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Sample records for accelerated thermal cycling

  1. Results of accelerated thermal cycle tests of solar cells modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P.; Mueller, R.; Salama, M.; Yasui, R.

    1976-01-01

    Various candidate solar panel designs were evaluated, both theoretically and experimentally, with respect to their thermal cycling survival capability, and in particular with respect to an accelerated simulation of thermal cycles representative of Viking '75 mission requirements. The experimental results were obtained on 'mini-panels' thermally cycled in a newly installed automated test facility herein described. The resulting damage was analyzed physically and theoretically, and on the basis of these analyses the panel design was suitably modified to significantly improve its ability to withstand the thermal environment. These successful modifications demonstrate the value of the complementary theoretical-experimental approach adopted, and discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  3. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  4. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the damage evolution of SnAgCu solder joints in accelerated thermal cycling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahin Shirazi, Sam

    Accelerated thermal cycling (ATC) tests are the most commonly used tests for the thermo-mechanical performance assessment of microelectronics assemblies. Currently used reliability models have failed to incorporate the microstructural dependency of lead free solder joint behavior and its microstructure evolution during cycling. Thus, it is essential to have a mechanistic understanding of the effect of cycling parameters on damage evolution and failure of lead free solder joints in ATC. Recrystallization has been identified as the damage rate controlling mechanism in ATC. Usually it takes 1/3 of life for completion of recrystallization regardless of cycling parameters. Thus, the life of the solder joints can be predicted by estimating global recrystallization. The objective of the first part of the study was to examine whether the damage scenario applies in service is the same as the harsh thermal cycling tests (i.e. 0/100 °C and -40/125 °C) commonly used in industry. Microstructure analysis results on a variety of lead free solder SnAgCu assemblies subjected to the both harsh (0/100 °C) and mild (20/80 °C) ATC confirmed similar failure mechanism under the both testing conditions. Sn grain morphology (interlaced versus beach ball) has a significant effect on the thermo-mechanical performance (and thus the model) of the lead free solder joints. The longer thermal cycling lifetime observed in the interlaced solder joints subjected to the ATC compared to the beach ball structure was correlated to the different initial microstructure and the microstructure evolution during cycling. For the modeling proposes, the present study was focused on Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints with either a single Sn grain or beach ball structure. Microstructural analysis results of the simulated thermal cycling experiment revealed that, the life can be approximated as determined by the accumulation of a certain amount of work during the high temperature dwells. Finally the effect of precipitates

  5. Influence of Accelerated Cooling Condition on Welding Thermal Cycle, Residual Stress, and Deformation in SM490A Steel ESW Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Sun, Jiamin; Dai, Deping; Jiang, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Electro-slag welding (ESW) has been widely used to join the box column because of high productivity. The heat input of ESW is far larger than those of other fusion welding processes, so ESW usually results in a long holding time over certain elevated temperature (∆ t H time), a long cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (∆ t 8/5 time), and a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ). It can be foreseen that the mechanical properties especially fracture toughness of the fusion zone and HAZ will be inferior to those of base metal. As a fundamental research, a computational approach based on MSC.Marc code was developed to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviors in a typical SM490A steel ESW joint under different cooling conditions. Meanwhile, the thermal cycles computed by numerical model were compared with the experimental measurements. Moreover, the influence of accelerated cooling methods on welding residual stress and deformation was examined numerically. Simulation results show that accelerated cooling methods not only can largely shorten ∆ t H time as well as ∆ t 8/5 time and reduce the size of HAZ, but also can affect the residual stress distribution and deformation. It is believed that the accelerated cooling methods proposed by this study potentially improve the mechanical properties of ESW joint.

  6. Microstructural Evolution of SAC305 Solder Joints in Wafer Level Chip-Scale Packaging (WLCSP) with Continuous and Interrupted Accelerated Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Bite; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Four high-strain design wafer level chip scale packages were given accelerated thermal cycling with a 10°C/min ramp rate and 10 min hold times between 0°C and 100°C to examine the effects of continuous and interrupted thermal cycling on the number of cycles to failure. The interruptions given two of the samples were the result of periodic examinations using electron backscattered pattern mapping, leading to room temperature aging of 30 days-2.5 years after increments of about 100 cycles at several stages of the cycling history. The continuous thermal cycling resulted in solder joints with a much larger degree of recrystallization, whereas the interrupted thermal cycling tests led to much less recrystallization, which was more localized near the package side, and the crack was more localized near the interface and had less branching. The failure mode for both conditions was still the same, with cracks nucleating along the high angle grain boundaries formed during recrystallization. In conditions where there were few recrystallized grains, recovery led to formation of subgrains that strengthened the solder, and the higher strength led to a larger driving force for crack growth through the solder, leading to failure after less than half of the cycles in the continuous accelerated thermal cycling condition. This work shows that there is a critical point where sufficient strain energy accumulation will trigger recrystallization, but this point depends on the rate of strain accumulation in each cycle and various recovery processes, which further depends on local crystal orientations, stress state evolution, and specific activated slip and twinning systems.

  7. Microstructural Evolution of SAC305 Solder Joints in Wafer Level Chip-Scale Packaging (WLCSP) with Continuous and Interrupted Accelerated Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Bite; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Four high-strain design wafer level chip scale packages were given accelerated thermal cycling with a 10°C/min ramp rate and 10 min hold times between 0°C and 100°C to examine the effects of continuous and interrupted thermal cycling on the number of cycles to failure. The interruptions given two of the samples were the result of periodic examinations using electron backscattered pattern mapping, leading to room temperature aging of 30 days-2.5 years after increments of about 100 cycles at several stages of the cycling history. The continuous thermal cycling resulted in solder joints with a much larger degree of recrystallization, whereas the interrupted thermal cycling tests led to much less recrystallization, which was more localized near the package side, and the crack was more localized near the interface and had less branching. The failure mode for both conditions was still the same, with cracks nucleating along the high angle grain boundaries formed during recrystallization. In conditions where there were few recrystallized grains, recovery led to formation of subgrains that strengthened the solder, and the higher strength led to a larger driving force for crack growth through the solder, leading to failure after less than half of the cycles in the continuous accelerated thermal cycling condition. This work shows that there is a critical point where sufficient strain energy accumulation will trigger recrystallization, but this point depends on the rate of strain accumulation in each cycle and various recovery processes, which further depends on local crystal orientations, stress state evolution, and specific activated slip and twinning systems.

  8. Reusable thermal cycling clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A reusable metal clamp for retaining a fused quartz ampoule during temperature cycling in the range of 20 deg C to 1000 deg C is described. A compressible graphite foil having a high radial coefficient of thermal expansion is interposed between the fused quartz ampoule and metal clamp to maintain a snug fit between these components at all temperature levels in the cycle.

  9. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  10. Thermal cycling graphite-polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Hagaman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of repetitive thermal cycling on the temperature-thermal deformation relation of graphite-polyimide were determined. The bending and axial strains, measured with strain gages, of unsymmetric 0 deg sub 2/90 deg sub 2 and 0 deg sub 4/90 deg sub 4 laminates were used as an indication of thermal deformation. The strains were measured as a function of temperature and two temperature ranges were used, room temperature to 180 C and room temperature to 315 C. Five cycles were run in each temperature range and the cycling was done in quasistatic fashion. The response of a flat 0 deg sub 8 laminate was measured as were the effects of repetitive cycling on the strain gages themselves. A piece-wise linear theory, based on classical lamination theory and using the variation of mechanical and thermal expansion properties with temperature, was compared with the experimental results. The correlation between theoretical predictions and experimental results for the thinner laminate was poor.

  11. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF-HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damage at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, was observed especially for the combined LCF-HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  12. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damages at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, were observed especially for the combined LCF/HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  13. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the {open_quotes}Hydride Vessels{close_quotes} Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer`s 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  14. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the [open quotes]Hydride Vessels[close quotes] Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer's 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  15. Influence of High Cycle Thermal Loads on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, as well as of coating failure, under thermal loads which simulate engine conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. In general, surface vertical cracks initiate early and grow continuously under LCF and HCF cyclic stresses. It is found that in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. Experiments show that the HCF cycles are very damaging to the coating systems. The combined LCF and HCF tests produced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. It is suggested that the HCF component cannot only accelerate the surface crack initiation, but also interact with the LCF by contributing to the crack growth at high temperatures. The increased LCF stress intensity at the crack tip due to the HCF component enhances the subsequent LCF crack growth. Conversely, since a faster HCF crack growth rate will be expected with lower effective compressive stresses in the coating, the LCF cycles also facilitate the HCF crack growth at high temperatures by stress relaxation process. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating system. This mechanism predicts that HCF damage effect increases with increasing temperature swing, the thermal expansion coefficient and the elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as the HCF interacting depth. A good agreement has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence.

  16. Thermal effects in plasma-based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2007-05-15

    Finite plasma temperature can modify the structure of the wake field, reduce the wave-breaking field, and lead to self-trapped electrons, which can degrade the electron bunch quality in a plasma-based accelerator. A relativistic warm fluid theory is used to describe the plasma temperature evolution and alterations to the structure of a nonlinear periodic wave exited in a warm plasma. The trapping threshold for a plasma electron and the fraction of electrons trapped from a thermal distribution are examined using a single-particle model. Numerical artifacts in particle-in-cell models that can mimic the physics associated with finite momentum spread are discussed.

  17. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  18. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  19. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2015-10-27

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  20. Prediction of thermal cycling induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fatigue has been observed to cause matrix cracking in laminated composite materials. A method is presented to predict transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates subjected to cyclic thermal load. Shear lag stress approximations and a simple energy-based fracture criteria are used to predict crack densities as a function of temperature. Prediction of crack densities as a function of thermal cycling is accomplished by assuming that fatigue degrades the material's inherent resistance to cracking. The method is implemented as a computer program. A simple experiment provides data on progressive cracking of a laminate with decreasing temperature. Existing data on thermal fatigue is also used. Correlations of the analytical predictions to the data are very good. A parametric study using the analytical method is presented which provides insight into material behavior under cyclical thermal loads.

  1. Convectively driven PCR thermal-cycling

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    2003-07-01

    A polymerase chain reaction system provides an upper temperature zone and a lower temperature zone in a fluid sample. Channels set up convection cells in the fluid sample and move the fluid sample repeatedly through the upper and lower temperature zone creating thermal cycling.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  3. idaho Accelerator Center Advanced Fuel Cycle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Douglas; Dale, Dan

    2011-10-20

    The technical effort has been in two parts called; Materials Science and Instrumentation Development. The Materials Science technical program has been based on a series of research and development achievements in Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for defect detection in structural materials. This work is of particular importance in nuclear power and its supporting systems as the work included detection of defects introduced by mechanical and thermal phenomena as well as those caused by irradiation damage. The second part of the program has focused on instrumentation development using active interrogation techniques supporting proliferation resistant recycling methodologies and nuclear material safeguards. This effort has also lead to basic physics studies of various phenomena relating to photo-fission. Highlights of accomplishments and facility improvement legacies in these areas over the program period include

  4. Wet granular materials submitted to thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumay, Geoffroy; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge; Pakpour, Maryam; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2015-03-01

    Many phenomenons observed in nature are related to the particular behavior of wet granular materials submitted to temperature cycling: ice-lens formation in soil leading to frost heaving, landslides, structures formation in permafrost, stone heave and possibly some geological formations observed on Mars. We present experimental results concerning the effect of thermal cycling on the packing fraction of equal spheres with the presence of water. First, the case corresponding to completely immersed granular piles is considered. Afterward, the effect of thermal cycling on unsaturated granular piles is discussed. The pile is submitted to temperature cycling ranging from T1 to T2. If the temperature is always higher than 4°C, the temperature increase (or decrease) induces a dilatation (or contraction) of the grains and of the water. We show that the packing fraction variation is mainly related to water dilatation and contraction. If the temperature decreases under 0°C during a cycle, the water situated between the grains experiences a strong dilatation during the freezing step and a contraction during the ice melting step. In this case, we show how the freeze-thaw transition affects the packing fraction of the pile.

  5. Thermal High- and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Thick Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have received increasing attention for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications because of their ability to provide thermal insulation to engine components. However, the durability of these coatings under the severe thermal cycling conditions encountered in a diesel engine (ref. 1) still remains a major issue. In this research at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a high-power laser was used to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of a yttria-stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated diesel engine conditions. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure under complex thermal low-cycle fatigue (LCF, representing stop/start cycles) and thermal high-cycle fatigue (HCF, representing operation at 1300 rpm) are described. Continuous wave and pulse laser modes were used to simulate pure LCF and combined LCF/HCF, respectively (ref. 2). The LCF mechanism was found to be closely related to the coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. These creep strains in the ceramic coating led to a tensile stress state during cooling, thus providing the major driving force for crack growth under LCF conditions. The combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation, and accelerated crack growth than did the pure LCF test. HCF thermal loads also facilitated lateral crack branching and ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations. HCF is associated with the cyclic stresses originating from the high-frequency temperature fluctuation at the ceramic coating surface. The HCF thermal loads act on the crack by a wedging mechanism (ref. 1), resulting in continuous crack growth at temperature. The HCF stress intensity factor amplitude increases with the interaction depth and temperature swing, and decreases with the crack depth. HCF damage also increases with the thermal expansion coefficient and the Young's modulus of the ceramic coating (refs. 1 and 3).

  6. Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications

    DOEpatents

    Scharman, Alan J.; Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

  7. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  8. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  9. Cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. II - Accelerated cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A cycle life test of nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered-type nickel electrode were carried out at 23 C using a 45-min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Ten cells containing 21 to 36 percent KOH were tested. Since this accelerated test regime accelerated the cycle life roughly twice as fast as a typical LEO regime, the present results indicate that the cells with 26 percent KOH may last over 5 years in an 80 percent depth-of-discharge cycling in an LEO regime. Cells with lower KOH concentrations (21 to 23.5 percent) also showed longer cycle life than those with KOH concentrations of 31 percent or higher, although the life was shorter than those with 26 percent KOH.

  10. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    , affordability is defined as lifecycle cost, which includes design, development, test, and engineering (DDT&E), production and operational costs (P&O). For this study, the system objectives include reducing DDT&E schedule by a factor of three, showing 99.9% reliability, flying up to four times per year, serving both crew and cargo missions, and evolving to a lift capability of 130 metric tons.3 After identifying gaps in the current system s capabilities, this study seeks to identify non-traditional and innovative technologies and processes that may improve performance in these areas and assess their impacts on booster system development. The DDT&E phase may be improved by incorporating incremental development testing and integrated demonstrations to mitigate risk. To further reduce DDT&E, this study will also consider how aspects of the booster system may have commonality with other users, such as the Department of Defense, commercial applications, or international partners; by sharing some of the risk and investment, the overall development cost may be reduced. Consideration is not limited to solid and liquid rocket boosters. A set of functional performance characteristics, such as engine thrust, specific impulse (Isp), mixture ratio, and throttle range are identified and their impacts on the system are evaluated. This study also identifies how such characteristics affect overall life cycle cost, including DDT&E and fixed and variable P&O.

  11. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have attracted increased attention for diesel engine applications. The advantages of using the ceramic coatings include a potential increase in efficiency and power density and a decrease in maintenance cost. Zirconia-based ceramics are the most important coating materials for such applications because of their low thermal conductivity, relatively high thermal expansivity and excellent mechanical properties. However, durability of thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) under severe temperature cycling encountered in engine conditions, remains a major question. The thermal transients associated with the start/stop and no-load/full-load engine cycle, and with the in-cylinder combustion process, generate thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermal high cycle fatigue (HCF) in the coating system. Therefore, the failure mechanisms of thick TBCs are expected to be quite different from those of thin TBCs under these temperature transients. The coating failure is related not only to thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation of the bond coats and substrates, but also to the steep thermal stress gradients induced in the coating systems. Although it has been reported that stresses generated by thermal transients can initiate surface and interface cracks in a coating system, the mechanisms of the crack propagation and of coating failure under the complex LCF and HCF conditions are still not understood. In this paper, the thermal fatigue behavior of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated LCF and HCF engine conditions is investigated. The effects of LCF and HCF on surface crack initiation and propagation are also discussed.

  12. Prolonging thermal barrier coated specimen life by thermal cycle management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Poolos, N. P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings applied to the heated side of engine components such as seals, combustor, and blades of a gas turbine offer a potential increase in efficiency through the use of higher gas temperatures or less cooling air or benefits arising from extended component life by reducing component metal temperatures. The considered investigation has the objective to show that while a thermal barrier coated (TBC) specimen can be brought to a fixed temperature using various fuel-air ratio (F/A) values, lower calculated stresses are associated with lower (F/A) values. This implies that control of (F/A) values (i.e., rates of heat input) during the starting transient and to a lesser extent during shutdown and operation, offers a potential method of improving TBC lifetime through thermal cycle management.

  13. Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brophy, J.R.; Aston, G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems are performed using commercially available finite element software executed on a desktop computer. Finite element models of a 30-cm-diameter accelerator system formulated using plate/shell elements give calculated results which agree well with similar published obtained on a mainframe computer. Analyses of a 50-cm-diameter, three-grid accelerator system using measured grid temperatures (corresponding to discharge powers of 653 and 886 watts) indicate that thermally induced grid movements need not be the performance limiting phenomena for accelerator systems of this size. 8 refs.

  14. Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems are performed using commercially available finite element software executed on a desktop computer. Finite element models of a 30-cm-diameter accelerator system formulated using plate/shell elements give calculated results which agree well with similar published obtained on a mainframe computer. Analyses of a 50-cm-diameter, three-grid accelerator system using measured grid temperatures (corresponding to discharge powers of 653 and 886 watts) indicate that thermally induced grid movements need not be the performance limiting phenomena for accelerator systems of this size.

  15. Induced natural convection thermal cycling device

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung Kit

    2002-08-13

    A device for separating gases, especially isotopes, by thermal cycling of a separation column using a pressure vessel mounted vertically and having baffled sources for cold and heat. Coils at the top are cooled with a fluid such as liquid nitrogen. Coils at the bottom are either electrical resistance coils or a tubular heat exchange. The sources are shrouded with an insulated "top hat" and simultaneously opened and closed at the outlets to cool or heat the separation column. Alternatively, the sources for cold and heat are mounted separately outside the vessel and an external loop is provided for each circuit.

  16. MHD Simulations of Thermal Plasma Jets in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    The development of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high energy density thermal plasma in coaxial plasma accelerators is presented. The coaxial plasma accelerator is a device used simulate the conditions created at the confining wall of a thermonuclear fusion reactor during an edge localized mode (ELM) disruption event. This is achieved by creating magnetized thermal plasma in a coaxial volume which is then accelerated by the Lorentz force to form a high velocity plasma jet. The simulation tool developed solves the resistive MHD equation using a finite volume method (FVM) framework. The acceleration and subsequent demagnetization of the plasma as it travels down the length of the accelerator is simulated and shows good agreement with experiments. Additionally, a model to study the thermalization of the plasma at the inlet is being developed in order to give self-consistent initial conditions to the MHD solver.

  17. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-05-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.

  18. High Cycle Thermal Fatigue in French PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Blondet, Eric; Faidy, Claude

    2002-07-01

    Different fatigue-related incidents which occurred in the world on the auxiliary lines of the reactor coolant system (SIS, RHR, CVC) have led EDF to search solutions in order to avoid or to limit consequences of thermodynamic phenomenal (Farley-Tihange, free convection loop and stratification, independent thermal cycling). Studies are performed on mock-up and compared with instrumentation on nuclear power stations. At the present time, studies allow EDF to carry out pipe modifications and to prepare specifications and recommendations for next generation of nuclear power plants. In 1998, a new phenomenal appeared on RHR system in Civaux. A crack was discovered in an area where hot and cold fluids (temperature difference of 140 deg. C) were mixed. Metallurgic studies concluded that this crack was caused by high cycle thermal fatigue. Since 1998, EDF is making an inventory of all mixing areas in French PWR on basis of criteria. For all identified areas, a method was developed to improve the first classifying and to keep back only potential damage pipes. Presently, studies are performing on the charging line nozzle connected to the reactor pressure vessel. In order to evaluate the load history, a mock-up has been developed and mechanical calculations are realised on this nozzle. The paper will make an overview of EDF conclusions on these different points: - dead legs and vortex in a no flow connected line; - stratification; - mixing tees with high {delta}T. (authors)

  19. The role of accelerators in the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    The use of neutrons produced by the medium energy proton accelerator (1 GeV--3 GeV) has considerable potential in reconstructing the nuclear fuel cycle. About 1.5 {approximately} 2.5 ton of fissile material can be produced annually by injecting a 450 MW proton beam directly into fertile materials. A source of neutrons, produced by a proton beam, to supply subcritical reactors could alleviate many of the safety problems associated with critical assemblies, such as positive reactivity coefficients due to coolant voiding. The transient power of the target can be swiftly controlled by controlling the power of the proton beam. Also, the use of a proton beam would allow more flexibility in the choice of fuel and structural materials which otherwise might reduce the reactivity of reactors. This paper discusses the rate of accelerators in the transmutation of radioactive wastes of the nuclear fuel cycles. 34 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Accelerator Generation and Thermal Separation (AGATS) of Technetium-99m

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Accelerator Generation and Thermal Separation (AGATS) of Technetium-99m is a linear electron accelerator-based technology for producing medical imaging radioisotopes from a separation process that heats, vaporizes and condenses the desired radioisotope. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Accelerator Generation and Thermal Separation (AGATS) of Technetium-99m

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator Generation and Thermal Separation (AGATS) of Technetium-99m is a linear electron accelerator-based technology for producing medical imaging radioisotopes from a separation process that heats, vaporizes and condenses the desired radioisotope. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Initiation of combustion in the thermally choked ram accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Burnham, E. A.; Knowlen, C.; Hertzberg, A.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    The methodology for initiating stable combustion in a ram accelerator operating in the thermally choked mode is presented in this paper. The ram accelerator is a high velocity ramjet-in-tube projectile launcher whose principle of operation is similar to that of an airbreathing ramjet. The subcaliber projectile travels supersonically through a stationary tube filled with a premixed combustible gas mixture. In the thermally choked propulsion mode subsonic combustion takes place behind the base of the projectile and leads to thermal choking, which stabilizes a normal shock system on the projectile, thus producing forward thrust. Projectiles with masses in the 45-90 g range have been accelerated to velocities up to 2650 m/sec in a 38 mm bore, 16 m long accelerator tube. Operation of the ram accelerator is started by injecting the projectile into the accelerator tube at velocities in the 700 - 1300 m/sec range by means of a conventional gas gun. A specially designed obturator, which seals the bore of the gun during this initial acceleration, enters the ram accelerator together with the projectile. The interaction of the obturator with the propellant gas ignites the gas mixture and establishes stable combustion behind the projectile.

  3. Initiation of combustion in the thermally choked ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Burnham, E. A.; Knowlen, C.; Hertzberg, A.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The methodology for initiating stable combustion in a ram accelerator operating in the thermally choked mode is presented in this paper. The ram accelerator is a high velocity ramjet-in-tube projectile launcher whose principle of operation is similar to that of an airbreathing ramjet. The subcaliber projectile travels supersonically through a stationary tube filled with a premixed combustible gas mixture. In the thermally choked propulsion mode subsonic combustion takes place behind the base of the projectile and leads to thermal choking, which stabilizes a normal shock system on the projectile, thus producing forward thrust. Projectiles with masses in the 45-90 g range have been accelerated to velocities up to 2650 m/sec in a 38 mm bore, 16 m long accelerator tube. Operation of the ram accelerator is started by injecting the projectile into the accelerator tube at velocities in the 700 - 1300 m/sec range by means of a conventional gas gun. A specially designed obturator, which seals the bore of the gun during this initial acceleration, enters the ram accelerator together with the projectile. The interaction of the obturator with the propellant gas ignites the gas mixture and establishes stable combustion behind the projectile.

  4. Thermal Cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) Test Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994 - March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles (+80 C to -100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  5. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  6. Accelerated thermal and radiative ageing of hydrogenated NBR for DRC

    SciTech Connect

    Mares, G.; Notingher, P.

    1996-12-31

    The accelerated thermal and gamma radiation ageing of HNBR carbon black-T80 has been studied by measuring the residual deformation under constant deflection -- DRC, in air, using a relevant equation for the relaxation phenomena. The residual deformation under constant deflection during the process of accelerated ageing is increasing but the structure of polymer answers in the proper manner to the mechanical stress. The degradation equations were obtained, using Alfrey model for the relaxation polymer subject to compression and an Arrhenius dependence for the chemical reaction rate. The inverted relaxation time for the thermal degradation is depending on the chemical reaction rate and the dose rate of gamma radiation.

  7. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, J.M.

    1980-02-19

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system is described including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirtconduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a tranversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure.

  8. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  9. Thermal Cycling of Thin and Thick Ply Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, S.S.; Shen, J.Y.; Lavoie, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of ply thickness in composite laminates on thermally induced cracking and changes in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). After a few thermal cycles, laminates with thick-plies cracked, resulting in large changes in CTE. CTE`s of the thin-ply laminates were unaffected by microcracking during the first 500 thermal cycles, whereas, the CTE`s of the thick-ply laminates changed significantly. After about 1500 cycles, microdamage had also reduced the CTE of the thin-ply laminates to a value of about half of their initial value.

  10. Parallel Computation of Integrated Electromagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  11. Parallel Computation of Intergrated Electronmagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L-Q.; Li, Z.; Ng, C-K.; Xiao, L.; Ko, K.

    2008-07-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  12. Capacitor bonding techniques and reliability. [thermal cycling tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, D. L.; Graff, S. M.; Allen, R. V.; Caruso, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical failure of bonded ceramic chip capacitors mounted on alumina substrates is studied. It is shown that differential thermal expansion is responsible for the cumulative effects which lead to delayed failure of the capacitors. Harder or higher melting solders are found to be less susceptible to thermal cycling effects, although they are more likely to fail during initial processing operations.

  13. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  14. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, J.M.

    1980-02-19

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system includes a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flow path of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flow path and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support there for and impart a desired flow direction to the steam. 10 figs.

  15. Thermal cycling reliability of RF-MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulloni, V.; Sordo, G.; Margesin, B.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal cycling test are part of the standard space qualification procedure for RF-MEMS devices. Standardized tests are rather demanding in terms of equipment and experimental time. In this paper we present a fast thermal cycling test aimed at obtaining a rapid selection among different switch geometries in terms of thermal cycling resistance. Seven different switch typologies are examined and tested, evidencing that the most important source of deterioration is the mechanical deformation of the movable membrane. The principal characteristic found in the most resistant typologies is a more uniform distribution of the thermal strain over the whole membrane. To this respect, a careful design of the membrane anchors is extremely important for achieving a good thermal cycling resistance.

  16. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  17. Thermal emittance from ionization-induced trapping in plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J.-L.; Esarey, E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Benedetti, C.; Yu, L.-L.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-10-01

    The minimum obtainable transverse emittance (thermal emittance) of electron beams generated and trapped in plasma-based accelerators using laser ionization injection is examined. The initial transverse phase space distribution following ionization and passage through the laser is derived, and expressions for the normalized transverse beam emittance, both along and orthogonal to the laser polarization, are presented. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations. Ultralow emittance beams can be generated using laser ionization injection into plasma accelerators, and examples are presented showing normalized emittances on the order of tens of nm.

  18. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  19. Thermal cycling can extend tool life in orthopaedic operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Katchky, Ryan N; McLachlin, Stewart D; Wong, Edwin K Y; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-03-01

    Thermal cycling is a temperature modulation process developed to improve the performance, durability and longevity of materials. This process has been successfully utilized in the automotive, aeronautic and manufacturing industries. Surgical cutting tools undergo cyclical loading and generally fail by dulling, suggesting that thermal cycling may improve their performance and longevity. Ten 2.5 mm orthopaedic drill bits were randomized, with five undergoing thermal cycling within their sterile packaging and five serving as untreated controls. Using a servohydraulic testing machine, 100 drilling cycles were performed with each drill bit into the diaphyseal region of bovine femurs. After every 25 cycles, data was collected by performing identical drilling cycles into simulated human cortical bone material. Maximum force, maximum normalized torque and drilling work were measured, and a scanning electron microscope was used to measure outer corner wear. After 100 drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, maximum normalized torque, drilling work and microscopic outer corner wear were all significantly lower for the treated drill bits (p < 0.05). Thermal cycling has the potential to decrease operating room costs and thermal necrosis associated with dull cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw blades, burrs and reamers. PMID:26296244

  20. Modeling of thermal effects in dielectric wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Piot, Philippe; Mihalcea, Daniel; Lemery, Francois

    2013-04-01

    An electron bunch passing through a dielectric-lined waveguide generates Cerenkov radiation that can result in a high-peak axial electric field suitable for acceleration of a subsequent bunch. Axial fields beyond gigavolt-per-meter are attainable in structures with sub-mm sizes depending on the achievement of suitable electron bunch parameters. A promising configuration consists of using a planar dielectric structure driven by flat electron bunches. However, a main concern is the thermal loading in the dielectric that will result from a high repetition rate. We present numerical modeling of the temperature rise due to single and multiple bunch passings and also the thermal conduction and cooling requirements.

  1. Solar thermal organic rankine cycle for micro-generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahli, N. A.; Abdullah, H.; Darus, A. N.; Jalaludin, A. F.

    2012-06-01

    The conceptual design of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) driven by solar thermal energy is developed for the decentralized production of electricity of up to 50 kW. Conventional Rankine Cycle uses water as the working fluid whereas ORC uses organic compound as the working fluid and it is particularly suitable for low temperature applications. The ORC and the solar collector will be sized according to the solar flux distribution in the Republic of Yemen for the required power output of 50 kW. This will be a micro power generation system that consists of two cycles, the solar thermal cycle that harness solar energy and the power cycle, which is the ORC that generates electricity. As for the solar thermal cycle, heat transfer fluid (HTF) circulates the cycle while absorbing thermal energy from the sun through a parabolic trough collector and then storing it in a thermal storage to increase system efficiency and maintains system operation during low radiation. The heat is then transferred to the organic fluid in the ORC via a heat exchanger. The organic fluids to be used and analyzed in the ORC are hydrocarbons R600a and R290.

  2. Thermal cycling of tungsten-fibre-reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherhold, Robert C.; Westfall, Leonard J.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal cycling of a tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite is typical of its application in high-temperature engine environments. The mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between fiber and matrix causes substantial longitudinal (0 deg) stresses in the composite, which can produce inelastic damage-producing matrix strains. The case of thermal fatigue is explored as a "worst case" of the possible matrix damage, in comparison with specimens which are also mechanically loaded in tension. The thermally generated cyclic stresses and the attendant matrix plasticity may be estimated using a nonlinear finite-element program, by proposing a physical analog to the micromechanics equations. A damage metric for the matrix is proposed using the Coffin-Manson criterion, which metric can facilitate comparisons of damage among different candidate materials, and also comparisons for a given material subjected to different temperature cycles. An experimental program was carried out for thermal cycling of a 37 vol pct TFRS composite to different maximum temperatures. The results confirm the prediction that thermal cycling produces matrix degradation and composite strength reduction, which become more pronounced with increasing maximum cyclic temperature. The strength of the fiber is shown to be identical for the as-fabricated and thermally cycled specimens, suggesting that the reduction in composite strength is due to the loss of matrix contribution and also to notching effects of the matrix voids on the fiber.

  3. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stress cycling was performed on gallium arsenide solar cells to investigate their electrical, mechanical, and structural integrity. Cells were cycled under low Earth orbit (LEO) simulated temperature conditions in vacuum. Cell evaluations consisted of power output values, spectral response, optical microscopy and ion microprobe mass analysis, and depth profiles on both front surface inter-grid areas and metallization contact grid lines. Cells were examined for degradation after 500, 5,000, 10,000 and 15,245 thermal cycles. No indication of performance degradation was found for any vendor's cell lot.

  4. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T. )

    1993-01-20

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown.

  5. Thermal Cycling Reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnections. Part 1: Effects of Test Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokka, Jussi; Mattila, Toni. T.; Xu, Hongbo; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2013-06-01

    The work presented in part 1 of this study focuses on identifying the effects of thermal cycling test parameters on the lifetime of ball grid array (BGA) component boards. Detailed understanding about the effects of the thermal cycling parameters is essential because it provides means to develop more efficient and meaningful methods of reliability assessment for electronic products. The study was carried out with a single package type (BGA with 144 solder balls), printed wiring board (eight-layer build-up FR4 structure), and solder interconnection composition (Sn-3.1Ag-0.5Cu) to ensure that individual test results would be comparable with each other. The effects of (i) temperature difference (Δ T), (ii) lower dwell temperature and lower dwell time, (iii) mean temperature, (iv) dwell time, and (v) ramp rate were evaluated. Based on the characteristic lifetimes, the thermal cycling profiles were categorized into three lifetime groups: (i) highly accelerated conditions, (ii) moderately accelerated conditions, and (iii) mildly/nonaccelerated conditions. Thus, one might be tempted to use the highly accelerated conditions to produce lifetime statistics as quickly as possible. However, to do this one needs to know that the failure mechanisms do not change from one lifetime group to another and that the failure mechanisms correlate with real-use failures. Therefore, in part 2 the observed differences in component board lifetimes will be explained by studying the failure mechanisms that take place in the three lifetime groups.

  6. Damage Produced in Solder Alloys during Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. W.; Plumbridge, W. J.

    2007-09-01

    The anisotropy of tin is associated with significant variations in its coefficient of thermal expansion and elastic modulus, with crystallographic direction. Under pure thermal cycling (with no externally applied stress or strain), substantial strains, in excess of 100%, may develop locally, and for very small structures, such as soldered interconnections comprising a few grains, structural integrity may be adversely affected. To examine this possibility, freestanding samples of tin, Sn-3.5wt.%Ag, Sn-0.5wt.%Cu, and Sn-3.8wt.%Ag-0.7wt.%Cu, have been subjected to thermal cycling. Temperature cycles from 30°C to 125°C or from -40°C to 55°C initially caused surface cracking, with openings up to several tens of microns after 3,000 cycles. Subsequently, the surface cracks grew into the interior of the specimens, with the maximum penetration ranging from a few microns after 100 cycles to more than 200 μm after 3,000 cycles. The cracks initiated from damage accumulated along grain boundaries. For the same temperature range, less damage resulted after the lower maximum (or mean) temperature cycle, and there appears to be a thermally activated component of cracking. The microstructure produced by rapid cooling (water quenching) was slightly more resistant than that formed by air, or furnace, cooling. Apart from microstructural coarsening, no damage accrues from isothermal exposure alone.

  7. Research of thermal cycles of long wavelength MCT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-gang; Liu, Da-fu; Zhu, San-gen; Gong, Hai-mei

    2009-07-01

    The conflict of longevity of satellite's service and limited life of Sterling cooler decides that coolers should work on the intermittent mode in space. As a result, The HgCdTe (MCT) infrared (IR) detectors in satellite are commonly subjected to thousands of repeated thermal cycles from below -173°C to room temperature (20°C), which brings some new reliability problems. Especially the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of different materials may lead to some unfamiliar failure modes with such low temperature and nearly 200°C span of thermal cycles. In order to study the characteristics of MCT detectors under the stress of thermal cycles, this paper introduced a special automatic system. The system is mainly composed of a sub-container of liquid nitrogen, a heater controlled by the PID hardware, and an object stage on which the MCT detectors to be tested are mounted. Furthermore, the sub-container, the heater and the stage are positioned in a large vacuum tank. In the course of thermal cycles, the object stage moved up and down with MCT detectors is driven by a step motor. When it rises to the bottom of liquid nitrogen sub-container, the stage is to be cooled with detectors, and when declines to the heater, the stage to be heated with detectors, too. At last, two long wavelength MCT detector samples are tested with this equipment, and the resistance, the signal and the noise are measured. It shows that all the pixels' resistance didn't change beyond 5% after 5000 cycles. However, the tested signal of the last pixel of both detectors increased sharply after 1000 cycles, and fell to normal level after 5000 cycles, with its noise altering a little from beginning to end. A deduction is given in this paper for this phenomenon. In accordance, the thermal cycle equipment and the experimental data, would supply some references to the design and fabrication of MCT IR detectors.

  8. Long-term storage life of light source modules by temperature cycling accelerated life test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningning, Sun; Manqing, Tan; Ping, Li; Jian, Jiao; Xiaofeng, Guo; Wentao, Guo

    2014-05-01

    Light source modules are the most crucial and fragile devices that affect the life and reliability of the interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). While the light emitting chips were stable in most cases, the module packaging proved to be less satisfactory. In long-term storage or the working environment, the ambient temperature changes constantly and thus the packaging and coupling performance of light source modules are more likely to degrade slowly due to different materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion in the bonding interface. A constant temperature accelerated life test cannot evaluate the impact of temperature variation on the performance of a module package, so the temperature cycling accelerated life test was studied. The main failure mechanism affecting light source modules is package failure due to solder fatigue failure including a fiber coupling shift, loss of cooling efficiency and thermal resistor degradation, so the Norris-Landzberg model was used to model solder fatigue life and determine the activation energy related to solder fatigue failure mechanism. By analyzing the test data, activation energy was determined and then the mean life of light source modules in different storage environments with a continuously changing temperature was simulated, which has provided direct reference data for the storage life prediction of IFOG.

