retinoic acid differentiation, RR disassembled in these cells but reformed when treated with Acivicin. Conclusions/Significance RR formation represented response to disturbances in the CTP or GTP synthetic pathways in cancer cell lines and mouse primary cells and RR are the convergence physical structures in these pathways. The availability of specific markers for these conserved structures and the ability to induce formation in vitro will allow further investigations in structure and function of RR in many biological systems in health and diseases. PMID:22220215

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Structural Optimization of Lycorine-Derived Phenanthridine Derivatives as Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway Agonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duo-Zhi; Jing, Chen-Xu; Cai, Jie-Yun; Wu, Ji-Bo; Wang, Sheng; Yin, Jun-Lin; Li, Xiao-Nian; Li, Lin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-01-22

    Lycorine is a benzylphenethylamine-type alkaloid member of the Amaryllidaceae family. A lycorine derivative, HLY78, was previously identified as a new Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway agonist that targets the DAX domain of axin. Herein, the structural optimization of HLY78 and analyses of the structure-activity relationships of lycorine-derived phenanthridine derivatives as agonists of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are presented. This research suggests that triazole groups are important pharmacophores for Wnt activation; triazole groups at C-8 and C-9 of phenanthridine compounds markedly enhanced Wnt activation. A C-11-C-12 single bond is also important for Wnt activation. On the basis of these findings, two Wnt agonists were designed and synthesized. The results for these agonists indicated that the combination of a 4-ethyldihydrophenanthridine skeleton and a triazole substituent improves Wnt activation. These compounds may be useful in further pharmacological or biological studies. PMID:26714198

  14. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of the Crucial Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway Enzyme O-Acetyl Serine Sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mohit; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is of fundamental importance for the growth, survival, and pathogenicity of the many pathogens. This pathway is present in many species but is absent in mammals. The ability of pathogens to counteract the oxidative defences of a host is critical for the survival of these pathogens during their long latent phases, especially in anaerobic pathogens such as Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania donovani, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Salmonella typhimurium. All of these organisms rely on the de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway to assimilate sulphur and maintain a ready supply of cysteine. The de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway, on account of its being important for the survival of pathogens and at the same time being absent in mammals, is an important drug target for diseases such as amoebiasis, trichomoniasis & tuberculosis. Cysteine biosynthesis is catalysed by two enzymes: serine acetyl transferase (SAT) followed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). OASS is well studied, and with the availability of crystal structures of this enzyme in different conformations, it is a suitable template for structure-based inhibitor development. Moreover, OASS is highly conserved, both structurally and sequence-wise, among the above-mentioned organisms. There have been several reports of inhibitor screening and development against this enzyme from different organisms such as Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Entamoeba histolytica. All of these inhibitors have been reported to display micromolar to nanomolar binding affinities for the open conformation of the enzyme. In this review, we highlight the structural similarities of this enzyme in different organisms and the attempts for inhibitor development so far. We also propose that the intermediate state of the enzyme may be the ideal target for the design of effective highaffinity inhibitors.

  15. Finding off-targets, biological pathways, and target diseases for chymase inhibitors via structure-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-07-01

    Off-target binding connotes the binding of a small molecule of therapeutic significance to a protein target in addition to the primary target for which it was proposed. Progressively such off-targeting is emerging to be regular practice to reveal side effects. Chymase is an enzyme of hydrolase class that catalyzes hydrolysis of peptide bonds. A link between heart failure and chymase is ascribed, and a chymase inhibitor is in clinical phase II for treatment of heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms of the off-target effects of human chymase inhibitors are still unclear. Here, we develop a robust computational strategy that is applicable to any enzyme system and that allows the prediction of drug effects on biological processes. Putative off-targets for chymase inhibitors were identified through various structural and functional similarity analyses along with molecular docking studies. Finally, literature survey was performed to incorporate these off-targets into biological pathways and to establish links between pathways and particular adverse effects. Off-targets of chymase inhibitors are linked to various biological pathways such as classical and lectin pathways of complement system, intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation cascade, and fibrinolytic system. Tissue kallikreins, granzyme M, neutrophil elastase, and mesotrypsin are also identified as off-targets. These off-targets and their associated pathways are elucidated for the effects of inflammation, cancer, hemorrhage, thrombosis, and central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's disease). Prospectively, our approach is helpful not only to better understand the mechanisms of chymase inhibitors but also for drug repurposing exercises to find novel uses for these inhibitors.

  16. Kinetic Analysis as a Tool to Distinguish Pathway Complexity in Molecular Assembly: An Unexpected Outcome of Structures in Competition.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Daan; Pieters, Pascal A; Korevaar, Peter A; Markvoort, Albert J; Spiering, A J H; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2015-10-01

    While the sensitive dependence of the functional characteristics of self-assembled nanofibers on the molecular structure of their building blocks is well-known, the crucial influence of the dynamics of the assembly process is often overlooked. For natural protein-based fibrils, various aggregation mechanisms have been demonstrated, from simple primary nucleation to secondary nucleation and off-pathway aggregation. Similar pathway complexity has recently been described in synthetic supramolecular polymers and has been shown to be intimately linked to their morphology. We outline a general method to investigate the consequences of the presence of multiple assembly pathways, and show how kinetic analysis can be used to distinguish different assembly mechanisms. We illustrate our combined experimental and theoretical approach by studying the aggregation of chiral bipyridine-extended 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamides (BiPy-1) in n-butanol as a model system. Our workflow consists of nonlinear least-squares analysis of steady-state spectroscopic measurements, which cannot provide conclusive mechanistic information but yields the equilibrium constants of the self-assembly process as constraints for subsequent kinetic analysis. Furthermore, kinetic nucleation-elongation models based on one and two competing pathways are used to interpret time-dependent spectroscopic measurements acquired using stop-flow and temperature-jump methods. Thus, we reveal that the sharp transition observed in the aggregation process of BiPy-1 cannot be explained by a single cooperative pathway, but can be described by a competitive two-pathway mechanism. This work provides a general tool for analyzing supramolecular polymerizations and establishing energetic landscapes, leading to mechanistic insights that at first sight may seem unexpected and counterintuitive. PMID:26354151

  17. A cautionary tale of structure-guided inhibitor development against an essential enzyme in the aspartate-biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Thangavelu, Bharani; Bhansali, Pravin; Viola, Ronald E

    2014-12-01

    The aspartate pathway is essential for the production of the amino acids required for protein synthesis and of the metabolites needed in bacterial development. This pathway also leads to the production of several classes of quorum-sensing molecules that can trigger virulence in certain microorganisms. The second enzyme in this pathway, aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH), is absolutely required for bacterial survival and has been targeted for the design of selective inhibitors. Fragment-library screening has identified a new set of inhibitors that, while they do not resemble the substrates for this reaction, have been shown to bind at the active site of ASADH. Structure-guided development of these lead compounds has produced moderate inhibitors of the target enzyme, with some selectivity observed between the Gram-negative and Gram-positive orthologs of ASADH. However, many of these inhibitor analogs and derivatives have not yet achieved the expected enhanced affinity. Structural characterization of these enzyme-inhibitor complexes has provided detailed explanations for the barriers that interfere with optimal binding. Despite binding in the same active-site region, significant changes are observed in the orientation of these bound inhibitors that are caused by relatively modest structural alterations. Taken together, these studies present a cautionary tale for issues that can arise in the systematic approach to the modification of lead compounds that are being used to develop potent inhibitors.

  18. The shikimate pathway: review of amino acid sequence, function and three-dimensional structures of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Jallu, Shais; Singh, T P

    2015-06-01

    The aromatic compounds such as aromatic amino acids, vitamin K and ubiquinone are important prerequisites for the metabolism of an organism. All organisms can synthesize these aromatic metabolites through shikimate pathway, except for mammals which are dependent on their diet for these compounds. The pathway converts phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate to chorismate through seven enzymatically catalyzed steps and chorismate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of variety of aromatic compounds. These enzymes have shown to play a vital role for the viability of microorganisms and thus are suggested to present attractive molecular targets for the design of novel antimicrobial drugs. This review focuses on the seven enzymes of the shikimate pathway, highlighting their primary sequences, functions and three-dimensional structures. The understanding of their active site amino acid maps, functions and three-dimensional structures will provide a framework on which the rational design of antimicrobial drugs would be based. Comparing the full length amino acid sequences and the X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes from bacteria, fungi and plant sources would contribute in designing a specific drug and/or in developing broad-spectrum compounds with efficacy against a variety of pathogens.

  19. Structural modeling and analysis of signaling pathways based on Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Suzuki, Shunichi; Ge, Qi-Wei; Nakata, Mitsuru; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Miyano, Satoru

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to model and analyze signaling pathways by using Petri net. Firstly, we propose a modeling method based on Petri net by paying attention to the molecular interactions and mechanisms. Then, we introduce a new notion "activation transduction component" in order to describe an enzymic activation process of reactions in signaling pathways and shows its correspondence to a so-called elementary T-invariant in the Petri net models. Further, we design an algorithm to effectively find basic enzymic activation processes by obtaining a series of elementary T-invariants in the Petri net models. Finally, we demonstrate how our method is practically used in modeling and analyzing signaling pathway mediated by thrombopoietin as an example.

  20. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  1. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  2. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  3. Does Grammatical Structure Accelerate Number Word Learning? Evidence from Learners of Dual and Non-Dual Dialects of Slovenian

    PubMed Central

    Plesničar, Vesna; Razboršek, Tina; Sullivan, Jessica; Barner, David

    2016-01-01

    How does linguistic structure affect children’s acquisition of early number word meanings? Previous studies have tested this question by comparing how children learning languages with different grammatical representations of number learn the meanings of labels for small numbers, like 1, 2, and 3. For example, children who acquire a language with singular-plural marking, like English, are faster to learn the word for 1 than children learning a language that lacks the singular-plural distinction, perhaps because the word for 1 is always used in singular contexts, highlighting its meaning. These studies are problematic, however, because reported differences in number word learning may be due to unmeasured cross-cultural differences rather than specific linguistic differences. To address this problem, we investigated number word learning in four groups of children from a single culture who spoke different dialects of the same language that differed chiefly with respect to how they grammatically mark number. We found that learning a dialect which features “dual” morphology (marking of pairs) accelerated children’s acquisition of the number word two relative to learning a “non-dual” dialect of the same language. PMID:27486802

  4. Effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion: An accelerated Eulerian stochastic fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangi, Mehdi; Lucchini, Tommaso; Gong, Cheng; Bai, Xue-Song

    2015-09-01

    An Eulerian stochastic fields (ESF) method accelerated with the chemistry coordinate mapping (CCM) approach for modelling spray combustion is formulated, and applied to model diesel combustion in a constant volume vessel. In ESF-CCM, the thermodynamic states of the discretised stochastic fields are mapped into a low-dimensional phase space. Integration of the chemical stiff ODEs is performed in the phase space and the results are mapped back to the physical domain. After validating the ESF-CCM, the method is used to investigate the effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion. It is shown that, depending of the fuel cetane number, liftoff length is varied, which can lead to a change in combustion mode from classical diesel spray combustion to fuel-lean premixed burned combustion. Spray combustion with a shorter liftoff length exhibits the characteristics of the classical conceptual diesel combustion model proposed by Dec in 1997 (http://dx.doi.org/10.4271/970873), whereas in a case with a lower cetane number the liftoff length is much larger and the spray combustion probably occurs in a fuel-lean-premixed mode of combustion. Nevertheless, the transport budget at the liftoff location shows that stabilisation at all cetane numbers is governed primarily by the auto-ignition process.