  9. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  10. Investigation of starting transients in the thermally choked ram accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, E. A.; Hinkey, J. B.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the starting transients of the thermally choked ram accelerator is presented in this paper. Construction of a highly instrumented tube section and instrumentation inserts provide high resolution experimental pressure, luminosity, and electromagnetic data of the starting transients. Data obtained prior to and following the entrance diaphragm show detailed development of shock systems in both combustible and inert mixtures. With an evacuated launch tube, starting the diffuser is possible at any Mach number above the Kantrowitz Mach number. The detrimental effects and possible solutions of higher launch tube pressures and excessive obturator leakage (blow-by) are discussed. Ignition of a combustible mixture is demonstrated with both perforated and solid obturators. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Data obtained from these starting experiments enhance the understanding of the ram accelerator, as well as assist in the validation of unsteady, chemically reacting CFD codes.

  11. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  12. Electron and Proton Acceleration during the First Ground Level Enhancement Event of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Sun, L. P.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 ± 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  13. Degradation of a two-layer thermal barrier coating under thermal cycling. [for superalloys of aircraft turbine engine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, R. D.; Scheuermann, C. M.; Andrews, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    A two-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating on a directionally solidified nickel-base eutectic alloy substrate was characterized prior to and after thermal cycling to 1095 C in an accelerated furnace test. The coating was comprised of an inner layer of Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y (wt%) bond coat and an outer layer of ZrO2-7.9Y2O3 (wt%) thermal barrier. Characterization of the bond coat revealed that substantial amounts of yttrium and aluminum were oxidized during plasma-spraying in air. The oxidation of these elements reduced the protective capacity of the bond coat so that, on thermal exposure, severe degradation of the bond coat resulted and large amounts of nickel oxide formed. This nickel oxide was demonstrated to grow outward into the thermal barrier, which appears to have increased the stresses in the thermal barrier and contributed to its failure near the thermal barrier-bond coat interface.

  14. A cycle life tester for the long-term stability of phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandbois, A.; Sangster, J.; Paris, J. R.

    Testing of the long-term stability of large quantities of a phase-change material, intended for low potential thermal storage of solar energy, was conducted on an accelerated freeze-thaw cycle apparatus with microcomputer monitoring. Such testing is considered essential for the selection of optimal substances among a wide variety of candidates.

  15. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  16. Failure of PVD/plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeria, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.; Stoever, D.

    1995-12-31

    ZrO{sub 2}7Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} plasma sprayed coatings (PS top coating) were applied on high temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by Physical Vapor Deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS) and Inert gas Plasma Spraying (IPS at 2 bar) for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1,000 C and 1,150 C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables the authors to calculate the transient thermal strains and stresses which contribute to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. They have also studied experimentally the adherence and failure modes of these coating systems during this high temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in the light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  17. Failure of physical vapor deposition/plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Malléner, W.; Buchkremer, H. P.; Stöver, D.

    2000-06-01

    ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 plasma-sprayed (PS) coatings were applied on high-temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by physical vapor deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS) at 2 bar for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1000 and 1150 °C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables calculation of the transient thermal strains and stresses, which contributes to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. The adherence and failure modes of these coating systems were experimentally studied during the high-temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  18. Thermal Cycling on Fatigue Failure of the Plutonium Vitrification Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Jeffrey; Gorczyca, Jennifer

    2009-02-11

    One method for disposition of excess plutonium is vitrification into cylindrical wasteforms. Due to the hazards of working with plutonium, the vitrification process must be carried out remotely in a shielded environment. Thus, the equipment must be easily maintained. With their simple design, induction melters satisfy this criterion, making them ideal candidates for plutonium vitrification. However, due to repeated heating and cooling cycles and differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of contacting materials fatigue failure of the induction melter is of concern. Due to the cost of the melter, the number of cycles to failure is critical. This paper presents a method for determining the cycles to failure for an induction melter by using the results from thermal and structural analyses as input to a fatigue failure model.

  19. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D. A.; Jaklevic, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the-circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate microtiter plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 .mu.l of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded.

  20. Thermal cycling tests on surface-mount assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.W.

    1988-03-01

    The capability of surface-mount (SM) solder joints to withstand various thermal cycle stresses was evaluated through electrical circuit resistance changes of a test pattern and by visual examination for cracks in the solder after exposure to thermal cycling. The joints connected different electrical components, primarily leadless-chip carriers (LCCs), and printed wiring-board (PWB) pads on different laminate substrates. Laminate compositions were epoxy-glass and polyimide-glass with and without copper/Invar/copper (CIC) inner layers, polyimide-quartz, epoxy-Kevlar, and polyimide-Kevlar. The most resistant joints were between small LCCs (24 and 48 pins) and polyimide-glass laminate with CIC inner layers. Processing in joint formation was found to be an important part of joint resistant. Thermal cycling was varied with respect to both time and temperature. A few resistors, capacitors, and inductors showed opens after 500 30-min cycles between -65/degree/C and 125/degree/C. Appreciable moisture contents were measured for laminate materials, especially those of polyimide-Kevlar after equilibration in 100/percent/ relative humidity at room temperature. If not removed or reduced, moisture can cause delamination in vapor-phase soldering. 17 refs, 12 figs.,10 tabs.

  1. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.A.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1996-04-16

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 microliters of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded. 13 figs.

  2. Thermal Cycling Reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnections—Part 2: Failure Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokka, Jussi; Mattila, Toni T.; Xu, Hongbo; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2013-06-01

    Part 1 of this study focused on identifying the effects of (i) temperature difference (Δ T), (ii) lower dwell temperature and shorter dwell time, (iii) mean temperature, (iv) dwell time, and (v) ramp rate on the lifetime of ball grid array (with 144 solder balls) component boards. Based on the characteristic lifetime, the studied thermal cycling profiles were categorized into three groups: (i) highly accelerated conditions, (ii) moderately accelerated conditions, and (iii) mildly/nonaccelerated conditions. In this work, the observed differences in component board lifetime are explained by studying the failure mechanisms and microstructural changes that take place in the three groups of loading conditions. It was observed that, under the standardized thermal cycling conditions (highly accelerated conditions), the networks of grain boundaries formed by recrystallization provided favorable paths for cracks to propagate intergranularly. It is noteworthy that the coarsening of intermetallic particles was strong in the recrystallized regions (the cellular structure had disappeared completely in the crack region). However, under real-use conditions (mildly/nonaccelerated conditions), recrystallization was not observed in the solder interconnections and cracks had propagated transgranularly in the bulk solder or between the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer and the bulk solder. The real-use conditions showed slight coarsening of the microstructure close to the crack region, but the solder bulk still included finer IMC particles and β-Sn cells characteristic of the as-solidified microstructures. These findings suggest that standardized thermal cycling tests used to assess the solder interconnection reliability of BGA144 component boards create failure mechanisms that differ from those seen in conditions representing real-use operation.

  3. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. FTIR characterization of thermally cycled PMR-15 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Chang, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical characterization results are presented for a variety of PMR-15/graphite composites, differentiated according to prepreg types and cure cycles, which were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between 0 and 450 F. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy was used in conjunction with diffuse reflectance sampling to examine whether changes in the matrix resin chemistry due to environmental exposure may have contributed to microcracking. Analysis based on compound spectra revealed behavior associated with the oxidation of methylene groups to carbonyl groups on the composite surface; evidence of crosslinking also emerged, although the two phenomena do not appear to be related.

  5. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, H.J. ); Guenther, P.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Failure of sheathed thermocouples due to thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Ludwig, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    Open circuit failures (up to 100%) in small-diameter thermocouples used in electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulator prototypes during thermal cycling tests were investigated to determine the cause(s) of the failures. The experiments conducted to determine the relative effects of differential thermal expansion, wire size, grain size, and manufacturing technology are described. It was concluded that the large grain size and embrittlement which result from certain common manufacturing annealing and drawing procedures were a major contributing factor in the breakage of the thermocouple wires.

  7. Thermal modelling of Li-ion polymer battery for electric vehicle drive cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Salvio; Chung, Yongmann M.

    2012-09-01

    Time-dependent, thermal behaviour of a lithium-ion (Li-ion) polymer cell has been modelled for electric vehicle (EV) drive cycles with a view to developing an effective battery thermal management system. The fully coupled, three-dimensional transient electro-thermal model has been implemented based on a finite volume method. To support the numerical study, a high energy density Li-ion polymer pouch cell was tested in a climatic chamber for electric load cycles consisting of various charge and discharge rates, and a good agreement was found between the model predictions and the experimental data. The cell-level thermal behaviour under stressful conditions such as high power draw and high ambient temperature was predicted with the model. A significant temperature increase was observed in the stressful condition, corresponding to a repeated acceleration and deceleration, indicating that an effective battery thermal management system would be required to maintain the optimal cell performance and also to achieve a full battery lifesapn.

  8. Effect of thermal cycling on ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper studies the comparative life of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings on NiCrAlY bond coats on Rene 41 in short (4 min) and long (57 min) thermal cycles at 1040 C in a 0.3-Mach flame. Attention is given to determining the effect of short- and long-duration cycles on ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, the cause of any cycle frequency effects, and methods to improve tolerance to thermal stress. Short cycles greatly reduced the life of the ceramic coating in terms of time at temperatures as compared to longer cycles, the failed coating indicating compressive failure. The experiments and stress calculations show that repeatedly subjecting a ceramic coating to high rates of initial heating has a more destructive influence on the coating than sustained operation at temperature. The effect of such thermal compressive stresses might be minimized through coating deposition and thickness control and by turbine cycle measurement to keep starting heating rates below critical values.

  9. Materials constitutive models for nonlinear analysis of thermally cycled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of inelastic materials models on computed stress-strain solutions for thermally loaded structures were studied by performing nonlinear (elastoplastic creep) and elastic structural analyses on a prismatic, double edge wedge specimen of IN 100 alloy that was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic kinematic, and combined plus transient creep) were exercised for the problem by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Maximum total strain ranges computed from the elastic and nonlinear analyses agreed within 5 percent. Mean cyclic stresses, inelastic strain ranges, and inelastic work were significantly affected by the choice of inelastic constitutive model. The computing time per cycle for the nonlinear analyses was more than five times that required for the elastic analysis.

  10. Thermal analysis of wildfires and effects on global ecosystem cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Brass, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Biomass combustion plays an important role in the earth's biogeochemical cycling. The monitoring of wildfires and their associated variables at global scales is feasible and can lead to predictions of the influence of combustion on biogeochemical cycling and tropospheric chemistry. Remote sensing data collected during the 1985 California wildfire season indicate that the information content of key thermal and infrared/thermal wave band channels centered at 11.5 microns, 3.8 microns, and 2.25 microns are invaluable for discriminating and calculating fire related variables. These variables include fire intensity, rate-of-spread, soil cooling recovery behind the fire front, and plume structure. Coinciding Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data provided information regarding temperature estimations and the movement of the smoke plume from one wildfire into the Los Angeles basin.

  11. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    SciTech Connect

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  12. Conversion of ocean thermal energy with the salt cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, S.

    1997-07-01

    A temperature gradient exists between the top and the depths of oceans, the Salt Cycle is targeted at converting this thermal energy. The phases of certain solutions (liquid-liquid or solid-liquid) separate out at lower temperatures enabling the separation of the solute. By placing the solute behind a semipermeable membrane, at a higher temperature, an osmotic pressure can be developed. The pressure released into a turbine can generate power or may be put to other uses like desalination.

  13. Stress Evolution in Sn Thin Films During Thermal Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, K. J.; Cheong, K. C.; Cai Zhonghou; Ingham, B.; Toney, M. F.

    2009-07-23

    Finite Element Modelling and corresponding X-ray and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction measurements have been used to investigate the development of strain in thin tin films during thermal cycling. The modeled average strain in the film was found to agree within 20% to the experimental result, although the strain within individual grains was found to vary dramatically as observed by electron backscatter diffraction and synchrotron microdiffraction.

  14. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polmer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1994-01-01

    The work done in the period August 1993 through February 1994 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program is summarized. Most of the work performed in this period, as well as the previous one, is described in detail in the attached Master's thesis, 'Analysis of Thermally Induced Damage in Composite Space Structures,' by Cecelia Hyun Seon Park. Work on a small thermal cycling and aging chamber was concluded in this period. The chamber was extensively tested and calibrated. Temperatures can be controlled very precisely, and are very uniform in the test chamber. Based on results obtained in the previous period of this program, further experimental progressive cracking studies were carried out. The laminates tested were selected to clarify the differences between the behaviors of thick and thin ply layers, and to explore other variables such as stacking sequence and scaling effects. Most specimens tested were made available from existing stock at Langley Research Center. One laminate type had to be constructed from available prepreg material at Langley Research Center. Specimens from this laminate were cut and prepared at MIT. Thermal conditioning was carried out at Langley Research Center, and at the newly constructed MIT facility. Specimens were examined by edge inspection and by crack configuration studies, in which specimens were sanded down in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate was implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Extensive correlations between test results and code predictions were carried out. The computer code was documented and is ready for distribution.

  15. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janousek, B. K.; Francis, R. W.; Wendt, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal cycling experiment was performed on GaAs solar cells to establish the electrical and structural integrity of these cells under the temperature conditions of a simulated low-Earth orbit of 3-year duration. Thirty single junction GaAs cells were obtained and tests were performed to establish the beginning-of-life characteristics of these cells. The tests consisted of cell I-V power output curves, from which were obtained short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and cell efficiency, and optical micrographs, spectral response, and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA) depth profiles on both the front surfaces and the front metallic contacts of the cells. Following 5,000 thermal cycles, the performance of the cells was reexamined in addition to any factors which might contribute to performance degradation. It is established that, after 5,000 thermal cycles, the cells retain their power output with no loss of structural integrity or change in physical appearance.

  16. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  17. Thermal Stress Behavior of Aluminum Nanofilms under Heat Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kusaka, Kazuya; Hanabusa, Takao; Shingubara, Shoso; Matsue, Tatsuya; Sakata, Osami; Noda, Kazuhiro; Hataya, Mitsuhiko

    2004-12-08

    In-situ thermal stress in aluminum nanofilms with silicon oxide glass (SOG) passivation was investigated by using synchrotron radiation at the SPring-8. Aluminum films of varying thickness (10, 20, 50 nm) were deposited on thermally oxidized silicon wafers by RF magnetron sputtering. Each specimen was heated in air over two cycles between room temperature and 300 deg. C. The following results were obtained: (1) {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes of aluminum nanofilm crystals were oriented parallel to the substrate normal; (2) the intensity of 111 diffraction was almost independent of temperature except in the case of the 50-nm-thick film; (3) the FWHM of 111 diffraction was almost independent of temperature at any given film thickness; and (4) for all films, the thermal stress varied linearly with heating temperature, and the hysteresis between the heating and cooling steps disappeared.

  18. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  19. Neutron Production from Feedback Controlled Thermal Cycling of a Pyroelectric Crystal Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Meyer, G; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Kerr, P; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Naranjo, B; Putterman, S

    2007-08-09

    The LLNL Crystal Driven Neutron Source is operational and has produced record ion currents of {approx}10 nA and neutron output of 1.9 ({+-}0.3) x 10{sup 5} per thermal cycle using a crystal heating rate of 0.2 C/s from 10 C to 110 C. A 3 cm diameter by 1 cm thick LiTaO{sub 3} crystal with a socket secured field emitter tip is thermally cycled with feedback control for ionization and acceleration of deuterons onto a deuterated target to produce D-D fusion neutrons. The entire crystal and temperature system is mounted on a bellows which allows movement of the crystal along the beam axis and is completely contained on a single small vacuum flange. The modular crystal assembly permitted experimental flexibility. Operationally, flashover breakdowns along the side of the crystal and poor emitter tip characteristics can limit the neutron source. The experimental neutron results extend earlier published work by increasing the ion current and pulse length significantly to achieve a factor-of-two higher neutron output per thermal cycle. These findings are reviewed along with details of the instrument.

  20. Phosphorus constrains accelerated nitrogen cycling in limed acidic forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Shaw, A. N.; Kluber, L. A.; Burke, D. J.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.; Smemo, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation by abiotic and biotic means. Soil acidification can remove P from available pools and nitrogen (N) deposition can increase the demand for P. We reason that chronic acidic deposition is promoting P limitation in acidic hardwood forests and thereby altering N cycling. The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactive influence of P availability and soil pH on N and P cycling and availability to determine if the response varies between two physiographic regions experiencing similar chronic acidic deposition. We addressed these objectives by experimentally manipulating soil pH, P, or both in strongly acidic glaciated and unglaciated hardwood forests in eastern Ohio, USA. Our results suggest complex interactions between P, soil pH, and the N cycle. Glaciated soils were found to be more N-saturated with nitrification rates 18 times greater than in unglaciated soils. Elevating pH, with or without added P, doubled nitrification rates in glaciated soils. For unglaciated soils, raising pH increased nitrification 10-fold, but increased nitrification only 5-fold in combination with P. This result suggests raising soil pH lowered the demand of soil N, or directly stimulated nitrifying activity, and that increasing P availability could limit N availability. To various degrees, readily available P was geochemically or biologically immobilized in all treatments, suggesting chronic P deficiency in these ecosystems. Phosphorus immobilization decreased as soil pH was elevated, but elevated P either had no effect (glaciated) or doubled P immobilization rates (unglaciated). These results suggest that raising soil pH reduces microbial P limitation for phosphate, whereas adding P appears to make phosphate scarcer. We suggest that P plays an important role in N transformations and cycling, but appears more important in unglaciated soils than in glaciated soils. Chronic soil acidification may have a greater

  1. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Andrew; Todosow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  2. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  3. Effect of thermal cycling on ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the comparative life of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings on NiCrAlY bond coats on Rene 41 in short (4 min) and long (57 min) thermal cycles to 1040 C in a 0.3 Mach flame. Short cycles greatly reduced the life of the ceramic coating in terms of time at temperature as compared to longer cycles. Appearance of the failed coating indicated compressive failure. Failure occurred at the bond coat-ceramic coat junction. At heating rates greater than 550 kw/sq m, the calculated coating detachment stress was in the range of literature values of coating adhesive/cohesive strength. Methods are discussed for decreasing the effect of high heating rate by avoiding compressive stress.

  4. Thermal cycling and vibration response for PREPP concrete waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, R.M.; Welch, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) will process those transuranic wastes which do not satisfy the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria. Since these wastes will contain considerable quantities of combustible materials, incineration will be an integral part of the treatment process. Four basic types of PREPP ash wastes have been identified. The four types are designated high metal box waste, combustible waste, average waste, and inorganic sludge. In this process, the output of the incinerator is a mixture of ash and shredded noncombustible material (principally metals) which is separated into two sizes, -1/4 inch (under-size waste) and reverse arrow 1/4 inch (oversize waste). These wastes are solidified with hydraulic cement in 55-gallon drums. Simulated PREPP waste forms prepared by Colorado School of Mines Research Institute were subjected to thermal cycling and vibration testing to demonstrate compliance with the WIPP immobilization criterion. Although actual storage and transport conditions are expected to vary somewhat from those utilized in the testing protocol, the generation of only very small amounts of particulate suggests that the immobilization criterion should be routinely met for similar waste form formulations and production procedures. However, the behavior of waste forms containing significant quantities of off-gas scrubber sludge or considerably higher waste loadings may differ. Limited thermal cycling and vibration testing of prototype waste forms should be conducted if the final formulations or production methods used for actual waste forms differ appreciably from those tested in this study. If such testing is conducted, consideration should be given to designing the experiment to accommodate a larger number of thermal cycles more representative of the duration of storage expected.

  5. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  6. Innovative method for the thermal cycling of large spacecraft systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steimer, C. H.; Hale, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    The use of low cost, off the shelf prefabricated enclosures for spacecraft system thermal cycling applications was indicated. The enclosures are erected in the satellite integration areas without disturbing the test article, electrical test set, or RF interfaces. They are assembled by metal clad, modular urethane panels. These panels are self supporting, and are locked and sealed to each other on assembly. Penetrations for interconnecting cables, coaxial and waveguide services; and temperature conditioning inlet and outlet ducts are easily incorporated where required. The facility and its advantages and intrinsic benefits are described.

  7. Thermal Cycling of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for space radiator applications owing to their light weight and high thermal conductivity. For those radiator applications where sunlight will impinge on the surface, it will be necessary to apply a white thermal control paint to minimize solar absorptance and enhance infrared emittance. Several currently available white thermal control paints were applied to candidate carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites and were subjected to vacuum thermal cycling in the range of -100 C to +277 C. The optical properties of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were evaluated before and after thermal cycling. In addition, adhesion of the paints was evaluated utilizing a tape test. The test matrix included three composites: resin-derived carbon-carbon and vapor infiltrated carbon-carbon, both reinforced with pitch-based P-120 graphite fibers, and a polyimide composite reinforced with T-650 carbon fibers, and three commercially available white thermal control paints: AZ-93, Z-93-C55, and YB-71P.

  8. Effects of ply thickness on thermal cycle induced damage and thermal strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of ply thickness in composite laminates on thermally induced cracking and changes in the coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE. A graphite-epoxy composite material, P75/ERL 1962, in thin (1 mil) and thick (5 mils) prepregs was used to make cross-ply laminates, ((0/90)(sub n))s, with equal total thickness (n=2, n=10) and cross-ply laminates with the same total number of plies (n=2). Specimens of each laminate configuration were cycled up to 1500 times between -250 and 250 F. Thermally induced microdamage was assessed as a function of the number of cycles as was the change in CTE. The results showed that laminates fabricated with thin-plies microcracked at significantly different rates and reached significantly different equilibrium crack densities than the laminate fabricated with thick-ply and n=2. The CTE of thin-ply laminates was less affected by thermal cycling and damage than the CTE of thick-ply laminates. These differences are attributed primarily to differences in interply constraints. Observed effects of ply thickness on crack density was qualitatively predicted by a combined shear-lag stress/energy method.

  9. Thermal cycling characteristics of plasma synthesized mullite films

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, O.R.; Hou, P.Y.; Brown, I.G.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have developed a plasma-based technique for the synthesis of mullite and mullite-like films on silicon carbide substrate material. The method, which they refer to as MePIIID (for Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition), uses two vacuum arc plasma sources and simultaneous pulse biasing of the substrate in a low pressure oxygen atmosphere. The Al:Si ratio can be controlled via the separate plasma guns, and the film adhesion, structure and morphology can be controlled via the ion energy which in turn is controlled by the pulse bias voltage. The films are amorphous as-deposited, and crystalline mullite is formed by subsequent annealing at 1000 C for 2 hours in air. Adhesion between the aluminum-silicon oxide film and the substrate increases after this first annealing. They have tested the behavior of films when subjected to repetitive thermal cycling between room temperature and 1100 C, and found that the films retain their adhesion and quality. Here they review the plasma synthesis technique and the characteristics of the mullite films prepared in this way, and summarize the status of the thermal cycling experiments.

  10. Cycle accurate and cycle reproducible memory for an FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameh W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-03-15

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to simulate operations of a device under test (DUT). The DUT includes a device memory having a number of input ports, and the FPGA is associated with a target memory having a second number of input ports, the second number being less than the first number. In one embodiment, a given set of inputs is applied to the device memory at a frequency Fd and in a defined cycle of time, and the given set of inputs is applied to the target memory at a frequency Ft. Ft is greater than Fd and cycle accuracy is maintained between the device memory and the target memory. In an embodiment, a cycle accurate model of the DUT memory is created by separating the DUT memory interface protocol from the target memory storage array.

  11. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  12. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  13. Improved Thermal Cycling Durability of Thermal Barrier Coatings Manufactured by PS-PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process is a promising method to manufacture thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). It fills the gap between traditional thermal spray processes and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The durability of PS-PVD manufactured columnar TBCs is strongly influenced by the compatibility of the metallic bondcoat (BC) and the ceramic TBC. Earlier investigations have shown that a smooth BC surface is beneficial for the durability during thermal cycling. Further improvements of the bonding between BC and TBC could be achieved by optimizing the formation of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer. In the present study, the parameters of pre-heating and deposition of the first coating layer were investigated in order to adjust the growth of the TGO. Finally, the durability of the PS-PVD coatings was improved while the main advantage of PS-PVD, i.e., much higher deposition rate in comparison to EB-PVD, could be maintained. For such coatings, improved thermal cycling lifetimes more than two times higher than conventionally sprayed TBCs, were measured in burner rigs at ~1250 °C/1050 °C surface/substrate exposure temperatures.

  14. Thermal-economic analysis of organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-12-01

    An evaluation of organic rankine cycles (ORC) as combined with topping incorporating gas turbines or diesel engines, and with subsequent waste heat utilization is presented. It is found that the potential benefit of the proposed organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration of useful heat and electricity is more flexible in meeting demands for the two products, by varying the mode of operation of the system. A thermal-economic analysis is developed and illustrated with cost and performance data for commercially available equipment, and with general economic parameters reflecting current regulations and market conditions. The performance of the ORC and of the entire combined cycle is described. Equations to evaluate the various thermodynamic and economic parameter, and the resultant case flows are presented. Criteria are developed to assess the addition of an ORC to a cogeneration system without ORC is viable based on rate of return on incremental investment. It is indicated that the proposed system is potentially viable, however, it is not viable under conditions prevailing in Chicago for the selected case studies.

  15. SOFIA-EXES: Probing the Thermal Structure of M Supergiant Wind Acceleration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team, EXES Science Team

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard model for mass loss from cool evolved stars, particularly for non-pulsating giants and supergiants. For the early-M supergiants, radiation pressure, convective ejections, magnetic fields, and Alfven waves have all been put forward as potential mass loss mechanisms. A potential discriminator between these ideas is the thermal structure resulting from the heating-cooling balance in the acceleration zone - the most important region to study mass loss physics.We present mid-IR [Fe II] emission line profiles of Betelgeuse and Antares obtained with NASA-DLR SOFIA-EXES and NASA IRTF-TEXES that were obtained as part of a GO program (Harper: Cycle 2-0004) and EXES instrument commissioning observations. The intra-term transitions sample a range of excitation conditions, Texc=540K, 3,400K, and 11,700K, i.e., from the warm chromospheric plasma, that also emits in the cm-radio and ultraviolet, to the cold inner circumstellar envelope. The spectrally-resolved profiles, when combined with VLA cm-radio observations, provide new constraints on the temperature and flow velocity in the outflow accelerating region. The semi-empirical energy balance can be used to test theoretical predictions of wind heating.

  16. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO sub 4 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, W.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  17. Design considerations of a pair of power leads for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets operating at 2 Tesla and 100 kA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Hays, Steven; Piekarz, Henryk; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, L.; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-08-01

    Recently proposed injector accelerator, Low Energy Ring (LER) for the LHC and fast cycling accelerators for the proton drivers (SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab) require that a new magnet technology be developed. In support of this accelerator program, a pair of power leads needs to be developed to close the loop between the power supply and accelerator system. The magnet proposed to be used will be a modified transmission line magnet technology that would allow for accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. The transmission line conductor will be using HTS technology and cooled with supercritical helium at 5 K. The power leads consist of two sections; upper one is a copper and lower section will be using HTS tapes. The accelerator magnet will be ramped to 100 kA in a second and almost immediately ramped down to zero in one second. This paper outlines the design considerations for the power leads to meet the operational requirements for the accelerator system. The power leads thermal analysis during the magnet powering cycle will be included.

  18. Thermal Cycle Testing of the Powersphere Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Mike; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Peterson, Todd T.; Scheiman, David A.; Simburger, Edward J.; Giants, Thomas W.; Matsumoto, James H.; Garcia, Alexander; Liu, Simon H.; Lin, John K.; Scarborough, Stephen E.; Gleeson, Daniel J.; Rawal, Suraj P.; Perry, Alan R.; Marshall, Craig H.

    2007-01-01

    During the past three years the team of The Aerospace Corporation, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, NASA Glenn Research Center, and ILC Dover LP have been developing a multifunctional inflatable structure for the PowerSphere concept under contract with NASA (NAS3-01115). The PowerSphere attitude insensitive solar power-generating microsatellite, which could be used for many different space and Earth science purposes, is ready for further refinement and flight demonstration. The development of micro- and nanosatellites requires the energy collection system, namely the solar array, to be of lightweight and small size. The limited surface area of these satellites precludes the possibility of body mounting the solar array system for required power generation. The use of large traditional solar arrays requires the support of large satellite volumes and weight and also requires a pointing apparatus. The current PowerSphere concept (geodetic sphere), which was envisioned in the late 1990 s by Mr. Simburger of The Aerospace Corporation, has been systematically developed in the past several years.1-7 The PowerSphere system is a low mass and low volume system suited for micro and nanosatellites. It is a lightweight solar array that is spherical in shape and does not require a pointing apparatus. The recently completed project culminated during the third year with the manufacturing of the PowerSphere Engineering Development Unit (EDU). One hemisphere of the EDU system was tested for packing and deployment and was subsequently rigidized. The other hemisphere was packed and stored for future testing in an uncured state. Both cured and uncured hemisphere components were delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center for thermal cycle testing and long-term storage respectively. This paper will discuss the design, thermal cycle testing of the PowerSphere EDU.

  19. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the period February 1993 through July 1993 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program. An oral presentation of this work was given to Langley personnel in September of 1993. This document was prepared for archival purposes. Progress studies have been performed on the effects of spatial variations in material strength. Qualitative agreement was found with observed patterns of crack distribution. These results were presented to NASA Langley personnel in November 1992. The analytical methodology developed by Prof. McManus in the summer of 1992 (under an ASEE fellowship) has been generalized. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate has been implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Experimental progressive cracking studies on a variety of laminates were carried out at Langley Research Center. Results were correlated to predictions using the new methods. Results were initially mixed. This motivated an exploration of the configuration of cracks within laminates. A crack configuration study was carried out by cutting and/or sanding specimens in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. These investigations were supplemented by dye-penetrant enhanced X-ray photographs. The behavior of thin plies was found to be different from the behavior of thicker plies (or ply groups) on which existing theories are based. Significant edge effects were also noted, which caused the traditional metric of microcracking (count of cracks on a polished edge) to be very inaccurate in some cases. With edge and configuration taken into account, rough agreement with predictions was achieved. All results to date were reviewed with NASA Langley personnel in September 1993.

  20. Thermal-Cycle Memory Functions and Ising Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brad; Patrick, David

    2008-03-01

    The Ising model provides a rich system for the study of a variety of correlated systems. In this talk, we present the results of numerical studies of 2- and 3-dimensional Ising spin systems subjected to thermal cycling from an ordered state to states with a fixed order parameter (<1), but with differing overall morphologies, and back to a quenched state. We find that for systems with initial states generated by thermal disordering above Tc, the initial state of a given order parameter has larger `islands' of like-spin (than the case for random disorder with the same overall order parameter) and consequent quenches of the state to T (B.Sinit), where Sinit is the order parameter of the initial state, is the average quenched order parameter, and B is a constant that depends upon the morphology of the initial state. The reason for the strong correlation stems from the energies associated with spins at the borders of large clusters. This `memory effect' does not occur in 3D (due to the larger number of near-neighbors). Finally, we discuss the `memory function' in the context of interfacial states of liquid crystals.

  1. Methodology for assessment of amount and amplitude of thermal stress cycles in masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of amount and amplitude of thermal stress cycles in historic masonry has been made by means of combination of three 2-D numerical models of heterogeneous ashlar masonry. The numerical models were used to simulate thermal stress cycles during June, July and August in reference climatic year valid for Prague Castle, Czech Republic. For evaluation of amplitude and amount of the thermal stress cycles the effective stress in selected point in masonry was used. Afterwards rainflow method was used to count the amplitude and amount of the stress cycles. The results show that during summer quite a lot of significant thermal stress cycles originate in masonry, especially during sunny hot days. The results presented in this paper confirm the significant fatigue character of the thermal stress cycles and the method presented here could be suitable to evaluate thermal stress in building materials and structures.

  2. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  3. Chemistry technology base and fuel cycle of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system, a description of the pyrochemistry technology base and the fuel cycle for the system. The pyrochemistry technology base consists of four processes: direct oxide reduction, reductive extraction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. Each process and its utility is described. The fuel cycle is described for a liquid metal-based system with the focus being the conversion of commercial spent nuclear fuel to fuel for the transmutation system. Fission product separation and actinide recycle processes are also described.

  4. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Blink, James; Carter, Joe; Massimiliano, Fratoni; Greenberg, Harris; Howard, Rob L

    2011-01-01

    The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated

  5. Proposed Few-optical Cycle Laser-driven ParticleAccelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Lu, P.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2006-10-06

    We describe a transparent dielectric grating accelerator structure that is designed for ultra-short laser pulse operation. The structure is based on the principle of periodic field reversal to achieve phase synchronicity for relativistic particles, however to preserve ultra-short pulse operation it does not resonate the laser field in the vacuum channel. The geometry of the structure appears well suited for application with high average power lasers and high thermal loading. Finally, it shows potential for an unloaded gradient of 10 GeV/m with 10 fsec laser pulses and the possibility to accelerate 10{sup 6} electrons per bunch at an efficiency of 8%. The fabrication procedure and a proposed near term experiment with this accelerator structure are presented.

  6. Study on properties of Al film on CFRP after cryogenic-thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng-hu, Wu; Zhan-ji, Ma; Geng-jie, Xiao; Dong-cai, Zhao; Ni, Ren

    Al film on CFRP has been tested by cryogenic-thermal cycling according to the especial condition of space. Properties of aluminum film have been characterized by electron pull apparatus, XRD and SEM. The result shows that the adhesion of Al film increases slowly at early stage of cryogenic-thermal cycling. When the times of cryogenic-thermal cycling exceed 50, the adhesion of Al film becomes stability, and then the adhesion of Al film decrease slowly when cycling times from 100 to 600. After 600 times, the adhesion of Al film becomes stability again. The microcrack appears on the surface of Al film after 50 times, and the amounts of microcrack increase and microcrack is coarsening versus times of cryogenic-thermal cycling. The structure of Al film is changing slowly during cryogenic-thermal cycling.

  7. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations: effect of thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Helvatjoglou-Antoniades, M; Theodoridou-Pahini, S; Papadogiannis, Y; Karezis, A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of thermal cycling on the microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations. Three dental amalgam alloys and a gallium alloy were tested with two adhesive resin systems and copal varnish as a control. Class V cavity preparations were prepared on 168 freshly extracted premolars or molars. The preparations were placed parallel to and 1.0 mm occlusal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Four groups of 42 teeth each were treated with one of the following adhesive dentin systems: Bond-It, All-Bond 2/Resinomer or a copal varnish (Copalite). The four groups of 42 teeth each were then restored with one of three dental amalgams: Orosphere Plus, Indiloy, Oralloy or a Gallium alloy (Galloy), resulting in 12 test groups of 14 teeth each. The specimens were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Final contouring and polishing of the restorations were performed under water spray. Half of the restorations in each group were thermocycled for 3000 cycles (5 degrees C-37 degrees C-55 degrees C-37 degrees C) with a dwell time of 15 sec at each temperature. The other half were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Then all 168 restorations were stained with dye, sectioned and scored for microleakage. Results showed that the adhesive dentin systems reduced microleakage in amalgam restorations compared to copal varnish only in non-thermocycled specimens. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there was an extremely significant difference (p < 0.001) in microleakage between the non-thermocycled and the thermocycled specimens in all test groups, whereas, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) among thermocycled specimens. The reduction of microleakage was not significantly different between Bond-It and All-Bond 2/Resinomer in non-thermocycled specimens. Oralloy showed the most microleakage in the non-thermocycled groups when compared to the other alloys using the same adhesive liner. PMID:11203837

  8. Effects of thermal cycling on graphie-fiber-reinforced 6061 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dries, G. A.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Graphite-reinforced aluminum alloy metal-matrix composites are among materials being considered for structural components in dimensionally stable space structures. This application requires materials with low values of thermal expansions and high specific stiffnesses. They must remain stable during exposures to the space environment for periods extending to 20 years. The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal expansion behavior and mechanical properties of Thornel P100 graphite 6061 aluminum composites, as fabricated and after thermal processing to eliminate thermal strain hysteresis, have been investigated. Two groups of composites were studied: one was fabricated by hot roll bonding and the other by diffusion bonding. Processing significantly reduced strain hysteresis during thermal cycling in both groups and improved the ultimate tensile strength and modulus in the diffusion-bonded composites. Thermal cycling stabilized the as-fabricated composites by reducing the residual fabrication stress and increased the matrix strength by metallurgical aging. Thermal expansion behavior of both groups after processing was insensitive to thermal cycling. Data scatter was too large to determine effects of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties. The primary effects of processing and thermal cycling can be attributed to changes in the metallurgical condition and stress state of the matrix.

  9. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-04-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. PMID:24718363

  10. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, H.P.; Wittwer, C.T.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes an apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column. 6 figs.

  11. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, Harold P.; Wittwer, Carl T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column.

  12. Experimental evidence for the acceleration of thermal electrons by ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. J.; Sojka, J. J.; Wrenn, G. L.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the acceleration of thermal electrons by large amplitude ion cyclotron waves (ICWs). The wave power in the ULF range near the helium gyrofrequency is compared with the distribution function of low energy electrons measured by GEOS satellite instruments. This comparison shows that electrons are accelerated near the geomagnetic equator along field lines, at times when the ICW energy is large and the cold plasma density is below a threshold value. It is suggested that these accelerated electrons can account for the ELF emissions, modulated at the ICW frequency, observed by Wehrlin (1981). A very efficient acceleration of thermal electrons along field lines results from other ULF events having frequencies close to the proton gyrofrequency. Evidence for this lies in the fact that medium energy protons having large temperature anisotropies in the 100-500 eV range are responsible for the ICW wave generation.

  13. Nylon 6.6 accelerated aging studies : thermal-oxidative degradation and its interaction with hydrolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Robert; Derzon, Dora Kay; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    2004-06-01

    Accelerated aging of Nylon 6.6 fibers used in parachutes has been conducted by following the tensile strength loss under both thermal-oxidative and 100% relative humidity conditions. Thermal-oxidative studies (air circulating ovens) were performed for time periods of weeks to years at temperatures ranging from 37 C to 138 C. Accelerated aging humidity experiments (100% RH) were performed under both an argon atmosphere to examine the 'pure' hydrolysis pathway, and under an oxygen atmosphere (oxygen partial pressure close to that occurring in air) to mimic true aging conditions. As expected the results indicated that degradation caused by humidity is much more important than thermal-oxidative degradation. Surprisingly when both oxygen and humidity were present the rate of degradation was dramatically enhanced relative to humidity aging in the absence of oxygen. This significant and previously unknown phenomena underscores the importance of careful accelerated aging that truly mimics real world storage conditions.

  14. Proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the intense pulsed neutron source rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx.3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at: (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science; (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation; and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, we are now proposing a third cavity for the RF systems which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  15. Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cellmembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

    2004-01-02

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes were developed in which zirconia-based electrolyte thin films were supported by a composite metal/ceramic electrode, and were subjected to rapid thermal cycling between 200 and 800 C. The effects of this cycling on membrane performance were evaluated. The membranes, not yet optimized for performance, showed a peak power density of 350mW/cm2at 900 C in laboratory-sized SOFCs that was not affected by the thermal cycling. This resistance to cycling degradation is attributed to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficient of the cermet support electrode with that of the zirconia electrolyte.

  16. Effect of thermal cycling treatment on the mechanical properties of low-alloy chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitskii, A.N.; Bega, N.D.; Brodnikovskii, N.P.; Khutorskii, A.L.; Turtsevich, E.V.

    1985-10-01

    The authors report the results of a study of the effect of structural changes occurring during thermal cycling treatment in low-alloy chromium on mechanical properties. Low-alloy chromium containing 0.5 wt.% lanthanum and 0.25 wt.% tantalum was selected as test material, as well as unalloyed chromium. It is concluded that thermal cycling treatment of chromium and low-alloy chromium leads to an increase in flow stresses as the result of forming a strengthened nitrogen-containing surface layer. Alloying of chromium with lanthanum and tantalum, apart from increasing the low-temperature ductility, increases its resistance to thermal cycling. In alloy specimens subjected to prior impregnation with nitrogen, the effect ot thermal cycling strengthening and embrittlement is more clearly defined. In unalloyed chromium under the action of thermal cycling treatment, the region of strain aging shifts in the direction of lower temperature.

  17. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  18. A Thorium/Uranium fuel cycle for an advanced accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste concept

    SciTech Connect

    Truebenbach, M.T.; Henderson, D.L.; Venneri, F.

    1993-12-31

    Utilizing the high thermal neutron flux of an accelerator driven transmuter to drive a Thorium-Uranium fuel production scheme, it is possible to produce enough energy in the transmuter not only to power the accelerator, but to have enough excess power available for commercial use. A parametric study has been initiated to determine the ``optimum`` equilibrium operation point in terms of the minimization of the equilibrium actinide inventory and the fuel {alpha} for various residence times in the High Flux Region (HFR) and in the Low Flux Region (LFR). For the cases considered, the ``optimum`` equilibrium operation point was achieved for a HFR residence time of 45 days and a LFR residence time of 60 days. For this case, the total actinide inventory in the system is about 20 tonnes and the fuel {alpha} approximately 1.46.

  19. RPRD1B promotes tumor growth by accelerating the cell cycle in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng; Hu, Weixu; Li, Shaoru; Yu, Jinjin

    2014-03-01

    RPRD1B, the regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing 1B gene, functions as a cell cycle manipulator and has been found overexpressed in a small panel of endometrial cancer types. In the present study, we investigated the roles of RPRD1B in endometrial cancer using various in vitro and in vivo experiments. According to our results, RPRD1B mRNA was significantly upregulated in endometrial cancer tissues (P=0.0012). RPRD1B overexpression was correlated with tumor stage (P=0.0004), histology type (P=0.0146) and depth of myometrial invasion (P=0.024). In vitro, RPRD1B promoted cellular proliferation (P=0.032 for MTT assay and P=0.018 for colony formation assay), and accelerated the cell cycle (P=0.007) by upregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6, while knockdown of RPRD1B suppressed cellular proliferation (P=0.02 for MTT assay and P=0.031 for colony formation assay), and led to G1 phase arrest (P=0.025) through downregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. Consistently, in the nude mice model, RPRD1B overexpression significantly accelerated the tumor xenograft growth (P=0.0012), accompanied by elevated Ki-67 and cyclin D1. In addition, we demonstrated that downregulating RPRD1B could sensitize Ishikawa cells to Raloxifene (P=0.01). In summary, we demonstrated that RPRD1B was frequently overexpressed in human endometrial cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo, over-abundant RPRD1B could promote tumor growth and accelerate cellular cell cycle. In addition, knockdown of RPRD1B also increased cell sensitivity to Raloxifene, making RPRD1B a potent therapeutic target for endometrial cancer, particularly in patients with resistance to the selective ER modulators. PMID:24452636

  20. Acceleration of ultrasound thermal therapy by patterned acoustic droplet vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Zhang, Man; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Carson, Paul L.; Padilla, Frederic; Swanson, Scott D.; Mougenot, Charles; Brian Fowlkes, J.; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-01-01

    One application of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), a method of converting biocompatible microdroplets into microbubbles, is to enhance locally high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Two objectives are pursued here: (1) the controlled creation of a bubble trench prior to HIFU using ADV and (2) use of the trench for increasing ablation volumes, lowering acoustic powers, and decreasing therapy duration. Thermally responsive phantoms were made with perfluorocarbon emulsion. Compound lesions were formed in a laboratory setting and a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided HIFU system. Linear and spiral patterned compound lesions were generated in trenches. A larger fraction of the HIFU beam is contained to increase the generation of heat. Using the laboratory system, a 90 mm linear length spiral trench was formed in 30 s with mechanical beam steering. Comparatively, the clinical HIFU system formed a 19.9 mm linear length spiral trench in approximately 1 s with electronic beam steering. Lesions were imaged optically and with MRI. A uniform thermal ablation volume of 3.25 mL was achieved in 55.4 s (4-times faster than standard clinical HIFU and 14-times larger volume versus sum of individual lesions). Single lesions showed a 400% volume increase. PMID:24437794

  1. Accelerated thermal aging of petroleum-based ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, V.; Nattrass, D.; Raj, K.; Leonard, D.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of elevated temperature on the physical and insulating properties of ferrofluid specifically developed for use as a liquid dielectric (D-fluid) for power transformers has been investigated. The D-fluid was produced as a colloidal mix of a specifically synthesized ferrofluid with a conventional mineral oil, and it was subjected to thermal aging conditions modeled after a typical power transformer where the insulation fluid is expected to retain its dielectric performance for about 40 years of continuous service in a sealed tank. The well-known Arrhenius relationship was employed to model "life in service" for up to 40 years at 105°C which corresponded to holding the samples in sealed jars for 10 weeks at 185°C. Another set of small ampules (5 ml) was prepared to test the main physical properties after even longer aging. D-fluid tested after a period of 34 and 50 weeks at 185°C showed no degradation of thermal or colloid stability. The dielectric colloid was also subjected to a 21 day-long test at 110°C in a sealed jar in the presence of typical transformer materials: copper, cellulose, and silicon steel (so-called "bomb" test). Finally, the ferrofluid went through an oxidation stability test (ASTM D2440). Test results show that the newly developed dielectric colloid satisfies the long-term service requirements the transformer users typically apply to conventional mineral oils.

  2. Accelerated cycle life performance for ovonic nickel-metal hydride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otzinger, Burton M.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries have emerged as the leading candidate for commercial replacement of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. An important incentive is that the Ni-MH cell provides approximately twice the capacity of a Ni-Cd cell for a given size. A six-cell battery was committed to an accelerated cycle life test to determine the effect of separation type on performance. Results of the test may also show the Ni-MH battery to be a replacement candidate for the aerospace Ni-Cd battery.

  3. A high-duty-cycle long-pulse electron gun for electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, N. A.; Thrasher, M. H.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the design and operation of a long-pulse (200-300 μs), high-duty-cycle (5%-6%), 8-mm-diam dispenser cathode, electrically isolated, modulating Wehnelt electron gun for applications in a high-average-power electron linear accelerator. The electron optics design was optimized with computer modeling of the electron trajectories and equipotentials. The gun performance was established in a series of experimental measurements in a test stand. Excellent pulse-to-pulse emission current reproducibility and electron-beam pulse profile stability were obtained.

  4. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H.; Brandt, Randolph J.

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  5. Ion acceleration by intense, few-cycle laser pulses with nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lucchio, Laura; Andreev, Alexander A.; Gibbon, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The energy distribution of electrons and ions emerging from the interaction of a few-cycle Gaussian laser pulse with spherical nanoclusters is investigated with the aim of determining prospects for accelerating ions in this regime. It is found that the direct conversion of laser energy into dense attosecond electron nanobunches results in rapid charge separation and early onset of Coulomb-explosion-dominated ion dynamics. The ion core of the cluster starts to expand soon after the laser has crossed the droplet, the fastest ions attaining 10 s of MeV at relativistic intensities. The current investigation should serve as a guide for contemporary experiments, i.e., using state-of-the-art few-cycle ultraintense lasers and nanoclusters of solid density.

  6. Ion acceleration by intense, few-cycle laser pulses with nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lucchio, Laura; Andreev, Alexander A.; Gibbon, Paul

    2015-05-15

    The energy distribution of electrons and ions emerging from the interaction of a few-cycle Gaussian laser pulse with spherical nanoclusters is investigated with the aim of determining prospects for accelerating ions in this regime. It is found that the direct conversion of laser energy into dense attosecond electron nanobunches results in rapid charge separation and early onset of Coulomb-explosion-dominated ion dynamics. The ion core of the cluster starts to expand soon after the laser has crossed the droplet, the fastest ions attaining 10 s of MeV at relativistic intensities. The current investigation should serve as a guide for contemporary experiments, i.e., using state-of-the-art few-cycle ultraintense lasers and nanoclusters of solid density.

  7. Accelerating thermal deposition modeling at terahertz frequencies using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroski, Michael; Knight, Michael; Payne, Jason; Grundt, Jessica E.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Thomas, Robert; Roach, William P.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2011-03-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods are widely used to model the propagation of electromagnetic radiation in biological tissues. High-performance central processing units (CPUs) can execute FDTD simulations for complex problems using 3-D geometries and heterogeneous tissue material properties. However, when FDTD simulations are employed at terahertz (THz) frequencies excessively long processing times are required to account for finer resolution voxels and larger computational modeling domains. In this study, we developed and tested the performance of 2-D and 3-D FDTD thermal propagation code executed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) device, which was coded using an extension of the C language referred to as CUDA. In order to examine the speedup provided by GPUs, we compared the performance (speed, accuracy) for simulations executed on a GPU (Tesla C2050), a high-performance CPU (Intel Xeon 5504), and supercomputer. Simulations were conducted to model the propagation and thermal deposition of THz radiation in biological materials for several in vitro and in vivo THz exposure scenarios. For both the 2-D and 3-D in vitro simulations, we found that the GPU performed 100 times faster than runs executed on a CPU, and maintained comparable accuracy to that provided by the supercomputer. For the in vivo tissue damage studies, we found that the GPU executed simulations 87x times faster than the CPU. Interestingly, for all exposure duration tested, the CPU, GPU, and supercomputer provided comparable predictions for tissue damage thresholds (ED50). Overall, these results suggest that GPUs can provide performance comparable to a supercomputer and at speeds significantly faster than those possible with a CPU. Therefore, GPUs are an affordable tool for conducting accurate and fast simulations for computationally intensive modeling problems.

  8. Combined Ageing and Thermal Cycling of Compressive Mica Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2005-06-30

    Hybrid Phlogopite mica seals were evaluated in a combined ageing and thermal cycling test. Two interlayers were investigated: a glass and a metallic foil. Samples were first aged at 800 degrees C for {approx}500 or {approx}1000 hrs in a simulated SOFC environment, followed by short-term thermal cycling. The results of hybrid mica with glass interlayer showed extensive reaction and poor thermal cycle stability after ageing for 1036 hrs and 21 thermal cycles. Use of the brazing alloy as the interlayer showed no interaction with mica over 504 hrs, and reasonable leak rates were maintained through eight cycles. The leakage development was found to be consistent with fracture surface and microstructure analyses.

  9. Degradation of Teflon(trademark) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  10. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon' FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon FEP.

  11. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno F.

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon' FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(registered trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(registered trademark) FEP.

  12. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(R) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(R) FEP.

  13. Thermal cycling damage of metal matrix composites. Analytical study on dimensional change

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, Minoru ); Armstrong, W.D. ); Dunn, M. )

    1993-05-01

    An analytical model to predict dimensional changes in thermal cycled metal matrix composites (MMCs) with and without constant stress is proposed. The present model assumes that the temperature-time relation to simulate thermal cycling is of a step-function type and the matrix metal deforms as elastic/plastic/creep material while the fiber remains elastic throughout thermal cycling. The model can explain well the experimental results of W-ThO[sub 2]/FeC[sub r]AlY composite during the early stage of cycling and those of the previous works. The present model is then compared with the existing ones including our previous model. Another model is also constructed to simulate the later stage of thermal cycling damage where the debonding of the matrix-fiber interface would presumably take place progressively with number of cycles. This model with a progressive debonded interface was found to explain reasonably well the later stage of dimensional changes observed in W-ThO[sub 2]/FeCrAlY composite. Then, the dimensional change in thermal cycled MMC under constant stress loading is studied by use of the above model for early (first) stage of thermal cycling that is modified to account for applied stress. This model can explain well the experimental results of W/Cu composite. 20 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  16. High Growth Rate YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by MOCVD Demonstrate High Thermal Cycling Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, Venu G; Besmann, Theodore M; Payzant, E Andrew; Pint, Bruce A; Lothian, Janet L; Anderson, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using Y(OBut{sup n}){sub 3}, Zr(OBut{sup n}){sub 4} precursors and O{sub 2} carrier gas. A thermodynamic analysis guided experiments by optimizing elemental molar (n) stoichiometric ratios for the (Zr-Y-O-C-H system). This analysis showed single-phase YSZ was favored at 950 C, 1 kPa, n{sub O}/(n{sub Y} + n{sub Zr}) > 30, n{sub Y}/(n{sub Y} + n{sub Zr}) = 0.06-0.10 (fixed n{sub C}, n{sub H}). Experimental YSZ growth had multiple phases (fcc, monoclinic), had a relatively high growth rate (43 {micro}m/h, 1005 C), had an Arrhenius dependence (845-950 C, E{sub a} = 53.8 {+-} 7.9 kJ/mol), had columnar grains (SEM analysis), and had a coating through-thickness n{sub Y}/(n{sub Y} + n{sub Zr}) = 0.04 (EPMA analysis). Doubling the inlet yttrium precursor mole fraction resulted in fcc YSZ growth with a coating through-thickness n{sub Y}/(n{sub Y} + n{sub Zr}) = 0.07. Hot-insertion thermal cycling of YSZ coatings on FeCrAlY bond coats showed >1000 h lifetime, matching current standards for EB-PVD YSZ coatings.

  17. Rapid thermal cycling of solar array blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been conducting rapid thermal cycling on blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom. This testing includes two designs (8 coupons total) of the solar array. Four coupons were fabricated as part of the Photovoltaic Array Environmental Protection Program (PAEP), NAS3-25079, at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. These coupons began cycling in early 1989 and have completed 172,000 thermal cycles. Four other coupons were fabricated a year later and included several design changes; cycling of these began in early 1990 and has reached 90,000 cycles. The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime (15 yrs.) of the welded interconnects within a low earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycling environment. The blanket coupons, design changes, test description, status to date including performance and observed anomalies, and any insights related to the testing of these coupons are described. The description of a third design is included.

  18. Coseismic thermal pressurization can prolong recurrence intervals of earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Y.; Hirahara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Earthquake is a short-lived event, while it needs a very long preparation period. The transition is rapid but seamless. We should correlate physics governing during the short-term earthquake period with that governing during the long-term preparation period. Brace and Byerlee [1966] proposed that stick-slip behavior is a mechanism for earthquakes from this standpoint. Following the proposition, lots of researchers have executed numerical simulations of a spring- slider system in order to interpret the earthquake cyclicity (e.g., Gu et al. [1991]). For such researches, it is necessary to use a constitutive law of friction on an interface between a slider and ground. By way of example, a rate- and state- dependent friction law (Dieterich [1979]) has been widely used, because it can represent frictional healing during the interseismic period. Despite the previous extensive studies, there is a dearth of information on roles of pore fluid. The pore fluid existence within a fault zone dramatically changes the frictional property via reduction of normal stress (Brace and Martin [1968]). Further, the pore fluid pressure may evolve and affect every aspect of earthquakes. Here, we try to add a new perspective to the earthquake cyclicity. It is an effect of short-term temporal change of the pore pressure, due to the coseismic thermal pressurization (hereinafter called TP). TP is a short-lived physical mechanism that frictional heating at a fluid-saturated fault pressurizes the pore fluid within the fault zone (Sibson [1973]). It can greatly affect the fault constitutive relation (Andrews [2002]) and the dynamic propagation of the earthquake rupture (Bizzarri and Cocco [2006]). In this presentation, we show that the short-lived TP is again a significant mechanism for the earthquake cyclicity, using the spring-slider system with the rate- and state- dependent law in a 1-D elastic body. If the shear zone thickness is smaller than several decimeters, TP can greatly prolong the

  19. Accelerated multiscale space-time finite element simulation and application to high cycle fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Lihua; Naboulsi, Sam; Eason, Thomas; Vasudevan, Vijay K.; Qian, Dong

    2016-05-01

    A multiscale space-time finite element method based on time-discontinuous Galerkin and enrichment approach is presented in this work with a focus on improving the computational efficiencies for high cycle fatigue simulations. While the robustness of the TDG-based space-time method has been extensively demonstrated, a critical barrier for the extensive application is the large computational cost due to the additional temporal dimension and enrichment that are introduced. The present implementation focuses on two aspects: firstly, a preconditioned iterative solver is developed along with techniques for optimizing the matrix storage and operations. Secondly, parallel algorithms based on multi-core graphics processing unit are established to accelerate the progressive damage model implementation. It is shown that the computing time and memory from the accelerated space-time implementation scale with the number of degree of freedom N through {˜ }{O}(N^{1.6}) and {˜ }{O}(N) , respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the accelerated space-time FEM simulation through benchmark problems.

  20. Accelerated multiscale space-time finite element simulation and application to high cycle fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Lihua; Naboulsi, Sam; Eason, Thomas; Vasudevan, Vijay K.; Qian, Dong

    2016-08-01

    A multiscale space-time finite element method based on time-discontinuous Galerkin and enrichment approach is presented in this work with a focus on improving the computational efficiencies for high cycle fatigue simulations. While the robustness of the TDG-based space-time method has been extensively demonstrated, a critical barrier for the extensive application is the large computational cost due to the additional temporal dimension and enrichment that are introduced. The present implementation focuses on two aspects: firstly, a preconditioned iterative solver is developed along with techniques for optimizing the matrix storage and operations. Secondly, parallel algorithms based on multi-core graphics processing unit are established to accelerate the progressive damage model implementation. It is shown that the computing time and memory from the accelerated space-time implementation scale with the number of degree of freedom N through ˜ O(N^{1.6}) and ˜ O(N), respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the accelerated space-time FEM simulation through benchmark problems.

  1. Infiltrated Phlogopite Micas with Superior Thermal Cycle Stability as Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    Thermal cycle stability is one of the most stringent requirements for sealants in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The sealants have to survive several hundreds to thousands of thermal cycles during lifetime operation in stationary and transportation applications. Recently, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a novel method to infiltrate the mica flakes with a wetting or liquid forming material such that the leak path will be reduced from 3-D to 2-D and achieve good thermal cycle stability with low leak rates.

  2. Thermal Cycling Effects on the Thermoelectric Properties of n-Type In, Ce based Skutterudite Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Krishnendu; Subramanian, Mas A.; Good, Morris S.; Roberts, Kamandi C.; Hendricks, Terry J.

    2012-06-14

    N-type In-filled CoSb3 are known skutterudite compounds that have shown promising thermoelectric (TE) properties resulting in high dimensionless figure of merit values at elevated temperatures. Their use in various waste heat recovery applications will require that they survive and operate after exposure to harsh thermal cycling environments. This research focused on uncovering the thermal cycling effects on thermoelectric properties of n-type In0.2Co4Sb12 and In0.2Ce0.15Co4Sb12 skutterudite compositions as well as quantifying their temperature-dependent structural properties (elastic modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio). It was observed that the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity increased only slightly in the double-filled In,Ce skutterudite materials upon thermal cycling. In the In-filled skutterudites the Seebeck coefficient remained approximately the same on thermal cycling, while electrical resistivity increased significantly after thermal cycling. Results also show that thermal conductivity marginally decreases in the case of In-filled skutterudites, whereas the reduction is more pronounced in In, Ce-based skutterudite compounds. The possible reason for this kind of reduction can be attributed to grain pinning effects due to formation of nano inclusions. High temperature structural property measurements (i.e., Young's modulus and shear modulus) are also reported and the results show that these structural properties decrease slowly as temperature increases and the compounds are structurally stable after numerous thermal cycles.

  3. An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent cloud-resolving numerical modeling results suggest that radiative forcing causes accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and early intensification. Furthermore, observational studies of tropical cyclones have found that oscillations of the cloud canopy areal extent often occur that are clearly related to the solar diurnal cycle. A theory is put forward to explain these findings. The primary mechanism that seems responsible can be considered a refinement of the mechanism proposed by Gray and Jacobson (1977) to explain diurnal variations of oceanic tropical deep cumulus convection. It is hypothesized that differential radiative cooling or heating between a relatively cloud-free environment and a developing tropical disturbance generates circulations that can have very significant influences on convective activity in the core of the system. It is further suggested that there are benefits to understanding this mechanism by viewing it in terms of the lateral propagation of thermally driven gravity wave circulations, also known as buoyancy bores. Numerical model experiments indicate that mean environmental radiative cooling outside the cloud system is playing an important role in causing a significant horizontal differential radiative forcing and accelerating the rate of tropical cyclogenesis. As an expansive stratiform cloud layer forms aloft within a developing system the mean low level radiative cooling is reduced while at mid levels small warming occurs. During the daytime there is not a very large differential radiative forcing between the environment and the cloud system, but at nighttime when there is strong radiative clear sky cooling of the environment it becomes significant. Thermally driven circulations develop, characterized by relatively weak subsidence in the environment but much stronger upward motion in the cloud system. This upward motion leads to a cooling tendency and increased relative humidity. The increased relative humidity at night

  4. An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    Recent cloud-resolving numerical modeling results suggest that radiative forcing causes accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and early intensification. Furthermore, observational studies of tropical cyclones have found that oscillations of the cloud canopy areal extent often occur that are clearly related to the solar diurnal cycle. A theory is put forward to explain these findings. The primary mechanism that seems responsible can be considered a refinement of the mechanism proposed by Gray and Jacobson (1977) to explain diurnal variations of oceanic tropical deep cumulus convection. It is hypothesized that differential radiative cooling or heating between a relatively cloud-free environment and a developing tropical disturbance generates circulations that can have very significant influences on convective activity in the core of the system. It is further suggested that there are benefits to understanding this mechanism by viewing it in terms of the lateral propagation of thermally driven gravity wave circulations, also known as buoyancy bores. Numerical model experiments indicate that mean environmental radiative cooling outside the cloud system is playing an important role in causing a significant horizontal differential radiative forcing and accelerating the rate of tropical cyclogenesis. As an expansive stratiform cloud layer forms aloft within a developing system the mean low-level radiative cooling is reduced, while at mid levels small warming occurs. During the daytime there is not a very large differential radiative forcing between the environment and the cloud system, but at nighttime when there is strong radiative clear-sky cooling of the environment it becomes significant. Thermally driven circulations develop, characterized by relatively weak subsidence in the environment but much stronger upward motion in the cloud system. This upward motion leads to a cooling tendency and increased relative humidity. The increased relative humidity at night

  5. The effects of thermal cycling on the physical and mechanical properties of [NZP] ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.B.; Limaye, S.Y.; Porter, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The [NZP] ceramics, sodium zirconium phosphate and its crystal structure analogs, are noted for their very low thermal expansion characteristics. What has not been widely studied is the effect of thermal cycling on physical and mechanical properties. Two [NZP] compositional series were selected (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24} and Ca{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) that exhibit varying bulk thermal expansion from positive to negative and varying degrees of thermal expansion anisotropy. The effect of thermal cycling, to 1,250 C, on the bulk thermal expansion and flexural strength of these ceramics is discussed in relationship to changes in density, thermal expansion anisotropy and microstructure.

  6. Thermal performance analysis and measurements of the prototype cryomodules of European XFEL accelerator - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Barbanotti, S.; Eschke, J.; Jensch, K.; Klos, R.; Maschmann, W.; Petersen, B.; Sawlanski, O.

    2014-11-01

    The European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), the research facility currently under construction in the Hamburg area, Germany, is based on a superconducting linear accelerator that brings electrons to almost the speed of light. The linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerating cryomodules (CMs) operating at the temperature of 2 K. The thermal performances of the accelerator CMs are a key element to determine the heat load budget, the required capacity and the cost of the XFEL refrigerating system and to guarantee its efficient operation. The measurement of the thermal performances of the CMs is also an important step in the qualification of the CMs during the series production. This paper describes the thermal performance analysis of the European XFEL prototype cryomodules. The analysis takes into account all the main contributors (multilayer insulation, current leads, power couplers, support posts, and cavities) to the static and dynamic heat loads at various cryogenic temperature levels. Existing empirical databases are reviewed and used to evaluate the heat transfer through the multilayer insulation and numerical simulations are developed to investigate the heat loads generated from the different CM components.

  7. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  8. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  9. Some Oobservations of the Role of Component Size in Solder Joint Degradation under Thermal Cycling Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, J.; Wen, L-C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results will be presented from a continuing investigation into the influence of component size and configuration of thermal cycling lifetimes, observed in a set of quadpak electronic component packages.

  10. Thermal cycle testing of Space Station Freedom solar array blanket coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Schieman, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Lewis Research Center is presently conducting thermal cycle testing of solar array blanket coupons that represent the baseline design for Space Station Freedom. Four coupons were fabricated as part of the Photovoltaic Array Environment Protection (PAEP) Program, NAS 3-25079, at Lockheed Missile and Space Company. The objective of the testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array welded interconnect design within the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array welded interconnect design within a low earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycling environment. Secondary objectives include the observation and identification of potential failure modes and effects that may occur within the solar array blanket coupons as a result of thermal cycling. The objectives, test articles, test chamber, performance evaluation, test requirements, and test results are presented for the successful completion of 60,000 thermal cycles.

  11. Compressive Seal Development: Combined Ageing and Thermal Cycling Compressive

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.Y-S.; Stevenson, J.W.; Singh, P.

    2005-01-27

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the combined aging and cycling effect on hybrid Phlogopite mica seals with respect to materials and interfacial degradations in a simulated SOFC environment.

  12. Diurnal Thermal Cycling Effects on Backscatter of Thin Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Gow, A. J.; Perovich, D. K.; Hsu, C. C.; Ding, K. H.; Kong, J. A.; Grenfell, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    To invesigate effects on polarimetric backscatter of sea ice grown under diurnal cycling conditions, we carried out an experiment inJanuary 1994 at the outdoor Geophysical Research Facility in the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

  13. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  14. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  15. Valve dynamic and thermal cycle model in stepless capacity regulation for reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiangming; Hong, Weirong

    2012-11-01

    The existing researches of stepless capacity regulation system by depressing the suction valve for reciprocation compressor always adopt hypothesis that the compressor valves are open or close instantaneously, the valve dynamic has not been taken account into thermal cycle computation, the influence of capacity regulation system on suction valves dynamic performance and cylinder thermal cycle operation has not been considered. This paper focuses on theoretical and experimental analysis of the valve dynamic and thermal cycle for reciprocating compressor in the situation of stepless capacity regulation. The valve dynamics equation, gas forces for normal and back flow, and the cylinder pressure varying with suction valve unloader moment during compression thermal cycle are discussed. A new valve dynamic model based on L-K real gas state equation for reciprocating compressor is first deduced to reduce the calculation errors induced by the ideal gas state equation. The variations of valve dynamic and cylinder pressure during part of compression stroke are calculated numerically. The calculation results reveal the non-normal thermal cycle and operation condition of compressor in stepless capacity regulation situation. The numerical simulation results of the valve dynamic and thermal cycle parameters are also verified by the stepless capacity regulation experiments in the type of 3L-10-8 reciprocating compressor. The experimental results agree with the numerical simulation results, which show that the theoretical models proposed are effective and high-precision. The proposed theoretical models build the theoretical foundation to design the real stepless capacity regulation system.

  16. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Adams, Marvin; Tsevkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2013-04-19

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  17. An investigation of the thermal cycling damage of 25 vol. pct SiCw/alumina ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, William D.; Taya, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was made of the thermal cycling damage of a 25 vol pct SiC whisker/alumina (SiCw/Al2O3) composite. Thermal cycling tests were conducted by subjecting a composite specimen to two different fluidized beds. After thermal cycling the composite specimens were subjected to elastic modulus and effective fracture toughness measurements. The thermal cycled specimens were investigated with SEM and TEM studies. It was found that this composite has a relatively high resistance to thermal cycling.

  18. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days. PMID:26595777

  19. Quantum radiation produced by a uniformly accelerating charged particle in thermal random motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshita, Naritaka; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Sen

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the properties of quantum radiation produced by a uniformly accelerating charged particle undergoing thermal random motion, which originates from the coupling to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Because the thermal random motion is regarded to result from the Unruh effect, the quantum radiation might give us hints of the Unruh effect. The energy flux of the quantum radiation is negative and smaller than that of Larmor radiation by one order in a /m , where a is the constant acceleration and m is the mass of the particle. Thus, the quantum radiation appears to be a suppression of the classical Larmor radiation. The quantum interference effect plays an important role in this unique signature. The results are consistent with the predictions of a model consisting of a particle coupled to a massless scalar field as well as those of the previous studies on the quantum effect on the Larmor radiation.

  20. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  1. Hydraulic performance of compacted clay liners under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2015-10-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in several landfill applications to isolate contaminants from the surrounding environment and minimize the escape of leachate from the landfill. Prior to waste placement in landfills, CCLs are often exposed to temperature fluctuations which can affect the hydraulic performance of the liner. Experimental research was carried out to evaluate the effects of daily thermal cycles on the hydraulic performance of CCLs under simulated landfill conditions. Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on different soil specimens after being exposed to various thermal and dehydration cycles. An increase in the CCL hydraulic conductivity of up to one order of magnitude was recorded after 30 thermal cycles for soils with low plasticity index (PI = 9.5%). However, medium (PI = 25%) and high (PI = 37.2%) plasticity soils did not show significant hydraulic deviation due to their self-healing potential. Overlaying the CCL with a cover layer minimized the effects of daily thermal cycles, and maintained stable hydraulic performance in the CCLs even after exposure to 60 thermal cycles. Wet-dry cycles had a significant impact on the hydraulic aspect of low plasticity CCLs. However, medium and high plasticity CCLs maintained constant hydraulic performance throughout the test intervals. The study underscores the importance of protecting the CCL from exposure to atmosphere through covering it by a layer of geomembrane or an interim soil layer. PMID:26241932

  2. Gravitational effects of process-induced dislocations in silicon. [during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Matters pertaining to semiconductor device fabrication were studied in terms of the influence of gravity on the production of dislocations in silicon wafers during thermal cycling in a controlled ambient where no impurities are present and oxidation is minimal. Both n-type and p-type silicon wafers having a diameter of 1.25 in to 1.5 in, with fixed orientation and resistivity values, were used. The surface dislocation densities were measured quantitatively by the Sirtl etch technique. The results show two significant features of the plastic flow phenomenon as it is related to gravitational stress: (1) the density of dislocations generated during a given thermal cycle is directly related to the duration of the cycle; and (2) the duration of the thermal cycle required to produce a given dislocation density is inversely related to the equilibrium temperature. Analysis of the results indicates that gravitational stress is instrumental in process-induced defect generation.

  3. Heat-affected zone thermal cycles in Inconel[reg sign] 718

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.J. CANMET-MTL, Ottawa, Ontario ); Nippes, E.F. . Materials Engineering Dept.)

    1993-12-01

    Thermal cycles adjacent to autogenous welds in 1-cm (0.39-in.) IN718 plate were obtained using a computer data-acquisition system. Data from gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) of various energy inputs were regression analyzed and tabulated for various times and distances from the centerline. The observation of grain-boundary precipitates in simulated and actual weld microstructures were used as a method of thermal-cycle verification. Application of the thermal-cycle data to the simulation of a fracture-toughness specimen was investigated. Thermal gradients across the specimen and high cooling rates were limiting factors in the microstructural simulation of a large cross-sectional-area specimen.

  4. Thermal shock cycling effect on the compressive behaviour of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, G C; Kouveliotis, G; Nikolopoulou, F; Papaefthymiou, K P; Bairami, V; Portan, D V

    2015-02-26

    All ceramic veneers are a common choice that both dentists and patients make for anterior restorations. In the framework of the present study the residual compressive behavior of the above mentioned complex structures after being thermally shock cycled was investigated. An exponential decrease in both compressive stiffness and strength with the thermal shock cycle number was observed. Experimental findings were in good agreement with predicted values. Photomicrographs obtained revealed a different failure mechanism for the pristine and cycled teeth, which is indicative of the susceptible nature of restored teeth to thermal shock. A two-dimensional finite element model designed gave a better insight upon the stress fields in response of thermal or mechanical loadings developed in the oral cavity. PMID:25597812

  5. Thermal Cycling of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia-Coated Hot Work Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel

    2011-09-01

    Thermal fatigue performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia-coated hot work tool steel was investigated under conditions encountered by thixoforming dies in semi-solid processing of steels. The thermal barrier effect of the YSZ coating was evident from the relatively smaller and more uniform temperature gradients set up across the section of the sample, which in turn, had a direct impact on the magnitude of thermal stresses generated at the surface of the tool steel. In spite of some thermal expansion mismatch with the substrate tool steel and occasional discontinuous thermally grown oxides along the splat boundaries and between the BC and TC, the YSZ coating survived thermal cycling under steel thixoforming conditions for over 12,000 cycles with no evidence of debonding and spallation. This is a nearly ten-fold increase in thermal fatigue life with respect to the uncoated counterpart. An increasingly dense YSZ layer and the toughening linked with the tetragonal to monoclinic ZrO2 phase transformation are credited for the remarkable performance of the YSZ-coating. It is fair to conclude that the YSZ coating offers adequate protection for the underlying tool steel, which without YSZ coating, suffers severe oxidation after only several hundred cycles and extensive cracking after 1000 cycles.

  6. Direct observation of prompt pre-thermal laser ion sheath acceleration.

    PubMed

    Zeil, K; Metzkes, J; Kluge, T; Bussmann, M; Cowan, T E; Kraft, S D; Sauerbrey, R; Schramm, U

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity laser plasma-based ion accelerators provide unsurpassed field gradients in the megavolt-per-micrometer range. They represent promising candidates for next-generation applications such as ion beam cancer therapy in compact facilities. The weak scaling of maximum ion energies with the square-root of the laser intensity, established for large sub-picosecond class laser systems, motivates the search for more efficient acceleration processes. Here we demonstrate that for ultrashort (pulse duration ~30 fs) highly relativistic (intensity ~10(21) W cm(-2)) laser pulses, the intra-pulse phase of the proton acceleration process becomes relevant, yielding maximum energies of around 20 MeV. Prominent non-target-normal emission of energetic protons, reflecting an engineered asymmetry in the field distribution of promptly accelerated electrons, is used to identify this pre-thermal phase of the acceleration. The relevant timescale reveals the underlying physics leading to the near-linear intensity scaling observed for 100 TW class table-top laser systems. PMID:22673901

  7. Direct observation of prompt pre-thermal laser ion sheath acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Zeil, K.; Metzkes, J.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.E.; Kraft, S.D.; Sauerbrey, R.; Schramm, U.

    2012-01-01

    High-intensity laser plasma-based ion accelerators provide unsurpassed field gradients in the megavolt-per-micrometer range. They represent promising candidates for next-generation applications such as ion beam cancer therapy in compact facilities. The weak scaling of maximum ion energies with the square-root of the laser intensity, established for large sub-picosecond class laser systems, motivates the search for more efficient acceleration processes. Here we demonstrate that for ultrashort (pulse duration ~30 fs) highly relativistic (intensity ~1021 W cm−2) laser pulses, the intra-pulse phase of the proton acceleration process becomes relevant, yielding maximum energies of around 20 MeV. Prominent non-target-normal emission of energetic protons, reflecting an engineered asymmetry in the field distribution of promptly accelerated electrons, is used to identify this pre-thermal phase of the acceleration. The relevant timescale reveals the underlying physics leading to the near-linear intensity scaling observed for 100 TW class table-top laser systems. PMID:22673901

  8. Experimental study of temperature fields and thermal fluxes in the electrode walls of an MGD accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, V.I.; Vitkovskaya, O.N.; Panfilova, O.V.; Rudakova, A.P.; Sukhobokov, A.D.; Shcherbakov, G.I.