  5. Does Grammatical Structure Accelerate Number Word Learning? Evidence from Learners of Dual and Non-Dual Dialects of Slovenian.

    PubMed

    Marušič, Franc; Žaucer, Rok; Plesničar, Vesna; Razboršek, Tina; Sullivan, Jessica; Barner, David

    2016-01-01

    How does linguistic structure affect children's acquisition of early number word meanings? Previous studies have tested this question by comparing how children learning languages with different grammatical representations of number learn the meanings of labels for small numbers, like 1, 2, and 3. For example, children who acquire a language with singular-plural marking, like English, are faster to learn the word for 1 than children learning a language that lacks the singular-plural distinction, perhaps because the word for 1 is always used in singular contexts, highlighting its meaning. These studies are problematic, however, because reported differences in number word learning may be due to unmeasured cross-cultural differences rather than specific linguistic differences. To address this problem, we investigated number word learning in four groups of children from a single culture who spoke different dialects of the same language that differed chiefly with respect to how they grammatically mark number. We found that learning a dialect which features "dual" morphology (marking of pairs) accelerated children's acquisition of the number word two relative to learning a "non-dual" dialect of the same language. PMID:27486802

  6. Structural Incorporation of Uranium into Iron Oxides: A Competitive Secondary Sequestration Pathway Mediated by Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, M. S.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Nico, P. S.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium retention and sequestration pathways determine the long-term fate of this important contaminant in soils and sediments. Direct, enzymatic U reduction and subsequent precipitation of UO2 is one potential sequestration pathway, but indirect U transformations can also occur as a result of reactions with microbially-generated Fe(II). Here we explored uranium retention mechanisms active during abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aqueous Fe(II), in the presence of ferrihydrite, in Ca and carbonate-bearing solutions. Ferrihydrite transformation and U reduction were studied in batch incubations containing Ca (0 and 4 mM), carbonate (3.8 mM), ferrihydrite (~180 mg/L), Fe(II) (0.3 mM), and a range of concentrations of uranyl (1 to 170 μM). Uranium retention pathways were differentiated using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. At U concentrations >50 μM, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2 was a dominant sequestration pathway. At lower U concentrations (1-10 μM), UO2 precipitation was not observed and incorporation into goethite, the secondary transformation product of ferrihydrite, was dominant. For groundwaters having micromolar U(VI) concentrations, U incorporation into ferrihydrite transformation products via microbially-produced Fe(II) may be an important sequestration process.

  7. Hypoactivity Affects IGF-1 Level and PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Cerebral Structures Implied in Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    Mysoet, Julien; Canu, Marie-Hélène; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Bastide, Bruno; Dupont, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    A chronic reduction in neuromuscular activity through prolonged body immobilization in human alters motor task performance through a combination of peripheral and central factors. Studies performed in a rat model of sensorimotor restriction have shown functional and biochemical changes in sensorimotor cortex. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1), a growth factor known to mediate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity by inducing phosphorylation cascades which include the PI3K–AKT pathway. In order to better understand the influence of IGF-1 in cortical plasticity in rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the effect of hindlimb unloading on IGF-1 and its main molecular pathway in structures implied in motor control (sensorimotor cortex, striatum, cerebellum). IGF-1 level was determined by ELISA, and phosphorylation of its receptor and proteins of the PI3K–AKT pathway by immunoblot. In the sensorimotor cortex, our results indicate that HU induces a decrease in IGF-1 level; this alteration is associated to a decrease in activation of PI3K-AKT pathway. The same effect was observed in the striatum, although to a lower extent. No variation was noticed in the cerebellum. These results suggest that IGF-1 might contribute to cortical and striatal plasticity induced by a chronic sensorimotor restriction. PMID:25226394

  8. Structure of sheared and rotating turbulence: Multiscale statistics of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations and passive scalar dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Frank G; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J T; Farge, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration statistics of sheared and rotating homogeneous turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation results. The statistical properties of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are considered together with the influence of the rotation to shear ratio, as well as the scale dependence of their statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations show a strong and similar dependence on the rotation to shear ratio. The variance and flatness of both accelerations are analyzed and the extreme values of the Eulerian acceleration are observed to be above those of the Lagrangian acceleration. For strong rotation it is observed that flatness yields values close to three, corresponding to Gaussian-like behavior, and for moderate and vanishing rotation the flatness increases. Furthermore, the Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are shown to be strongly correlated for strong rotation due to a reduced nonlinear term in this case. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations increases as scale decreases, which provides evidence for intermittent behavior. For strong rotation the Eulerian acceleration is even more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation. Moreover, the dynamics of a passive scalar with gradient production in the direction of the mean velocity gradient is analyzed and the influence of the rotation to shear ratio is studied. Concerning the concentration of a passive scalar spread by the flow, the pdf of its Eulerian time rate of change presents higher extreme values than those of its Lagrangian time rate of change. This suggests that the Eulerian time rate of change of scalar concentration is mainly due to advection, while its Lagrangian counterpart is only due to gradient production and viscous dissipation. PMID:26871161

  9. Structure of sheared and rotating turbulence: Multiscale statistics of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations and passive scalar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank G.; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Farge, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration statistics of sheared and rotating homogeneous turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation results. The statistical properties of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are considered together with the influence of the rotation to shear ratio, as well as the scale dependence of their statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations show a strong and similar dependence on the rotation to shear ratio. The variance and flatness of both accelerations are analyzed and the extreme values of the Eulerian acceleration are observed to be above those of the Lagrangian acceleration. For strong rotation it is observed that flatness yields values close to three, corresponding to Gaussian-like behavior, and for moderate and vanishing rotation the flatness increases. Furthermore, the Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are shown to be strongly correlated for strong rotation due to a reduced nonlinear term in this case. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations increases as scale decreases, which provides evidence for intermittent behavior. For strong rotation the Eulerian acceleration is even more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation. Moreover, the dynamics of a passive scalar with gradient production in the direction of the mean velocity gradient is analyzed and the influence of the rotation to shear ratio is studied. Concerning the concentration of a passive scalar spread by the flow, the pdf of its Eulerian time rate of change presents higher extreme values than those of its Lagrangian time rate of change. This suggests that the Eulerian time rate of change of scalar concentration is mainly due to advection, while its Lagrangian counterpart is only due to gradient production and viscous dissipation.

  10. Enzyme-accelerated and structure-guided crystallization of calcium carbonate: role of the carbonic anhydrase in the homologous system.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schlossmacher, Ute; Schröder, Heinz C; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Korzhev, Michael; Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    The calcareous spicules from sponges, e.g. from Sycon raphanus, are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate. In order to elucidate the formation of those structural skeletal elements, the function of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from this species, during the in vitro calcium carbonate-based spicule formation, was investigated. It is shown that the recombinant sponge CA substantially accelerates calcium carbonate formation in the in vitro diffusion assay. A stoichiometric calculation revealed that the turnover rate of the sponge CA during the calcification process amounts to 25 CO2s(-1) × molecule CA(-1). During this enzymatically driven process, initially pat-like particles are formed that are subsequently transformed to rhomboid/rhombohedroid crystals with a dimension of ~50 μm. The CA-catalyzed particles are smaller than those which are formed in the absence of the enzyme. The Martens hardness of the particles formed is ~4 GPa, a value which had been determined for other biogenic calcites. This conclusion is corroborated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which revealed that the particles synthesized are composed predominantly of the elements calcium, oxygen and carbon. Surprising was the finding, obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, that the newly formed calcitic crystals associate with the calcareous spicules from S. raphanus in a highly ordered manner; the calcitic crystals almost perfectly arrange in an array orientation along the two opposing planes of the spicules, leaving the other two plane arrays uncovered. It is concluded that the CA is a key enzyme controlling the calcium carbonate biomineralization process, which directs the newly formed particles to existing calcareous spicular structures. It is expected that with the given tools new bioinspired materials can be fabricated.

  11. Associations between Proprioceptive Neural Pathway Structural Connectivity and Balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fling, Brett W; Dutta, Geetanjali Gera; Schlueter, Heather; Cameron, Michelle H; Horak, Fay B

    2014-01-01

    Mobility and balance impairments are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting nearly half of patients at presentation and resulting in decreased activity and participation, falls, injuries, and reduced quality of life. A growing body of work suggests that balance impairments in people with mild MS are primarily the result of deficits in proprioception, the ability to determine body position in space in the absence of vision. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of balance disturbances in MS is needed to develop evidence-based rehabilitation approaches. The purpose of the current study was to (1) map the cortical proprioceptive pathway in vivo using diffusion-weighted imaging and (2) assess associations between proprioceptive pathway white matter microstructural integrity and performance on clinical and behavioral balance tasks. We hypothesized that people with MS (PwMS) would have reduced integrity of cerebral proprioceptive pathways, and that reduced white matter microstructure within these tracts would be strongly related to proprioceptive-based balance deficits. We found poorer balance control on proprioceptive-based tasks and reduced white matter microstructural integrity of the cortical proprioceptive tracts in PwMS compared with age-matched healthy controls (HC). Microstructural integrity of this pathway in the right hemisphere was also strongly associated with proprioceptive-based balance control in PwMS and controls. Conversely, while white matter integrity of the right hemisphere's proprioceptive pathway was significantly correlated with overall balance performance in HC, there was no such relationship in PwMS. These results augment existing literature suggesting that balance control in PwMS may become more dependent upon (1) cerebellar-regulated proprioceptive control, (2) the vestibular system, and/or (3) the visual system.

  12. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  13. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  14. The crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB reveals mechanistic differences among bacterial DNA replication restart pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jinlan; George, Nicholas P.; Duckett, Katrina L.; DeBeer, Madeleine A.P.; Lopper, Matthew E.

    2010-05-25

    Reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks is essential for complete duplication of bacterial genomes. However, not all bacteria encode homologs of the well-studied Escherichia coli DNA replication restart primosome proteins, suggesting that there might be distinct mechanistic differences among DNA replication restart pathways in diverse bacteria. Since reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks requires coordinated DNA and protein binding by DNA replication restart primosome proteins, we determined the crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution and investigated its ability to physically interact with DNA and PriA helicase. Comparison of the crystal structures of PriB from N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli reveals a well-conserved homodimeric structure consisting of two oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds. In spite of their overall structural similarity, there is significant species variation in the type and distribution of surface amino acid residues. This correlates with striking differences in the affinity with which each PriB homolog binds single-stranded DNA and PriA helicase. These results provide evidence that mechanisms of DNA replication restart are not identical across diverse species and that these pathways have likely become specialized to meet the needs of individual organisms.

  15. The VP3 structural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus inhibits the IFN-β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yang, Wenping; Yang, Fan; Liu, Huanan; Zhu, Zixiang; Lian, Kaiqi; Lei, Caoqi; Li, Shu; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue; Shu, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a frequently occurring disease of cloven-hoofed animals that is caused by infection with the foot-and-mouth virus (FMDV). FMDV circumvents the type-I IFN response by expressing proteins that antagonize cellular innate immunity, such as leader protease and 3C protease. We identified the FMDV structural protein VP3 as a negative regulator of the virus-triggered IFN-β signaling pathway. Expression of FMDV VP3 inhibited the Sendai virus-triggered activation of IFN regulatory factor-3 and the expression of retinoic acid-inducible gene-I/melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5. Transient transfection and coimmunoprecipitation confirmed that the structural protein VP3 interacts with virus-induced signaling adapter (VISA), which is dependent on the C-terminal aa 111-220 of VP3. In addition, we found that FMDV VP3 inhibits the expression of VISA by disrupting its mRNA. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel strategy used by the structural VP3 protein of FMDV to evade host innate immunity.-Li, D., Yang, W., Yang, F., Liu, H., Zhu, Z., Lian, K., Lei, C., Li, S., Liu, X., Zheng, H., Shu, H. The VP3 structural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus inhibits the IFN-β signaling pathway. PMID:26813975

  16. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis Hypothetical Protein CT263 Supports That Menaquinone Synthesis Occurs through the Futalosine Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Michael L.; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Schramm, Vern L.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5′-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5′-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 103 m−1 s−1), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5′-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

  17. Structure and composition of the distant lunar exosphere: Constraints from ARTEMIS observations of ion acceleration in time-varying fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    By analyzing the trajectories of ionized constituents of the lunar exosphere in time-varying electromagnetic fields, we can place constraints on the composition, structure, and dynamics of the lunar exosphere. Heavy ions travel slower than light ions in the same fields, so by observing the lag between field rotations and the response of ions from the lunar exosphere, we can place constraints on the composition of the ions. Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) provides an ideal platform to utilize such an analysis, since its two-probe vantage allows precise timing of the propagation of field discontinuities in the solar wind, and its sensitive plasma instruments can detect the ion response. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by using fully time-dependent charged particle tracing to analyze several minutes of ion observations taken by the two ARTEMIS probes ~3000-5000 km above the dusk terminator on 25 January 2014. The observations from this time period allow us to reach several interesting conclusions. The ion production at altitudes of a few hundred kilometers above the sunlit surface of the Moon has an unexpectedly significant contribution from species with masses of 40 amu or greater. The inferred distribution of the neutral source population has a large scale height, suggesting that micrometeorite impact vaporization and/or sputtering play an important role in the production of neutrals from the surface. Our observations also suggest an asymmetry in ion production, consistent with either a compositional variation in neutral vapor production or a local reduction in solar wind sputtering in magnetic regions of the surface.

  18. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27630054

  19. Oxygen diffusion pathways in brownmillerite SrCoO2.5: influence of structure and chemical potential.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Chandrima; Meyer, Tricia; Lee, Ho Nyung; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-08-28

    To design and discover new materials for next-generation energy materials such as solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a fundamental understanding of their ionic properties and behaviors is essential. The potential applicability of a material for SOFCs is critically determined by the activation energy barrier of oxygen along various diffusion pathways. In this work, we investigate interstitial-oxygen (Oi) diffusion in brownmillerite oxide SrCoO2.5, employing a first-principles approach. Our calculations indicate highly anisotropic ionic diffusion pathways, which result from its anisotropic crystal structure. The one-dimensional-ordered oxygen vacancy channels are found to provide the easiest diffusion pathway with an activation energy barrier height of 0.62 eV. The directions perpendicular to the vacancy channels have higher energy barriers for Oint diffusion. In addition, we have studied migration barriers for oxygen vacancies that could be present as point defects within the material. This in turn could also facilitate the transport of oxygen. Interestingly, for oxygen vacancies, the lowest barrier height was found to occur within the octahedral layer with an energy of 0.82 eV. Our results imply that interstitial migration would be highly one-dimensional in nature. Oxygen vacancy transport, on the other hand, could preferentially occur in the two-dimensional octahedral plane.

  20. Effective management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) through structured re-assessment: the Dundee ADHD Clinical Care Pathway.

    PubMed

    Coghill, David; Seth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has become a major aspect of the work of child and adolescent psychiatrists and paediatricians in the UK. In Scotland, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services were required to address an increase in referral rates and changes in evidence-based medicine and guidelines without additional funding. In response to this, clinicians in Dundee have, over the past 15 years, pioneered the use of integrated psychiatric, paediatric, nursing, occupational therapy, dietetic and psychological care with the development of a clearly structured, evidence-based assessment and treatment pathway to provide effective therapy for children and adolescents with ADHD. The Dundee ADHD Clinical Care Pathway (DACCP) uses standard protocols for assessment, titration and routine monitoring of clinical care and treatment outcomes, with much of the clinical work being nurse led. The DACCP has received international attention and has been used as a template for service development in many countries. This review describes the four key stages of the clinical care pathway (referral and pre-assessment; assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning; initiating treatment; and continuing care) and discusses translation of the DACCP into other healthcare systems. Tools for healthcare professionals to use or adapt according to their own clinical settings are also provided. PMID:26587055

  1. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  2. Exploring the N-glycosylation Pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Unravels Novel Complex Structures*

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu-Rivet, Elodie; Scholz, Martin; Arias, Carolina; Dardelle, Flavien; Schulze, Stefan; Le Mauff, François; Teo, Gavin; Hochmal, Ana Karina; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Fufezan, Christian; Burel, Carole; Lerouge, Patrice; Martinez, Flor; Bardor, Muriel; Hippler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green unicellular eukaryotic model organism for studying relevant biological and biotechnological questions. The availability of genomic resources and the growing interest in C. reinhardtii as an emerging cell factory for the industrial production of biopharmaceuticals require an in-depth analysis of protein N-glycosylation in this organism. Accordingly, we used a comprehensive approach including genomic, glycomic, and glycoproteomic techniques to unravel the N-glycosylation pathway of C. reinhardtii. Using mass-spectrometry-based approaches, we found that both endogenous soluble and membrane-bound proteins carry predominantly oligomannosides ranging from Man-2 to Man-5. In addition, minor complex N-linked glycans were identified as being composed of partially 6-O-methylated Man-3 to Man-5 carrying one or two xylose residues. These findings were supported by results from a glycoproteomic approach that led to the identification of 86 glycoproteins. Here, a combination of in-source collision-induced dissodiation (CID) for glycan fragmentation followed by mass tag-triggered CID for peptide sequencing and PNGase F treatment of glycopeptides in the presence of 18O-labeled water in conjunction with CID mass spectrometric analyses were employed. In conclusion, our data support the notion that the biosynthesis and maturation of N-linked glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus occur via a GnT I-independent pathway yielding novel complex N-linked glycans that maturate differently from their counterparts in land plants. PMID:23912651

  3. Exploring the N-glycosylation pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii unravels novel complex structures.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Rivet, Elodie; Scholz, Martin; Arias, Carolina; Dardelle, Flavien; Schulze, Stefan; Le Mauff, François; Teo, Gavin; Hochmal, Ana Karina; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Fufezan, Christian; Burel, Carole; Lerouge, Patrice; Martinez, Flor; Bardor, Muriel; Hippler, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green unicellular eukaryotic model organism for studying relevant biological and biotechnological questions. The availability of genomic resources and the growing interest in C. reinhardtii as an emerging cell factory for the industrial production of biopharmaceuticals require an in-depth analysis of protein N-glycosylation in this organism. Accordingly, we used a comprehensive approach including genomic, glycomic, and glycoproteomic techniques to unravel the N-glycosylation pathway of C. reinhardtii. Using mass-spectrometry-based approaches, we found that both endogenous soluble and membrane-bound proteins carry predominantly oligomannosides ranging from Man-2 to Man-5. In addition, minor complex N-linked glycans were identified as being composed of partially 6-O-methylated Man-3 to Man-5 carrying one or two xylose residues. These findings were supported by results from a glycoproteomic approach that led to the identification of 86 glycoproteins. Here, a combination of in-source collision-induced dissodiation (CID) for glycan fragmentation followed by mass tag-triggered CID for peptide sequencing and PNGase F treatment of glycopeptides in the presence of (18)O-labeled water in conjunction with CID mass spectrometric analyses were employed. In conclusion, our data support the notion that the biosynthesis and maturation of N-linked glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus occur via a GnT I-independent pathway yielding novel complex N-linked glycans that maturate differently from their counterparts in land plants.

  4. Parallel processing in the honeybee olfactory pathway: structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Rössler, Wolfgang; Brill, Martin F

    2013-11-01

    Animals face highly complex and dynamic olfactory stimuli in their natural environments, which require fast and reliable olfactory processing. Parallel processing is a common principle of sensory systems supporting this task, for example in visual and auditory systems, but its role in olfaction remained unclear. Studies in the honeybee focused on a dual olfactory pathway. Two sets of projection neurons connect glomeruli in two antennal-lobe hemilobes via lateral and medial tracts in opposite sequence with the mushroom bodies and lateral horn. Comparative studies suggest that this dual-tract circuit represents a unique adaptation in Hymenoptera. Imaging studies indicate that glomeruli in both hemilobes receive redundant sensory input. Recent simultaneous multi-unit recordings from projection neurons of both tracts revealed widely overlapping response profiles strongly indicating parallel olfactory processing. Whereas lateral-tract neurons respond fast with broad (generalistic) profiles, medial-tract neurons are odorant specific and respond slower. In analogy to "what-" and "where" subsystems in visual pathways, this suggests two parallel olfactory subsystems providing "what-" (quality) and "when" (temporal) information. Temporal response properties may support across-tract coincidence coding in higher centers. Parallel olfactory processing likely enhances perception of complex odorant mixtures to decode the diverse and dynamic olfactory world of a social insect.