    1980-07-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study of the features of heat transfer from a flow of air with KNa admixture to the electrode walls of an MGD accelerator in a wide range of operating modes (B=1--2.5 T,j=4--45 A/cm/sup 2/,P/sub st/0.2=(en-dash0.5)x10/sup 5/ Pa). Data are obtained on the size and distribution of the thermal fluxes in different zones of an MGD channel and over the electrodes, taken separately. Methods are chosen for calculating the convective thermal flux on the electrode walls over the entire length of the accelerator channel, and the values of the thermal flux in the discharge zone due to processes at the electrodes are determined. A possible explanation is proposed for the difference between the values of the thermal fluxes at the electrode walls over different portions of the MGD channel, which is based on features of the behavior of microarcs on the surface of the electrodes.

  9. Some single-piston closed-cycle machines and Peter Tailer's thermal lag engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, C. D.

    1993-05-01

    Peter Tailer has devised, built, and operated a beautifully simple engine with a closed working gas cycle, external heating, and only a single piston. The aim of this paper is to cast some light on the possible modes of operation for his machine. The methods developed to analyze certain aspects of Stirling cycle engines, and especially the thermodynamic losses incurred in systems that are neither perfectly isothermal nor perfectly adiabatic, can be applied to Tailer's system. The results identify two idealized cycles fr such machines; relate those cycles to a single piston, ported cylinder machine proposed earlier; and offer a possible explanation for the success of the thermal lag engine.

  10. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in thermally heated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M.; Vennelakanti, S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally heated sediment environments, such as are found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park, host fully functional microbial ecosystems. As with any ecosystem, both sources and sinks of carbon, nitrogen, and a myriad of other nutrients and energy-driving factors must be supplied. While we know microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse, we know little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in sediments and biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that the four best studied carbon fixation pathways [Calvin, reverse tricarboxylic acid, acetyl-CoA, 3-hydroxypropionate cycles] may all be functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Microcosm experiments using biofilms from this hot spring as inoculae with 13C labeled carbon substrates indicate heterotrophic growth [2]. In addition, metagenomic analysis of environmental DNA has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [3]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [4, 5]. Of particular interest is the role of individuals in carbon and nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions suitable for chemosynthetic and photosynthetic growth vary. This study explores the diversity of cbbM/cbbL [Calvin cycle], aclB/oor/porA [rTCA cycle], nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. The transition of genetic diversity within sediments and biofilms is focused on the chemosynthetic

  11. A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, Bryan F

    2009-01-01

    It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

  12. High-frequency thermal-electrical cycles for pyroelectric energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Bikram; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Cho, Hanna; Martin, Lane W.; King, William P.

    2014-11-21

    We report thermal to electrical energy conversion from a 150 nm thick BaTiO{sub 3} film using pyroelectric cycles at 1 kHz. A microfabricated platform enables temperature and electric field control with temporal resolution near 1 μs. The rapid electric field changes as high as 11 × 10{sup 5 }kV/cm-s, and temperature change rates as high as 6 × 10{sup 5 }K/s allow exploration of pyroelectric cycles in a previously unexplored operating regime. We investigated the effect of phase difference between electric field and temperature cycles, and electric field and temperature change rates on the electrical energy generated from thermal-electrical cycles based on the pyroelectric Ericsson cycle. Complete thermodynamic cycles are possible up to the highest cycle rates tested here, and the energy density varies significantly with phase shifts between temperature and electric field waveforms. This work could facilitate the design and operation of pyroelectric cycles at high cycle rates, and aid in the design of new pyroelectric systems.

  13. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  14. A thermal model for the seasonal nitrogen cycle on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal N2-cycle model presently used to characterize such observed phenomena on Triton as atmospheric pressure and surface albedo features at the time of the Voyager encounter incorporates diurnal and seasonal subsurface heat conduction, and can account for the heat capacity of N2 frost deposits. The results obtained by this model differ from those of previous studies in that they do not predict the seasonal freezing-out of the Triton atmosphere; even for a wide range of input parameters, the bright southern polar cap is seen as rather unlikely to be N2. The results support the microphysical arguments for the presence of either dark or smooth translucent N2 frosts on the Triton surface.

  15. Thermal Cycling of Advanced Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; CA Lewisohn; M Singh; RE Loehman

    2003-08-25

    Thermal cycling was conducted on the compressive mica seals at 800 degrees C in air. Thin ({approx}0.1 mm) Muscovite mica was pressed between a metal tube and an alumina substrate and tested for leak rates at a stress of 100 psi in the advanced design and the plain design. The advanced design involves adding two glass interlayers and was found to greatly reduce the leak rates. Two metals (Inconcl No.600 and SS430) with high and low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) were used to evaluate the effect of CTE mismatch on thermal cycling. The results showed that the leak rates were lower for the advanced design than the plain micas. In addition, using the lower CTE (SS430) metal tube resulted in lower leak rates as compared to Inconel No.600 metal (high CTE). In general, the leak rates abruptly increased during the first couple of cycles, and the

  16. Oxidation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU with thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, MyoungYoup; Duong, Anh T.; Mumm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Crofer22 APU specimens were prepared by grinding with grit 80 and 120 SiC grinding papers and were thermally cycled. The variation in oxidation behavior with thermal cycling was then investigated. Observation of microstructure, measurement of area specific resistance (ASR), analysis of the atomic percentages of the elements by EDX, and XRD analysis were performed. XRD patterns showed that the (Cr, Mn)3O4 spinel phase grew on the surface of the Crofer22 APU samples ground with grit 120. For the samples ground with grit 80, the ASR increased as the number of thermal cycles increased. Plots of ln (ASR/T) vs. 1/T for the samples ground with grit 80 after n = 4, 20 and 40 exhibited good linearity, and the apparent activation energies were between 63.7 kJ/mole and 76.3 kJ/mole.

  17. Thermal runaway features of large format prismatic lithium ion battery using extended volume accelerating rate calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuning; Fang, Mou; He, Xiangming; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Mingxuan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the thermal runaway features of a 25 Ah large format prismatic lithium ion battery with Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 (NCM) cathode are evaluated using the extended volume-accelerating rate calorimetry (EV-ARC). 4 thermocouples are set at different positions of the battery. The temperature inside the battery is 870 °C or so, much higher than that outside the battery. The temperature difference is calculated from the recorded data. The temperature difference within the battery stays lower than 1 °C for 97% of the test period, while it rises to its highest, approximately 520 °C, when thermal runaway happens. The voltage of the battery is also measured during the test. It takes 15-40 s from the sharp drop of voltage to the instantaneous rise of temperature. Such a time interval is beneficial for early warning of the thermal runaway. Using a pulse charge/discharge profile, the internal resistance is derived from the quotient of the pulse voltage and the current during the ARC test. The internal resistance of the battery increases slowly from 20 mΩ to 60 mΩ before thermal runaway, while it rises to 370 mΩ when thermal runaway happens indicating the loss of the integrity of the separator or the battery swell.

  18. Thermal analysis of a simple-cycle gas turbine in biogas power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Yomogida, D.E.; Thinh, Ngo Dinh

    1995-09-01

    This paper investigates the technical feasibility of utilizing small simple-cycle gas turbines (25 kW to 125 kW) for biogas power generation through thermal analysis. A computer code, GTPower, was developed to evaluate the performance of small simple-cycle gas turbines specifically for biogas combustion. The 125 KW Solar Gas Turbine (Tital series) has been selected as the base case gas turbine for biogas combustion. After its design parameters and typical operating conditions were entered into GTPower for analysis, GTPower outputted expected values for the thermal efficiency and specific work. For a sensitivity analysis, the GTPower Model outputted the thermal efficiency and specific work. For a sensitivity analysis, the GTPower Model outputted the thermal efficiency and specific work profiles for various operating conditions encountered in biogas combustion. These results will assist future research projects in determining the type of combustion device most suitable for biogas power generation.

  19. Effects of Radiation and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on EPC 1001 Gallium Nitride Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Data obtained on long-term thermal cycling of new un-irradiated and irradiated samples of EPC1001 gallium nitride enhancement-mode transistors are presented. This work was done by a collaborative effort including GRC, GSFC, and support the NASA www.nasa.gov 1 JPL in of Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  20. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  1. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Control and Irradiated EPC 2nd Generation GaN FETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Results of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  2. CHANGE IN FIELD HARMONICS AFTER QUENCH AND THERMAL CYCLES IN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; JAIN,A.; MURATORE,J.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; WYSS,C.

    1997-05-12

    A change in field harmonics after quench and thermal cycles has been observed in superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of this effect in a number of RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. These changes in field harmonics may limit the ultimate field quality and its reproducibility in superconducting magnets. A change in pre-stress has also been observed after quench and thermal cycles. A possible link between these two changes is explored.

  3. Effect of thermal cycling on impurity grain boundary segregation in maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.; Borisov, B. A.

    2002-12-01

    The paper presents results of Auger spectroscopy of grain boundary elemental composition of maraging steel 11Cr10Ni2TiMo after typical heat treatment followed by thermal cycling. Specimens in the austenitic condition were subjected to aging at 550 °C and to cyclic heat treatment. Afterwards specimens were doped by hydrogen in an electrolytic cell in order to produce grain boundary brittleness. Fracture was performed by tensile loading in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber of a special Auger spectrometer. A noticeable phosphorus grain boundary segregation was observed after aging at 550 °C. A substantial decrease in grain boundary impurity segregation following thermal cycling has been observed.

  4. Residual thermal effects in macro fiber composite actuators exposed to persistent temperature cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobeck, J. D.; Owen, R. B.; Inman, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the authors present results of an experimental investigation demonstrating how extreme persistent thermal cycling influences the performance of piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. More specifically, this research shows how repeated temperature cycling ranging from -60 °C to 90 °C and from -50 °C to 150 °C affects an MFCs ability to actuate while being driven at frequencies of 60 Hz to 90 Hz with a voltage of 20 Vpp. Experimental results show that thermal cycling causes MFC actuation characteristics to drift and eventually stabilize after approximately 20 cycles. In two cases presented here, thermal cycling alone caused a residual increase in actuation amplitude that exceeded the initial amplitude by 70%. This apparent thermal memory effect of MFCs may significantly impact the design and analysis of active structures where MFCs are used for vibration or displacement control in transient extreme temperature environments such as those encountered by aerospace structures, industrial equipment, automobiles, and civil infrastructure.

  5. Thermal cycling effect in U-10Mo/Zry-4 monolithic nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Denise A.; Zimmermann, Angelo J. O.; Silva, Selma L.; Piqueira, J. R. C.

    2016-05-01

    Uranium alloys in a monolithic form have been considered attractive candidates for high density nuclear fuel. However, this high-density fissile material configuration keeps the volume permitted for the retention of fission products at a minimum. Additionally, the monolithic nuclear fuel has a peculiar configuration, whereby the fuel is in direct contact with the cladding. How this fuel configuration will retain fission products and how this will affect its integrity under various physical conditions - such as thermal cycling - are some of the technological problems for this new fuel. In this paper, the effect of out-of-pile thermal cycling is studied for a monolithic fuel plate produced by a hot co-rolling method using U-10Mo (wt %) as the fuel alloy and Zircaloy-4 as the cladding material. After performing 10 thermal cycles from 25 to 400 °C at a rate of 1 °C/min (∼125 h), the fuel alloy presented several fractures that were observed to occur in the last three cycles. These cracks nucleated approximately in the center of the fuel alloy and crossed the interdiffusion zone initiating an internal crack in the cladding. The results suggest that the origin of these fractures is the thermal fatigue of the U-10Mo alloy caused due to the combination of two factors: (i) the high difference in the thermal expansion coefficient of the fuel and of the cladding material, and (ii) the bound condition of fuel/cladding materials in this fuel element configuration.

  6. On the Thermal Property of Arbitrarily Accelerating Charged Black Hole with a New Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenfeng, Niu; Wenbiao, Liu

    2006-07-01

    After a new tortoise coordinate transformation is adopted, the entropy and non-thermal radiation of an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole are discussed as an example of non-stationary black holes. The same cut-off relation is chosen as static case, which is independent of space-time, and then the entropy of the non-stationary black hole is also proportional to the area of its event horizon. Meanwhile, the crossing of the particle energy levels near the event horizon is studied, the representative of the maximum value of the crossing energy levels is the same as the usual tortoise coordinate transformation.

  7. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M; Mosher, Scott W; Slattery, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  8. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M.; Mosher, Scott W.; Slattery, Stuart R.; Hamilton, Steven P.

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  9. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating

  10. Long-term Thermal Cycling of Phlogopite Mica-based Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-02-02

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) require sealants to function properly in harsh environments at elevated temperatures. The SOFC stacks are expected to experience multiple thermal cycles (perhaps thousands of cycles for some applications) during their life time service in stationary or transportation applications. As a result, thermal cycle stability is considered a top priority for SOFC sealant development. In previous work, we have developed a hybrid mica-based compressive seal with very low leak rates of 2-4 x 10-2 to 10-3 sccm/cm at 800 C, and showed stable leak rates over limited thermal cycles In this paper we present results of long-term thermal cycle testing (> 1000 thermal cycles) of Phlogopite mica-based compressive seals. Open circuit voltage (OCV) was measured on a 2? x 2? 8-YSZ plate with the hybrid Phlogopite mica seals during thermal cycling in a dual environment (2.75% H2/Ar vs. air). During two long-term cycling tests, the measured OCVs were found to be consistent with the calculated Nernst voltages. The hybrid mica seal showed excellent thermal cycle stability over 1000 thermal cycles and can be considered a strong candidate for SOFC applications.

  11. On a thermal analysis of a second stripper for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-08-04

    This memo summarizes simple calculations and results of the thermal analysis on the second stripper to be used in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Both liquid (Sodium) and solid (Titanium and Vanadium) stripper concepts were considered. These calculations were intended to provide basic information to evaluate the feasibility of liquid (thick film) and solid (rotating wheel) second strippers. Nuclear physics calculations to estimate the volumetric heat generation in the stripper material were performed by 'LISE for Excel'. In the thermal calculations, the strippers were modeled as a thin 2D plate with uniform heat generation within the beam spot. Then, temperature distributions were computed by assuming that the heat spreads conductively in the plate in radial direction without radiative heat losses to surroundings.

  12. A Simulation Based Metaheuristic Optimization of the Thermal Cure Cycle of Carbon-Epoxy Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Palazzo, Gaetano S.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper a simulation based optimization procedure, based on the combination of the Simulated Annealing and the Nelder Mead algorithms, for the time reduction of the thermal cure cycle of composite laminates, has been proposed and discussed. The cycle time has been assumed as the objective function to be minimized, taking into account technological limitations by the means of a penalty function. Several simulations have been performed to test the proposed method and investigate the influence of the optimization algorithm parameters on the quality of the solution and the convergence rate of the algorithm, evidencing the capability of the procedure to converge to an optimal process window for cure cycle design.

  13. Thermal Cycle Reliability of PBGA/CCGA 717 I/Os

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2006-01-01

    Status of thermal cycle test results for a nonfunctional daisy-chained peripheral ceramic column grid array (CCGA) and its plastic ball grid array (PBGA) version. both having 560 I/Os. were presented in last year's conference. Test results included environmental data for three different thermal cycle regimes (-55 C/125 C, -55 C/100 C, and -50 C /75 C). Update information on these - especially failure type for assemblies with high and low solder volumes-were presented. The thermal cycle test procedure followed those recommended IPC-9701 for tin-lead solder joint assemblies. Revision A of this specification covers guideline thermal cycle requirements for Pb-free solder joints. Some background information discussed during release of this specification with its current guideline recommendations were also presented. In a recent reliability investigation a fully populated CCGA with 717 I/Os was also considered for assembly reliability. evaluation. The functional package is a field-programmable gate array that has much higher processing power than its previous version. This new package is smaller in dimension, has no interposer, and has a thinner column wrapped with copper for reliability improvement. This paper will also present thermal cycle test results for this package assembly and its plastic version with 728 I/Os. both of which were exposed to three different cycle regimes. Two cycle profiles were those specified by IPC- 9701A for tin-lead, i.e. -55 to 100 C and -55 to 125 C and one was a cycle profile specified by Mil-Std-883, i.e.. -65 C/150 C which is generally used for ceramic hybrid packages. Per IPC-9701 A, test vehicles were built using daisy chain packages and were continuously monitored. The effects of many process and assembly variables-including corner staking commonly used for improving resistance to mechanical loading such as drop and vibration loads--were also considered as part of the test matrix. Optical photomicrographs were taken at various thermal

  14. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  15. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  16. Improved thermal cycling durability and PCR compatibility of polymer coated quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhe; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Guan, Yifu

    2013-09-01

    Quantum dots have experienced rapid development in imaging, labeling and sensing in medicine and life science. To be suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, we have tested QD thermal cycling durability and compatibility, which have not been addressed in previous reports. In this study, we synthesized CdSe/ZnS QDs with a surface modification with high-MW amphiphilic copolymers and observed that Mg2+ ions in the PCR reaction could induce the QDs to precipitate and reduce their fluorescence signal significantly after thermal cycling. To overcome this problem, we used mPEG2000 to conjugate the QD surface for further protection, and found that this modification enables QDs to endure 40 thermal cycles in the presence of other components essential for PCR reactions. We have also identified that QDs have different effects on rTaq and Ex Taq polymerization systems. A high QD concentration could apparently reduce the PCR efficiency, but this inhibition was relieved significantly in the Ex PCR system as the concentration of Ex Taq polymerase was increased. Real-time PCR amplification results showed that QDs could provide a sufficiently measurable fluorescence signal without excessively inhibiting the DNA amplification. Based on this improved thermal cycling durability and compatibility with the PCR system, QDs have the potential to be developed as stable fluorescent sensors in PCR and real-time PCR amplification.

  17. Improved thermal cycling durability and PCR compatibility of polymer coated quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Xun, Zhe; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Guan, Yifu

    2013-09-01

    Quantum dots have experienced rapid development in imaging, labeling and sensing in medicine and life science. To be suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, we have tested QD thermal cycling durability and compatibility, which have not been addressed in previous reports. In this study, we synthesized CdSe/ZnS QDs with a surface modification with high-MW amphiphilic copolymers and observed that Mg²⁺ ions in the PCR reaction could induce the QDs to precipitate and reduce their fluorescence signal significantly after thermal cycling. To overcome this problem, we used mPEG2000 to conjugate the QD surface for further protection, and found that this modification enables QDs to endure 40 thermal cycles in the presence of other components essential for PCR reactions. We have also identified that QDs have different effects on rTaq and Ex Taq polymerization systems. A high QD concentration could apparently reduce the PCR efficiency, but this inhibition was relieved significantly in the Ex PCR system as the concentration of Ex Taq polymerase was increased. Real-time PCR amplification results showed that QDs could provide a sufficiently measurable fluorescence signal without excessively inhibiting the DNA amplification. Based on this improved thermal cycling durability and compatibility with the PCR system, QDs have the potential to be developed as stable fluorescent sensors in PCR and real-time PCR amplification. PMID:23924819

  18. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine their durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  19. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine there durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  20. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1986-12-30

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  1. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1992-02-25

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  2. Thermal Cycling and Degradation Mechanisms of Compressive Mica-based Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. )

    2002-11-14

    Thermal cycling was conducted on the compressive mica seals at 800 degrees C in air. Thin ({approx}0-1 mm) Muscovite mica was pressed between a metal pipe and an alumina substrate and tested for leak rates at a stress of 100 psi in the plain (mica only) and the hybrid design.

  3. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  4. Sensing of retained martensite during thermal cycling of shape memory alloy wires via electrical resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher B.

    2013-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) remain one of the most commercially viable active materials, thanks to a high specific work and the wide availability of high quality material. Still, significant challenges remain in predicting the degradation of SMA actuators during thermal cycling. One challenges in both the motivation and verification of degradation models is the measurement of retained martensite fraction during cycling. Direct measurement via diffraction is difficult to perform in situ, impossible for thin wires, (< 0.5mm) and prohibitively difficult for lengthy studies. As an alternative, the temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity (TCR) is used as an indicator of martensite phase fraction during thermal cycling of SMA wires. We investigate this technique with an example cycling experiment, using the TCR to successfully measure a 20% increase in retained martensite fraction over 80000 thermal cycles. As SMA wire temperature is difficult to measure directly during resistive heating, we also introduce a method to infer temperature to within 5 °C by integrating the lumped heat equation.

  5. Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life

    SciTech Connect

    Maleki, Hossein; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Hallmark, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The impact of elevated temperature chargeedischarge cycling on thermal conductivity (K-value) of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) cells of various chemistries from three different manufacturers was investigated. These included high voltage (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.35 V), wide voltage (Si:C/LiCoO2:2.7e4.35 V) and conventional (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.2 V) chemistries. Investigation results show limited variability within the in-plane and through-plane K-values for the fresh cells with graphite-based anodes from all three suppliers. After 500 cycles at 45 C, in-plane and through-plane K-values of the high voltage cells reduced less vs. those for the wide voltage cells. Such results suggest that high temperature cycling could have a greater impact on thermal properties of Si:C cells than on the LIP cells with graphite (Gr) anode cells we tested. This difference is due to the excess swelling of Si:C-anode based cells vs. Gr-anode cells during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Thermal modeling is used to evaluate the impact of K-value changes, due to cycles at 45 C, on the cells internal heat propagation under internal short circuit condition that leads to localized meltdown of the separator.

  6. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, V. M.; Müller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have been used to categorise possible chemical changes of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) which are currently used in the aircraft industry. HSI is a hybrid technique that combines spectroscopy with imaging. It is able to detect chemical degradation of surfaces and has already been successfully applied in a wide range of fields including astronomy, remote sensing, cultural heritage and medical sciences. GFRP specimens were exposed to two different thermal loading conditions. One thermal loading condition was a continuous thermal exposure at 120°C for 24h, 48 h and 96h, i.e. ageing at a constant temperature. The other thermal loading condition was thermal cycling with three different numbers of cycles (4000, 8000, 12000) and two temperature ranges (0°C to 120°C and -25°C to 95°C). The effects of both conditions were measured using both HSI and interlaminar shear (ILSS) tests. No significant changes of the physical properties of the thermally cycled GFRP specimens were detected using interlaminar shear strength tests and optical microscopy. However, when using HIS, differences of the surface conditions were detected. The results showed that the different thermal loading conditions could be successfully clustered in different colours, using the HSI linear unmixing technique. Each different thermal loading condition showed a different chemical degradation level on its surface which was indicated using different colours.

  7. The effects of thermal cycling on matrix cracking and stiffness changes in composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Hyer, M. W.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The study investigated the accumulation of transverse matrix cracks and the resultant loss of torsional, extensional, and bending stiffnesses in 8 layer 0.5 in. diameter crossply tubes subjected to thermal cycling. The tubes were graphite-epoxy and the temperature range during cycling was -250 to 200 F. The effect of fiber and matrix properties was investigated through the use of T300 and P75S fibers and 934 and CE339 resins. The study considered 0, 10, 50, 100, 300, and 500 thermal cycles. Photomicrographs, X-rays, and edge replication were used to evaluate cracking. Special loading fixtures were used to measure stiffness changes. An important finding was that for the tubes studied, even with extensive cracking, the bending and extensional stiffnesses were not affected. The torsional stiffness, however, was strongly affected.

  8. On the thermal efficiency of power cycles in finite time thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Farhang; Morad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Ashkan

    2016-09-01

    The Carnot, Diesel, Otto, and Brayton power cycles are reconsidered endoreversibly in finite time thermodynamics (FTT). In particular, the thermal efficiency of these standard power cycles is compared to the well-known results in classical thermodynamics. The present analysis based on FTT modelling shows that a reduction in both the maximum and minimum temperatures of the cycle causes the thermal efficiency to increase. This is antithetical to the existing trend in the classical references. Under the assumption of endoreversibility, the relation between the efficiencies is also changed to {η }{{Carnot}}\\gt {η }{{Brayton}}\\gt {η }{{Diesel}}\\gt {η }{{Otto}}, which is again very different from the corresponding classical results. The present results benefit a better understanding of the important role of irreversibility on heat engines in classical thermodynamics.

  9. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  11. ICME Shock Accelerated Seps Transport in 3-D Heliospheric Magnetic Fields: Simulations and Multi Spacecraft Observations in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In solar cycle 24, solar energetic particles (SEPs) are measured by multi-spacecraft at different locations, e.g., STEREO A and B, and ACE. Interplanetary observers located on the opposite sides of the Sun may or may not be connected to the ICME shock by the IMF. And the connected observers may also be connected to different parts of an ICME. In this work, we will numerically solve the Fokker-Planck transport equation to get the fluxes of SEPs accelerated by ICME shocks. In addition, we will compare our simulation results with SEP observations of different spacecraft, e.g., STEREO A and B, and ACE, during solar cycle 24. The simulation and data analysis together can improve our understanding of SEPs acceleration and transport mechanism.

  12. Difference in the heat capacity and the coefficient of thermal expansion responses during thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Grigori; Lee, Eun-Woong; Caruthers, James

    2011-03-01

    An observation that different experimental methods give different values of Tg is part of the lore of the field of the glassy polymers. We report on a careful study of a series of polymeric systems both thermoplastic and thermoset, including PMMA, PC, PS, and 3,3' DDS Epon 825, conducted using DSC and TMA techniques. We found that for the same thermal history the heat capacity and the coefficient of thermal expansion (both measured upon heating) as functions of temperature transition from the glassy asymptote to the equilibrium asymptote at significantly different temperatures; this difference was in the range from 8 to 17 degrees, depending on the system. We argue that such a large difference in the enthalpy and volume responses during the same thermal history is inconsistent with the commonly used material clock models, but is consistent with the view of the glassy materials as containing dynamically heterogeneous regions.

  13. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  14. Thermal energy storage for low grade heat in the organic Rankine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Michael John

    Limits of efficiencies cause immense amounts of thermal energy in the form of waste heat to be vented to the atmosphere. Up to 60% of unrecovered waste heat is classified as low or ultra-low quality, making recovery difficult or inefficient. The organic Rankine cycle can be used to generate mechanical power and electricity from these low temperatures where other thermal cycles are impractical. A variety of organic working fluids are available to optimize the ORC for any target temperature range. San Diego State University has one such experimental ORC using R245fa, and has been experimenting with multiple expanders. One limitation of recovering waste heat is the sporadic or cyclical nature common to its production. This inconsistency makes sizing heat recovery ORC systems difficult for a variety of reasons including off-design-point efficiency loss, increased attrition from varying loads, unreliable outputs, and overall system costs. Thermal energy storage systems can address all of these issues by smoothing the thermal input to a constant and reliable level and providing back-up capacity for times when the thermal input is deactivated. Multiple types of thermal energy storage have been explored including sensible, latent, and thermochemical. Latent heat storage involves storing thermal energy in the reversible phase change of a phase change material, or PCM, and can have several advantages over other modalities including energy storage density, cost, simplicity, reliability, relatively constant temperature output, and temperature customizability. The largest obstacles to using latent heat storage include heat transfer rates, thermal cycling stability, and potentially corrosive PCMs. Targeting 86°C, the operating temperature of SDSU's experimental ORC, multiple potential materials were explored and tested as potential PCMs including Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate (MgCl2˙6H2O), Magnesium Nitrate Hexahydrate (Mg(NO3)2˙6H 2O), montan wax, and carnauba wax. The

  15. The chloroplast protein LTO1/AtVKOR is involved in the xanthophyll cycle and the acceleration of D1 protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bo; Lu, Ying; Du, Jia-Jia; Peng, Jun-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The thylakoid protein LTO1/AtVKOR-DsbA is recently found to be an oxidoreductase involved in disulfide bond formation and the assembly of photosystem II (PSII) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, experimental evidence showed that LTO1 deficiency caused severe photoinhibition which was related to the xanthophyll cycle and D1 protein degradation. The lto1-2 mutant was more sensitive to intense irradiance than wild type. When treated with different concentrations of dithiothreitol (DTT), an inhibitor of violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE) in the xanthophyll cycle, there was a larger reduction in NPQ in the wild type than in the lto1-2 mutant under high irradiance, indicating that lto1-2 had a lower sensitivity to DTT gradients than did the wild type. Zeaxanthin in the xanthophyll cycle, which participates in the thermal dissipation of excess absorbed light energy, was much less active in lto1-2 than in the wild type under intense light levels, and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle was consistent with the susceptibility of NPQ. Together these observations indicated that aggravated photoinhibition in lto1-2 was related to a reduction in xanthophyll cycle-associated energy dissipation. When D1 protein synthesis was suppressed by an inhibitor of chloroplast protein synthesis (streptomycin sulfate), the levels of D1 protein decreased more in the lto1-2 mutant than in the wild type when exposed to intense light levels, implying that a deficiency in LTO1 accelerated the degradation of D1 and thus affected D1 turnover. Transgenic complementation of plants with lto1-2 ultimately allowed for the recovery of the photoinhibition properties of leaves. PMID:24300993

  16. Thermal-Cycling Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Partially Stabilized Zirconia Coatings on High-Density Graphite Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Jagadeesh; Thyagarajan, K.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-08-01

    The thermal cycling behavior of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ)-coated by plasma-spray process on NiCrAlY bond-coated high-density (HD) graphite substrate was investigated. Thermal cycling was carried out at 600 and 750 °C under vacuum, up to 200 cycles. Each cycle comprised a 10-min heating followed by forced air cooling for 10 min down to room temperature. Characterization of the microstructure and the phase analysis of thermal-cycled PSZ coatings by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy revealed the correlation between the microstructural/crystallographic phases and the mechanical integrity of the coating up to 200 cycles. Segmented and vertical cracks generated on the coating during thermal cycling were observed to propagate with increase in the number of cycles. Macrocracks and variations in elemental compositions were not observed until 200 cycles at 600 and 750 °C. XRD and Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of nontransformable tetragonal phase only in all the thermal-cycled PSZ coatings, irrespective of temperature up to 200 cycles.

  17. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  18. Thermal Behavior of Prismatic Lithium-Ion Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takuto; Wakahara, Kenji; Fukuda, Kenichi; Ohmori, Yositake; Nakayama, Masato; Onda, Kazuo

    The temperature of secondary batteries may increase above allowable limits and deteriorate its performance, during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Therefore, assessing thermal behavior of battery is essential. On the other hand, rectangular parallelepiped shape batteries are supposedly going to be used more commonly for cars and electrical devices because of their better space efficiency. Then, we constructed a two dimensional Cartesian coordinates battery thermal behavior model for a prismatic lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. It was extended from one dimensional cylindrical coordinates model, which had been developed and experimentally verified. As parameters of the numerical model, battery heat source factors such as overpotential resistance, entropy change, heat transfer coefficient and heat capacity have been measured. The radiation thermometer was used for obtaining battery surface temperature variance and distributions. Battery temperature generally increases as charge and discharge cycle proceeds, nevertheless temperature drops were observed at begging of low rate charge cycle and vicinity of SOC=0.8 in discharge cycle. Our modified model could predict these phenomena and agreed well with experimental results. Then the reliability of our numerical model and measuring techniques of heat source factors are confirmed each other.

  19. Thermal Behavior of Small Lithium-Ion Secondary Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles than the rated condition, when EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. During rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature rises significantly and may increase more than the allowable temperature. So we calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles using our battery thermal behavior model, which we have developed being confirmed its validity during discharge cycle at the smaller current than the discharge rate of 1C. The heat source factors were measured by the methods described in our previous study, because the present batteries have been improved in their performance and have low overpotential resistance. The battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient was measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, and was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The calculated temperature by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple. Therefore we can confirm the validity of this model again during rapid charge and discharge cycles.

  20. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, Bryan F

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  1. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  2. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  3. Stability of lysozyme in aqueous extremolyte solutions during heat shock and accelerated thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Avanti, Christina; Saluja, Vinay; van Streun, Erwin L P; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of lysozyme in aqueous solutions in the presence of various extremolytes (betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose, ectoine, and firoin) under different stress conditions. The stability of lysozyme was determined by Nile red Fluorescence Spectroscopy and a bioactivity assay. During heat shock (10 min at 70°C), betaine, trehalose, ectoin and firoin protected lysozyme against inactivation while hydroxyectoine, did not have a significant effect. During accelerated thermal conditions (4 weeks at 55°C), firoin also acted as a stabilizer. In contrast, betaine, hydroxyectoine, trehalose and ectoine destabilized lysozyme under this condition. These findings surprisingly indicate that some extremolytes can stabilize a protein under certain stress conditions but destabilize the same protein under other stress conditions. Therefore it is suggested that for the screening extremolytes to be used for protein stabilization, an appropriate storage conditions should also be taken into account. PMID:24465983

  4. Open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Status and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.

    1984-08-01

    Tropical oceans with a 20 C or more temperature difference between surface and deep water represent a vast resource of renewable thermal energy. One of the methods of harnessing this resource is an open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system utilizing steam evaporated from the surface water for powering the turbine. In this paper, the state of the art of research and component development, as related to heat and mass transfer processes, power production, noncondensable gas handling, and seawater flow hydraulics, are described through an illustrated preliminary design study of a 1-MW facility.

  5. Compatibility and accelerated aging study for Li(Si)/FeS/sub 2 thermally activated batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, J. W.; Searcy, J. Q.; Neiswander, P. N.; Poole, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    Thermally activated batteries using the lithium (silicon) iron disulfide (Li(Si)/FeS2) electrochemical system are used in weapons having a required storage life of 25 years and high reliability. A review of known data revealed no information on the compatibility of Li(Si)/FeS2 with the organic materials used in the system. The compatibility question is studied. Accelerated-aging data on pairs of materials were produced. In addition, a group of production batteries was aged and tested. Three aging temperatures were used during the one-year study. Gas analyses, electrical tests and mechanical tests were compared for control and aged samples. Two results, the depletion of oxygen and an increase in hydrogen in the compatibility and accelerated-aging samples, stimulated additional studies. No unexpected or significant changes were observed in the electrical or mechanical properties of the organic materials. Calorific output and chloride ion content of heat pellets indicated no degradation with aging. Ignition sensitivity and burn rate measurements suggested no heat pellet degradation. Oxygen content in aged lithium (silicon) anodes remained within acceptable limits. Single-cell tests and battery test results showed no degradation with aging.

  6. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  7. Effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of 350-grade maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Kishore, R.; Asundi, M.K.

    1996-03-01

    The effects of retained austenite produced by thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of a precipitation-hardened 350-grade commercial maraging steel were examined. The presence of retained austenite caused decreases in the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and effected a significant increase in the tensile ductility. Increased impact toughness was also produced by this treatment. The mechanical stability of retained austenite was evaluated by tension and impact tests at subambient temperatures. A deformation-induced transformation of the austenite was manifested as load drops on the load-elongation plots at subzero temperatures. This transformation imparts excellent low-temperature ductility to the material. A wide range of strength, ductility, and toughness can be obtained by subjecting the steel to thermal cycling before the precipitation-hardening treatment.

  8. Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP): Instrument and Simulation Development Status at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Angela A.; Schmierer, Eric N.; Gettemy, Donald; Howard, David W.; Wermer, Joseph R.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    2005-07-15

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a collaborative effort with Savannah River Site to demonstrate the Tube-in-Tube (TnT) column design and to improve TCAP science. TnT TCAP is an alternative design which uses a liquid to thermally cycle the metal hydride packed column. Inert gas displacement tests and deuterium pulse tests have been performed on the TnT TCAP column. The inert gas displacement tests are designed to measure plug flow in the column while the deuterium pulse tests determine the separation ability of the column. A residual gas analyzer measures the gases in the exit stream and the experimental results are compared with pulse test model results.

  9. The effect of two configuration factors, time, and thermal cycling on resin to dentin bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard B; Dérand, Tore; Andreou, Pantelis; Murphy, Darcy

    2003-03-01

    Most in vitro testing of bonding systems is performed using specimens made in a mold with a low configuration (C) factor (ratio of bonded/unbonded surfaces) whereas clinically the C-factor is usually much greater. This study compared the effect of thermal cycling on the measured shear bond strength of 3M Single Bond dental adhesive bonded to dentin using molds with two different C-factors. The hypothesis was that neither C-factor nor thermal cycling would affect measured bond strengths. Resin composite was bonded to human dentin in cylindrical molds with an internal diameter of 3.2mm and either 1mm or 2.5mm deep. The 1mm deep molds had a C-factor of 2.2 and the 2.5mm deep molds had a C-factor of 4.1. Specimens were debonded either 10min after they had been bonded to dentin, or after they had been stored for 7 days in water at 37+/-1 degrees C, or after thermal cycling 5000 times for 7 days. Two-way ANOVA showed that overall both the C-factor and the storage condition had a significant effect on bond strength (p<0.001). There was a significant interaction (p<0.001) between the C-factor and how the specimens had been stored. The GLM/LSMEANS procedure with Sidak's adjustment for multiple comparisons showed that overall the specimens made in the mold with a high C-factor (4.1) had a lower bond strength than those that had been made in the mold with a lower (2.2) C-factor (p<0.001). Thermal cycling had a negative effect on the bond strength only for specimens made in molds with a C-factor of 4.1 (p<0.001). PMID:12504523

  10. Effects of cure temperature, electron radiation, and thermal cycling on P75/930 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composites are candidates for future space structures due to high stiffness and dimensional stability requirements of these structures. Typical graphite/epoxy composites are brittle and have high residual stresses which often result in microcracking during the thermal cycling typical of the space environment. Composite materials used in geosynchronous orbit applications will also be exposed to high levels of radiation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of cure temperature and radiation exposure on the shear strength and thermal cycling-induced microcrack density of a high modulus, 275 F cure epoxy, P75/930. The results from the P75/930 are compared to previously reported data on P75/934 and T300/934 where 934 is a standard 350 F cure epoxy. The results of this study reveal that P75/930 is significantly degraded by total doses of electron radiation greater than 10(exp 8) rads and by thermally cycling between -250 F and 150 F. The P75/930 did not have improved microcrack resistance over the P75/934, and the 930 resin system appears to be more sensitive to electron radiation-induced degradation than the 934 resin system.