  5. Ghrelin accelerates wound healing through GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways in combined radiation and burn injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Jing; Hao, Yuhui; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of ghrelin on wound healing was assessed using a rat model of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI). Rat ghrelin, anti-rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α polyclonal antibody (PcAb), or selective antagonists of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a (SB203580, SP600125, and [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, respectively), were administered for seven consecutive days. Levels of various signaling molecules were assessed in isolated rat peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that serum ghrelin levels and levels of macrophage glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased, while phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65 nuclear factor (NF) κB increased. Ghrelin inhibited the serum induction of proinflammatory mediators, especially TNF-α, and promoted wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. Ghrelin treatment decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65NF-κB, and increased GR levels in the presence of GHS-R1a. SB203580 or co-administration of SB203580 and SP600125 decreased TNF-α level, which may have contributed to the inactivation of p65NF-κB and increase in GR expression, as confirmed by western blotting. In conclusion, ghrelin enhances wound recovery in CRBI rats, possibly by decreasing the induction of TNF-α or other proinflammatory mediators that are involved in the regulation of GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways. PMID:27271793

  6. Liposomal Doxorubicin Increases Radiofrequency Ablation–induced Tumor Destruction by Increasing Cellular Oxidative and Nitrative Stress and Accelerating Apoptotic Pathways1

    PubMed Central

    Solazzo, Stephanie A.; Ahmed, Muneeb; Schor-Bardach, Rachel; Yang, Wei; Girnun, Geoffrey D.; Rahmanuddin, Syed; Levchenko, Tatyana; Signoretti, Sabina; Spitz, Douglas R.; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    comparisons). Conclusion: Combining RF ablation with liposomal doxorubicin increases cell injury and apoptosis in the zone of increased coagulation by using a mechanism that involves oxidative and nitrative stress that leads to accelerated apoptosis. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20160000

  7. Mimicking the folding pathway to improve homology-free protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl; Debartolo, Joe; Colubri, Andres; Jha, Abhishek; Fitzgerald, James; Sosnick, Tobin

    2010-03-01

    Since demonstrating that a protein's sequence encodes its structure, the prediction of structure from sequence remains an outstanding problem that impacts numerous scientific disciplines including many genome projects. By iteratively fixing secondary structure assignments of residues during Monte Carlo simulations of folding, our coarse grained model without information concerning homology or explicit side chains outperforms current homology-based secondary structure prediction methods for many proteins. The computationally rapid algorithm using only single residue (phi, psi) dihedral angle moves also generates tertiary structures of comparable accuracy to existing all-atom methods for many small proteins, particularly ones with low homology. Hence, given appropriate search strategies and scoring functions, reduced representations can be used for accurately predicting secondary structure as well as providing three-dimensional structures, thereby increasing the size of proteins approachable by homology-free methods and the accuracy of template methods whose accuracy depends on the quality of the input secondary structure. Inclusion of information from evolutionarily related sequences enhances the statistics and the accuracy of the predictions.

  8. One DOF mechanism for the mechanical harvest of vines in an arbor structure and the validation of the acceleration of grape berry harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penisi, Osvaldo; Bocca, José; Aguilar, Horacio; Bocca, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    In the mechanized harvest of vines, grape berries are detached through the vibration to the structure supporting the clusters. According to the kind of guide selected, the clusters require one or two vibration directions in the structure. For guiding in parral structures, vibration is necessary in two directions or planes: One perpendicular to the other. The guide branches producing the clusters develop in these planes, and the guiding is called H-guiding. Mechanism theory indicates that a mechanism has as many degrees of freedom as its actuators, and an actuator is needed to achieve a certain vibration. Having the smallest number of possible actuators is beneficial in reducing moving parts and achieving more compact and easily controllable mechanisms. In this case, a single degree-of-freedom mechanism is proposed. It is capable of generating vibrations on two planes: One perpendicular to the other. This mechanism is the sum of two link mechanisms on perpendicular planes with a common outlet located at the output rod of the mechanism where the actuator is found. As the distance between the soil and the elements containing the clusters is not constant, a system has been designed to measure the accelerations at the bars and the rocker to validate the acceleration values that detach the grape berries in a prototype in a lab experiment, to ensure that the acceleration needed for pulling the grape berries are produced at any contact point of the bar.

  9. A visual pathway links brain structures active during magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Heyers, Dominik; Manns, Martina; Luksch, Harald; Güntürkün, Onur; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-09-26

    The magnetic compass of migratory birds has been suggested to be light-dependent. Retinal cryptochrome-expressing neurons and a forebrain region, "Cluster N", show high neuronal activity when night-migratory songbirds perform magnetic compass orientation. By combining neuronal tracing with behavioral experiments leading to sensory-driven gene expression of the neuronal activity marker ZENK during magnetic compass orientation, we demonstrate a functional neuronal connection between the retinal neurons and Cluster N via the visual thalamus. Thus, the two areas of the central nervous system being most active during magnetic compass orientation are part of an ascending visual processing stream, the thalamofugal pathway. Furthermore, Cluster N seems to be a specialized part of the visual wulst. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that migratory birds use their visual system to perceive the reference compass direction of the geomagnetic field and that migratory birds "see" the reference compass direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  10. Structural and electronic transformation pathways in morphotropic BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Heo, Y.; Jang, B.-K.; Liu, Y. Y.; Li, J. Y.; Yang, C.-H.; Seidel, J.

    2016-09-01

    Phase boundaries in multiferroics, in which (anti-)ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and ferroelastic order parameters coexist, enable manipulation of magnetism and electronic properties by external electric fields through switching of the polarization in the material. It has been shown that the strain-driven morphotropic phase boundaries in a single-phase multiferroic such as BiFeO3 (BFO) can exhibit distinct electronic conductivity. However, the control of ferroelectric and phase switching and its correlation with phase boundary conductivity in this material has been a significant challenge. Supported by a thermodynamic approach, here we report a concept to precisely control different switching pathways and the associated control of electronic conductivity in mixed phase BFO. This work demonstrates a critical step to control and use non-volatile strain-conductivity coupling at the nanoscale. Beyond this observation, it provides a framework for exploring a route to control multiple order parameters coupled to ferroelastic and ferroelectric order in multiferroic materials.

  11. Structural and electronic transformation pathways in morphotropic BiFeO3.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Heo, Y; Jang, B-K; Liu, Y Y; Li, J Y; Yang, C-H; Seidel, J

    2016-01-01

    Phase boundaries in multiferroics, in which (anti-)ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and ferroelastic order parameters coexist, enable manipulation of magnetism and electronic properties by external electric fields through switching of the polarization in the material. It has been shown that the strain-driven morphotropic phase boundaries in a single-phase multiferroic such as BiFeO3 (BFO) can exhibit distinct electronic conductivity. However, the control of ferroelectric and phase switching and its correlation with phase boundary conductivity in this material has been a significant challenge. Supported by a thermodynamic approach, here we report a concept to precisely control different switching pathways and the associated control of electronic conductivity in mixed phase BFO. This work demonstrates a critical step to control and use non-volatile strain-conductivity coupling at the nanoscale. Beyond this observation, it provides a framework for exploring a route to control multiple order parameters coupled to ferroelastic and ferroelectric order in multiferroic materials. PMID:27581222

  12. Structural and electronic transformation pathways in morphotropic BiFeO3

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Heo, Y.; Jang, B.-K.; Liu, Y. Y.; Li, J. Y.; Yang, C.-H.; Seidel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Phase boundaries in multiferroics, in which (anti-)ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and ferroelastic order parameters coexist, enable manipulation of magnetism and electronic properties by external electric fields through switching of the polarization in the material. It has been shown that the strain-driven morphotropic phase boundaries in a single-phase multiferroic such as BiFeO3 (BFO) can exhibit distinct electronic conductivity. However, the control of ferroelectric and phase switching and its correlation with phase boundary conductivity in this material has been a significant challenge. Supported by a thermodynamic approach, here we report a concept to precisely control different switching pathways and the associated control of electronic conductivity in mixed phase BFO. This work demonstrates a critical step to control and use non-volatile strain-conductivity coupling at the nanoscale. Beyond this observation, it provides a framework for exploring a route to control multiple order parameters coupled to ferroelastic and ferroelectric order in multiferroic materials. PMID:27581222

  13. ATP requirements and small interfering RNA structure in the RNA interference pathway.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, A; Haley, B; Zamore, P D

    2001-11-01

    We examined the role of ATP in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Our data reveal two ATP-dependent steps and suggest that the RNAi reaction comprises at least four sequential steps: ATP-dependent processing of double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), incorporation of siRNAs into an inactive approximately 360 kDa protein/RNA complex, ATP-dependent unwinding of the siRNA duplex to generate an active complex, and ATP-independent recognition and cleavage of the RNA target. Furthermore, ATP is used to maintain 5' phosphates on siRNAs. A 5' phosphate on the target-complementary strand of the siRNA duplex is required for siRNA function, suggesting that cells check the authenticity of siRNAs and license only bona fide siRNAs to direct target RNA destruction.

  14. Structural characterization of the reaction pathway in phosphoserine phosphatase: Crystallographic 'snapshots' of intermediate states.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiru; Cho, Ho S.; Kim, Rosalind; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao; Nguyen, Henry H.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wemmer, David E.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2004-04-12

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) is a member of a large class of enzymes that catalyze phosphoester hydrolysis using a phosphoaspartate enzyme intermediate. PSP is a likely regulator of the steady-state-serine level in the brain, which is a critical co-agonist of the N-methyl--aspartate type of glutamate receptors. Here, we present high-resolution (1.5 1.9 Angstrom) structures of PSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, which define the open state prior to substrate binding, the complex with phosphoserine substrate bound (with a D to N mutation in the active site), and the complex with AlF3, a transition-state analog for the phospho-transfer steps in the reaction. These structures, together with those described for the BeF3- complex (mimicking the phospho-enzyme) and the enzyme with phosphate product in the active site, provide a detailed structural picture of the full reaction cycle. The structure of the apostate indicates partial unfolding of the enzyme to allow substrate binding, with refolding in the presence of substrate to provide specificity. Interdomain and active-site conformational changes are identified. The structure with the transition state analog bound indicates a ''tight'' intermediate. A striking structure homology, with significant sequence conservation, among PSP, P-type ATPases and response regulators suggests that the knowledge of the PSP reaction mechanism from the structures determined will provide insights into the reaction mechanisms of the other enzymes in this family.