  11. Vibration and Thermal Cycling Effects on Bulk-fill Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Nagy, Z. F.; Sojourner, S. J.; Morris, D. L.

    2006-04-01

    Large-scale (1,000,000 liters or more) cryogenic storage tanks are typically perlite-insulated double-walled vessels. Associated problems with perlite, such as mechanical compaction and settling, could be greatly reduced by using newer bulk-fill materials such as glass bubbles or aerogel beads. Using the newer materials should translate to lower life cycle costs and improved system reliability. NASA Kennedy Space Center is leveraging its experience in the areas of materials development, insulation testing, and cryogenic systems design to develop an insulation retrofit option that will meet both industry and NASA requirements. A custom 10-liter dewar test apparatus, developed by the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory, was used to determine the vibration and thermal cycling effects on different bulk-fill insulation materials for cryogenic tanks. The testing included liquid-nitrogen boiloff testing and thermal cycling (with vibration) of a number of test dewars. Test results show that glass bubbles have better thermal performance and less mechanical compaction compared to perlite powder. The higher cost of the bulk material should be offset by reduced commodity loss from boiloff and improvements in material handling, evacuation, and vacuum retention. The long-term problem with settling and compaction of perlite should also be eliminated. Aerogel beads are superior for the no-vacuum condition and can now be considered in some applications. Further studies on large-scale systems are presently being pursued.

  12. Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi: Simulations vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell; Benafan, Othmane; Noebe, Ronald; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A recent microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal-based plasticity, the B2<-> MB190 phase transformation and anisotropic elasticity at the grain scale is calibrated to recent data for polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at.% Ni). Inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, texture and differential scanning calorimetry data, as well as a subset of recent isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. The model is assessed against additional experimental data. Several experimental trends are captured - in particular, the transformation strain during thermal cycling monotonically increases and reaches a peak with increasing bias stress. This is achieved, in part, by modifying the martensite hardening matrix proposed by Patoor et al. [Patoor E, Eberhardt A, Berveiller M. J Phys IV 1996;6:277]. Some experimental trends are underestimated - in particular, the ratcheting of macrostrain during thermal cycling. This may reflect a model limitation that transformation-plasticity coupling is captured on a coarse (grain) scale but not on a fine (martensitic plate) scale.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  14. Thermal Behavior of Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles, when the EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. The generated heat increases significantly the cell temperature and causes possibly bad influences on the battery performance and the safely requirement. So we have studied the thermal behavior of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles, applying our previous battery thermal model, which have been confirmed to agree with the experimental results at smaller charge current than the rated current. The heat sources by the entropy change, the hydrogen occlusion and the side reaction have been referred to the published data, and the overpotential resistance and the current efficiency, the ratio of main reaction current to charge current, have been measured experimentally through the rapid charge and discharge characteristics with constant current. By using these data our thermal model for Ni/MH battery has estimated its temperature increase, which agrees well with the measured temperature rise, with the root mean square error of 1.5°C and 2.1°C for charge and discharge cycles, respectively.

  15. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Zinc Antimonide Thin Films for High Temperature Thermoelectric Power Generation Applications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Woo, Chang-Su; Han, Seungwoo

    2015-08-19

    The zinc antimonide compound ZnxSby is one of the most efficient thermoelectric materials known at high temperatures due to its exceptional low thermal conductivity. For this reason, it continues to be the focus of active research, especially regarding its glass-like atomic structure. However, before practical use in actual surroundings, such as near a vehicle manifold, it is imperative to analyze the thermal reliability of these materials. Herein, we present the thermal cycling behavior of ZnxSby thin films in nitrogen (N2) purged or ambient atmosphere. ZnxSby thin films were prepared by cosputtering and reached a power factor of 1.39 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 321 °C. We found maximum power factor values gradually decreased in N2 atmosphere due to increasing resistivity with repeated cycling, whereas the specimen in air kept its performance. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy observations revealed that fluidity of Zn atoms leads to nanoprecipitates, porous morphologies, and even growth of a coating layer or fiber structures on the surface of ZnxSby after repetitive heating and cooling cycles. With this in mind, our results indicate that proper encapsulation of the ZnxSby surface would reduce these unwanted side reactions and the resulting degradation of thermoelectric performance. PMID:26226167

  16. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  17. Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

    2005-08-24

    An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

  18. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage–induced cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A.; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase–regulated nuclear–cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage–induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β–dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP–regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  19. Thermal Modelling Analysis of Spiral Wound Supercapacitor under Constant-Current Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Li, Liwei; Yin, Huaixian; Zhang, Tiezhu; Wan, Wubo

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional modelling approach is used to study the effects of operating and ambient conditions on the thermal behaviour of the spiral wound supercapacitor. The transient temperature distribution during cycling is obtained by using the finite element method with an implicit predictor-multicorrector algorithm. At the constant current of 2A, the results show that the maximum temperature appears in core area. After 5 cycles, the maximum temperature is 34.5°C, while in steady state, it’s up to 42.5°C. This paper further studies the relationship between the maximum temperature and charge-discharge current. The maximum temperature will be more than 60°C after 5 cycles at the current of 4A, and cooling measurements should be taken at that time. It can provide thoughts on inner temperature field distribution and structure design of the spiral wound supercapacitor in working process. PMID:26444687

  20. Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of thermally cycled single-edge wedge specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic-plastic stress-strain analyses were performed for single-edge wedge alloys subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Three cases (NASA TAZ-8A alloy under one cycling condition and 316 stainless steel alloy under two cycling conditions) were analyzed by using the MARC nonlinear, finite-element computer program. Elastic solutions from MARC showed good agreement with previously reported solutions that used the NASTRAN and ISO3DQ computer programs. The NASA TAZ-8A case exhibited no plastic strains, and the elastic and elastic-plastic analyses gave identical results. Elastic-plastic analyses of the 316 stainless steel alloy showed plastic strain reversal with a shift of the mean stresses in the compressive direction. The maximum equivalent total strain ranges for these cases were 13 to 22 percent greater than that calculated from elastic analyses.

  1. Some effects of thermal-cycle-induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Price, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation process observed in the hot gas side wall of rocket combustion chambers was investigaged for three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure by using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/cu m. The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the problems of life prediction associated with the types of failures encountered in the present work. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers. From these deformation data and observation of the failure sites it is evident that modeling the failure process as classic low cycle thermal fatigue is inadequate as a life prediction method.

  2. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  3. Damage accumulation in advanced metal-matrix composites under thermal cycling. Final report, 1 Oct 87-15 Oct 90

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, M.; Ramulu, M.; Armstrong, W.; Dunn, M.

    1991-02-25

    This research investigates the response to thermal cycling of a set of W-1%THO2 reinforced Fe-25CR-8Al-50Y superalloy matrix composites. During this research, unique composite materials were produced by powder metallurgical processing. These materials were three aligned composites of differing reinforcement aspect ratio, and a hierarchic composite which included fine diameter Al2O3 fibers. After hot isostatic pressing processing, specimen blanks were cut from the HIP billets by abrasive water jets after which specimens were turned using a conventional engine lathe. The specimens were then thermal sprayed with an oxidation resistant FeCrAlY coating identical to the matrix material. The specimens were then thermal cycled between 1100 C and 352 c and between 1100 C and 534 C for 100,500, or 750 cycles on a specially built thermal cycling machine. The dimensional change of each specimen was measured. It was found that the initial longitudinal growth per thermal cycle was small. After many thermal cycles however the longitudinal growth per thermal cycle became much larger. A severe growth of fiber-matrix interfacial damage was documented with scanning electron microscopy. The growth of two interfacial reaction phases was determined with a KEVEX dispersive x-ray analysis. The mechanical properties of the interfacial material were investigated with a Vickers microhardness test. Finally, the basic mechanical response of the material was investigated with room temperature tensile testing.

  4. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  5. COBRA-SFS CYCLE 3. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Spent Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a code for thermal-hydraulic analysis of multi-assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. It uses a lumped parameter finite difference approach to predict flow and temperature distributions in spent fuel storage systems and fuel assemblies, under forced and natural convection heat transfer conditions. Derived from the COBRA family of codes, which have been extensively evaluated against in-pile and out-of-pile data, COBRA-SFS retains all the important features of the COBRA codes for single phase fluid analysis, and extends the range application to include problems with two-dimensional radiative and three-dimensional conductive heat transfer. COBRA-SFS has been used to analyze various single- and multi-assembly spent fuel storage systems containing unconsolidated and consolidated fuel rods, with a variety of fill media, including air, helium and vacuum. Cycle 0 of COBRA-SFS was released in 1986. Subsequent applications of the code led to development of additional capabilities, which resulted in the release of Cycle 1 in February 1989. Since then, the code has undergone an independent technical review as part of a submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a generic license to apply the code to spent fuel storage system analysis. Modifications and improvements to the code have been combined to form Cycle 2. Cycle 3., the newest version of COBRA-SFS, has been validated and verified for transient applications, such as a storage cask thermal response to a pool fire.

  6. Microstructural stability of directionally solidified eutectic NiAl-Mo under static and thermal cycling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kush, M.T.; Holmes, J.W.; Gibala, R.

    1997-12-31

    The quasi-binary eutectic NiAl-9% Mo with faceted molybdenum fibers was subjected to both thermal annealing conditions and to annealing under thermal cycling conditions to determine the microstructural stability of this alloy. The static temperature tests were run at 0.85T{sub M}--0.97T{sub M} in an argon gas atmosphere. The thermal cycling tests were performed between temperatures of 700 C and 1,200 C by induction heating disk-shaped specimens in an argon gas atmosphere using time-temperature heating and cooling profiles to approximate potential engine applications. To quantify microstructural changes, the fiber size and size distribution and number of fibers per unit area were measured as a function of time at temperature. The overall results demonstrate that the directionally solidified eutectic NiAl-9Mo subjected to thermal fatigue conditions exhibits cell boundary coarsening and large shape changes, whereas the microstructure under static stress-free annealing is stable.

  7. Modeling and Prediction of Thermal Cycle Induced Failure in Epoxy-Silica Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmita, Grzegorz; Nowak, Tomasz; Sekula, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Epoxy resins filled with dielectric mineral particles are frequently used as insulating materials in power industry applications. Due to their excellent dielectric properties and relatively good thermal performance (resistance, ageing and conductivity) their usability is common and extensive. However, the mechanical performance of the resins is influenced by several factors such as resistance to crack propagation, especially in low temperature applications. This phenomenon is normally linked with appearance of two phase systems where particle filled epoxy material interacts with metallic inserts having significantly different thermal expansion coefficients. This kind of epoxy-metal interface can produce relatively high stresses in the product structure during thermal cycle loading. The paper deals with mechanical problems of power industry products and introduces the methodology for numerical modeling of failure in silica filled epoxy systems subjected to severe temperature gradients. Various aspects of material behavior modeling are covered in this article, including polymerization process, viscoelastic stress relaxation as well as stochastic cracking.

  8. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    PubMed Central

    CASSELLI, Denise Sá Maia; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CASSELLI, Henrique; MARTINS, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB)] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL)]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification). The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0). After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5ºC±2ºC followed by 55ºC±2ºC - T1) and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz - T2). Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (a=0.05). Results: The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. PMID:23559115

  9. Human Physiological Responses to Cycle Ergometer Leg Exercise During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Barnes, P. R.; Leftheriotis, G. P. N.; Arndt, N. F.; Simonson, S.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Spaceflight and bed-rest deconditioning decrease maximal oxygen uptake (aerobic power), strength, endurance capacity, and orthostatic tolerance. In addition to extensive use of muscular exercise conditioning as a countermeasure for the reduction in aerobic power (VO(sub 2max)), stimuli from some form of +Gz acceleration conditioning may be necessary to attenuate the orthostatic intolerance component of this deconditioning. Hypothesis: There will be no significant difference in the physiological responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  10. Modeling Seasonal Thermal Radiance Cycles for Change Detection at Volcanic / Geothermal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R.; Beuttel, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of thermal features associated with (and often preceding) volcanic activity have been used for decades to detect and monitor volcanism. However, anomalous thermal precursors to volcanic eruptions are usually only recognized retrospectively. One of the reasons for this is that precursor thermal activity is often too subtle in magnitude (spatially, temporally, or in absolute temperature) to be unambiguously detected in time to issue warnings or forecasts. Part of the reason for this is the trade-off between high spatial and high temporal resolution associated with satellite imaging systems. Thus, the goal of this work has been to develop some techniques for using high-temporal-resolution, coarse-spatial-resolution imagery to try to detect subtle thermal anomalies. To identify anomalies, background thermal activity must first be characterized. Every active, or potentially active, volcano has a unique thermal history that provides information about normal background thermal activity due to seasonal or diurnal variations. Understanding these normal variations allows recognition of anomalous activity that may be due to volcanic / hydrothermal processes - ultimately with a lead time that may be sufficient to issue eruption warnings or forecasts. Archived MODIS data, acquired ~daily from 2000 to 2012, were used to investigate seasonal thermal cycles at three volcanic areas with different types of thermal features: Mount St. Helens, which had a dacite dome-building eruption from 2004-2008; Mount Ruapehu, which has a 500-m diameter active summit crater lake; and Yellowstone, which is a large active geothermal system that has hundreds of hot springs and fumarole fields spread out over a very large area. The focus has been on using MODIS 1-km sensor radiance data in the MIR and TIR wavelength regions that are sensitive to thermal emission from features that range in temperature from hundreds of °C, down to tens of °C (below the boiling temperature

  11. The Effect of Interface Roughness and Oxide Film Thickness on the Inelastic Response of Thermal Barrier Coatings to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of interfacial roughness and oxide film thickness on thermally-induced stresses in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings subjected to thermal cycling are investigated using the recently developed higher-order theory for functionally graded materials. The higher-order theory is shown to be a viable alternative to the finite-element approach, capable of modeling different interfacial roughness architectures in the presence of an aluminum oxide layer and capturing the high stress gradients that occur at the top coat/bond coat interface. The oxide layer thickness is demonstrated to have a substantially greater effect on the evolution of residual stresses than local variations in interfacial roughness. Further, the location of delamination initiation in the top coat is predicted to change with increasing oxide layer thickness. This result can be used to optimize the thickness of a pre-oxidized layer introduced at the top coat/bond coat interface in order to enhance TBC durability as suggested by some researchers. The results of our investigation also support a recently proposed hypothesis regarding delamination initiation and propagation in the presence of an evolving bond coat oxidation, while pointing to the importance of interfacial roughness details and specimen geometry in modeling this phenomenon.

  12. Nitrogen cycling in Yellowstone National Park thermal features: using gene expression to reveal ecological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafree, S. T.; Burton, M. S.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of biodiversity, metabolic strategies, and functional ecology in modern hydrothermal systems have the potential to provide insight into the metabolism and evolution of life. The geochemical and microbial diversity present at Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, makes it an ideal place for studying the functional ecology and metabolic processes of prokaryotic organisms. While much work in terrestrial hydrothermal features is focused on phylogenetic and geochemical analyses, a few recent investigations in YNP and other hydrothermal areas have focused on “gene hunting”: screening thermal sediment and biofilm samples for the presence of genes utilized in specific metabolic processes [2, 3, 6, 7, 8]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of many of these genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use, and few researchers have done work to confirm the utilization (expression) of the genes discovered in thermal samples [1, 6, 7, 8]. Disequilibrium between reduced hydrothermal fluid of YNP thermal features and the atmosphere provides a copious source of potential energy to be harnessed through microbial metabolic processes, with NO3- and NO2- serving as the preferred electron acceptors and top energy sources after O2 [4, 5]. Consequentially, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes, as well as nutrient availability. This study explores the presence and utilization of functional genes that are key in steps of the nitrogen cycle, such as nitrogen fixation (NifH), denitrification (nirKS), and ammonia oxidation (amoA). Both DNA and RNA were extracted from thermal sediment and streamer biofilm communities collected in the chemosynthetic zone of various thermal features of the Sentinel Meadows Group in Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Extracted DNA and reverse transcribed RNA (cDNA) were amplified using the polymerase chain

  13. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  14. Cycle-powered short radius (1.9M) centrifuge: exercise vs. passive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Gundo, D. P.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Marchman, N.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A human-powered short-arm centrifuge is described. This centrifuge could be used during spaceflight to provide +Gz acceleration while subjects performed exercise, thus supplying two forms of weightlessness countermeasures. Results from a study of cardiovascular responses while using the centrifuge are presented.

  15. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  16. Molecular Entropy, Thermal Efficiency, and Designing of Working Fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Zhiyou

    2012-06-01

    A shortage of fossil energy sources boosts the utilization of renewable energy. Among numerous novel techniques, recovering energy from low-grade heat sources through power generation via organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) is one of the focuses. Properties of working fluids are crucial for the ORC's performance. Many studies have been done to select proper working fluids or to design new working fluids. However, no researcher has systematically investigated the relationship between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. This paper has investigated the interrelations of molecular structures, molecular entropies, and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. By calculating thermal efficiencies and molecular entropies, we find that the molecular entropy is the most appropriate thermophysical property of a working fluid to determine how much energy can be converted into work and how much cannot in a system. Generally speaking, working fluids with low entropies will generally have high thermal efficiency for an ideal ORC. Based on this understanding, the direct interrelations of molecular structures and entropies provide an explicit interrelation between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies, and thus provide an insightful direction for molecular design of novel working fluids for ORCs.

  17. Thermal performance of gaseous-helium-purged tank-mounted multilayer insulation system during ground-hold and space-hold thermal cycling and exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine (1) the ground-hold and space-hold thermal performance of a multilayer insulation (MLI) system mounted on a spherical, liquid-hydrogen propellant tank and (2) the degradation to the space-hold thermal performance of the insulation system that resulted from both thermal cycling and exposure to moisture. The propellant tank had a diameter of 1.39 meters (4.57ft). The MLI consisted of two blankets of insulation; each blanket contained 15 double-aluminized Mylar radiation shields separated by double silk net spacers. Nineteen tests simulating basic cryogenic spacecraft thermal (environmental) conditions were conducted. These tests typically included initial helium purge, liquid-hydrogen fill and ground-hold, ascent, space-hold, and repressurization. No significant degradation of the space-hold thermal performance due to thermal cycling was noted.

  18. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  19. Accelerated discovery of cathode materials with prolonged cycle life for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Motoaki; Ootani, Takuya; Kamimura, Yuichi; Sueki, Toshitsugu; Esaki, Shogo; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Ohira, Koji; Koyama, Yukinori; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale battery systems are essential for efficiently utilizing renewable energy power sources from solar and wind, which can generate electricity only intermittently. The use of lithium-ion batteries to store the generated energy is one solution. A long cycle life is critical for lithium-ion battery when used in these applications; this is different from portable devices which require 1,000 cycles at most. Here we demonstrate a novel co-substituted lithium iron phosphate cathode with estimated 70%-capacity retention of 25,000 cycles. This is found by exploring a wide chemical compositional space using density functional theory calculations. Relative volume change of a compound between fully lithiated and delithiated conditions is used as the descriptor for the cycle life. On the basis of the results of the screening, synthesis of selected materials is targeted. Single-phase samples with the required chemical composition are successfully made by an epoxide-mediated sol-gel method. The optimized materials show excellent cycle-life performance as lithium-ion battery cathodes.

  20. Accelerated discovery of cathode materials with prolonged cycle life for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Motoaki; Ootani, Takuya; Kamimura, Yuichi; Sueki, Toshitsugu; Esaki, Shogo; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Ohira, Koji; Koyama, Yukinori; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale battery systems are essential for efficiently utilizing renewable energy power sources from solar and wind, which can generate electricity only intermittently. The use of lithium-ion batteries to store the generated energy is one solution. A long cycle life is critical for lithium-ion battery when used in these applications; this is different from portable devices which require 1,000 cycles at most. Here we demonstrate a novel co-substituted lithium iron phosphate cathode with estimated 70%-capacity retention of 25,000 cycles. This is found by exploring a wide chemical compositional space using density functional theory calculations. Relative volume change of a compound between fully lithiated and delithiated conditions is used as the descriptor for the cycle life. On the basis of the results of the screening, synthesis of selected materials is targeted. Single-phase samples with the required chemical composition are successfully made by an epoxide-mediated sol-gel method. The optimized materials show excellent cycle-life performance as lithium-ion battery cathodes. PMID:25080933

  1. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  2. Thermodynamic systems analysis of open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.; Bharathan, D.; Althof, J. A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes an updated thermal-hydraulic systems analysis program called OTECSYS that studies the integrated performance of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant, specifically, the effects of component performance, design parameters, and site specific resource data on the total system performance and plant size. OTECSYS can size the various open-cycle power cycle and hydraulic components. Models for the evaporator, mist eliminator, turbine-generator diffuser, direct-contact condenser, exhaust compressors, seawater pumps, and seawater piping are included, as are evaluations of the pressure drops associated with the intercomponent connections. It can also determine the required steam, cold seawater, and warm seawater flow rates. OTECSYS uses an approach similar to earlier work and integrates the most up-to-date developments in component performance and configuration. The program format allows the user to examine subsystem concepts not currently included by creating new component models. It will be useful to the OTEC plant designer who wants to quantify the design point sizing, performance, and power production using site-specific resource data. Detailed design trade-offs are easily evaluated, and several examples of these types of investigations are presented using plant size and power as criteria.

  3. Feasibility Study on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Akira, Ohnuki; Kazuyuki, Takase; Masatoshi, Kureta; Hiroyuki, Yoshida; Hidesada, Tamai; Wei, Liu; Toru, Nakatsuka; Takeharu, Misawa; Hajime, Akimoto

    2006-07-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is started at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in collaboration with power company, reactor vendors, universities since 2002. The FLWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important R and D items for the FLWR because of the tight lattice configuration. In this paper, we will show the R and D plan and summarize experimental studies. The experimental study is performed mainly using large-scale (37-rod bundle) test facility. Most important objective of the large-scale test is to resolve a fundamental subject whether the core cooling under a tight-lattice configuration is feasible. The characteristics of critical power and flow behavior are investigated under different geometrical configuration and boundary conditions. The configuration parameter is the gap between rods (FY2004) and the rod bowing (FY2005). We have confirmed the thermal-hydraulic feasibility from the experimental results. (authors)

  4. Study of the Performance of TBC under Thermal Cycling Conditions using an Acoustic Emission Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyer, J.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M. I.

    1998-06-01

    An experimental rig based on the use of infrared quartz lamps has been developed to monitor the degradation mechanisms causing failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) under thermal-cycling conditions. An acoustic emission (AE) technique monitored these degradation mechanisms, and advanced signals processing identified the key parameters that classify the AE signals according to the long-term behavior of the TBC. The AE technique enabled the localization of degradation sources inside the TBC with a linear resolution of ˜5 mm by the use of two transducers fixed at both ends of the sample. Furthermore, sample zones of high AE activity showed typical vertical cracks at the surface and delaminations at the interface between the ceramic and the bond-coat layer. Vertical cracks were induced preferentially during the heating period of the thermal cycles when the ceramic coating was in a tensile-stress state, while delaminations were induced during the cooling period when the TBC was in a compressive-stress state.

  5. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  6. Three-dimensional finite-element elastic analysis of a thermally cycled single-edge wedge geometry specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Hill, R. J.; Guilliams, B. P.; Drake, S. K.; Kladden, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    An elastic stress analysis was performed on a wedge specimen (prismatic bar with single-wedge cross section) subjected to thermal cycles in fluidized beds. Seven different combinations consisting of three alloys (NASA TAZ-8A, 316 stainless steel, and A-286) and four thermal cycling conditions were analyzed. The analyses were performed as a joint effort of two laboratories using different models and computer programs (NASTRAN and ISO3DQ). Stress, strain, and temperature results are presented.

  7. Long-Term Thermal Cycling of Phlogopite Mica-Based Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    Reliable sealants are one of the toughest challenges in advancing solid oxide fuel cell technologies. One of the most stringent requirements for sealants is the thermal cycle stability. The sealants have to survive multiple thermal cycles during operation in stationary and transportation applications. Recently, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a hybrid mica-based compressive seal with which leak rates were reduced...

  8. The cost of transport of human running is not affected, as in walking, by wide acceleration/deceleration cycles.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Alberto E; Gaudino, Paolo; Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario

    2013-02-15

    Although most of the literature on locomotion energetics and biomechanics is about constant-speed experiments, humans and animals tend to move at variable speeds in their daily life. This study addresses the following questions: 1) how much extra metabolic energy is associated with traveling a unit distance by adopting acceleration/deceleration cycles in walking and running, with respect to constant speed, and 2) how can biomechanics explain those metabolic findings. Ten males and ten females walked and ran at fluctuating speeds (5 ± 0, ± 1, ± 1.5, ± 2, ± 2.5 km/h for treadmill walking, 11 ± 0, ± 1, ± 2, ± 3, ± 4 km/h for treadmill and field running) in cycles lasting 6 s. Field experiments, consisting of subjects following a laser spot projected from a computer-controlled astronomic telescope, were necessary to check the noninertial bias of the oscillating-speed treadmill. Metabolic cost of transport was found to be almost constant at all speed oscillations for running and up to ±2 km/h for walking, with no remarkable differences between laboratory and field results. The substantial constancy of the metabolic cost is not explained by the predicted cost of pure acceleration/deceleration. As for walking, results from speed-oscillation running suggest that the inherent within-stride, elastic energy-free accelerations/decelerations when moving at constant speed work as a mechanical buffer for among-stride speed fluctuations, with no extra metabolic cost. Also, a recent theory about the analogy between sprint (level) running and constant-speed running on gradients, together with the mechanical determinants of gradient locomotion, helps to interpret the present findings. PMID:23221963

  9. ACCELERATED AGING OF AGRICULTURAL SOILS AND THE COUPLING OF THE NITROGEN AND PROTON CYCLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroecosystems currently utilize about one third of the soils of the world and, in these soils, crop management introduces new variables to the biogeochemical cycles governing soil development. N fixation related to human activities now accounts for about half of the global N budget and has greatly...

  10. Accelerating the Design of Solar Thermal Fuel Materials through High Throughput Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Grossman, JC

    2014-12-01

    Solar thermal fuels (STF) store the energy of sunlight, which can then be released later in the form of heat, offering an emission-free and renewable solution for both solar energy conversion and storage. However, this approach is currently limited by the lack of low-cost materials with high energy density and high stability. In this Letter, we present an ab initio high-throughput computational approach to accelerate the design process and allow for searches over a broad class of materials. The high-throughput screening platform we have developed can run through large numbers of molecules composed of earth-abundant elements and identifies possible metastable structures of a given material. Corresponding isomerization enthalpies associated with the metastable structures are then computed. Using this high-throughput simulation approach, we have discovered molecular structures with high isomerization enthalpies that have the potential to be new candidates for high-energy density STF. We have also discovered physical principles to guide further STF materials design through structural analysis. More broadly, our results illustrate the potential of using high-throughput ab initio simulations to design materials that undergo targeted structural transitions.

  11. Axisymmetric deformation of plates and shells with phase trasformations under thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkutin, L. I.

    2008-03-01

    A mathematical formulation is given of nonlinear axisymmetric buckling problems for plates and shells in the two-phase zones of austenite-to-martensite transformation. Numerical solutions of the direct-and inverse-transformation problems are used to construct hysteresis loops for thermomechanically cycled, pressure-loaded circular plates and shallow spherical domes of titanium nickelide (NiTi) alloy. It is shown that dynamic instability of the dome deformation process can occur during transformation under loads notably lower than the upper critical values for the isothermal states of the material outside the transformation zone. A theoretical analysis gives external loads below which the dome remains stable in the thermally cycled material with phase transformations.

  12. Open cycle OTEC thermal-hydraulic systems analysis and parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsons, B.; Bharathan, D.; Althof, J.

    1984-06-01

    An analytic thermohydraulic systems model of the power cycle an seawater supply systems for an open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant has been developed that allows ready examination of the effects of system and component operating points on plant size and parasitic power requirements. This paper presents the results of three parametric studies on the effects of system temperature distribution, plant gross electric capacity, and the allowable seawater velocity in the supply and discharge pipes. The paper also briefly discusses the assumptions and equations used in the model and the state-of-the-art component limitations. The model provides a useful tool for an OTEC plant designer to evaluate system trade-offs and define component interactions and performance.

  13. Diagnosis of Thermal Efficiency of Advanced Combined Cycle Power Plants Using Optical Torque Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi

    A new optical torque measurement method was applied to diagnosis of thermal efficiency of advanced combined cycle, i.e. ACC, plants. Since the ACC power plant comprises a steam turbine and a gas turbine and both of them are connected to the same generator, it is difficult to identify which turbine in the plant deteriorates the performance when the plant efficiency is reduced. The sensor measures axial distortion caused by power transmission by use of He-Ne laser beams, small stainless steel reflectors having bar-code patterns, and a technique of signal processing featuring high frequency. The sensor was applied to the ACC plants of TOKYO ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY, TEPCO, following the success in the application to the early combined cycle plants of TEPCO. The sensor performance was inspected over a year. After an improvement related to the signal process, it is considered that the sensor performance has reached a practical use level.

  14. The Kepler Light Curve of V344 LYR: Constraining the Thermal-Viscous Limit Cycle Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Still, M. D.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present time dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 90 d light curve of the short period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long term light curves. The data encompass a super outburst, preceded by three normal (i.e., short) outbursts and followed by two normal outbursts. The main decay of the super outburst is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate approx.12 d/mag, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. We show that the standard limit cycle model can account for the light curve, without the need for either the thermal-tidal instability or enhanced mass transfer.

  15. Rate equations modeling for hydrogen inventory studies during a real tokamak material thermal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, X.; Hodille, E.; Ning, N.; Sang, C.; Grisolia, Ch.

    2015-08-01

    Prediction and control of tritium inventory in plasma-facing components (PFCs) is a critical nuclear safety issue for ITER and future fusion devices. This goal can be achieved through rate equations models as presented here. We calibrate our models with thermal desorption spectrometry results to obtain a validated set of material parameters relevant to hydrogen inventory processes in bulk tungsten. The best fits are obtained with two intrinsic trap types, deep and shallow, and an extrinsic trap created by plasma irradiation and plastic deformation of the tungsten matrix associated with blister formation. We then consider a realistic cycle of plasma discharges consisting of 400 s of plasma exposure followed by a resting period of 1000 s, repeating for several hours. This cycle is then closed by a long "overnight" period, thus providing an estimate of the amount of tritium retained in the PFCs after a full day of standard operation.

  16. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  17. Thermal behavior of small lithium-ion battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Kazuo; Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto

    The secondary batteries for electric vehicles (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles at current levels exceeding the batteries' rating, such as when the EV quickly starts consuming battery power or when recovering inertia energy during sudden stops. During these rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature may increase above allowable limits. We calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. The heat-source factors were measured again by the methods described in our previous study, because the performance of the battery reported here has been improved, showing lower overpotential resistance. Battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient, measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The temperature calculated by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Also, battery radial temperature distributions were calculated to be small, and confirmed experimentally.

  18. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Ali Reza; Davari, Abdol Rahim; Ataei, Ebrahim; Dastjerdi, Fariba; Hajighasemi, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000) cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles. PMID:23946737

  19. Low-cycle fatigue of thermal-barrier coatings at 982 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Liebert, C. H.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue lives of ZrO2-NiCrAlY and Al2O3-ZrO2-NiCrAlY thermal-barrier coatings in air at 982 C were determined from cyclic flexural tests of coated TAZ-8A strips. Strains were computed as a function of specimen displacements from a nonlinear, three-dimensional stress analysis program. Fatigue resistances of thermal-barrier coatings applied to the strips were compared with those of uncoated and NiCrAlY-coated strips. The results indicate that ZrO2 is about four times greater in fatigue life than TAZ-8A at 982 C, that ZrO2 would probably retain that fatigue strength up to 1316 C, and that adding an outer coat of Al2O3 to ZrO2 is neither beneficial nor detrimental to fatigue resistance.

  20. Analysis of electric and thermal behaviour of lithium-ion cells in realistic driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourani, Abbas; White, Peter; Ivey, Paul

    2014-12-01

    A substantial part of electric vehicles (EVs) powertrain is the battery cell. The cells are usually connected in series, and failure of a single cell can deactivate an entire module in the battery pack. Hence, understanding the cell behaviour helps to predict and improve the battery performance and leads to design a cost effective thermal management system for the battery pack. A first principle thermo electrochemical model is applied to study the cell behaviour. The model is in good agreement with the experimental results and can predict the heat generation and the temperature distribution across the cell for different operating conditions. The operating temperature effect on the cell performance is studied and the operating temperature for the best performance is verified. In addition, EV cells are examined in a realistic driving cycle from the Artemis class. The study findings lead to the proposal of some crucial recommendation to design cost effective thermal management systems for the battery pack.

  1. Seawater test results of Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H.; Panchal, C. B.

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems- the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages- have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 cu m/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  2. Thermal and Cycle-Life Behavior of Commercial Li-ion and Li-Polymer Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.; Quinzio, M. V.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerated and real-time LEO cycle-life test data will be presented for a range of commercial Li-ion and Li-polymer (gel type) cells indicating the ranges of performance that can be obtained, and the performance screening tests that must be done to assure long life. The data show large performance variability between cells, as well as a highly variable degradation signature during non-cycling periods within the life tests. High-resolution Dynamic Calorimetry data will be presented showing the complex series of reactions occurring within these Li cells as they are cycled. Data will also be presented for cells being tested using an Adaptive Charge Control Algorithm (ACCA) that continuously adapts itself to changes in cell performance, operation, or environment to both find and maintain the optimum recharge over life. The ACCA has been used to prevent all unneeded overcharge for Li cells, NiCd cells and NiH2 cells. While this is important for all these cell types, it is most critical for Li-ion cells, which are not designed with electrochemical tolerance for overcharge.

  3. Thermal cycling induced load on copper-ribbons in crystalline photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kraemer, F.; Wiese, S.; Wolter, K.-J.; Bagdahn, J.

    2010-08-01

    Solar module lifetime is limited by the fatigue behavior of its cell interconnectors: the copper-ribbons. Every change in temperature induces thermo-mechanical stresses in the module components due to their thermo-mechanical mismatch. The purpose of this work is to quantify this load on the copper-ribbons between the individual cells of a cell string during a thermal cycling test by measuring cell displacement using digital image correlation and to compare the results to finite element analysis (FEM). Furthermore with help of FEM the influences of different materials were investigated, allowing material and layout optimizations with respect to copper-ribbon loading.

  4. Thermal effects on the clearance and stiffness of foil journal bearings for a Brayton cycle turboalternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshel, A.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of foil journal bearings for a NASA Brayton Cycle Unit (BRU) is presented. The study represents an extension of previous work in that it includes the effects of thermal expansion of foil-bearing components, as well as an improved model of the influence of foil flexure. The results presented give the bearing film thickness, the bearing stiffness, and the foil tension as functions of the operating temperatures and the elasto-hydrodynamic and geometrical parameters pertinent to the design of BRU foil bearings. A computer program for the evaluation of design data and for parametric studies is included.

  5. Thermal energy storage for organic Rankine cycle solar dynamic space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, G. R.; Parekh, M. B.

    An organic Rankine cycle-solar dynamic power system (ORC-SDPS) comprises a concentrator, a radiator, a power conversion unit, and a receiver with a thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem which charges and discharges energy to meet power demands during orbital insolation and eclipse periods. Attention is presently given to the criteria used in designing and evaluating an ORC-SDPS TES, as well as the automated test facility employed. It is found that a substantial data base exists for the design of an ORC-SDPS TES subsystem.

  6. Effects of thermal and moisture cycling on the internal structure of stitched RTM laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Jeff; Roundy, Lance; Goering, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Conventional aerospace composites are strong and stiff in the directions parallel to the carbon fibers, but they are prone to delaminations and damage in the through-the-thickness directions. Recent research has shown that substantial improvements in damage tolerance are obtained from textile composites with Z-direction reinforcement provided by stitching, weaving, or braiding. Because of the mismatch in thermal and moisture expansion properties of the various material components, there is a potential for microcracks to develop in the resin matrix. These cracks can form to relieve the mechanical stresses that are generated during curing or in-service temperature cycles.