  15. Structural and functional changes in the olfactory pathway of adult Drosophila take place at a critical age.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Acebes, Angel; Ramaswami, Mani; Ferrús, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    The olfactory system of several holometabolous insect species undergoes anatomical changes after eclosion of the imago, following those occurring during metamorphosis. In parallel, odor experience and learning performance also evolve with age. Here, we analyze the case of adult Drosophila females. Synaptogenesis in the antennal lobe (AL) starts in late pupa and continues during the first days of adult life, at the same time as the behavioral response to odors matures. Individual olfactory glomeruli (DM6, DM2, and V) display specific growth patterns between days 1 and 12 of adult life. Experience can modify the olfactory pathway both structurally and functionally as shown by adaptation experiments. The modifications associated with this form of nonassociative learning seem to take place at a critical age. Exposure to benzaldehyde at days 2-5 of adult life, but not at 8-11, causes behavioral adaptation as well as structural changes in DM2 and V glomeruli. Altered levels in intracellular cAMP, caused by dunce and rutabaga mutants, do not affect the normal changes in glomerular size, at least at day 6 of development, but they prevent those elicited by experience, establishing a molecular difference between glomerular changes of intrinsic versus environmental origin. Taken together, these data demonstrate an imprinting-like phenomenon in the olfactory pathway of young Drosophila adults, and illustrate its glomerulus-specific dynamics.

  16. Structural Insight into Archaic and Alternative Chaperone-Usher Pathways Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Pilus Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pakharukova, Natalia; Garnett, James A.; Tuittila, Minna; Paavilainen, Sari; Diallo, Mamou; Xu, Yingqi; Matthews, Steve J.; Zavialov, Anton V.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogens express fibrous adhesive organelles that mediate targeting to sites of infection. The major class of these organelles is assembled via the classical, alternative and archaic chaperone-usher pathways. Although non-classical systems share a wider phylogenetic distribution and are associated with a range of diseases, little is known about their assembly mechanisms. Here we report atomic-resolution insight into the structure and biogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii Csu and Escherichia coli ECP biofilm-mediating pili. We show that the two non-classical systems are structurally related, but their assembly mechanism is strikingly different from the classical assembly pathway. Non-classical chaperones, unlike their classical counterparts, maintain subunits in a substantially disordered conformational state, akin to a molten globule. This is achieved by a unique binding mechanism involving the register-shifted donor strand complementation and a different subunit carboxylate anchor. The subunit lacks the classical pre-folded initiation site for donor strand exchange, suggesting that recognition of its exposed hydrophobic core starts the assembly process and provides fresh inspiration for the design of inhibitors targeting chaperone-usher systems. PMID:26587649

  17. A rapid pathway toward a superb gene delivery system: programming structural and functional diversity into a supramolecular nanoparticle library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Kan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Yujie; Wang, Shutao; Lin, Wei-Yu; Guo, Feng; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohashi, Minori; Wang, Mingwei; Garcia, Mitch André; Zhao, Xing-Zhong; Shen, Clifton K-F; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2010-10-26

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising transfection reagents for effective and safe delivery of nucleic acids into a specific type of cells or tissues providing an alternative manipulation/therapy strategy to viral gene delivery. However, the current process of searching novel delivery materials is limited due to conventional low-throughput and time-consuming multistep synthetic approaches. Additionally, conventional approaches are frequently accompanied with unpredictability and continual optimization refinements, impeding flexible generation of material diversity creating a major obstacle to achieving high transfection performance. Here we have demonstrated a rapid developmental pathway toward highly efficient gene delivery systems by leveraging the powers of a supramolecular synthetic approach and a custom-designed digital microreactor. Using the digital microreactor, broad structural/functional diversity can be programmed into a library of DNA-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles (DNA⊂SNPs) by systematically altering the mixing ratios of molecular building blocks and a DNA plasmid. In vitro transfection studies with DNA⊂SNPs library identified the DNA⊂SNPs with the highest gene transfection efficiency, which can be attributed to cooperative effects of structures and surface chemistry of DNA⊂SNPs. We envision such a rapid developmental pathway can be adopted for generating nanoparticle-based vectors for delivery of a variety of loads.

  18. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and Pathways for Three Structurally Related Antitumor Antibiotics Bleomycin, Tallysomycin and Zorbamycin†

    PubMed Central

    Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Unsin, Claudia; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M.; Shen, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene clusters for the glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics bleomycin (BLM), tallysomycin (TLM), and zorbamycin (ZBM) have been recently cloned and characterized from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003, Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, and Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, respectively. The striking similarities and differences among the biosynthetic gene clusters for the three structurally related glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics prompted us to compare and contrast their respective biosynthetic pathways and to investigate various enzymatic elements. The presence of different numbers of isolated nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains in all three clusters does not result in major structural differences of the respective compounds. The seemingly identical domain organization of the NRPS modules responsible for heterocycle formation, on the other hand, is contrasted by the biosynthesis of two different structural entities, bithiazole and thiazolinyl-thiazole, for BLM/TLM and ZBM, respectively. Variations in sugar biosynthesis apparently dictate the glycosylation patterns distinct for each of the BLM, TLM, and ZBM glycopeptide scaffolds. These observations demonstrate nature’s ingenuity and flexibility in achieving structural differences and similarities via various mechanisms and will surely inspire combinatorial biosynthesis efforts to expand on natural product structural diversity. PMID:21210656

  20. The Structure of L-Tyrosine 2,3-Aminomutase frmo the C-1027 Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson,C.; Montavon, T.; Van Lanen, S.; Shen, B.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The SgcC4 L-tyrosine 2,3-aminomutase (SgTAM) catalyzes the formation of (S)-{beta}-tyrosine in the biosynthetic pathway of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. SgTAM is homologous to the histidine ammonia lyase family of enzymes whose activity is dependent on the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) cofactor. Unlike the lyase enzymes, SgTAM catalyzes additional chemical transformations resulting in an overall stereospecific 1,2-amino shift in the substrate L-tyrosine to generate (S)-{beta}-tyrosine. Previously, we provided kinetic, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data supporting the presence of MIO in the active site of SgTAM [Christenson, S. D.; Wu, W.; Spies, A.; Shen, B.; and Toney, M. D. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 12708-12718]. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of an MIO-containing aminomutase, SgTAM, and confirm the structural homology of SgTAM to ammonia lyases. Comparison of the structure of SgTAM to the L-tyrosine ammonia lyase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides provides insight into the structural basis for aminomutase activity. The results show that SgTAM has a closed active site well suited to retain ammonia and minimize the formation of lyase elimination products. The amino acid determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis can be predicted from the structure, setting the framework for detailed mechanistic investigations.

  1. Crystal structure of CmlI, the arylamine oxygenase from the chloramphenicol biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Knoot, Cory J; Kovaleva, Elena G; Lipscomb, John D

    2016-09-01

    The diiron cluster-containing oxygenase CmlI catalyzes the conversion of the aromatic amine precursor of chloramphenicol to the nitroaromatic moiety of the active antibiotic. The X-ray crystal structures of the fully active, N-terminally truncated CmlIΔ33 in the chemically reduced Fe(2+)/Fe(2+) state and a cis μ-1,2(η (1):η (1))-peroxo complex are presented. These structures allow comparison with the homologous arylamine oxygenase AurF as well as other types of diiron cluster-containing oxygenases. The structural model of CmlIΔ33 crystallized at pH 6.8 lacks the oxo-bridge apparent from the enzyme optical spectrum in solution at higher pH. In its place, residue E236 forms a μ-1,3(η (1):η (2)) bridge between the irons in both models. This orientation of E236 stabilizes a helical region near the cluster which closes the active site to substrate binding in contrast to the open site found for AurF. A very similar closed structure was observed for the inactive dimanganese form of AurF. The observation of this same structure in different arylamine oxygenases may indicate that there are two structural states that are involved in regulation of the catalytic cycle. Both the structural studies and single crystal optical spectra indicate that the observed cis μ-1,2(η (1):η (1))-peroxo complex differs from the μ-η (1):η (2)-peroxo proposed from spectroscopic studies of a reactive intermediate formed in solution by addition of O2 to diferrous CmlI. It is proposed that the structural changes required to open the active site also drive conversion of the µ-1,2-peroxo species to the reactive form. PMID:27229511

  2. Structural basis of the heterodimerization of the MST and RASSF SARAH domains in the Hippo signalling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Eunha; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Mushtaq, Ameeq Ul; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Woo Cheol; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Cheong, Chaejoon; Jeon, Young Ho

    2014-07-01

    The heterodimeric structure of the MST1 and RASSF5 SARAH domains is presented. A comparison of homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions provides a structural basis for the preferential association of the SARAH heterodimer. Despite recent progress in research on the Hippo signalling pathway, the structural information available in this area is extremely limited. Intriguingly, the homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST) kinases through the so-called ‘SARAH’ (SAV/RASSF/HPO) domains play a critical role in cellular homeostasis, dictating the fate of the cell regarding cell proliferation or apoptosis. To understand the mechanism of the heterodimerization of SARAH domains, the three-dimensional structures of an MST1–RASSF5 SARAH heterodimer and an MST2 SARAH homodimer were determined by X-ray crystallography and were analysed together with that previously determined for the MST1 SARAH homodimer. While the structure of the MST2 homodimer resembled that of the MST1 homodimer, the MST1–RASSF5 heterodimer showed distinct structural features. Firstly, the six N-terminal residues (Asp432–Lys437), which correspond to the short N-terminal 3{sub 10}-helix h1 kinked from the h2 helix in the MST1 homodimer, were disordered. Furthermore, the MST1 SARAH domain in the MST1–RASSF5 complex showed a longer helical structure (Ser438–Lys480) than that in the MST1 homodimer (Val441–Lys480). Moreover, extensive polar and nonpolar contacts in the MST1–RASSF5 SARAH domain were identified which strengthen the interactions in the heterodimer in comparison to the interactions in the homodimer. Denaturation experiments performed using urea also indicated that the MST–RASSF heterodimers are substantially more stable than the MST homodimers. These findings provide structural insights into the role of the MST1–RASSF5 SARAH domain in apoptosis signalling.

  3. Structural polymorphism of amyloid oligomers and fibrils underlies different fibrillization pathways: immunogenicity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    The past fifteen years have led to a profound re-consideration of the molecular and cellular basis of amyloid diseases. Since the formulation of the amyloid hypothesis in 1991-1992, increasing interest was initially focused at amyloid fibrils and, subsequently, at their precursors, oligomers and pre-fibrillar aggregates as main culprits of cell impairment and demise, particularly in neurodegenerative diseases with amyloid deposition. In 2002, this concept was generalized by the demonstration that pre-fibrillar aggregates were toxic even when they were grown from proteins not associated with amyloid disease. Presently, the general structural features and polymorphism of amyloid fibrils grown from a range of different peptides and proteins are rather well known; however, in spite of the growing interest in amyloid oligomers as the main source of amyloid toxicity, a better definition of their structural features remains elusive due to their transient nature, remarkable instability, high flexibility and structural heterogeneity possibly resulting in the appearance of polymorphic assemblies. Nevertheless, recent studies have started to unravel this key topic by providing significant insights into some general structural features and conformational polymorphism of amyloid oligomers and the higher order structures they generate. Important clues into the structure-toxicity relation of amyloids, the role performed by natural surfaces in oligomer growth and the molecular basis of oligomer-membrane interaction are also emerging. PMID:20423295

  4. Design of On-chip Power Transport and Coupling Components for a Silicon Woodpile Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziran; Ng, C.; McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2011-05-23

    Three-dimensional woodpile photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguide enables high-gradient and efficient laser driven acceleration, while various accelerator components, including laser couplers, power transmission lines, woodpile accelerating and focusing waveguides, and energy recycling resonators, can be potentially integrated on a single monolithic structure via lithographic fabrications. This paper will present designs of this on-chip accelerator based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide. Laser power is coupled from free-space or fiber into SOI waveguide by grating structures on the silicon surface, split into multiple channels to excite individual accelerator cells, and eventually gets merged into the power recycle pathway. Design and simulation results will be presented regarding various coupling components involved in this network.

  5. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  6. Insights into the structural nature of the transition state in the Kir channel gating pathway.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Bollepalli, Murali K; Rapedius, Markus; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark Sp; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we identified an extensive gating network within the inwardly rectifying Kir1.1 (ROMK) channel by combining systematic scanning mutagenesis and functional analysis with structural models of the channel in the closed, pre-open and open states. This extensive network appeared to stabilize the open and pre-open states, but the network fragmented upon channel closure. In this study we have analyzed the gating kinetics of different mutations within key parts of this gating network. These results suggest that the structure of the transition state (TS), which connects the pre-open and closed states of the channel, more closely resembles the structure of the pre-open state. Furthermore, the G-loop, which occurs at the center of this extensive gating network, appears to become unstructured in the TS because mutations within this region have a 'catalytic' effect upon the channel gating kinetics. PMID:25483285

  7. Insights into the structural nature of the transition state in the Kir channel gating pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W; Bollepalli, Murali K; Rapedius, Markus; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark SP; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we identified an extensive gating network within the inwardly rectifying Kir1.1 (ROMK) channel by combining systematic scanning mutagenesis and functional analysis with structural models of the channel in the closed, pre-open and open states. This extensive network appeared to stabilize the open and pre-open states, but the network fragmented upon channel closure. In this study we have analyzed the gating kinetics of different mutations within key parts of this gating network. These results suggest that the structure of the transition state (TS), which connects the pre-open and closed states of the channel, more closely resembles the structure of the pre-open state. Furthermore, the G-loop, which occurs at the center of this extensive gating network, appears to become unstructured in the TS because mutations within this region have a ‘catalytic’ effect upon the channel gating kinetics. PMID:25483285

  8. Photosynthesis. Structural basis for energy transfer pathways in the plant PSI-LHCI supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaochun; Suga, Michihiro; Kuang, Tingyun; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2015-05-29

    Photosynthesis converts solar energy to chemical energy by means of two large pigment-protein complexes: photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). In higher plants, the PSI core is surrounded by a large light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) that captures sunlight and transfers the excitation energy to the core with extremely high efficiency. We report the structure of PSI-LHCI, a 600-kilodalton membrane protein supercomplex, from Pisum sativum (pea) at a resolution of 2.8 angstroms. The structure reveals the detailed arrangement of pigments and other cofactors—especially within LHCI—as well as numerous specific interactions between the PSI core and LHCI. These results provide a firm structural basis for our understanding on the energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms within the PSI-LHCI supercomplex.

  9. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  10. Age-related changes in the function and structure of the peripheral sensory pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Canta, Annalisa; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Meregalli, Cristina; Oggioni, Norberto; Bossi, Mario; Rodriguez-Menendez, Virginia; Avezza, Federica; Crippa, Luca; Lombardi, Raffaella; de Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Cavaletti, Guido; Marmiroli, Paola

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed at describing the changes occurring in the entire peripheral nervous system sensory pathway along a 2-year observation period in a cohort of C57BL/6 mice. The neurophysiological studies evidenced significant differences in the selected time points corresponding to childhood, young adulthood, adulthood, and aging (i.e., 1, 7, 15, and 25 months of age), with a parabolic course as function of time. The pathological assessment allowed to demonstrate signs of age-related changes since the age of 7 months, with a remarkable increase in both peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia at the subsequent time points. These changes were mainly in the myelin sheaths, as also confirmed by the Rotating-Polarization Coherent-Anti-stokes-Raman-scattering microscopy analysis. Evident changes were also present at the morphometric analysis performed on the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia neurons, and skin biopsies. This extensive, multimodal characterization of the peripheral nervous system changes in aging provides the background for future mechanistic studies allowing the selection of the most appropriate time points and readouts according to the investigation aims. PMID:27459934

  11. Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried; Eagleman, David M; Loui, Psyche

    2013-07-01

    Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations.

  12. Neisseria meningitidis Lipooligosaccharide Structure-Dependent Activation of the Macrophage CD14/Toll-Like Receptor 4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Zimmer, Shanta M.; Datta, Anup; Carlson, Russell W.; Stephens, David S.

    2004-01-01

    Meningococcal lipopoly(oligo)saccharide (LOS) is a major inflammatory mediator of fulminant meningococcal sepsis and meningitis. Highly purified wild-type meningococcal LOS and LOS from genetically defined mutants of Neisseria meningitidis that contained specific mutations in LOS biosynthesis pathways were used to confirm that meningococcal LOS activation of macrophages was CD14/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD-2 dependent and to elucidate the LOS structural requirement for TLR4 activation. Expression of TLR4 but not TLR2 was required, and antibodies to both TLR4 and CD14 blocked meningococcal LOS activation of macrophages. Meningococcal LOS α or β chain oligosaccharide structure did not influence CD14/TLR4-MD-2 activation. However, meningococcal lipid A, expressed by meningococci with defects in 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthesis or transfer, resulted in an ∼10-fold (P < 0.0001) reduction in biologic activity compared to KDO2-containing meningococcal LOS. Removal of KDO2 from LOS by acid hydrolysis also dramatically attenuated cellular responses. Competitive inhibition assays showed similar binding of glycosylated and unglycosylated lipid A to CD14/TLR4-MD-2. A decrease in the number of lipid A phosphate head groups or penta-acylated meningococcal LOS modestly attenuated biologic activity. Meningococcal endotoxin is a potent agonist of the macrophage CD14/TLR4-MD-2 receptor, helping explain the fulminant presentation of meningococcal sepsis and meningitis. KDO2 linked to meningococcal lipid A was structurally required for maximal activation of the human macrophage TLR4 pathway and indicates an important role for KDO-lipid A in endotoxin biologic activity. PMID:14688118

  13. Nucleoprotein structure influences the response of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter to activation of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pennie, W D; Hager, G L; Smith, C L

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence of crosstalk between steroid receptors and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathways in the regulation of gene expression. A synergism between intracellular phosphorylation inducers and either glucocorticoids or progestins has been shown to occur during activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. We have investigated the effect of 8-Br-cAMP and okadaic acid, modulators of cellular kinases and phosphatases, on the hormone-induced activation of the MMTV promoter in two forms: a transiently transfected template with a disorganized, accessible nucleoprotein structure and a stably replicating template with an ordered, inaccessible nucleoprotein structure. Both okadaic acid and 8-Br-cAMP synergize significantly with either glucocorticoids or progestins in activating the transiently transfected MMTV template. In contrast, 8-Br-cAMP, but not okadaic acid, is antagonistic to hormone-induced activation of the stably replicating MMTV template. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrate that this inhibition is a transcriptional effect on both hormone-induced transcription and basal transcription. Surprisingly, 8-Br-cAMP does not inhibit glucocorticoid-induced changes in restriction enzyme access and nuclear factor 1 binding. However, association of a complex with the TATA box region is inhibited in the presence of 8-Br-cAMP. Thus, cAMP treatment interferes with the initiation process but does not inhibit interaction of the receptor with the template. Since the replicated, ordered MMTV templates and the transfected, disorganized templates show opposite responses to 8-Br-cAMP treatment, we conclude that chromatin structure can influence the response of a promoter to activation of the cAMP signalling pathway. PMID:7891707

  14. Crystal Structure of Vancosaminyltransferase GtfD from the Vancomycin Biosynthetic Pathway: Interactions with Acceptor and Nucleotide Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mulichak, A.M.; Lu, W.; Losey, H.C.; Walsh, C.T.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    The TDP-vancosaminyltransferase GtfD catalyzes the attachment of L-vancosamine to a monoglucosylated heptapeptide intermediate during the final stage of vancomycin biosynthesis. Glycosyltransferases from this and similar antibiotic pathways are potential tools for the design of new compounds that are effective against vancomycin resistant bacterial strains. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of GtfD as a complex with TDP and the natural glycopeptide substrate at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. GtfD, a member of the bidomain GT-B glycosyltransferase superfamily, binds TDP in the interdomain cleft, while the aglycone acceptor binds in a deep crevice in the N-terminal domain. However, the two domains are more interdependent in terms of substrate binding and overall structure than was evident in the structures of closely related glycosyltransferases GtfA and GtfB. Structural and kinetic analyses support the identification of Asp13 as a catalytic general base, with a possible secondary role for Thr10. Several residues have also been identified as being involved in donor sugar binding and recognition.