  7. Gas exchange in seawater with special emphasis on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Zapka, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined gas-transfer characteristics of seawater. Special emphasis is on gas-transfer processes in connection with Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) applications. Experiments probed the mechanism regulating gas transfer in bubbles and in a packed column. In order to compare gas transfer in seawater with extensively documented transfer characteristics of fresh water, all tests were conducted using both seawater and fresh water in the same experimental setting. Ten main findings are listed and briefly discussed. With appropriate system conditions, an approximately 85% removal of dissolved gas from the OC-OTEC feed stream appears to be feasible.

  8. Recent Advances in SRS on Hydrogen Isotope Separation Using Thermal Cycling Absorption Process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Xin; Sessions, Henry T.; Heung, L. Kit

    2015-02-01

    The recent Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10th of the current production system’s footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects and medical isotope production.

  9. COBRA-SFS CYCLE 3: Code System for Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Spent Fuel Casks

    2003-11-01

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a code for thermal-hydraulic analysis of multi-assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. It uses a lumped parameter finite difference approach to predict flow and temperature distributions in spent fuel storage systems and fuel assemblies, under forced and natural convection heat transfer conditions. Derived from the COBRA family of codes, which have been extensively evaluated against in-pile and out-of-pile data, COBRA-SFS retains all the important features of the COBRA codesmore » for single phase fluid analysis and extends the range application to include problems with two-dimensional radiative and three-dimensional conductive heat transfer. COBRA-SFS has been used to analyze various single- and multi-assembly spent fuel storage systems containing unconsolidated and consolidated fuel rods, with a variety of fill media, including air, helium and vacuum. Cycle 0 of COBRA-SFS was released in 1986. Subsequent applications of the code led to development of additional capabilities, which resulted in the release of Cycle 1 in February 1989. Since then, the code has undergone an independent technical review as part of a submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a generic license to apply the code to spent fuel storage system analysis. Modifications and improvements to the code have been combined to form Cycle 2. Cycle 3., the newest version of COBRA-SFS, has been validated and verified for transient applications, such as a storage cask thermal response to a pool fire.« less

  10. Electron acceleration in solar flares and the transition from nonthermal to thermal hard X-ray phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are reviewed which indicate that hard X-rays during the impulsive phase of a flare typically start with a primarily nonthermal phase which undergoes a transition to a primarily thermal phase as the flare progresses. Recent theoretical work on the modified two-stream instability as an efficient electron accelerator and modeling of thermal hard X-ray sources is considered. A scenario which is termed the dissipative thermal model is proposed to explain the observations. Fast tearing modes occurring in a loop give rise to cross-field ion motion. This in turn excites the modified two-stream instability which converts about 50 percent of the ion energy into accelerated electrons along the loop as long as the plasma beta is less than 0.3. These electrons impact the chromosphere and boil off a part of it which rises up the loop. This density increase coupled with the temperature increase due to tearing causes the beta to increase beyond 0.3 and efficient electron acceleration ceases. This leads to the primarily thermal phase.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic design of the target/blanket for the accelerator production of tritium conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Kapernick, R.J.

    1997-11-01

    A conceptual design was developed for the target/blanket system of an accelerator-based system to produce tritium. The target/blanket system uses clad tungsten rods for a spallation target and clad lead rods as a neutron multiplier in a blanket surrounding the target. The neutrons produce tritium in {sup 3}He, which is contained in aluminum tubes located in the decoupler and blanket regions. This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic design of the target, decoupler, and blanket developed for the conceptual design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project, and demonstrates there is adequate margin in the design at full power operation.

  12. Accelerated and real-time geosynchronous life cycling test performance of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    RCA Astro-Electronics currently has four nickel-hydrogen storage battery modules (11 cells each) on test in simulated geosynchronous life cycle regimes. These battery modules are of identical design to those used on the GSTAR (GTE Satellite Corp.) and Spacenet (GTE Spacenet Corp.) communications satellites. The batteries are being tested using an automated test station equipped with computer-controlled environmental chambers and recording equipment. The two battery types, 30 ampere-hours and 40 ampere-hours (GSTAR and Spacenet, respectively), are being electrically cycled using identical 44-day eclipse sequences at 5 C and vary with respect to depth of discharge, recharge ratio, duration of accumulated suntime, and the use of a reconditioning sequence. The test parameters are outlined and the preliminary test data and results are presented.

  13. Assembly reliability of CSPs with various chiip sizes by accelerated thermal and mechanical cycling test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    2000-01-01

    A JPL-led chip scale package (CSP) Consortium, composed of team members representing government agencies and private companies, recently joined together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects.

  14. Piston motion and thermal loading analyses of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engines for locomotives

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, S.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Two-stroke cycle and four-stroke cycle diesel engines are in use in rail traction, with the four-stroke cycle design dominating the field. Cycle simulations using computer programs have shown that the conventional two-stroke cycle is somewhat inferior to its four-stroke cycle counterpart in combustion efficiency and thermal loading. Research concluded that the conventional two-stroke cycle engine is not very suitable for locomotive application. A survey, based on an investigation of engines in current production for traction application, suggested that there are potentials in two-stroke cycle design. This paper presents a summary of the results of a research project concerned with comparison of two well-proven typical locomotive diesel engines, one with a two-stroke cycle and the other with a four-stroke cycle. Performance, mechanical loading, thermal loading, and vibration were chosen as parameters to be investigated to provide information on the status of the two cycles in relation to power range, fuel consumption, reliability, and durability, with a view to assisting the users of locomotive engines to make the correct choice.

  15. Influence of rapid thermal cycles in multipass welding on heat-affected-zone properties in ferritic cryogenic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Shin, H.K.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    The results of both welding and weld simulation studies on 2BT-treated 9Ni steel show that multiple rapid thermal cycles have a very beneficial effect on heat-affected zone toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The metallurgical sources of toughness are, however, different from those in the furnace-treated base plate. The rapidly cycled material contains no detectable austenite phase. The alloy is grain-refined by the rapid thermal cycle, and the matrix carbon content is relieved by the formation of interlathcementite precipitates which do not destroy toughness.

  16. In Situ Measurement of Stress and Whisker/Hillock Density During Thermal Cycling of Sn Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Fei; Chason, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Compressive stress is believed to be the primary driving force that makes Sn whiskers/hillocks grow, but the mechanisms that create the stress (e.g., intermetallic compound growth) are difficult to control. As an alternative, the thermal expansion mismatch between the Sn layer and the substrate can be used to induce stress in a controlled way via heating and cooling. In this work, we describe real-time experiments which quantify the whiskering behavior and stress evolution during cyclic heating. The density of whiskers/hillocks is measured with an optical microscope, while the stress is measured simultaneously with a wafer-curvature-based multi-beam optical stress sensor. Results from three thermal cycles are described in which the samples are heated from room temperature to 65 °C at rates of 10, 30, and 240 °C/h. In each case, we find that the whisker/hillock formation is the primary source of stress relaxation. At fast heating rates, the relaxation is proportional to the number of hillocks, indicating that the stress is relaxed by the nucleation of many small surface features. At slower heating rates, the whisker/hillock density is lower, and continual growth of the features is suggested after nucleation. Long whiskers are found to be more likely to form in the slow heating cycle.

  17. Reduction of Thermal Energy Loss in Cyclic Operation of Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gommori, Masahiko; Kogure, Hiroshi; Hara, Toshitsugu

    Investigation of thermal energy loss in cyclic operation of refrigeration cycle in a refrigerator-freezer were made. The energy loss was found to consist of three parts ; hot gas-refrigerant entering loss, cooling lag loss, and evaporator superheat loss. Hot gas-refrigerant entering loss is occured when high temperature gaseous refrigerant in a condenser flows into an evaporator to heat up the refrigerant in it. Main results are as follows ; 1) Hot gas-refrigerant entering loss, which was the most dominant, was found to be from 7.6 to 12.3% (for reciprocationg compressor) and from 11.9 to 17.4% (for rotary compressor) of the cooling load, respectively. 2) The thermal energy loss was confirmed to be able to be reduced when hot gas-refrigerant was restricted to flow in the evaporator with control valves. It follows to reduce electrical power consumption by 10 and 15%, in the case of reciprocating compressor and of rotary compressor, respectively. 3) Cycle frequency was made to be optimized theoretically and experimentally in the case of with and without valves.

  18. Study of the pores inside tungsten coating after thermal cycling for fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, C.; Firdaouss, M.; Hernandez, C.; Martin, C.; Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Missirlian, M.; Samaille, F.; Bucalossi, J.

    2016-02-01

    In the next fusion devices, all the plasma facing components will consist of bulk tungsten or tungsten coating on carbon. This paper focuses on the behaviour of tungsten coated on carbon fibre composite designed for the WEST project (Bucalossi et al 2011 Fusion Eng. Des. 86 684-688) under intensive thermal cycling delivered by an electron beam. The use of scanning electron microscope has allowed in particular, the observation of several pore lines inside the coating. These pore lines have different aspects depending on the observed zone according to the localisation of the electron beam, accentuated lines with more numerous enlarged pores in zone exposed to the electron beam. An analogous trend is also observed for JET tungsten-coated samples under similar thermal cycles despite their different properties due to an alternative manufacturing method of the substrate. A systematic and attentive comparison on the coating changes after the application of the electron beam heating is presented. The observed comportments as the formation of the pore lines or the pore shapes are assumed to be inherent to simultaneous diffusion processes. In association with the pore line formation, a migration of the carbon substrate towards the surface is presumed and discussed.

  19. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Qiu, Chunlin

    2015-07-15

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t{sub 8/5} is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary.

  20. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle

  1. Effect of crystallographic orientation on hillock formation in thermally cycled large grain tin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, John Patrick

    Tin whiskers and hillocks grow spontaneously from the surfaces of polycrystalline Sn films at room temperature. Whiskers can grow long enough to cause short circuits in electronic devices. We hypothesized that the anisotropies of the crystal structure lead to locally high strain energies that are relieved by the growth of whiskers and hillocks. This research studies hillock formations on large grain Sn-alloy films relative to the crystallographic orientations of the adjacent grains. Large grain films were produced by solidifying 96.5wt% Sn - 3wt% Ag - 0.5wt% Cu solder alloy on a Cu substrate. These surface defects (hillocks) grew predominately at grain boundaries during thermal cycling. The formation of the surface defects between two grains created a pseudo-bi-crystal sample geometry, making it ideal for studying surface defects relative to the local crystallographic orientations and the grains' corresponding anisotropic properties. The crystallographic orientations of the grains were studied with Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Laue micro-diffraction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Local orientation studies of the surface defects and the surrounding grains indicated that the surface defects nucleated and grew with low dislocation densities. In addition, the linear surface defect densities along the grain boundaries were measured and observed to change as a function of orientation. The change in linear defect density with respect to orientation was due, in part, to the anisotropy of the coefficient of thermal expansion of β-Sn. In addition, it was important to account for elastic anisotropies. The elastic stresses, strains, and strain energy densities of the microstructures were determined with Object Oriented Finite element analysis. The simulations indicated that during thermal cycling the local stresses exceeded the yield strength. As a result, the highest linear defect densities did not occur at orientations

  2. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  3. Tectonic 1 accelerates gastric cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbao; Yu, Qiming; Zhang, Yingli; Ling, Zhiqiang; Yu, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is important in development and cancer. Hh signaling is constitutively active in gastric cancer. Recently, tectonic 1 (TCTN1) was identified as one regulator of the Hh pathway. In the present study, the biological role of TCTN1 was examined in gastric cancer via an RNA interference lentivirus system. The constructed lentivirus efficiently suppressed TCTN1 expression in three gastric cancer cell lines. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was significantly inhibited in TCTN1 knockdown cells, as determined by 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assays. Furthermore, in order to determine the underlying mechanism, the cell cycle progression of MGC80‑3 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Knockdown of TCTN1 led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, which contributed to inhibition of growth. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that TCTN1 was essential in the growth of gastric cancer cells in vitro, suggesting TCTN1 as a potential target candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26252641

  4. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  5. Slip, Crystal Orientation, and Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in High-Strain Wafer-Level Chip-Scale Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bite; Zhou, Quan; Bieler, Thomas R.; Lee, Tae-kyu

    2015-03-01

    Wafer-level chip-scale package samples with pre-cross-sectioned edge rows were thermally cycled to study microstructure evolution and damage development. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and high-energy x-ray diffraction were used to obtain Sn grain orientations and the average coefficient of thermal expansion normal to the board in every joint of the package for samples in the as-fabricated and thermally cycled conditions. The results indicated a near-random distribution of joint orientation. Optical, scanning electron microscopy, and EBSD methods were used to characterize microstructure changes in pre-cross-sectioned samples due to thermal cycling. Slip trace analysis and Orientation Imaging Microscopy™ (OIM) show that slip systems with high Schmid factors (estimated global shear stress based on the package neutral point) are responsible for the observed microstructure evolution during thermal cycling, which provides information about slip systems that are more easily activated. Two joints were analyzed in detail to evaluate slip activity at different stages of their thermal history. The first case showed that a solidification twin grain boundary misorientation deviated from the twin relationship due to slip activity during thermal cycling, which can influence damage development and the path of crack propagation. The second case showed a new grain orientation developing due to gradual lattice rotation about the Sn [110] axis by a continuous recrystallization mechanism. This rotation was correlated with the operation of slip system . Small tin whiskers emerged from the initially polished chip interface and grew with increasing thermal cycles until a crack developed in the solder that relieved the stress. As the local stresses are not known experimentally, this analysis provides observations that can be compared with a crystal plasticity model simulation.

  6. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO{sub 4} systems. Final topical report, January 1, 1982--December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, W.E.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  7. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation of thermal uniformity in a thermal cycling based calibration chamber for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Xulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) has become important for many industries such as automotive, home appliance, portable electronics, especially with the emergence of Internet of Things. Volume testing with temperature compensation has been essential in order to provide MEMS based sensors with repeatability, consistency, reliability, and durability, but low cost. Particularly, in the temperature calibration test, temperature uniformity of thermal cycling based calibration chamber becomes more important for obtaining precision sensors, as each sensor is different before the calibration. When sensor samples are loaded into the chamber, we usually open the door of the chamber, then place fixtures into chamber and mount the samples on the fixtures. These operations may affect temperature uniformity in the chamber. In order to study the influencing factors of sample-loading on the temperature uniformity in the chamber during calibration testing, numerical simulation work was conducted first. Temperature field and flow field were simulated in empty chamber, chamber with open door, chamber with samples, and chamber with fixtures, respectively. By simulation, it was found that opening chamber door, sample size and number of fixture layers all have effects on flow field and temperature field. By experimental validation, it was found that the measured temperature value was consistent with the simulated temperature value.

  8. Large Ground Level events in solar cycle 22 and some peculiarities of relativistic proton acceleration.

    PubMed

    Vashenyuk, E V; Miroshnichenko, L I; Sorokin, M O; Perez-Peraza, J; Gallegos, A

    1994-10-01

    Some of the Ground Level Enhancements of Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) recorded by neutron monitors during solar cycle 22 are analyzed. The events appeared in series, and their occurrence rate in 1989-1991 was a factor of 4 larger than the average value (approximately equal to 1/yr) for the total observation interval (since 1942). The events of Sept. 29 and Oct. 24, 1989 proved to be the more intensive. The analyzed events show no peculiarities as to the distribution of the T1/2 parameter, whereas the shape of the profile of some events is notable for a two peak structure. The latter implies the possibility of a two component SCR ejection from two different sources in the solar atmosphere. For the event of Sep. 29 we have estimated the ejection rigidity spectrum of protons to be D solar (R) = (1-2) 10(32)R(-2.9) Gv-1 at R greater than or equal to 1 Gv. As to its proton flux, this event proved to be by 1-2 orders less intensive than the well known event of Feb. 23 1956. PMID:11540014

  9. Stochastic gyroresonant electron acceleration on a low-beta plasma. II - Implications of thermal effects in a solar flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Steinacker, Juergen

    1992-01-01

    We consider the thermal damping of R and L waves under typical solar flare conditions. We find that the thermal particles cause rapid dissipation of the cyclotron waves, but do not affect whistlers and Alfven waves. The dissipation of electron cyclotron waves in particular leads to a threshold energy for acceleration which is about 10 times the thermal energy. Therefore, in the absence of an instability that excites these HF waves, a second mechanism is required in order to inject a sufficient number of electrons above the threshold energy and account for solar flare gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We also find that the comoving gyroresonance, which occurs when the electron is in gyroresonance with an R wave whose group velocity equals the parallel electron velocity, can be realized by relativistic electrons if the plasma temperature is less than or approximately equal to 5,000,000 K.

  10. Thermal cycling life prediction of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joint using type-I censored data.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jinhua; Li, Yan-Feng; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Peng, Weiwen; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Because solder joint interconnections are the weaknesses of microelectronic packaging, their reliability has great influence on the reliability of the entire packaging structure. Based on an accelerated life test the reliability assessment and life prediction of lead-free solder joints using Weibull distribution are investigated. The type-I interval censored lifetime data were collected from a thermal cycling test, which was implemented on microelectronic packaging with lead-free ball grid array (BGA) and fine-pitch ball grid array (FBGA) interconnection structures. The number of cycles to failure of lead-free solder joints is predicted by using a modified Engelmaier fatigue life model and a type-I censored data processing method. Then, the Pan model is employed to calculate the acceleration factor of this test. A comparison of life predictions between the proposed method and the ones calculated directly by Matlab and Minitab is conducted to demonstrate the practicability and effectiveness of the proposed method. At last, failure analysis and microstructure evolution of lead-free solders are carried out to provide useful guidance for the regular maintenance, replacement of substructure, and subsequent processing of electronic products. PMID:25121138

  11. Thermal Cycling Life Prediction of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joint Using Type-I Censored Data

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jinhua; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Because solder joint interconnections are the weaknesses of microelectronic packaging, their reliability has great influence on the reliability of the entire packaging structure. Based on an accelerated life test the reliability assessment and life prediction of lead-free solder joints using Weibull distribution are investigated. The type-I interval censored lifetime data were collected from a thermal cycling test, which was implemented on microelectronic packaging with lead-free ball grid array (BGA) and fine-pitch ball grid array (FBGA) interconnection structures. The number of cycles to failure of lead-free solder joints is predicted by using a modified Engelmaier fatigue life model and a type-I censored data processing method. Then, the Pan model is employed to calculate the acceleration factor of this test. A comparison of life predictions between the proposed method and the ones calculated directly by Matlab and Minitab is conducted to demonstrate the practicability and effectiveness of the proposed method. At last, failure analysis and microstructure evolution of lead-free solders are carried out to provide useful guidance for the regular maintenance, replacement of substructure, and subsequent processing of electronic products. PMID:25121138

  12. Elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of thermally cycled double-edge wedge specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic-plastic stress-strain analyses were performed for double-edge wedge specimens subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds at 316 and 1088 C. Four cases involving different nickel-base alloys (IN 100, Mar M-200, NASA TAZ-8A, and Rene 80) were analyzed by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Elastic solutions from MARC showed good agreement with previously reported solutions obtained by using the NASTRAN and ISO3DQ computer programs. Equivalent total strain ranges at the critical locations calculated by elastic analyses agreed within 3 percent with those calculated from elastic-plastic analyses. The elastic analyses always resulted in compressive mean stresses at the critical locations. However, elastic-plastic analyses showed tensile mean stresses for two of the four alloys and an increase in the compressive mean stress for the highest plastic strain case.

  13. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  14. Personal, closed-cycle cooling and protective apparatus and thermal battery therefor

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Klett, Lynn B.

    2004-07-20

    A closed-cycle apparatus for cooling a living body includes a heat pickup body or garment which permits evaporation of an evaporating fluid, transmission of the vapor to a condenser, and return of the condensate to the heat pickup body. A thermal battery cooling source is provided for removing heat from the condenser. The apparatus requires no external power and provides a cooling system for soldiers, race car drivers, police officers, firefighters, bomb squad technicians, and other personnel who may utilize protective clothing to work in hostile environments. An additional shield layer may simultaneously provide protection from discomfort, illness or injury due to harmful atmospheres, projectiles, edged weapons, impacts, explosions, heat, poisons, microbes, corrosive agents, or radiation, while simultaneously removing body heat from the wearer.

  15. Diagnosis of Thermal Efficiency of Combined Cycle Power Plants Using Optical Torque Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi

    A new optical torque measurement method is proposed for diagnosis of thermal efficiency of combined cycle power plants. In the case that the plant comprises a steam turbine and a gas turbine, both of which are connected to the same generator, it is difficult to identify which turbine causes deterioration of performance when the plant efficiency is reduced. Therefore, an optical torque sensor has been developed to measure the output of each turbine, which are important data to analyze performance of each machineries in a plant. The sensor measures axial distortion caused by power transmission by use of He-Ne laser beams, small stainless steel reflectors having bar-code patterns, and a technique of signal processing featuring high frequency. It was applied to TOKYO ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY (TEPCO) commercial plants. Following system improvements, it is concluded that error factors can be eliminated and sensor performance can reach a practical use level.

  16. A study of thermal cycling and radiation effects on indium and solder bump bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk Cihangir et al.

    2001-09-12

    The BTeV hybrid pixel detector is constructed of readout chips and sensor arrays which are developed separately. The detector is assembled by flip-chip mating of the two parts. This method requires the availability of highly reliable, reasonably low cost fine-pitch flip-chip attachment technology. We have tested the quality of two bump-bonding technologies; indium bumps (by Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong) and fluxless solder bumps (by MCNC in North Carolina, USA). The results have been presented elsewhere[1]. In this paper we describe tests we performed to further evaluate these technologies. We subjected 15 indium bump-bonded and 15 fluxless solder bump-bonded dummy detectors through a thermal cycle and then a dose of radiation to observe the effects of cooling, heating and radiation on bump-bonds.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling effects on atomic oxygen protective photovoltaic array blanket materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J.; Banks, B.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of synergistic environmental exposure is demonstrated through the evaluation of DuPont 93-1 in simulated LEO environment. Changes in optical properties, surface condition, and mass loss data are described. The qualitative results indicate the necessity for exposure of materials to a series of simulated LEO environments in order to properly determine synergistic effects and demonstrate the overall LEO durability of candidate materials. It is shown that synergistic effects may occur with vacuum thermal cycling combined with VUV radiation followed by atomic oxygen exposure. Testing the durability of candidate solar array blanket materials in a test sequence with necessary synergistic effects makes it possible to determine the appropriate material for providing structural support and maintaining the proper operating temperature for solar cells in the SSF Photovaltaic Power System.

  18. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  19. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth’s nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a−1 of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a−1 of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  20. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  1. Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

    1990-07-01

    There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Variation with thermal cycling in microstructure and area specific resistance of a ferritic stainless steel having rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Mumm, Daniel R.; Song, Jiunn

    2013-03-01

    Crofer22 APU specimens were prepared by grinding with grit 120 and 400 SiC grinding papers, and were then thermally cycled. The variation in oxidation behavior with thermal cycling was then investigated. Observation of microstructures, measurement of area-specific resistance (ASR), analysis of the atomic percentages of the elements by EDX, and XRD analysis were performed. XRD patterns showed that the (Cr, Mn)3O4 spinel phase grew on the surface of the Crofer22 APU samples ground using grit 120. For the samples ground with grit 400, ASR increased as the number of thermal cycles ( n) increased. Plots of ln (ASR/T) vs. 1/ T for the samples ground with grit 400 after n = 4, 20, and 40 exhibited good linearity, and the apparent activation energies were between 73.4 kJ/mole and 82.5 kJ/mole.

  3. Weld thermal cycles and precipitation effects in Ti-V-containing HSLA steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.R.; Lau, T.W.; Weatherly, G.C.; North, T.H. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science)

    1989-10-01

    Particle dissolution, precipitation, and grain-coarsening effects were examined in the heat affected zone of submerged arc welds deposited at 3 and 6 kJ/mm heat inputs on three Ti-V-containing steels. The Ti-bearing steel (0.014 pct Ti) showed little change in the TiN particle distribution on welding in agreement with calculations which demonstrated limited TiN solution during the weld thermal cycle. For the high-V, low-Ti steel (0.093 pct V, 0.002 pct Ti), the V-rich particles in the baseplate dissolved and Ti-rich precipitates formed during the heating leg of the cycle, while V-rich particles precipitated again on cooling. The third steel (0.014 pct Ti, 0.08 pct V) contained a wide distribution of particle compositions. On welding, the Ti-rich cuboidal precipitates did not dissolve, while the V-rich spheroidal precipitates did dissolve. No reprecipitation was observed on cooling. The different behaviors of the three steels related to the dissolution of precipitates in the baseplate and the available thermodynamic driving force for reprecipitation on cooling.

  4. Efficiency Study of a Commercial Thermoelectric Power Generator (TEG) Under Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzikraniotis, E.; Zorbas, K. T.; Samaras, I.; Kyratsi, Th.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) make use of the Seebeck effect in semiconductors for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy. The possible use of a device consisting of numerous TEG modules for waste heat recovery from an internal combustion (IC) engine could considerably help worldwide efforts towards energy saving. However, commercially available TEGs operate at temperatures much lower than the actual operating temperature range in the exhaust pipe of an automobile, which could cause structural failure of the thermoelectric elements. Furthermore, continuous thermal cycling could lead to reduced efficiency and lifetime of the TEG. In this work we investigate the long-term performance and stability of a commercially available TEG under temperature and power cycling. The module was subjected to sequential hot-side heating (at 200°C) and cooling for long times (3000 h) in order to measure changes in the TEG’s performance. A reduction in Seebeck coefficient and an increase in resistivity were observed. Alternating-current (AC) impedance measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations were performed on the module, and results are presented and discussed.

  5. Vacuum deaeration for ocean thermal-energy-conversion open-cycle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in the condenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. Studies were carried out on two areas: (1) vacuum deaeration in a packed column; and (2) deaeration in the barometric leg of the intake system. The design of a gas desorption test loop and a barometric intake system are described, the results of vacuum deaeration in a packed column and a barometric intake system are presented, and the saving that can be achieved when the packed column is combined with the barometric system is discussed. Vacuum deaeration laboratory experiments of three different kinds of packing in a packed column test section and a series of barometric intake deaeration experiments have been performed. A conceptual OTEC deaeration subsystem design based on these results and its implications upon an OTEC open cycle power system are presented.

  6. Effect of thermal cycling on the bond strength of self-adhesive cements to fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the push-out bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to epoxy resin-based fiber posts after challenging by thermocycling. Thirty-six single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were drilled to receive RelyX Fiber posts #1. Three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Breeze) were used for luting fiber posts. The bonded specimens were either stored for 1 month in a moist field (37°C) or submitted to thermocycling (5,000 times) prior to push-out test. The maximum force required to dislodge the post via an apical-coronal direction was recorded (megapascal). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). The factors "luting cement" and "thermocycling" significantly influenced bond strengths. The initial push-out values of RelyX Unicem and Breeze were higher than those of G-Cem. After thermocycling, the bond strength of G-Cem increased and no differences were found between groups. RelyX Unicem and Breeze bond strengths were not affected by the thermal challenge. Thermal cycling and cement type differently influence the bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements. Self-adhesive cements can represent an option for luting fiber posts into root canal. PMID:21670983

  7. Seawater test results of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    SciTech Connect

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H. ); Panchal, C.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems--the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages--have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 m[sup 3]/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  8. Carnot cycle for interacting particles in the absence of thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Nobre, Fernando D; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2014-02-01

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion, which has been recently analyzed within the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics. It amounts to expressing the interaction energy of the system in terms of a temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), with q = 2. Since θ assumes much higher values than those of typical room temperatures T ≪ θ, the thermal noise can be neglected for this system (T/θ ≃ 0). This framework is now extended by the introduction of a work term δW which, together with the formerly defined heat contribution (δ Q = θ ds(q)), allows for the statement of a proper energy conservation law that is analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. These definitions lead to the derivation of an equation of state and to the characterization of s(q) adiabatic and θ isothermic transformations. On this basis, a Carnot cycle is constructed, whose efficiency is shown to be η = 1-(θ(2)/θ(1)), where θ(1) and θ(2) are the effective temperatures of the two isothermic transformations, with θ(1)>θ(2). The results for a generalized thermodynamic description of this system open the possibility for further physical consequences, like the realization of a thermal engine based on energy exchanges gauged by the temperature θ. PMID:25353432

  9. Irreversible deformation and the superplasticity of a TN-1 alloy during thermal cycling through the martensitic transformations ranges under loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. N.; Ryabkov, Yu. I.; Bogdanov, N. P.; Severova, N. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Churilina, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the thermal cycling conditions on the thermal-cycling creep of a TN-1 alloy and the related irreversible deformations is studied. The conditions under which an anomalous increase in the irreversible deformations begins are determined. The structural mechanism of the irreversible deformations of an equiatomic alloy is shown to be analogous to the structural mechanism of metal creep at high temperatures: it predominantly has a dislocation character. It is proposed to use the effect of anomalous increase in the deformation of materials with reversible martensitic transformations for forming parts made of these materials at low temperatures.

  10. Hubble Space telescope thermal cycle test report for large solar array samples with BSFR cells (Sample numbers 703 and 704)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble space telescope (HST) solar array was designed to meet specific output power requirements after 2 years in low-Earth orbit, and to remain operational for 5 years. The array, therefore, had to withstand 30,000 thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. The ability of the array to meet this requirement was evaluated by thermal cycle testing, in vacuum, two 128-cell solar cell modules that exactly duplicated the flight HST solar array design. Also, the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit was evaluated by performing a cold-roll test using one module.

  11. Effects of Thermal Cycling and Thermal Aging on the Hermeticity and Strength of Silver-Copper Oxide Air-Brazed Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon; Hardy, John S.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750°C for 200, 400, and 800hrs in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75°C/min) between room temperature and 750°C for as many as fifty cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800hrs of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800hrs of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze/electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  12. Role of interfacial and matrix creep during thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, I.

    2000-03-14

    A uni-dimensional micro-mechanical model for thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites is developed. The model treats the fiber and matrix as thermo-elastic and thermo-elasto-plastic-creeping solids, respectively, and allows the operation of multiple matrix creep mechanisms at various stages of deformation through the use of unified creep laws. It also incorporates the effect of interfacial sliding by an interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep mechanism proposed earlier (Funn and Dutta, Acta mater., 1999, 47, 149). The results of thermal cycling simulations based on a graphite fiber reinforced pure aluminum-matrix composite were compared with experimental data on a P100 graphite-6061 Al composite. The model successfully captured all the important features of the observed heating/cooling rate dependence, strain hysteresis, residual permanent strain at the end of a cycle, as well as both intrusion and protrusion of the fiber-ends relative to the matrix at the completion of cycling. The analysis showed that the dominant deformation mechanism operative in the matrix changes continually during thermal cycling due to continuous stress and temperature revision. Based on these results, a framework for the construction of a transient deformation mechanism map for thermal excursions of continuous fiber composites is proposed.

  13. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  14. Continental growth and mantle hydration as intertwined feedback cycles in the thermal evolution of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-06-01

    A model of Earth's continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used to produce continental crust while the remainder is subducted into the mantle. The total length of the subduction zones is calculated from the total surface area of continental crust assuming randomly distributed continents. The mantle viscosity is dependent of temperature and the water concentration. Sediments are generated by continental crust erosion, and water outgassing at mid-oceanic ridges closes the water cycle. We discuss the strongly coupled, non-linear model using a phase plane defined by the continental coverage and mantle water concentration. Fixed points are found in the phase plane at which the rates of change of both variables are zero. These fixed points evolve with time, but in many cases, three fixed points emerge of which two are stable and an intermediate point is unstable with respect to continental coverage. With initial conditions from a Monte-Carlo scheme we calculate evolution paths in the phase plane and find a large spread of final states that all have a mostly balanced water budget. The present day observed 40% continental surface coverage is found near the unstable fixed point. Our evolution model suggests that Earth's continental coverage formed early and has been stable for at least 1.5 Gyr. The effect of mantle water regassing (and mantle viscosity depending on water concentration) is found to lower the present day mantle temperature by about 120 K, but the present day mantle viscosity is affected little. The water cycle thus complements the well-known thermostat effect of viscosity and mantle temperature. Our results further suggest that the biosphere could impact the feedback cycles by

  15. Electron thermal effects on electron acceleration and energy cascades in geomagnetic field line resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J.; Wright, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    Some of the most intense electron precipitation and largest ion outflows are found in regions of intense, Alfvenic waves. Recent analysis of auroral turbulence suggests that large-scale waves couple energy to smaller scale lengths on the order of the electron inertial, ion-acoustic or ion-gyroradius. In this presentation, we examine the effects of electron temperature on the characteristics of electron acceleration and cross-scale energy coupling of wave energy using a hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulation of Field Line Resonances in a dipolar coordinate system. The simulations describe a cascade of energy from a large-scale global driver to kinetic scales principally in the auroral acceleration region where electron inertial effects dominate and electron acceleration occurs. However, the fine scale transverse structuring of the upward current associated with this cascade appears to depend on the temperature of the ambient electron population suggesting that the ion acoustic scale length (which is dominant at higher altitudes) can influence the characteristics of the current fragmentation. Additionally, although the majority of the electron acceleration remains in the auroral acceleration region, the higher temperature cases appear to require a more extended (along the field line) source of electrons in order to carry the parallel current. We also consider the possible mechanisms by which coupling of large and small perpendicular scale lengths occurs and what effects the addition of ion gyro-radius physics may have on the characteristics of the acceleration and cascade.

  16. The Dependence of the Change in the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polyimide IM7-K3B on Microcracking due to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Melissa C.

    1995-01-01

    Composite IM7-K3B was subjected to a simulated high speed aircraft thermal environment to determine the effects of microcracking on the change in CTE. IM7-K3B is a graphite fiber reinforced polyimide laminate, manufactured by Dupont. The lay-up for the material was (0.90((Sub 3)(Sub s))). The specimens were placed in a laser-interferometric dilatometer to obtain thermal expansion measurements and were then repeatedly cycled between -65 F and 350 F up to 1000 cycles. After cycling they were scanned for microcracks at a magnification of 400x. The material was expected not to crack and to have a near zero CTE. Some microcracking did occur in all specimens and extensive microcracking occurred in one specimen. Further testing is required to determine how closely the CTE and microcracking are related.

  17. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part behavior under tensile stress, thermal cycling, and fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shojib

    using visual feedback method led to an increase in UTS of 16% in XYZ, 7% in XZY, and 22% in ZXY. The FDM fabricated parts using PC were tested under thermal cycling of -30° C to 85° C. A series of experiments were performed (e.g., tensile test, deformation of fabricated part, glass transition measurement) to evaluate the possibility of FDM fabricated parts in the harsh environment (embedded electronics, wiring in automotive industry, etc.). The UTS results showed that the results were not significantly different using statistical analysis after 150 thermal cycles while average Young's modulus increased from 1389 MPa to 1469 MPa after 150 thermal cycles. The highest warping of the specimen was found to be 78 microm which was the result of continuous thermal expansion and contraction. A sealing algorithm was developed using LabVIEW and MATLAB programming. The LabVIEW program was developed to obtain the edge information of each layer of a 3D model part. The MATLAB programming was used to gather the output information from LabVIEW and calculate the suggested RW providing least amount of gap in between rasters and contours. As a result, each layer became sealed and was able to withstand air pressure within a pressure vessel. A test specimen was fabricated according to the developed sealing algorithm parameters and used to show entirely sealed walls capable of withstanding up to 138 kPa air pressure.