  15. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  16. Pathways to Parental Knowledge: The Role of Family Process and Family Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Harper, James M.; Bean, Roy A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was (a) to examine the role of family process on child disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental knowledge and (b) to examine how patterns might differ as a function of family structure. Data for this study were taken from the Flourishing Families Project, which consists of 353 two- and 147 single-parent…

  17. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  18. TOP 1 and 2, polysaccharides from Taraxacum officinale, inhibit NFκB-mediated inflammation and accelerate Nrf2-induced antioxidative potential through the modulation of PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung Mu; Cho, Chung Won; Song, Young Sun

    2014-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities of polysaccharides from Taraxacum officinale (TOP 1 and 2) were analyzed in RAW 264.7 cells. First, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was applied to identify anti-inflammatory activity of TOPs, which reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. TOPs treatment inhibited phosphorylation of inflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)κB, and its upstream signaling molecule, PI3K/Akt. Second, cytoprotective potential of TOPs against oxidative stress was investigated via heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction. HO-1, one of phase II enzymes shows antioxidative activity, was potently induced by TOPs treatment, which was in accordance with the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In addition, TOPs treatment phosphorylated PI3K/Akt with slight activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). TOPs-mediated HO-1 induction protected macrophage cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death, which was confirmed by SnPP and CoPP (HO-1 inhibitor and inducer, respectively). Consequently, TOPs potently inhibited NFκB-mediated inflammation and accelerated Nrf2-mediated antioxidative potential through the modulation of PI3K/Akt pathway, which would contribute to their promising strategy for novel anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agents.

  19. Structure, pathways and dynamics of the East Greenland Current in eddy-resolving global ocean models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bacon, Sheldon; Nurser, George; Coward, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The fresh and cold East Greenland Current (EGC) transports Polar waters from the Arctic Ocean southward in the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic, affecting deep convection in the Nordic and Labrador Seas with potential impacts on the meridional overturning circulation. The pathways of the EGC in Fram Strait and south of it are well documented by observations and model simulations. However, neither the EGC's pathways upstream of Fram Strait nor its sources in the central Arctic Ocean are known sufficiently well to attribute variability of the Arctic outflow to atmospheric or oceanic mechanisms. A set of eddy-permitting and eddy-resolving global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) run with dye tracers and observational data have been used to examine the structure and dynamics of the EGC. The Montgomery function on pseudo-neutral surfaces has been applied to the model results to investigate dynamics of the current and its inter-annual variability. The sources of the EGC and the covariance of Arctic fresh water sinks via Fram Strait and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago are investigated. The model results are compared with observations, and mechanisms driving the EGC are suggested.

  20. MEG3 long noncoding RNA regulates the TGF-β pathway genes through formation of RNA–DNA triplex structures

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Subhash, Santhilal; Vaid, Roshan; Enroth, Stefan; Uday, Sireesha; Reinius, Björn; Mitra, Sanhita; Mohammed, Arif; James, Alva Rani; Hoberg, Emily; Moustakas, Aristidis; Gyllensten, Ulf; Jones, Steven J.M.; Gustafsson, Claes M; Sims, Andrew H; Westerlund, Fredrik; Gorab, Eduardo; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression by association with chromatin, but how they target chromatin remains poorly understood. We have used chromatin RNA immunoprecipitation-coupled high-throughput sequencing to identify 276 lncRNAs enriched in repressive chromatin from breast cancer cells. Using one of the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs, MEG3, we explore the mechanisms by which lncRNAs target chromatin. Here we show that MEG3 and EZH2 share common target genes, including the TGF-β pathway genes. Genome-wide mapping of MEG3 binding sites reveals that MEG3 modulates the activity of TGF-β genes by binding to distal regulatory elements. MEG3 binding sites have GA-rich sequences, which guide MEG3 to the chromatin through RNA–DNA triplex formation. We have found that RNA–DNA triplex structures are widespread and are present over the MEG3 binding sites associated with the TGF-β pathway genes. Our findings suggest that RNA–DNA triplex formation could be a general characteristic of target gene recognition by the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs. PMID:26205790

  1. Prenatal inhibition of the kynurenine pathway leads to structural changes in the hippocampus of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Omari S; Pisar, Mazura; Forrest, Caroline M; Vincenten, Maria C J; Darlington, L Gail; Stone, Trevor W

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate receptors for N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) are involved in early brain development. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism includes the NMDA receptor agonist quinolinic acid and the antagonist kynurenic acid. We now report that prenatal inhibition of the pathway in rats with 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[4-(3-nitrophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulphonamide (Ro61-8048) produces marked changes in hippocampal neuron morphology, spine density and the immunocytochemical localisation of developmental proteins in the offspring at postnatal day 60. Golgi–Cox silver staining revealed decreased overall numbers and lengths of CA1 basal dendrites and secondary basal dendrites, together with fewer basal dendritic spines and less overall dendritic complexity in the basal arbour. Fewer dendrites and less complexity were also noted in the dentate gyrus granule cells. More neurons containing the nuclear marker NeuN and the developmental protein sonic hedgehog were detected in the CA1 region and dentate gyrus. Staining for doublecortin revealed fewer newly generated granule cells bearing extended dendritic processes. The number of neuron terminals staining for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)-1 and VGLUT-2 was increased by Ro61-8048, with no change in expression of vesicular GABA transporter or its co-localisation with vesicle-associated membrane protein-1. These data support the view that constitutive kynurenine metabolism normally plays a role in early embryonic brain development, and that interfering with it has profound consequences for neuronal structure and morphology, lasting into adulthood. PMID:24646396

  2. Crystal Structure of UBA2ufd-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2010-01-01

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2ufd), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2ufd and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades. PMID:21209884

  3. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel “in-cell infection” mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified “in-cell infection” as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that “in-cell infection” is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs. PMID:25916549

  4. Crystal Structure of UBA2[superscript ufd]-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Taherbhoy, Asad M.; Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-04-30

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2{sup ufd}), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2{sup ufd} and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  5. Hyaluronan is organized into fiber-like structures along migratory pathways in the developing mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Baier, Claudia; Baader, Stephan L; Jankowski, Jakob; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Schilling, Karl; Rauch, Uwe; Kappler, Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Hyaluronan is a free glycosaminoglycan which is abundant in the extracellular matrix of the developing brain. Although not covalently linked to any protein it can act as a backbone molecule forming aggregates with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans of the lectican family and link proteins. Using neurocan-GFP as a direct histochemical probe we analyzed the distribution and organization of hyaluronan in the developing mouse cerebellum, and related its fine structure to cell types of specified developmental stages. We observed a high affinity of this probe to fiber-like structures in the prospective white matter which are preferentially oriented parallel to the cerebellar cortex during postnatal development suggesting a specially organized form of hyaluronan. In other layers of the cerebellar cortex, the hyaluronan organization seemed to be more diffuse. During the second postnatal week, the overall staining intensity of hyaluronan in the white matter declined but fiber-like structures were still present at the adult stage. This type of hyaluronan organization is different from perineuronal nets e.g. found in deep cerebellar nuclei. Double staining experiments with cell type specific markers indicated that these fiber-like structures are predominantly situated in regions where motile cells such as Pax2-positive inhibitory interneuron precursors and MBP-positive oligodendroglial cells are located. In contrast, more stationary cells such as mature granule cells and Purkinje cells are associated with lower levels of hyaluronan in their environment. Thus, hyaluronan-rich fibers are concentrated at sites where specific neural precursor cell types migrate, and the anisotropic orientation of these fibers suggests that they may support guided neural migration during brain development.

  6. Structural and mechanistic studies of the orf12 gene product from the clavulanic acid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Valegård, Karin; Iqbal, Aman; Kershaw, Nadia J; Ivison, David; Généreux, Catherine; Dubus, Alain; Blikstad, Cecilia; Demetriades, Marina; Hopkinson, Richard J; Lloyd, Adrian J; Roper, David I; Schofield, Christopher J; Andersson, Inger; McDonough, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    Structural and biochemical studies of the orf12 gene product (ORF12) from the clavulanic acid (CA) biosynthesis gene cluster are described. Sequence and crystallographic analyses reveal two domains: a C-terminal penicillin-binding protein (PBP)/β-lactamase-type fold with highest structural similarity to the class A β-lactamases fused to an N-terminal domain with a fold similar to steroid isomerases and polyketide cyclases. The C-terminal domain of ORF12 did not show β-lactamase or PBP activity for the substrates tested, but did show low-level esterase activity towards 3'-O-acetyl cephalosporins and a thioester substrate. Mutagenesis studies imply that Ser173, which is present in a conserved SXXK motif, acts as a nucleophile in catalysis, consistent with studies of related esterases, β-lactamases and D-Ala carboxypeptidases. Structures of wild-type ORF12 and of catalytic residue variants were obtained in complex with and in the absence of clavulanic acid. The role of ORF12 in clavulanic acid biosynthesis is unknown, but it may be involved in the epimerization of (3S,5S)-clavaminic acid to (3R,5R)-clavulanic acid.

  7. Retrobiosynthetic Approach Delineates the Biosynthetic Pathway and the Structure of the Acyl Chain of Mycobacterial Glycopeptidolipids*

    PubMed Central

    Vats, Archana; Singh, Anil Kumar; Mukherjee, Raju; Chopra, Tarun; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Mohanty, Debasisa; Chatterji, Dipankar; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2012-01-01

    Glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) are dominant cell surface molecules present in several non-tuberculous and opportunistic mycobacterial species. GPLs from Mycobacterium smegmatis are composed of a lipopeptide core unit consisting of a modified C26-C34 fatty acyl chain that is linked to a tetrapeptide (Phe-Thr-Ala-alaninol). The hydroxyl groups of threonine and terminal alaninol are further modified by glycosylations. Although chemical structures have been reported for 16 GPLs from diverse mycobacteria, there is still ambiguity in identifying the exact position of the hydroxyl group on the fatty acyl chain. Moreover, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the fatty acyl component are unknown. In this study we show that a bimodular polyketide synthase in conjunction with a fatty acyl-AMP ligase dictates the synthesis of fatty acyl chain of GPL. Based on genetic, biochemical, and structural investigations, we determine that the hydroxyl group is present at the C-5 position of the fatty acyl component. Our retrobiosynthetic approach has provided a means to understand the biosynthesis of GPLs and also resolve the long-standing debate on the accurate structure of mycobacterial GPLs. PMID:22798073

  8. Structural modeling and analysis of dengue-mediated inhibition of interferon signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Aslam, B; Ahmad, J; Ali, A; Paracha, R Z; Tareen, S H K; Khusro, S; Ahmad, T; Muhammad, S A; Niazi, U; Azevedo, V

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and can cause major health problems worldwide, including dengue fever and dengue shock syndrome. DENV replicon in human cells inhibits interferon α and β with the help of its non-structural proteins. Non-structural protein 5 (NS5) of DENV is responsible for the proteasome-mediated degradation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 2 protein, which has been implicated in the development of resistance against interferon-mediated antiviral effect. This degradation of STAT2 primarily occurs with the help of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Seven in absentia homologue (SIAH) 2 is a host protein that can mediate the ubiquitination of proteins and is known for its interaction with NS5. In this study, comprehensive computational analysis was performed to characterize the protein-protein interactions between NS5, SIAH2, and STAT2 to gain insight into the residues and sites of interaction between these proteins. The objective of the study was to structurally characterize the NS5-STAT2, SIAH2-STAT2, and NS5-SIAH2 interactions along with the determination of the possible reaction pattern for the degradation of STAT2. Docking and physicochemical studies indicated that DENV NS5 may first interact with the host SIAH2, which can then proceed towards binding with STAT2 from the side of SIAH2. These implications are reported for the first time and require validation by wet-lab studies.