  18. Investigation of a putative nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbl, Friedrich; Breitfuss, Angelika; Weidler, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    Background: Previous studies on the microbial diversity [1] of the slightly radioactive thermal springs near Bad Gastein, Salzburg, Austria, suggested the occurrence of a nitrogen cycle in this subterranean environment. Microcosm experiments were performed to prove if nitrogen compounds may be used as energy sources for certain members of the microbial community of this spring Methods: 2 x 25 l of thermal mineral water were sampled and filtered through a 0.22 µm Stericup (Millipore). Filters were excised and used as inocula for one microcosm. Stable isotope probing (SIP), was performed by using labeled nitrogen compounds to identify microorganisms, which were able to use nitrogen as the only energy source. 2 x 35 ml of natural grown biofilm were collected and used also as inocula for microcosms. Incubation was carried out as batch cultures in the dark at 30 °C or 40 °C, respectively. Two different types of media were used for incubation. Ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were measured 3-4 times a week. PH-value was also measured and adjusted to ca. 7.5 - 7.7 if necessary. DNA extraction was performed after 3 and 8 weeks of incubation, followed by an isopycnic centrifugation step. Clone libraries were performed only from microcosms incubated at 40 °C. To compare putative differences between the microbial communities at 30 °C with those at 40 °C, as well as the two different media, DGGE analyses were carried out. Results: A continuous decrease of the initial amount of ammonium was detected while the amounts of nitrite and nitrate increased simultaneously. No alterations of the initial amount of ammonium and nitrite or nitrate, could be detected with negative controls. Mass spectrometric measurements demonstrated that the extracted DNA was highly labeled. Phylogenetic analysis of DNA bands obtained from CsCl gradients led to differences in archaeal and bacterial communities of microcosms, which may reflect the different composition of media. Two of the archaeal

  19. Thermodynamic and design considerations of organic Rankine cycles in combined application with a solar thermal gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Kusterer, K.; Sugimoto, T.; Tanimura, K.; Bohn, D.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies are considered to provide a significant contribution for the electric power production in the future. Different kinds of technologies are presently in operation or under development, e.g. parabolic troughs, central receivers, solar dish systems and Fresnel reflectors. This paper takes the focus on central receiver technologies, where the solar radiation is concentrated by a field of heliostats in a receiver on the top of a tall tower. To get this CSP technology ready for the future, the system costs have to reduce significantly. The main cost driver in such kind of CSP technologies are the huge amount of heliostats. To reduce the amount of heliostats, and so the investment costs, the efficiency of the energy conversion cycle becomes an important issue. An increase in the cycle efficiency results in a decrease of the solar heliostat field and thus, in a significant cost reduction. The paper presents the results of a thermodynamic model of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for combined cycle application together with a solar thermal gas turbine. The gas turbine cycle is modeled with an additional intercooler and recuperator and is based on a typical industrial gas turbine in the 2 MW class. The gas turbine has a two stage radial compressor and a three stage axial turbine. The compressed air is preheated within a solar receiver to 950°C before entering the combustor. A hybrid operation of the gas turbine is considered. In order to achieve a further increase of the overall efficiency, the combined operation of the gas turbine and an Organic Rankine Cycle is considered. Therefore an ORC has been set up, which is thermally connected to the gas turbine cycle at two positions. The ORC can be coupled to the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle at the intercooler and after the recuperator. Thus, waste heat from different cycle positions can be transferred to the ORC for additional production of electricity. Within this investigation

  20. Optimization of conditions for thermal treatment of rice bran using an accelerator including an organo-iron compound.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hikari; Tachibana, Naoya; Fukushima, Masami

    2011-02-01

    A method for thermal conversion of raw organic waste (ROW) to a compost-like material (CLM) with higher levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds was developed, in which rice bran and an organo-iron compound were employed as a model ROW and the accelerator, respectively. To evaluate the qualities of CLMs, organic substances of an acid insoluble fraction of alkaline extracts (AIAEs) from a CLM were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, and nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds in the CLM samples were increased by long-term treatment (60°C for 5 days, 170°C for 3 days). In particular, the high lipid content of the AIAEs, which was indicative of inadequate digestion of CLM components, was dramatically reduced in the presence of the accelerator. PMID:21044838

  1. Particle acceleration and non-thermal emission in Pulsar Wind Nebulae from relativistic MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2015-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae are among the most powerful particle accelerators in the Galaxy with acceleration efficiencies that reach up to 30% and maximum particle energies in the PeV range. In recent years relativistic axisymmetric MHD models have proven to be excellent tools for describing the physics of such objects, and particularly successful at explaining their high energy morphology, down to very fine details. Nevertheless, some important aspects of the physics of PWNe are still obscure: the mechanism(s) responsible for the acceleration of particles of all energies is (are) still unclear, and the origin of the lowest energy (radio emitting) particles is most mysterious. The correct interpretation of the origin of radio emitting particles is of fundamental importance, as this holds information about the amount of pair production in the pulsar magnetosphere, and hence on the role of pulsars as antimatter factories. On the other hand, the long lifetimes of these particles against synchrotron losses, allows them to travel far from their injection location, making their acceleration site difficult to constrain. As far as the highest energy (X and gamma-ray emitting) particles are concerned, their acceleration is commonly believed to occur at the pulsar wind termination shock. But since the upstream flow is thought to have non-uniform properties along the shock surface, important constraints on the acceleration mechanism(s) could come from exact knowledge of the location and flow properties where particles are being accelerated. We investigate in detail both topics by means of 2D numerical MHD simulations. Different assumptions on the origin of radio particles and more generally on the injection sites of all particles are considered, and the corresponding emission properties are computed. We discuss the physical constraints that can be inferred from comparison of the synthetic emission properties against multiwavelength observations of the PWN class prototype, the Crab

  2. Effect of thermal cycling in a Mach 0.3 burner rig on properties and structure of directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and stress rupture properties at 1040 C of a thermally cycled gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic were essentially equivalent to the as-grown properties. Tensile strength and rupture life at 760 C appeared to decrease slightly by thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in gamma prime coarsening and Widmanstatten delta precipitation in the gamma phase. An unidentified precipitate, presumably gamma prime, was observed within the delta phase. The eutectic alloy exhibited a high rate of oxidation-erosion weight loss during thermal cycling in the Mach 0.3 burner rig.

  3. The effect of thermal cycling on the structure and properties of a Co, Cr, Ni-TaC directionally solidified eutectic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlevey, F. M.; Wallace, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of thermal cycling on the structure and properties of a cobalt, chromium, nickel, tantalum carbide directionally solidified eutectic composite is reported. It was determined that the stress rupture properties of the alloy were decreased by the thermal cycling. The loss in stress rupture properties varied with the number of cycles with the loss in properties after about 200 cycles being relatively high. The formation of serrations and the resulting changes in the mechanical properties of the material are discussed.

  4. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael; Halkyard, John

    2012-05-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawaii and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the

  5. Material Degradation during Isothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling of Hybrid Mica Seal with Ag Interlayer under SOFC Exposure Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Hardy, John S.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2006-11-01

    Hybrid phlogopite mica seals with silver interlayers were evaluated in terms of materials degradation in a combined isothermal ageing and thermal cycling test. The hybrid mica seal was composed of a phlogopite mica paper sandwiched between two Ag foils. The hybrid micas were first aged at 800oC for ~1,000 hrs in a moist, dilute hydrogen fuel (~2.7% H2/bal. Ar + ~3% H2O), followed by short-term thermal cycling between ~100oC and 800oC. The combined test was repeated for 3 times for a total of 4,000 hrs ageing at 800oC and 119 thermal cycles. The results of high temperature leak rate tests showed very good thermal stability and thermal cycle stability with 800oC leak rates of ~0.02-0.03 sccm/cm. A hybrid mica seal tested in a high water content fuel (30 v% H2O/70 v% H2) demonstrated similar leakage during isothermal ageing and subsequent thermal cycles. Post-mortem analyses showed no extensive reaction between Ag and phlogopite mica as well as no significant mica degradation. Simple calculations to estimate the effect of measured leakage on the open circuit voltage and the total fuel loss for various SOFC stack sizes suggest very small fuel losses for the current hybrid mica seals, indicating that they are good candidates for SOFC sealing applications. Corresponding author: Yeong-Shyung Chou Tel: 509-375-2527, Fax: 509-375-2186, E-mail: yeong-shyung.chou@pnl.gov

  6. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  7. Ion acceleration to supra-thermal energies in the near-Earth magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Kronberg

    2016-07-01

    We here present an analysis of ion composition measurements by the RAPID instruments onboard Cluster. We discuss the evidence for an acceleration of ions to energies above 100 keV in the near-Earth current sheet, in the vicinity of a possible near-Earth neutral line, and we investigate the physical details of such an acceleration. We present observations of tailward bulk flows in the near-Earth tail associated with plasmoid-like magnetic structures. These flows are superimposed by low-frequency magnetic and electric field fluctuations. Observations and modelling show that resonant interactions between ions and low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations facilitate the ion energization inside plasmoids.

  8. Numerical simulation of reacting flow in a thermally choked ram accelerator projectile launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.

    1991-06-01

    CFD solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations are presently applied to a ram-accelerator projectile launcher's reacting and nonreacting turbulent flowfields. The gases in question are a hydrocarbon such as CH4, an oxidizer such as O2, and an inert gas such as N2. Numerical simulations are presented which highlight in-bore flowfield details and allow comparisons with measured launch tube wall pressures and projectile thrust as a function of velocity. The computation results thus obtained are used to ascertain the operational feasibility of a proposed 120-mm-bore ram accelerator system.

  9. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  10. Evaluation of roughness and micromorphology of epoxy paint on cobalt-chromium alloy before and after thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Alessandra Cardoso da Silva; Muzilli, Carlos Alberto; Miranda, Milton Edson; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the epoxy paint used to coat metal substrates in industrial electrostatic painting applications could also be used to mask metal clasps in removable dental prostheses (RDP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the influence of thermal cycling and the in vitro roughness of a surface after application of epoxy paint, as well as to assess the micromorphology of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) based metal structure. Sixty test specimens were fabricated from a CoCr alloy. The specimens were separated into three groups (n = 20) according to surface treatment: Group 1 (Pol) - polished with abrasive stone and rubbers; Group 2 (Pol+Epo) - polished and coated with epoxy paint; Group 3 (Epo) - air-abraded with aluminum oxide particles and coated with epoxy paint. The surface roughness was evaluated before and after 1000 thermal cycles (5°C and 50°C). The surface micromorphology was verified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences among surface treatments (p < 0.0001), but no difference was found before and after thermal cycling (p = 0.6638). The CoCr-based metal alloy surfaces treated with epoxy paint (Groups 2 and 3) were rougher than the surfaces that were only polished (Group 1). Thermal cycling did not influence surface roughness, or lead to chipping or detachment of the epoxy paint. PMID:23538429

  11. Microstructural changes in HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate the heat-affected zone during welding

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, G.; Fonda, R.W.; Vandermeer, R.A.; Matuszeski, A.

    1995-12-01

    The microstructural changes that occur in a commercial HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate weld heat affected zone (HAZ) behavior were systematically investigated primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eight different weld thermal cycles, with peak temperatures representative of four HAZ regions (the tempered region, the intercritical region, the fine-grained austenitized region, and the coarse-grained austenitized region) and cooling rates characteristic of high heat input (cooling rate (CR) = 5 C/s) and low heat input (CR = 60 C/s) welding were simulated in a heating/quenching dilatometer. The as-received base plate consisted of heavily tempered lath martensite, acicular ferrite, and retained austenite matrix phases with precipitates of copper, niobium-carbonitride, and cementite. The microstructural changes in both the matrix and precipitate phases due to thermal cycling were examined by TEM and correlated with the results of (1) conventional optical microscopy, (2) prior austenite grain size measurements, (3) microhardness testing, and (4) dilatometric analysis. Many of the thermal cycles resulted in dramatic changes in both the microstructures and the properties due to the synergistic interaction between the simulated position in the HAZ and the heat input. Some of these microstructures deviate substantially from those predicted from published continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves. The final microstructure was predominantly dependent upon peak temperature (i.e., position within the HAZ), although the cooling rate (i.e., heat input) strongly affected the microstructures of the simulated intercritical and fine-grained austenitized regions.

  12. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C.

    2012-10-15

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  13. Optimization and experimental validation of a thermal cycle that maximizes entropy coefficient fisher identifiability for lithium iron phosphate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Sergio; Rothenberger, Michael; Hake, Alison; Fathy, Hosam

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a framework for optimizing the thermal cycle to estimate a battery cell's entropy coefficient at 20% state of charge (SOC). Our goal is to maximize Fisher identifiability: a measure of the accuracy with which a parameter can be estimated. Existing protocols in the literature for estimating entropy coefficients demand excessive laboratory time. Identifiability optimization makes it possible to achieve comparable accuracy levels in a fraction of the time. This article demonstrates this result for a set of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cells. We conduct a 24-h experiment to obtain benchmark measurements of their entropy coefficients. We optimize a thermal cycle to maximize parameter identifiability for these cells. This optimization proceeds with respect to the coefficients of a Fourier discretization of this thermal cycle. Finally, we compare the estimated parameters using (i) the benchmark test, (ii) the optimized protocol, and (iii) a 15-h test from the literature (by Forgez et al.). The results are encouraging for two reasons. First, they confirm the simulation-based prediction that the optimized experiment can produce accurate parameter estimates in 2 h, compared to 15-24. Second, the optimized experiment also estimates a thermal time constant representing the effects of thermal capacitance and convection heat transfer.

  14. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling for Accelerated Design of EV Batteries; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad; Zhang, Chao; Kim, Gi-heon; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2015-06-10

    The physical and chemical phenomena occurring in a battery are many and complex and in many different scales. Without a better knowledge of the interplay among the multi-physics occurring across the varied scales, it is very challenging and time consuming to design long-lasting, high-performing, safe, affordable large battery systems, enabling electrification of the vehicles and modernization of the grid. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory, has been developing thermal and electrochemical models for cells and battery packs. Working with software producers, carmakers, and battery developers, computer-aided engineering tools have been developed that can accelerate the electrochemical and thermal design of batteries, reducing time to develop and optimize them and thus reducing the cost of the system. In the past couple of years, we initiated a project to model the mechanical response of batteries to stress, strain, fracture, deformation, puncture, and crush and then link them to electrochemical and thermal models to predict the response of a battery. This modeling is particularly important for understanding the physics and processes that happen in a battery during a crush-inducing vehicle crash. In this paper, we provide an overview of electrochemical-thermal-mechanical models for battery system understanding and designing.

  15. Probabilistic material strength degradation model for Inconel 718 components subjected to high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of both the fifth and sixth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for five variables, namely, high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using an updated version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of high-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue was performed. Then using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS94, a second sensitivity study including the effect of low-cycle mechanical fatigue, as well as, the three previous effects was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of high-cycle mechanical

  16. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  17. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  18. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  19. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of Sic Fiber-reinforced Reaction-bonded Si3n4 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal expansion curves for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix composites (SiC/RBSN) and unreinforced RBSN were measured from 25 to 1400 C in nitrogen and in oxygen. The effects of fiber/matrix bonding and cycling on the thermal expansion curves and room-temperature tensile properties of unidirectional composites were determined. The measured thermal expansion curves were compared with those predicted from composite theory. Predicted thermal expansion curves parallel to the fiber direction for both bonding cases were similar to that of the weakly bonded composites, but those normal to the fiber direction for both bonding cases resulted in no net dimensional changes at room temperature, and no loss in tensile properties from the as-fabricated condition. In contrast, thermal cycling in oxygen for both composites caused volume expansion primarily due to internal oxidation of RBSN. Cyclic oxidation affected the mechanical properties of the weakly bonded SiC/RBSN composites the most, resulting in loss of strain capability beyond matrix fracture and catastrophic, brittle fracture. Increased bonding between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix due to oxidation of the carbon-rich fiber surface coating and an altered residual stress pattern in the composite due to internal oxidation of the matrix are the main reasons for the poor mechanical performance of these composites.

  20. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism, electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher-energy electrons. It is shown that the Fermi mechanism can result in scattering into the loss cone of up to several tenths of percent of electrons with flux peaking at energies up to several hundred eVs.

  1. Engineering deamidation-susceptible asparagines leads to improved stability to thermal cycling in a lipase

    PubMed Central

    Bhanuramanand, K; Ahmad, Shoeb; Rao, N M

    2014-01-01

    At high temperatures, protein stability is influenced by chemical alterations; most important among them is deamidation of asparagines. Deamidation kinetics of asparagines depends on the local sequence, solvent, pH, temperature, and the tertiary structure. Suitable replacement of deamidated asparagines could be a viable strategy to improve deamidation-mediated loss in protein properties, specifically protein thermostability. In this study, we have used nano RP-HPLC coupled ESI MS/MS approach to identify residues susceptible to deamidation in a lipase (6B) on heat treatment. Out of 15 asparagines and six glutamines in 6B, only five asparagines were susceptible to deamidation at temperatures higher than 75°C. These five positions were subjected to site saturation mutagenesis followed by activity screen to identify the most suitable substitutions. Only three of the five asparagines were found to be tolerant to substitutions. Best substitutions at these positions were combined into a mutant. The resultant lipase (mutC) has near identical secondary structure and improved thermal tolerance as compared to its parent. The triple mutant has shown almost two-fold higher residual activity compared to 6B after four cycles at 90°C. MutC has retained more than 50% activity even after incubation at 100°C. Engineering asparagines susceptible to deamidation would be a potential strategy to improve proteins to withstand very high temperatures. PMID:25043738

  2. Comparative analysis of optimisation methods applied to thermal cycle of a coal fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Łukasz; Elsner, Witold

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic optimization of 900MW power unit for ultra-supercritical parameters, modified according to AD700 concept. The aim of the study was to verify two optimisation methods, i.e., the finding the minimum of a constrained nonlinear multivariable function (fmincon) and the Nelder-Mead method with their own constrain functions. The analysis was carried out using IPSEpro software combined with MATLAB, where gross power generation efficiency was chosen as the objective function. In comparison with the Nelder-Mead method it was shown that using fmincon function gives reasonable results and a significant reduction of computational time. Unfortunately, with the increased number of decision parameters, the benefit measured by the increase in efficiency is becoming smaller. An important drawback of fmincon method is also a lack of repeatability by using different starting points. The obtained results led to the conclusion, that the Nelder-Mead method is a better tool for optimisation of thermal cycles with a high degree of complexity like the coal-fired power unit.

  3. The seasonal cycle of water vapour on Mars from assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, François; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-07-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr μm depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around LS=240-260°. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  4. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  5. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  6. A study of thermal cycling and radiation effects on indium and solder bump bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Kwan et al.

    2001-12-11

    The BTeV hybrid pixel detector is constructed of readout chips and sensor arrays which are developed separately. The detector is assembled by flip-chip mating of the two parts. This method requires the availability of highly reliable, reasonably low cost fine-pitch flip-chip attachment technology. We have tested the quality of two bump-bonding technologies; indium bumps (by Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong) and fluxless solder bumps (by MCNC in North Carolina, USA). The results have been presented elsewhere [1]. In this paper we describe tests we performed to further evaluate these technologies. We subjected 15 indium bump-bonded and 15 fluxless solder bump-bonded dummy detectors through a thermal cycle and then a dose of radiation to observe the effects of cooling, heating and radiation on bump-bonds. We also exercised the processes of HDI mounting and wire bonding to some of the dummy detectors to see the effect of these processes on bump bonds.

  7. Evidence of Transformation Bursts During Thermal Cycling of a Pu-Ga Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Mitchell, J N; Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Massalski, T B; Schwartz, A J

    2005-02-09

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the fcc (delta) to monoclinic (alpha-prime) phase transformation and its reversion in a plutonium-gallium alloy have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry. Under ambient conditions, the delta phase is metastable in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Thermal cycling to below the ambient temperature results in a partial transformation to the alpha-prime phase; this transformation is composition-invariant and exhibits martensitic behavior. Because this transformation results in an unusually invariant large 25% volume contraction that cannot be fully accommodated by purely elastic adjustments, the transformation mode is expected to involve burst formation of individual alpha-prime particles. However, upon cooling, these individual bursts were not resolved by the above techniques, although signals corresponding to the overall accumulation of many alpha-prime particles were observed. On the other hand, upon heating, signals from differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry showed a series of discrete changes occurring in periodic increments beginning at approximately 32 C. These features correspond to the cooperative reversion of many alpha-prime particles to the delta phase; they appear to be the result of an interplay between the autocatalytically driven reversion of a cascade of individual martensite units, and self-quenching caused by small changes of temperature and/or stress accompanying each individual transformation burst. The heat of the delta/alpha-prime transformation is estimated to be about + 4 kJ/mole.

  8. Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

    2009-07-01

    In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

  9. Life cycle assessment of thermal waste-to-energy technologies: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy. PMID:25052337

  10. Gas desorption from seawater in open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion barometric upcomers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiaasiaan, S.M.; Wassel, A.T. ); Pesaran, A.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Gas desorption from warm and cold seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions is addressed in this paper. The desorption process of dissolved O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} in the barometric upcomers of an OTEC plant is simulated mathematically. The model considers the growth of bubbles originating in the ocean and bubbles formed in the upcomers. Bubble growth is induced by gas mass transfer and water evaporation at the bubble-liquid interface, as well as by the decreasing hydrostatic pressure. Heterogeneous nucleation at pipe wall crevices and on suspended particles in the water stream is also modeled. Bubble coalescence due to turbulent shear and differential buoyancy is simulated. The results generated show the deaeration efficiency as a function of flow and geometric parameters. The calculations show that gas desorption in the barometric upcomers can be appreciable. Such desorption is enhanced by increasing the concentration of the incoming and/or the heterogeneously formed bubbles. Results of existing experiments are discussed and predictions are shown for the selected test conditions.

  11. Evaluation of accelerated UV and thermal testing for benzene formation in beverages containing benzoate and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Patricia J; Wamer, Wayne G; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W; Perfetti, Gracia A

    2010-04-01

    Under certain conditions, benzene can form in beverages containing benzoic and ascorbic acids. The American Beverage Assn. (ABA) has published guidelines to help manufacturers mitigate benzene formation in beverages. These guidelines recommend accelerated testing conditions to test product formulations, because exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light and elevated temperature over the shelf life of the beverage may result in benzene formation in products containing benzoic and ascorbic acids. In this study, the effects of UVA exposure on benzene formation were determined. Benzene formation was examined for samples contained in UV stabilized and non-UV stabilized packaging. Additionally, the usefulness of accelerated thermal testing to simulate end of shelf-life benzene formation was evaluated for samples containing either benzoic or ascorbic acid, or both. The 24 h studies showed that under intense UVA light benzene levels increased by as much as 53% in model solutions stored in non-UV stabilized bottles, whereas the use of UV stabilized polyethylene terephthalate bottles reduced benzene formation by about 13% relative to the non-UV stabilized bottles. Similar trends were observed for the 7 d study. Retail beverages and positive and negative controls were used to study the accelerated thermal testing conditions. The amount of benzene found in the positive controls and cranberry juice suggests that testing at 40 degrees C for 14 d may more reliably simulate end of shelf-life benzene formation in beverages. Except for cranberry juice, retail beverages were not found to contain detectable amounts of benzene (<0.05 ng/g) at the end of their shelf lives. PMID:20492277

  12. Influence of High- G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling on Localized Recrystallization in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Kim, Choong-Un; Bieler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of isothermal aging and recrystallized grain structure distribution on mechanical shock and thermal cycling performance of solder joints with 1% and 3% silver content Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects were investigated. Localized recrystallized grain structure distributions were analyzed to identify correlations between the microstructure evolution and shock performance. The results reveal that the shock tolerance depends on the amount of shock energy that can be absorbed during each shock cycle, which depends on microstructural features. Based on the recrystallized grain distribution, additional isothermal aging in 1% silver Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects shows improved shock performance, whereas degraded shock performance was observed in 3% Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects. Using the same grain boundary distribution analysis on thermally cycled samples, relationships between the particle size distribution, localized recrystallized grain structure development, shock, and thermomechanical performance were identified: finer particle spacing is beneficial for thermal cycling as it resists grain boundary generation, while conversely, wider particle spacing facilitates recrystallization and grain boundary mobility that allows Sn to absorb shock energy.

  13. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Blink, James; Carter, Joe; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark; Howard, Robert

    2012-07-01

    A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Used Fuel Disposition campaign. Reference concepts are identified for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. These were analyzed for waste inventory cases representing a range of waste types that could be produced by advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress. All of these disposal concepts are enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature limits for different disposal concepts. For the crystalline rock and clay/shale repository concepts, a waste package surface temperature limit of 100 deg. C was assumed to prevent changes in clay-based buffer material or clay-rich host rock. Surface decay storage of 50 to 100 years is needed for disposal of high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, or disposal of HLW glass from reprocessing LWR uranium oxide (UOX) fuel. High-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of metal fuel used in a fast reactor could be disposed after decay storage of 50 years or less. For disposal in salt the rock thermal conductivity is significantly greater, and higher temperatures (200 deg. C) can be tolerated at the waste package surface. Decay storage of 10 years or less is needed for high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR

  14. Low Temperature, Rapid Thermal Cycle Annealing of HgCdTe Grown on CdTe/Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simingalam, Sina; Brill, Gregory; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Rao, Mulpuri V.

    2015-05-01

    The HgCdTe(MCT) grown on CdTe/Si substrate has a high dislocation density due to lattice mismatch. Thermal cycle annealing (TCA) is effective in reducing the dislocation density. The TCA at high temperatures results in inter-diffusion of the constituent elements across the MCT/CdTe interface. In this study, we observed a reduction in dislocation density with good surface morphology due to proper design of the TCA system, low annealing temperature, and large number of annealing cycles. The ampoule containing the samples is placed in direct contact with the graphite heating tube which helps in increasing the heating and cooling rates of the annealing cycle. To maintain Hg overpressure, Hg is placed in the sample holder, instead of in the ampoule to avoid Hg condensation. The best results were obtained by cycling the annealing temperature between 290°C and 350°C. Anneals were performed by using 32, 64, 128 and 256 cycles. We obtained an etch pit density (EPD) as low as 1 × 106 cm-2. Lower EPD was not achieved either by increasing annealing temperature or number of annealing cycles. Through secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis, we observed very little inter-diffusion of Cd across the MCT/CdTe interface for the 128 cycle annealing. These results show promise in bridging the gap in the device performance between the MCT material grown on CdTe/Si and CdZnTe substrates.

  15. Global Carbon Cycle Perturbations and Implications for Arctic Hydrology during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Kump, L.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ca. 55.9 Ma) was an interval of geologically abrupt global warming lasting ~200 ka. It has been proposed as an ancient analogue for future climate response to CO2 emission from fossil fuel burning. The onset of this event is fueled by a large release of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. However, there is a large discrepancy in the magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) between marine and terrestrial records. Here we present new organic geochemical data and stable carbon isotope records from n-alkanes and pristane extracted from core materials representing the most expanded PETM section yet recovered from a nearshore marine early Cenozoic succession from Spitsbergen. The low hydrogen index and oxygen index indicate that organic matter has been thermally altered, consistent with n-alkanes that do not show a clear odd-over-even predominance as reflected by the low and constant carbon preference index. The δ13C records of long chain n-alkanes from core BH9-05 track the δ13C recorded in total organic carbon, but are ~3% more negative prior to the CIE, ~4.5% more negative during the CIE, and ~4% more negative after the CIE. An orbital age model derived from the same core suggests the CIE from n-alkanes appears more abruptly onset than the bulk organic carbon, indicating possibly climate-induced modification to the observed feature in n-alkanes. In addition, the carbon isotope values of individual long-chain (n-C27 to n-C31) n-alkanes tend to become less negative with increasing chain length resulting in the smallest magnitude CIEs in longer chain lengths (i.e. n-C31) and the largest magnitude CIEs in shorter chain lengths (i.e. n-C27). We are currently considering the effect of plant community and paleoclimate on the observed pattern of CIE in n-alkanes to evaluate carbon cycle perturbations and Arctic hydrology changes during the PETM. One interpretation of these patterns is that there was an

  16. The extent of non-thermal particle acceleration in relativistic, electron-positron reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Greg; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    Reconnection is studied as an explanation for high-energy flares from the Crab Nebula. The production of synchrotron emission >100 MeV challenges classical models of acceleration. 3D simulation shows that reconnection, converting magnetic energy to kinetic energy, can accelerate beyond γrad. The power-law index and high-energy cutoff are important for understanding the radiation spectrum dN/dγ = f(γ) ∝ γ. α and cutoff were measured vs. L and σ, where L is system (simulation) size and σ is upstream magnetization (σ = B2/4πnmc2). α can affect the high-energy cutoff. In conclusion, for collisionless relativistic reconnection in electron-positron plasma, without guide field, nb/nd=0.1: (1) relativistic magnetic reconnection yields power-law particle spectra, (2) the power law index decreases as σ increases, approaching ≈1.2. (3) the power law is cut off at an energy related to acceleration within a single current layer, which is proportional to the current layer length (for small systems, that length is the system length, yielding γc2 ≈ 0.1 L/ρ0; for large systems, the layer length is limited by secondary tearing instability, yielding γc1 ≈ 4σ; the transition from small to large is around L/ρ0 = 40σ.). (4) although the large-system energy cutoff is proportional to the average energy per particle, it is significantly higher than the average energy per particle.

  17. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  18. Elastic modulus and thermal stress in coating during heat cycling with different substrate shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Daniel; Valarezo, Alfredo

    2015-09-01

    The elastic modulus of a deposit ( E d) can be obtained by monitoring the temperature (Δ T) and curvature (Δ k) of a one-side coated long plate, namely, a onedimensional (1D) deformation model. The aim of this research is to design an experimental setup that proves whether a 1D deformation model can be scaled for complex geometries. The setup includes a laser displacement sensor mounted on a robotic arm capable of scanning a specimen surface and measuring its deformation. The reproducibility of the results is verified by comparing the present results with Stony Brook University Laboratory's results. The Δ k-Δ T slope error is less than 8%, and the E d estimation error is close to 2%. These values reveal the repeatability of the experiments. Several samples fabricated with aluminum as the substrate and 100MXC nanowire (Fe and Cr alloy) as the deposit are analyzed and compared with those in finite element (FE) simulations. The linear elastic behavior of 1D (flat long plate) and 2D (squared plate) specimens during heating/cooling cycles is demonstrated by the high linearity of all Δ k-Δ T curves (over 97%). The E d values are approximately equal for 1D and 2D analyses, with a median of 96 GPa and standard deviation of 2 GPa. The correspondence between the experimental and simulated results for the 1D and 2D specimens reveals that deformation and thermal stress in coated specimens can be predicted regardless of specimen geometry through FE modeling and by using the experimental value of E d. An example of a turbine-bladeshaped substrate is presented to validate the approach.

  19. Effect of Restorative System and Thermal Cycling on the Tooth-Restoration Interface - OCT Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, C S; Rodrigues, R V; Souza-Junior, E J; Freitas, A Z; Ambrosano, G M B; Pascon, F M; Puppin-Rontani, R M

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the tooth/noncarious cervical lesion restoration interface when using different adhesive systems and resin composites, submitted to thermal cycling (TC), using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) preparations (0.7 mm depth × 2 mm diameter) were performed on 60 human third molars and randomly divided into six groups, according to the adhesive system and resin composite used: group 1 = Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2) + Aelite LS Posterior (AP); group 2 = SB2 + Venus Diamond (VD); group = SB2 + Filtek Z250XT (Z250); group 4 = Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) + AP; group 5 = CSE + VD; group 6 = CSE + Z250. Selective enamel etching was performed for 30 seconds on groups 4, 5, and 6, while groups 1, 2, and 3 were etched for 30 seconds in enamel and 15 seconds in dentin. All groups were evaluated using OCT before and after TC (n=10). Images were analyzed using Image J software; enamel and dentin margins were separately evaluated. Data from OCT were submitted to PROC MIXED for repeated measurements and Tukey Kramer test (α = 0.05). No marginal gaps were observed in etched enamel, either before or after TC, for all adhesive and resin composite systems. A significant interaction was found between adhesive system and TC for the dentin groups; after TC, restorations with CSE showed smaller gaps at the dentin/restoration interface compared with SB2 for all resin composites. Increased gap percentages were noticed after TC compared with the gaps before TC for all groups. In conclusion, TC affected marginal integrity only in dentin margins, whereas etched enamel margins remained stable even after TC. Dentin margins restored with CSE adhesive system showed better marginal adaptation than those restored with SB2. Resin composites did not influence marginal integrity of NCCL restorations. PMID:26266651

  20. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinkin, Alexandr Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-27

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  1. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulinkin, Alexandr; Shugurov, Artur; Panin, Alexey; Sergeev, Viktor; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  2. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  3. Cool-down acceleration of G-M cryocoolers with thermal oscillations passively damped by helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, R. J.; Delmas, J.

    2015-12-01

    4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers suffer from inherent temperature oscillations which can be a problem for certain attached electronic instrumentation. Sumitomo Heavy Industries has exploited the high volumetric specific heat of super-critical He to quell these oscillations (approx. 10 dB) by strongly thermally linking a separate vessel of He to the second stage; no significant thermal resistance is added between the payload and the working gas of the cryocooler. A noticeable effect of the helium damper is to increase the cool-down time of the second stage below 10 K. For the operation of niobium-based superconducting electronics (NbSCE), a common practice is to warm the circuits above the critical temperature (∼9 K) and then cool to the operating point in order to redistribute trapped magnetic fluxons, so for NbSCE users, the time to cool from 10 K is important. The gas in the helium damper is shared between a room-temperature buffer tank and the 2nd stage vessel, which are connected by a capillary tube. We show that the total cool-down time below 10 K can be substantially reduced by introducing a combination of thermal linkages between the cryocooler and the capillary tube and in-line relief valves, which control the He mass distribution between the warm canister and cold vessel. The time to reach operating temperature from the superconducting transition has been reduced to <25% of the time needed without these low-cost modifications.

  4. Modeling phase transformation behavior during thermal cycling in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    An implicit finite-difference analysis was used to model the diffusion-controlled transformation behavior in a ternary system. The present analysis extends earlier work by examining the transformation behavior under the influence of multiple thermal cycles. The analysis was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system to simulate the microstructural development in austenitic stainless steel welds. The ferrite-to-austenite transformation was studied in an effort to model the response of the heat-affected zone to multiple thermal cycles experienced during multipass welding. Results show that under some conditions, a transformation ``inertia`` exists that delays the system`s response when changing from cooling to heating. Conditions under which this ``inertia`` is most influential were examined. It was also found that under some conditions, the transformation behavior does not follow the equilibrium behavior as a function of temperature. Results also provide some insight into effect of composition distribution on transformation behavior.

  5. A thermal model for analysis of hermetic reciprocating compressors under the on-off cycling operating condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohn, S. K.; Diniz, M. C.; Deschamps, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    The on-off cycling operating condition of compressors is very common in low capacity refrigeration systems, being characterized by alternate periods in which the compressor is either operating (on) or idle (off). Thermal interactions between the compressor components affect its performance during the operating period and establish the initial condition for the compressor start up from idle condition. This paper presents a numerical model to predict the temperature field of hermetic reciprocating compressors under on-off cycling conditions. The model adopts a lumped formulation for control volumes formed in the fluid solution domain and the finite volume method to solve heat conduction in the solid components. Some required heat transfer coefficients were experimentally adjusted. Predictions for temperature were compared to measurements and good agreement was observed, especially for the thermal transient during the period in which the compressor is off.

  6. An integrated fingerprinting and kinetic approach to accelerated shelf-life testing of chemical changes in thermally treated carrot puree.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Magpusao, Johannes; Palmers, Stijn; Michiels, Chris; Hendrickx, Marc; Loey, Ann Van

    2015-07-15

    To have a better understanding of chemical reactions during shelf-life, an integrated analytical and engineering toolbox: "fingerprinting-kinetics" was used. As a case study, a thermally sterilised carrot puree was selected. Sterilised purees were stored at four storage temperatures as a function of time. Fingerprinting enabled selection of volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. Only these volatiles were identified and studied further. Next, kinetic modelling was performed to investigate the suitability of these volatiles as quality indices (markers) for accelerated shelf-life testing (ASLT). Fingerprinting enabled selection of terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, fatty acid derivatives, Strecker aldehydes and sulphur compounds as volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. The amount of Strecker aldehydes increased during storage, whereas the rest of the volatiles decreased. Out of the volatiles, based on the applied kinetic modelling, myristicin, α-terpinolene, β-pinene, α-terpineol and octanal were identified as potential markers for ASLT. PMID:25722143

  7. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M. )

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  8. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  9. Bond Coat Engineering Influence on the Evolution of the Microstructure, Bond Strength, and Failure of TBCs Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Nagy, D.; Marple, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of thermal spray systems, including HVOF (JP5000 and DJ2600-hybrid), APS (F4-MB and Axial III), and LPPS (Oerlikon Metco system) were employed to spray CoNiCrAlY bond coats (BCs) onto Inconel 625 substrates. The chemical composition of the BC powder was the same in all cases; however, the particle size distribution of the powder employed with each torch was that specifically recommended for the torch. For optimization purposes, these BCs were screened based on initial evaluations of roughness, porosity, residual stress, relative oxidation, and isothermal TGO growth. A single type of standard YSZ top coat was deposited via APS (F4MB) on all the optimized BCs. The TBCs were thermally cycled by employing a furnace cycle test (FCT) (1080 °C-1 h—followed by forced air cooling). Samples were submitted to 10, 100, 400, and 1400 cycles as well as being cycled to failure. The behavior of the microstructures, bond strength values (ASTM 633), and the TGO evolution of these TBCs, were investigated for the as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. During FCT, the TBCs found to be both the best and poorest performing and had their BCs deposited via HVOF. The results showed that engineering low-oxidized BCs does not necessarily lead to an optimal TBC performance. Moreover, the bond strength values decrease significantly only when the TBC is about to fail (top coat spall off) and the as-sprayed bond strength values cannot be used as an indicator of TBC performance.

  10. Surface degradation of CeO2 stabilized acrylic polyurethane coated thermally treated jack pine during accelerated weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sudeshna; Kocaefe, Duygu; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2013-07-01

    The thermally treated wood is a new value-added product and is very important for the diversification of forestry products. It drew the attention of consumers due to its attractive dark brown color. However, it loses its color when exposed to outside environment. Therefore, development of a protective coating for this value added product is necessary. In the present study, the efficiency of CeO2 nano particles alone or in combination with lignin stabilizer and/or bark extracts in acrylic polyurethane polymer was investigated by performing an accelerated weathering test. The color measurement results after accelerated weathering demonstrated that the coating containing CeO2 nano particles was the most effective whereas visual assessment suggested the coating containing CeO2 nano particles and lignin stabilizer as the most effective coating. The surface polarity changed for all the coatings during weathering and increase in contact angle after weathering suggested cross linking and reorientation of the polymer chain during weathering. The surface chemistry altered during weathering was evaluated by ATR-FTIR analysis. It suggested formation of different carbonyl byproducts during weathering. The chain scission reactions of the urethane linkages were not found to be significant during weathering.

  11. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  12. Behavior of oxide scales on 2. 25Cr-1Mo steel during thermal cycling. II. Scales grown in water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Christl, W.; Rahmel, A.; Schuetze, M.