  9. Pathways and hydrography in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System Part 2: Water masses and thermohaline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, L.; Johns, E. M.; Smith, R. H.; Lamkin, J. T.; Largier, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrographic data from two oceanographic cruises conducted during March 2006 and January/February 2007 are used to investigate the thermohaline structure related to the observed circulation along the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS). From our observations we identify three water masses in the MBRS: the Caribbean Surface Water (CSW), North Atlantic Subtropical Underwater (SUW), and Tropical Atlantic Central Water (TACW). Little vertical structure in temperature is observed in the upper 100 m of the water column, but important differences are observed in the salinity distribution both horizontally and with depth. Freshwater inputs to the system from the mainland can be traced in the surface layer, with two possible sources: one from surface rivers located along the southern portion of the MBRS, and the other originating from an underground river system located along the northern portion of the MBRS. The thermohaline structure in the MBRS reflects the dynamics of the observed circulation. Uplifted isopycnals along most of the central and northern coastline of the MBRS reflect the effects of the strong geostrophic circulation flowing northward, i.e. the Yucatan Current. To the south along the MBRS, much weaker velocities are observed, with the Honduras Gyre dominating the flow in this region as presented during January/February 2007. These two regions are separated by onshore and divergent alongshore flow associated with the impingement of the Cayman Current on the shore and the MBRS.

  10. Regulation of the protein glycosylation pathway in yeast: structural control of N-linked oligosaccharide elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, P K; Ballou, C E

    1987-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180 strain with the mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 mutations, all of which affect mannoprotein glycosylation, synthesizes N-linked oligosaccharides having the following structure: (Formula: see text) whereas the mnn1 mnn2 mutant extends the alpha 1----6-linked backbone of some of the core oligosaccharides by adding 20-30 mannose units. Membrane fractions from the mnn1 mnn2 and mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 mutants are equally effective in catalyzing transfer from GDP-[3H]mannose to add mannose in both alpha 1----2 and alpha 1----6 linkages to an oligosaccharide having the following structure: (Formula: see text) but neither membrane preparation can utilize the homologous mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 oligosaccharide as an acceptor. Thus, addition of the alpha 1----2-linked mannose side chain to the terminal alpha 1----6-linked mannose in oligosaccharides of the mnn9 mutant inhibits the elongation reaction and may serve as an important structural control of mannoprotein glycosylation. The mnn9 mutation also increases the transit time for invertase secretion, meaning that this mutation could affect the processing machinery in the Golgi apparatus. PMID:3321055

  11. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  13. Human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene: Complete genomic structure and localization on the genetic map of chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Enjyoji, Kei-ichi; Emi, Mitsuru; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Imada, Motohiro; Kato, Hisao ); Leppert, M.L.; Lalouel, J.M. Univ. of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, UT )

    1993-08-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a protease inhibitor that circulates in association with plasma lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL), helps to regulate the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade. The authors have cloned a 125-kb genomic region containing the entire human TFPI gene on six overlapping cosmids and prepared a restriction map of this contig to clarify gene structure. More than half (45 kb) of the 85-kb gene is occupied with 5[prime] noncoding elements: coding begins at exon 3. A HindIII RFLP identified with one cosmid was genotyped in the CEPH panel of 559 reference families. Linkage analysis using markers on human chromosome 2 located the TFPI gene on 2q, 36 cM proximal to D2S43(pYNZ15) and 13 cM distal to the crystalline [gamma]-polypeptide locus CRYGP1(p5G1). 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Structural Mechanisms of the Agrin-LRP4-MuSK Signaling Pathway in Neuromuscular Junction Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yinong; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the most extensively studied model of neuronal synaptogenesis. Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering on the postsynaptic membrane is a cardinal event in the differentiation of NMJs. AChR clustering and postsynaptic differentiation is orchestrated by sophisticated interactions among three proteins: the neuron-secreted proteoglycan agrin, the co-receptor LRP4, and the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK. LRP4 and MuSK act as scaffolds for multiple binding partners, resulting in a complex and dynamic network of interacting proteins that is required for AChR clustering. In this review, we discuss the structural basis for NMJ postsynaptic differentiation mediated by the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling pathway. PMID:23178848

  15. Structural mechanisms of the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling pathway in neuromuscular junction differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yinong; Jin, Rongsheng

    2013-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the most extensively studied model of neuronal synaptogenesis. Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering on the postsynaptic membrane is a cardinal event in the differentiation of NMJs. AChR clustering and postsynaptic differentiation is orchestrated by sophisticated interactions among three proteins: the neuron-secreted proteoglycan agrin, the co-receptor LRP4, and the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK. LRP4 and MuSK act as scaffolds for multiple binding partners, resulting in a complex and dynamic network of interacting proteins that is required for AChR clustering. In this review, we discuss the structural basis for NMJ postsynaptic differentiation mediated by the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling pathway. PMID:23178848

  16. Structure and Function of the RedJ Protein, a Thioesterase from the Prodiginine Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Whicher, Jonathan R.; Florova, Galina; Sydor, Paulina K.; Singh, Renu; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun; Challis, Gregory L.; Reynolds, Kevin A.; Smith, Janet L.

    2011-08-17

    Prodiginines are a class of red-pigmented natural products with immunosuppressant, anticancer, and antimalarial activities. Recent studies on prodiginine biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor have elucidated the function of many enzymes within the pathway. However, the function of RedJ, which was predicted to be an editing thioesterase based on sequence similarity, is unknown. We report here the genetic, biochemical, and structural characterization of the redJ gene product. Deletion of redJ in S. coelicolor leads to a 75% decrease in prodiginine production, demonstrating its importance for prodiginine biosynthesis. RedJ exhibits thioesterase activity with selectivity for substrates having long acyl chains and lacking a {beta}-carboxyl substituent. The thioesterase has 1000-fold greater catalytic efficiency with substrates linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) than with the corresponding CoA thioester substrates. Also, RedJ strongly discriminates against the streptomycete ACP of fatty acid biosynthesis in preference to RedQ, an ACP of the prodiginine pathway. The 2.12 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of RedJ provides insights into the molecular basis for the observed substrate selectivity. A hydrophobic pocket in the active site chamber is positioned to bind long acyl chains, as suggested by a long-chain ligand from the crystallization solution bound in this pocket. The accessibility of the active site is controlled by the position of a highly flexible entrance flap. These data combined with previous studies of prodiginine biosynthesis in S. coelicolor support a novel role for RedJ in facilitating transfer of a dodecanoyl chain from one acyl carrier protein to another en route to the key biosynthetic intermediate 2-undecylpyrrole.

  17. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis).

  18. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, W. T.; Kerr, P. J.; Jermiin, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  19. Structure and function of the RedJ protein, a thioesterase from the prodiginine biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Jonathan R; Florova, Galina; Sydor, Paulina K; Singh, Renu; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun; Challis, Gregory L; Reynolds, Kevin A; Smith, Janet L

    2011-06-24

    Prodiginines are a class of red-pigmented natural products with immunosuppressant, anticancer, and antimalarial activities. Recent studies on prodiginine biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor have elucidated the function of many enzymes within the pathway. However, the function of RedJ, which was predicted to be an editing thioesterase based on sequence similarity, is unknown. We report here the genetic, biochemical, and structural characterization of the redJ gene product. Deletion of redJ in S. coelicolor leads to a 75% decrease in prodiginine production, demonstrating its importance for prodiginine biosynthesis. RedJ exhibits thioesterase activity with selectivity for substrates having long acyl chains and lacking a β-carboxyl substituent. The thioesterase has 1000-fold greater catalytic efficiency with substrates linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) than with the corresponding CoA thioester substrates. Also, RedJ strongly discriminates against the streptomycete ACP of fatty acid biosynthesis in preference to RedQ, an ACP of the prodiginine pathway. The 2.12 Å resolution crystal structure of RedJ provides insights into the molecular basis for the observed substrate selectivity. A hydrophobic pocket in the active site chamber is positioned to bind long acyl chains, as suggested by a long-chain ligand from the crystallization solution bound in this pocket. The accessibility of the active site is controlled by the position of a highly flexible entrance flap. These data combined with previous studies of prodiginine biosynthesis in S. coelicolor support a novel role for RedJ in facilitating transfer of a dodecanoyl chain from one acyl carrier protein to another en route to the key biosynthetic intermediate 2-undecylpyrrole.

  20. Structure and Function of the RedJ Protein, a Thioesterase from the Prodiginine Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor*

    PubMed Central

    Whicher, Jonathan R.; Florova, Galina; Sydor, Paulina K.; Singh, Renu; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun; Challis, Gregory L.; Reynolds, Kevin A.; Smith, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Prodiginines are a class of red-pigmented natural products with immunosuppressant, anticancer, and antimalarial activities. Recent studies on prodiginine biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor have elucidated the function of many enzymes within the pathway. However, the function of RedJ, which was predicted to be an editing thioesterase based on sequence similarity, is unknown. We report here the genetic, biochemical, and structural characterization of the redJ gene product. Deletion of redJ in S. coelicolor leads to a 75% decrease in prodiginine production, demonstrating its importance for prodiginine biosynthesis. RedJ exhibits thioesterase activity with selectivity for substrates having long acyl chains and lacking a β-carboxyl substituent. The thioesterase has 1000-fold greater catalytic efficiency with substrates linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) than with the corresponding CoA thioester substrates. Also, RedJ strongly discriminates against the streptomycete ACP of fatty acid biosynthesis in preference to RedQ, an ACP of the prodiginine pathway. The 2.12 Å resolution crystal structure of RedJ provides insights into the molecular basis for the observed substrate selectivity. A hydrophobic pocket in the active site chamber is positioned to bind long acyl chains, as suggested by a long-chain ligand from the crystallization solution bound in this pocket. The accessibility of the active site is controlled by the position of a highly flexible entrance flap. These data combined with previous studies of prodiginine biosynthesis in S. coelicolor support a novel role for RedJ in facilitating transfer of a dodecanoyl chain from one acyl carrier protein to another en route to the key biosynthetic intermediate 2-undecylpyrrole. PMID:21543318