    1989-02-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to identify scale cracking during thermal cycling of tubes of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The scale morphology and failure mode were investigated by light and electron optical method. The scale formed at 600/degree/C in water vapor consists of an outer magnetite and an inner, chromium-containing spinel layer. Cooling leads to tensile stresses in the scale that cause macro- and microcrack formation in the scale. At constant-cycle parameters, a characteristic set of crack length and crack density is established. Changes in the cycle parameters also change the crack length and crack density. The experimental results can be described by a model developed by Hasselmann assuming a large number of noninteracting microcracks in a ceramic plate.

  13. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  14. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. )

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  15. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F.

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  16. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Giant pulses of thermal neutrons in large accelerator beam dumps. Possibilities for experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavissky, Yurii Ya

    2006-12-01

    A short review is presented of the development in Russia of intense pulsed neutron sources for physical research — the pulsating fast reactors IBR-1, IBR-30, IBR-2 (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna), and the neutron-radiation complex of the Moscow meson factory — the 'Troitsk Trinity' (RAS Institute for Nuclear Research, Troitsk, Moscow region). The possibility of generating giant neutron pulses in beam dumps of superhigh energy accelerators is discussed. In particular, the possibility of producing giant pulsed thermal neutron fluxes in modified beam dumps of the large hadron collider (LHD) under construction at CERN is considered. It is shown that in the case of one-turn extraction ov 7-TeV protons accumulated in the LHC main rings on heavy targets with water or zirconium-hydride moderators placed in the front part of the LHC graphite beam-dump blocks, every 10 hours relatively short (from ~100 µs) thermal neutron pulses with a peak flux density of up to ~1020 neutrons cm-2 s-1 may be produced. The possibility of applying such neutron pulses in physical research is discussed.

  17. Prognostics of Power Mosfets Under Thermal Stress Accelerated Aging Using Data-Driven and Model-Based Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Saxena, Abhinav; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai F.

    2011-01-01

    An approach for predicting remaining useful life of power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor) devices has been developed. Power MOSFETs are semiconductor switching devices that are instrumental in electronics equipment such as those used in operation and control of modern aircraft and spacecraft. The MOSFETs examined here were aged under thermal overstress in a controlled experiment and continuous performance degradation data were collected from the accelerated aging experiment. Dieattach degradation was determined to be the primary failure mode. The collected run-to-failure data were analyzed and it was revealed that ON-state resistance increased as die-attach degraded under high thermal stresses. Results from finite element simulation analysis support the observations from the experimental data. Data-driven and model based prognostics algorithms were investigated where ON-state resistance was used as the primary precursor of failure feature. A Gaussian process regression algorithm was explored as an example for a data-driven technique and an extended Kalman filter and a particle filter were used as examples for model-based techniques. Both methods were able to provide valid results. Prognostic performance metrics were employed to evaluate and compare the algorithms.

  18. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  19. Effects of arc current on the life in burner rig thermal cycling of plasma sprayed ZrOsub2-Ysub2Osub3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of thermal cycle life data for four sets of eight thermal barrier coated specimens representing arc currents (plasma gun power) of 525, 600, 800, or 950 amps is presented. The ZrO2-8Y2O3/NiCrAlY plasma spray coated Rene 41 rods were thermal cycled to 1040 C in a Mach 0.3-Jet A/air burner flame. The experimental results indicate the existance of a minimum or threshold power level which coating life expectancy is less than 500 cycles. Above the threshold power level, coating life expectancy more than doubles and increases with arc current.

  20. First evidence of non-Gaussian solar flare EUV spectral line profiles and accelerated non-thermal ion motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Context. The properties of solar flare plasma can be determined from the observation of optically thin lines. The emitting ion distribution determines the shape of the spectral line profile, with an isothermal Maxwellian ion distribution producing a Gaussian profile. Non-Gaussian line profiles may indicate more complex ion distributions. Aims: We investigate the possibility of determining flare-accelerated non-thermal ion and/or plasma velocity distributions. Methods: We study EUV spectral lines produced during a flare SOL2013-05-15T01:45 using the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The flare is located close to the eastern solar limb with an extended loop structure, allowing the different flare features: ribbons, hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints and the loop-top source to be clearly observed in UV, EUV and X-rays. EUV line spectroscopy is performed in seven different regions covering the flare. We study the line profiles of the isolated and unblended Fe XVI lines (λ262.9760 Å ) mainly formed at temperatures of ~2 to 4 MK. Suitable Fe XVI line profiles at one time close to the peak soft X-ray emission and free of directed mass motions are examined using: 1. a higher moments analysis, 2. Gaussian fitting, and 3. by fitting a kappa distribution line profile convolved with a Gaussian to account for the EIS instrumental profile. Results: Fe XVI line profiles in the flaring loop-top, HXR footpoint and ribbon regions can be confidently fitted with a kappa line profile with an extra variable κ, giving low, non-thermal κ values between 2 and 3.3. An independent higher moments analysis also finds that many of the spectral line kurtosis values are higher than the Gaussian value of 3, even with the presence of a broad Gaussian instrumental profile. Conclusions: A flare-accelerated non-thermal ion population could account for both the observed non-Gaussian line profiles, and for the Fe XVI "excess" broadening found from Gaussian fitting, if the emitting ions are interacting

  1. HYPOTHALAMIC OREXINE SYSTEM ACCELERATES REGULATION OF SLEEP HOMEOSTASIS AND SLEEP-WAKEFULNESS CYCLE RECOVERY FROM BARBITURATE ANESTHESIA-INDUCED ARTIFICIAL SLEEP.

    PubMed

    Nachkebia, N; Maglakelidze, N; Chijavadze, E; Chkhartishvili, E; Babilodze, M

    2015-12-01

    The work was aimed for the ascertainment of following question - whether Orexin-containing neurons of dorsal and lateral hypothalamus and brain Orexinergic system in general are those cellular targets which can accelerate recovery of disturbed sleep homeostasis and restoration of sleep-wakefulness cycle behavioral states from barbiturate anesthesia-induced artificial sleep. Investigation was carried out on 18 wild type white rats (weight 200-250gr). Different doses of Nembutal Sodium were used for the initiation of deep anesthesia. 30 min after barbiturate anesthesia induced artificial sleep serial electrical stimulations of dorsal or lateral hypothalamus were started. Stimulation period lasted for 1 hour with the 5 min intervals between subsequent stimulations applied by turn to the left and right side hypothalamic parts. EEG registration of cortical and hippocampal electrical activity was started 10 min after intra-peritoneal administration of Nembutal Sodium and continued continuously during 72 hour. According to obtained new evidences, serial electrical stimulations of dorsal and lateral hypothalamic Orexin-containing neurons significantly accelerate recovery of wakefulness, sleep homeostasis, disturbed because of barbiturate anesthesia induced artificial sleep and different behavioral states of sleep-wakefulness cycle. Hypothalamic Orexin-containing neurons can be considered as the cellular targets for regulating of sleep homeostasis through the acceleration of recovery of wakefulness, and SWC in general, from barbiturate anesthesia-induced deep sleep. PMID:26719553

  2. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms. PMID:24626875

  3. Long-term calcination/carbonation cycling and thermal pretreatment for CO{sub 2} capture by limestone and dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongxiang Chen; Hoon Sub Song; Miguel Portillo; C. Jim Lim; John R. Grace; E.J. Anthony

    2009-03-15

    Capturing carbon dioxide is vital for the future of climate-friendly combustion, gasification, and steam-re-forming processes. Dry processes utilizing simple sorbents have great potential in this regard. Long-term calcination/carbonation cycling was carried out in an atmospheric-pressure thermogravimetric reactor. Although dolomite gave better capture than limestone for a limited number of cycles, the advantage declined over many cycles. Under some circumstances, decreasing the carbonation temperature increased the rate of reaction because of the interaction between equilibrium and kinetic factors. Limestone and dolomite, after being pretreated thermally at high temperatures (1000 or 1100{sup o}C), showed a substantial increase in calcium utilization over many calcination/carbonation cycles. Lengthening the pretreatment interval resulted in greater improvement. However, attrition was significantly greater for the pretreated sorbents. Greatly extending the duration of carbonation during one cycle was found to be capable of restoring the CO{sub 2} capture ability of sorbents to their original behavior, offering a possible means of countering the long-term degradation of calcium sorbents for dry capture of carbon dioxide. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  5. Comparison of Extensive Thermal Cycling Effects on Microstructure Development in Micro-alloyed Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E.; Boesenberg, Adam; Harringa, Joel; Riegner, David; Steinmetz, Andrew; Hillman, David

    2011-09-28

    Pb-free solder alloys based on the Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) ternary eutectic have promise for widespread adoption across assembly conditions and operating environments, but enhanced microstructural control is needed. Micro-alloying with elements such as Zn was demonstrated for promoting a preferred solidification path and joint microstructure earlier in simple (Cu/Cu) solder joints studies for different cooling rates. This beneficial behavior now has been verified in reworked ball grid array (BGA) joints, using dissimilar SAC305 (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu, wt.%) solder paste. After industrial assembly, BGA components joined with Sn-3.5Ag-0.74Cu-0.21Zn solder were tested in thermal cycling (-55 C/+125 C) along with baseline SAC305 BGA joints beyond 3000 cycles with continuous failure monitoring. Weibull analysis of the results demonstrated that BGA components joined with SAC + Zn/SAC305 have less joint integrity than SAC305 joints, but their lifetime is sufficient for severe applications in consumer, defense, and avionics electronic product field environments. Failure analysis of the BGA joints revealed that cracking did not deviate from the typical top area (BGA component side) of each joint, in spite of different Ag3Sn blade content. Thus, SAC + Zn solder has not shown any advantage over SAC305 solder in these thermal cycling trials, but other characteristics of SAC + Zn solder may make it more attractive for use across the full range of harsh conditions of avionics or defense applications.

  6. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

    2011-03-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

  7. Development of improved high pressure turbine outer gas path seal components. [abradability and thermal cycling test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A plasma sprayed graded layered ceramic/metallic (ZrO2/CoCrAlY) seal was evaluated for JT9D turbine application by rig and engine tests. Four cyclic thermal shock rig tests were conducted during the program. Three completed 1000 simulated engine thermal cycle tests and the fourth completed 500 cycles without severe cracking or spalling. Three ceramic seals were installed in a JT9D experimental engine to evaluate the effect of the engine thermal environment on the seals. All three seals completed the test successfully without severe cracking or spalling. The three seals did have slight laminar cracks at the 85/15-40/60 ZrO2/CoCrAlY interface. The second engine test evaluated the rub capabilities of the seal. Six ceramic seals were installed in the engine with fourteen abrasive tip blades. Three of the six seals rubbed to a depth of 24 mils. Eight of the fourteen abrasive tip blades showed evidence of wear. Three of the eight blades wore a maximum of five mils. Engine rub test results demonstrated the potential of reducing turbine clearances and thereby improving engine performance by use of sprayed ceramic seals.

  8. Beat-by-Beat Quantification of Cardiac Cycle Events Detected From Three-Dimensional Precordial Acceleration Signals.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Mikko; Parkkila, Petteri; Hurnanen, Tero; Pankaala, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kettunen, Raimo; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    The vibrations produced by the cardiovascular system that are coupled to the precordium can be noninvasively detected using accelerometers. This technique is called seismocardiography. Although clinical applications have been proposed for seismocardiography, the physiology underlying the signal is still not clear. The relationship of seismocardiograms of on the back-to-front axis and cardiac events is fairly well known. However, the 3-D seismocardiograms detectable with modern accelerometers have not been quantified in terms of cardiac cycle events. A major reason for this might be the degree of intersubject variability observed in 3-D seismocardiograms. We present a method to quantify 3-D seismocardiography in terms of cardiac cycle events. First, cardiac cycle events are identified from the seismocardiograms, and then, assigned a number based on the location in which the corresponding event was found. 396 cardiac cycle events from 9 healthy subjects and 120 cardiac cycle events from patients suffering from atrial flutter were analyzed. Despite the weak intersubject correlation of the waveforms (0.05, 0.27, and 0.15 for the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively), the present method managed to find latent similarities in the seismocardiograms of healthy subjects. We observed that in healthy subjects the distribution of cardiac cycle event coordinates was centered on specific locations. These locations were different in patients with atrial flutter. The results suggest that spatial distribution of seismocardiographic cardiac cycle events might be used to discriminate healthy individuals and those with a failing heart. PMID:25594987

  9. Supersonic inflation of the radio lobes of NGC 1052: evidence for non-thermal particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Taylor Andrew; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine

    2016-01-01

    We analyze archival Chandra data of the nearby AGN NGC 1052 to determine the nature of the interaction of the radio lobes with the ambient hot gas. NGC 1052 is typically classified as a Seyfert galaxy, but has a radio bright core and extended diffuse radio lobes on kpc scales. We report the detection of X-ray bright shells around the radio lobes, suggestive of compression of the ISM by the supersonic inflation of the lobes. We determine the temperature and density of the gas in these shells and of the ambient ISM. We find that the temperature of the ISM is 0.8 keV, and that of the shells around the E and W radio lobes are 0.72 and 0.69 keV, respectively fitting a single temperature APEC model. The statistical quality of the fits is low, so systematic uncertainties dominate our ability to distinguish temperature variations between regions. NGC 1052's outburst is relatively young (9 x 1013 sec) and comparatively low power (1.9 x 1041 erg/sec). Interestingly, the density jump between the shells and the ambient ISM is larger than the maximum compression allows by the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, suggesting that the emission from the shells is not thermal. We propose that the bubbles are highly supersonic (Mach number >5) and that the emission of the shell is due to synchrotron radiation from a population of ultrarelativistic electrons created by the powerful shock. If this interpretation is correct, NGC 1052 would be only the second AGN in which this process has been observed. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  10. Thermally Accelerated Oxidative Degradation of Quercetin Using Continuous Flow Kinetic Electrospray-Ion Trap-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jeremy S.; Foss, Frank W.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2013-10-01

    Thermally accelerated oxidative degradation of aqueous quercetin at pH 5.9 and 7.4 was kinetically measured using an in-house built online continuous flow device made of concentric capillary tubes, modified to fit to the inlet of an electrospray ionization-ion trap-time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (ESI-IT-TOF-MS). Time-resolved mass spectral measurements ranging from 2 to 21 min were performed in the negative mode to track intermediate degradation products and to evaluate the degradation rate of the deprotonated quercetin ion, [Q-H]-. Upon heating solutions in the presence of dissolved oxygen, degradation of [Q-H]- was observed and was accelerated by an increase in pH and temperature. Regardless of the condition, the same degradation pathways were observed. Degradation mechanisms and structures were determined using higher order tandem mass spectrometry (up to MS3) and high mass accuracy. The observed degradation mechanisms included oxidation, hydroxylation, and ring-cleavage by nucleophilic attack. A chalcan-trione structure formed by C-ring opening after hydroxylation at C2 was believed to be a precursor for other degradation products, formed by hydroxylation at the C2, C3, and C4 carbons from attack by nucleophilic species. This resulted in A-type and B-type ions after cross-ring cleavage of the C-ring. Based on time of appearance and signal intensity, nucleophilic attack at C3 was the preferred degradation pathway, which generated 2,4,6-trihydroxymandelate and 2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylglyoxylate ions. Overall, 23 quercetin-related ions were observed.

  11. Fibrin biomatrix-conjugated platelet-derived growth factor AB accelerates wound healing in severe thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Rainer; Branski, Ludwik; Moritz, Martina; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel; Schense, Jason; Gampfer, Jörg; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Controlled delivery of growth factors from biodegradable biomatrices could accelerate and improve impaired wound healing. The study aim was to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF.AB) with a transglutaminase (TG) crosslinking substrate site released from a fibrin biomatrix improves wound healing in severe thermal injury. The binding and release kinetics of TG-PDGF.AB were determined in vitro. Third-degree contact burns (dorsum of Yorkshire pigs) underwent epifascial necrosectomy 24 h post-burn. Wound sites were covered with autologous meshed (3:1) split-thickness skin autografts and either secured with staples or attached with sprayed fibrin sealant (FS; n = 8/group). TG-PDGF.AB binds to the fibrin biomatrix using the TG activity of factor XIIIa, and is subsequently released through enzymatic cleavage. Three doses of TG-PDGF.AB in FS (100 ng, 1 µg and 11 µg/ml FS) were tested. TG-PDGF.AB was bound to the fibrin biomatrix as evidenced by western blot analysis and subsequently released by enzymatic cleavage. A significantly accelerated and improved wound healing was achieved using sprayed FS containing TG-PDGF.AB compared to staples alone. Low concentrations (100 ng-1 µg TG-PDGF.AB/ml final FS clot) demonstrated to be sufficient to attain a nearly complete closure of mesh interstices 14 days after grafting. TG-PDGF.AB incorporated in FS via a specific binding technology was shown to be effective in grafted third-degree burn wounds. The adhesive properties of the fibrin matrix in conjunction with the prolonged growth factor stimulus enabled by this binding technology could be favourable in many pathological situations associated with wound-healing disturbances. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23723146

  12. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic

  13. Three-dimensional simulations of the non-thermal broadband emission from young supernova remnants including efficient particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar; Decourchelle, Anne E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2014-07-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be major contributors to Galactic cosmic rays. In this paper, we explore how the non-thermal emission from young remnants can be used to probe the production of energetic particles at the shock (both protons and electrons). Our model couples hydrodynamic simulations of a supernova remnant with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. We include two important back-reaction loops upstream of the shock: energetic particles can (1) modify the flow structure and (2) amplify the magnetic field. As the latter process is not fully understood, we use different limit cases that encompass a wide range of possibilities. We follow the history of the shock dynamics and of the particle transport downstream of the shock, which allows us to compute the non-thermal emission from the remnant at any given age. We do this in three dimensions, in order to generate projected maps that can be compared with observations. We observe that completely different recipes for the magnetic field can lead to similar modifications of the shock structure, although to very different configurations of the field and particles. We show how this affects the emission patterns in different energy bands, from radio to X-rays and γ-rays. High magnetic fields (>100 μG) directly impact the synchrotron emission from electrons, by restricting their emission to thin rims, and indirectly impact the inverse Compton emission from electrons and also the pion decay emission from protons, mostly by shifting their cut-off energies to respectively lower and higher energies.

  14. Thermal-economic analysis of organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration. ITT Energy management report TR-82-3

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This study presents an evaluation of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) as combined with topping cycles incorporating gas turbines or diesel engines, and with subsequent waste heat utilization. The potential benefit of the proposed organic-Rankine-combined-cycle cogeneration of useful heat and electricity is more flexibility in meeting demands for the two products, by varying the mode of operation of the system. A thermal-economic analysis is developed and illustrated with cost and performance data for commercially available equipment, and with general economic parameters reflecting current regulations and market conditions. The performance of the ORC and of the entire combined cycle is described. Equations are presented for evaluating the various thermodynamic and economic parameters, and the resultant cash flows. Criteria are developed in order to assess whether or not the addition of an ORC to a cogeneration system without ORC is viable based on rate of return on incremental investment. Examples are given to illustrate how the method may be applied, namely to serve proposed commercial energy facilities for the North Loop Project and for Illinois Center, in Chicago. While results indicate that the proposed system is potentially viable, it is not viable under conditions prevailing in Chicago for the selected case studies.

  15. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  16. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Dhanesh; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255°C; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly

  17. Nanocomposite containing CaF2 nanoparticles: Thermal cycling, wear and long-term water-aging

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Michael D.; Moreau, Jennifer L.; Levine, Eric D.; Strassler, Howard D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Fluoride (F) releasing dental restoratives are promising to promote remineralization and combat caries. The objectives of this study were to develop nanocomposite containing calcium fluoride nanoparticles (nCaF2), and to investigate the long-term mechanical durability including wear, thermal-cycling and long-term water-aging behavior. Methods Two types of fillers were used: nCaF2 with a diameter of 53 nm, and glass particles of 1.4 μm. Four composites were fabricated with fillers of: (1) 0% nCaF2 + 65% glass; (2) 10% nCaF2 + 55% glass; (3) 20% nCaF2 + 45% glass; (4) 30% nCaF2 + 35% glass. Three commercial materials were also tested. Specimens were subjected to thermal-cycling between 5 °C and 60 °C for 105 cycles, three-body wear for 4×105 cycles, and water-aging for 2 years. Results After thermal-cycling, the nCaF2 nanocomposites had flexural strengths in the range of 100-150 MPa, five times higher than the 20-30 MPa for resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). The wear scar depth showed an increasing trend with increasing nCaF2 filler level. Wear of nCaF2 nanocomposites was within the range of wear for commercial controls. Water-aging decreased the strength of all materials. At 2 years, flexural strength was 94 MPa for nanocomposite with 10% nCaF2, 60 MPa with 20% nCaF2, and 48 MPa with 30% nCaF2. They are 3-6 fold higher than the 15 MPa for RMGI (p < 0.05). SEM revealed air bubbles and cracks in a RMGI, while composite control and nCaF2 nanocomposites appeared dense and solid. Significance Combining nCaF2 with glass particles yielded nanocomposites with long-term mechanical properties that were comparable to those of a commercial composite with little F release, and much better than those of RMGI controls. These strong long-term properties, together with their F release being comparable to RMGI as previously reported, indicate that the nCaF2 nanocomposites are promising for load-bearing and caries-inhibiting restorations. PMID:22429937

  18. Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01

    A finite element model has been created to quantify the thermal fatigue damage of the CPV die attach. Simulations are used to compare to results of empirical thermal fatigue equations originally developed for accelerated chamber cycling. While the empirical equations show promise when extrapolated to the lower temperature cycles characteristic of weather-induced temperature changes in the CPV die attach, it is demonstrated that their damage does not accumulate linearly: the damage a particular cycle contributes depends on the preceding cycles. Simulations of modeled CPV cell temperature histories provided for direct comparison of the FEM and empirical methods, and for calculation of equivalent times provided by standard accelerated test sequences.

  19. Characterizing and modeling the evolution of silicon oxide precipitates during thermal cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, J.; Burle, N.; Serafino, C.; Pichaud, B.

    2013-06-01

    The effects of oxidizing annealing cycles on Si high-quality wafers (as used to monitor IC production tools or SOI applications) were studied using different techniques (nano-scale observations and chemical analysis in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), but also large scale measurements, such as Laser Scattering Tomography (LST) and chemical etching (CE), thus coupling local analyses with global measurements of defects density and size) to determine their characteristics. Interstitial oxygen loss during cycles was also measured using Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR). It appeared that each cycle is composed of a defect nucleation stage and a growth stage, and that the distribution of these defects (mainly oxide precipitates) along wafer radius essentially depends on the initial point defect density. The evolution of these precipitates was described by a diffusion-and-growth model derived from Ham's model and taking into account various phenomena: oxygen loss, point-defect distribution and cycle effects (up/down ramp and high-temperature plateau). Extensions and limits of the model are also discussed.

  20. Methods for separation/purification utilizing rapidly cycled thermal swing sorption

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Monzyk, Bruce F.; Wang, Yong; VanderWiel, David P.; Perry, Steven T.; Fitzgerald, Sean P.; Simmons, Wayne W.; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Weller, Jr., Albert E.

    2004-11-09

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for separating fluid components. In preferred embodiments, the apparatus and methods utilize microchannel devices with small distances for heat and mass transfer to achieve rapid cycle times and surprisingly large volumes of fluid components separated in short times using relatively compact hardware.

  1. Accelerating Ground-Test Cycle Time: The Six-Minute Model Change and Other Visions for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegelman, Jerome T.

    1998-01-01

    The advantage of managing organizations to minimize product development cycle time has been well established. This paper provides an overview of the wind tunnel testing cycle time reduction activities at Langley Research Center (LaRC) and gives the status of several improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and cost reductions that have resulted from these activities. Processes have been examined and optimized. Metric data from monitoring processes provides guidance for investments in advanced technologies. The most promising technologies under implementation today include the use of formally designed experiments, a diverse array of quick disconnect technology and the judicious use of advanced electronic and information technologies.

  2. Amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle as observed by thermal infrared and microwave radiometers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input to physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, and global measurements of LST are provided by many satellite platforms. Passive microwave (MW) observations offer an alternative to conventional thermal infrared (TIR) LST retri...

  3. Rapid acceleration of ferrous iron/peroxymonosulfate oxidation of organic pollutants by promoting Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle with hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Ma, Jun; Chen, Liwei; Li, Xuchun; Guan, Yinghong; Xie, Pengchao; Pan, Chao

    2013-10-15

    The reaction between ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS) generates reactive oxidants capable of degrading refractory organic contaminants. However, the slow transformation from ferric iron (Fe(III)) back to Fe(II) limits its widespread application. Here, we added hydroxylamine (HA), a common reducing agent, into Fe(II)/PMS process to accelerate the transformation from Fe(III) to Fe(II). With benzoic acid (BA) as probe compound, the addition of HA into Fe(II)/PMS process accelerated the degradation of BA rapidly in the pH range of 2.0-6.0 by accelerating the key reactions, including the redox cycle of Fe(III)/Fe(II) and the generation of reactive oxidants. Both sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals were considered as the primary reactive oxidants for the degradation of BA in HA/Fe(II)/PMS process with the experiments of electron spin resonance and alcohols quenching. Moreover, HA was gradually degraded to N2, N2O, NO2 (−), and NO3 (−), while the environmentally friendly gas of N2 was considered as its major end product in the process. The present study might provide a promising idea based on Fe(II)/PMS process for the rapid degradation of refractory organic contaminants in water treatment. PMID:24033112

  4. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  5. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size Refinement by Thermal Cycling on the Microstructural Features of As-Quenched Lath Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Javier; Santofimia, Maria Jesus

    2016-05-01

    Current trends in steels are focusing on refined martensitic microstructures to obtain high strength and toughness. An interesting manner to reduce the size of martensitic substructure is by reducing the size of the prior austenite grain (PAG). This work analyzes the effect of PAGS refinement by thermal cycling on different microstructural features of as-quenched lath martensite in a 0.3C-1.6Si-3.5Mn (wt pct) steel. The application of thermal cycling is found to lead to a refinement of the martensitic microstructures and to an increase of the density of high misorientation angle boundaries after quenching; these are commonly discussed to be key structural parameters affecting strength. Moreover, results show that as the PAGS is reduced, the volume fraction of retained austenite increases, carbides are refined and the concentration of carbon in solid solution as well as the dislocation density in martensite increase. All these microstructural modifications are related with the manner in which martensite forms from different prior austenite conditions, influenced by the PAGS.

  6. Novel Silver/mica Multilayer Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: The Effect of Thermal Cycling and Material Degradation on Leak Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-09-01

    A novel Ag/mica compressive seal was thermally cycled between 100 degrees C and 800 degrees C in air to evaluate its stability. The novel Ag/mica compressive seal was composed of a naturally cleaved Muscovite mica sheet and two thin silver layers, and was reported in a previous study to have very low leak rates at 800 degrees C. In the present study, we examined the thermal cycle stability of the Ag/mica-based compressive seals pressed between mating couples with large and small mismatch in thermal expansion. For comparison, thermal cycling was also conducted on plain mica as well as plain silver only. In addition, the results were compared with published data of a similar mica seal using glass instead of Ag as the interlayers. For mating materials of large mismatch in CTE (Inconel/alumina), the Ag/mica seal showed lower leak rates than the plain mica. For mating materials of small mismatch in CTE (SS430/alumina), the leak rates were similar for both the Ag/mica and the plain mica seal. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of the mica after thermal cycling. Microcracks, fragmentation, and wear particle formation were observed on the mica and were correlated to the leak behavior. Overall, the novel Ag/mica seals present good thermal cycle stability for solid oxide fuel cells although the leak rates were greater than the corresponding mica seals with glass interlayers.

  7. The effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the final irradiation experiment in a series of screening experiments aimed at investigating the effects of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on irradiated copper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment. The post-irradiation tests at 100 C revealed the greatest loss of ductility occurred in the CuCrZr alloys, irrespective of the pre-irradiation heat treatment, with the uniform elongation dropping to levels of less than 1.5%. The yield and ultimate strengths for all of the individual heat treated samples increased substantially after irradiation. The same trend was observed for the CuNiBe alloys, which overall exhibited a factor of 3 higher uniform elongation after irradiation with almost double the strength. In both alloys irradiation-induced precipitation lead to a large increase in the strength of the solution annealed specimens with a noticeable decrease in uniform elongation. The Al25 alloy also experienced an increase in the overall strength of the alloy after irradiation, accompanied by approximately a 50% decrease in the uniform and total elongation. The additional bakeout treatments given to the CuCrZr and CuNiBe before irradiation served to increase the strength, but in terms of the ductility no improvement or degradation resulted from the additional thermal exposure. The results of this experiment confirm that the al25 possesses the most resistant microstructure to thermal and irradiation-induced changes, while the competing effects of ballistic dissolution and reprecipitation lead to important changes in the two precipitation strengthened alloys. This study and others have repeatedly shown that these materials can only be used if the very low uniform elongation (1% or less) can be accounted for in the design since pre-irradiation thermal processing cannot mitigate the irradiation embrittlement.

  8. Chloride-dependent acceleration of cell cycle via modulation of Rb and cdc2 in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Yamane, Junko; Niisato, Naomi; Morihara, Toru; Kubo, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-05

    In the present study, we investigated if Cl{sup -} regulates the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells was diminished by lowering the extracellular Cl{sup -} concentration ([Cl{sup -}]{sub o}) in the culture medium. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} increased the periods of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. We further studied the effects of [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the key enzymes, Rb and cdc2, playing key roles in checking points of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} diminished the active forms of enzymes, Rb and cdc2. We further found that the action of lowered [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the cell proliferation, the cell cycle, Rb and cdc2 was abolished by the presence of 2 mM glutamine, but not by that of pyruvate as another Krebs cycle substrate. Taken together, these observations indicate here for the first time that Cl{sup -} modulates Rb and cdc2, enhancing the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

  9. Influence of thermal and mechanical load cycling on microtensile bond strengths of total and self-etching adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different thermal (TC) and mechanical (MC) cycling protocols on microtensile bond strength (muTBS) to cervical dentin margins of Class II restorations using two total-etch (TE) adhesives and one self-etching (SE) primer. Class II slot cavities were prepared on the mesial surfaces of 168 bovine incisors and were divided into three groups according to the bonding system used: Single Bond, OptiBond Solo Plus and Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored with Filtek Z250 composite. Following restorative procedures, the restored teeth were allocated to seven subgroups (n = 8) according to the thermal/mechanical protocol performed: G1-control (no cycling), G2-100,000 MC, G3-200,000 MC, G4-500,000 MC, G5-100,000 MC+1,000 TC, G6-200,000 MC+1,000 TC, G7-500,000 MC+1,000 TC. TC was performed using 5 +/- 2 degrees C and 55 +/- 2 degrees C baths, with a dwell time of 60 seconds in each bath. MC was achieved with an axial force of 80 N at 2 cycles/second. The restorations were sectioned perpendicular to the cervical bonded interface into two 0.8-1-mm thick slabs. The slabs were trimmed at the interface to obtain a cross-sectional surface area of 0.8-1 mm2. All specimens were then subjected to muTBS (v = 0.5 mm/minute). Fracture mode analysis was performed using SEM. Bond strength mean values (MPa) were analyzed with ANOVA 3-way and Tukey's test (alpha = 5%). Dunnett's test was used to compare tested groups against Control groups of each adhesive system (alpha = 56%). SE primer presented lower mean bond strength values when compared to TE adhesives (p = 0.05). In addition, specimens restored with the SE primer did not resist to the 200,000 and 500,000 MC associated with TC. The application of 100,000 MC did not present a significant decrease in bond strength when compared to the control. Mixed failures were predominant for all groups. The higher the amount of thermal/mechanical cycles, the greater the number of mixed failures and the

  10. Effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shao, Yang; Gong, Pan; Yao, KeFu

    2012-12-01

    The effect of thermal cycling treatment on mechanical properties and thermal stability of a Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass is investigated. The metallic glassy samples are sealed into quartz tubes under high vacuum condition, and liquid nitrogen together with electric furnace are used to control a periodical temperature variation between -196°C and 150°C. The structure and properties of the tested samples for different thermal cycles have been examined by X-ray diffraction analysis, mechanical properties measurement and thermal analysis. It has been found that the structure and properties of the samples do not show a significant change even after 200 cycles, which suggests Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy as having potential in aerospace environment.

  11. Effects of the Fabrication Process and Thermal Cycling on the Oxidation of Zirconium-Niobium Pressure Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Cheol

    2009-12-01

    Pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy are used to contain fuels and coolant in CANDU nuclear power reactors The pressure tube oxidizes during reactor operation and hydrogen ingress through the oxide grown on the tube limits its lifetime. Little attention was paid to the intermediate tube manufacturing processes in enhancing the oxidation resistance. In addition, the oxide grown on the tube experiences various thermal cycles depending on the reactor shutdown and startup cycles. To address these two aspects and to better understand the oxidation process of the Zr-2.5Nb tube, research was conducted in two parts: (i) effects of tube fabrication on oxidation behavior, and (ii) thermal cycling behaviors of oxides grown on a pressure tube. In the first part, the optimum manufacturing process was pursued to improve the corrosion resistance of Zr-2.5Nb tubes. Experimental micro-tubes were fabricated with various manufacturing routes in the stages of billet preparation, hot extrusion and cold drawing. These were oxidized in air at 400°C and 500°C, and in an autoclave at 360°C lithiated water. Microstructure and texture of the tubes and oxides were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. Special emphasis was given to examinations of the metal/oxide interface structures. A correlation between the manufacturing process and oxidation resistance was investigated in terms of tube microstructure and the metal/oxide interface structure. As a result, it was consistently observed that uniform interface structures were formed on the tubes which had a fine distribution of secondary phases. These microstructures were found to be beneficial in enhancing the oxidation resistance as opposed to the tubes that had coarse and continuous beta-Zr phases. Based on these observations, a schematic model of the oxidation process was proposed with respect to the oxidation resistance under oxidizing temperatures of 360°C, 400°C and 500°C. In

  12. Acceleration of the Water Cycle over the Colorado Headwaters Region from Eight Year Cloud Resolving Simulations of the WRF Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.; Gochis, D. J.; Dudhia, J.; Thompson, G.; Chen, F.; Tewari, M.; Gutmann, E. D.; Grubisic, V.; Arsenault, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    A number of studies have indicated that one of the expected results of climate change will be an acceleration of the water cycle due to the enhanced moisture available due to a warmer climate. The representation of the water cycle in most climate models, however, is relatively poor due in part to the relatively coarse resolution as well as the difficulty of representing convection using existing convective parameterizations and the poor representation of complex topography. As a result, there is some uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the acceleration and its seasonal dependence. To overcome these deficiencies, a high resolution (4 km) cloud resolving simulation of the current climate (continuous eight years starting 2001) and a perturbed moister climate using the Pseudo Global Warming approach was performed using the WRF Climate model over the Colorado Headwaters region. The current simulation was driven by the North American Regional Reanalysis with 32 km resolution and 3 hourly updates. The future simulation was driven by the same NARR reanalysis with enhanced moisture and temperature from a CCSM A1B AR4 simulation of the global future climate out to 50 years. The headwaters region of Colorado that includes, among others, the Colorado, Platte, Rio Grande and Arkansas Rivers, is one of the key source regions for water in the Southwest as ~85% of the streamflow for the Colorado River comes from snowmelt in this region. The performance of the WRF model for precipitation, temperature and snowpack was verified to be reasonable for both winter and summer during the 2001-2008 period using SNOTEL observations at ~100 sites. Based on this good performance, an analysis of the residence time and fluxes the various components of the water cycle was performed. This paper will this analysis for water in its various phases as a function of season and region both above and below ground due to the warmer and moister climate. A comparison will also be made to current climate

  13. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Thomsen, E. C.; Williams, R. T.; Choi, J.-P.; Canfield, N. L.; Bonnett, J. F.; Stevenson, J. W.; Shyam, A.; Lara-Curzio, E.

    2011-03-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ∼17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700 and 850 °C using back pressures ranging from 1.4 to 6.8 kPa (0.2-1.0 psi). Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

  14. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  15. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  16. Constant-Strain Thermal Cycling of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Halsmer, T. J.; Padula, S. A.; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of various pre-straining routines on the recovery stresses of a Ni-rich Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 high-temperature shape memory alloy was investigated in tension and compression. The recovery stresses, obtained by means of constant-strain thermal cycling, were evaluated after isothermal (up to ±2 % applied strain at room temperature) or after isobaric thermal cycling at stress levels between ±100 and 400 MPa. The material exhibited high force generation capability with recovery stresses of nearly 1.5 GPa on the first cycle under particular pre-strain conditions. The recovery stresses are shown to decay during subsequent cycles using an upper cycle temperature of 300 °C with a saturated stress level nearing 1.1 GPa in compression.

  17. Constant-Strain Thermal Cycling of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Halsmer, T. J.; Padula, S. A.; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of various pre-straining routines on the recovery stresses of a Ni-rich Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 high-temperature shape memory alloy was investigated in tension and compression. The recovery stresses, obtained by means of constant-strain thermal cycling, were evaluated after isothermal (up to ±2 % applied strain at room temperature) or after isobaric thermal cycling at stress levels between ±100 and 400 MPa. The material exhibited high force generation capability with recovery stresses of nearly 1.5 GPa on the first cycle under particular pre-strain conditions. The recovery stresses are shown to decay during subsequent cycles using an upper cycle temperature of 300 °C with a saturated stress level nearing 1.1 GPa in compression.

  18. Unexpectedly large mass loss during the thermal pulse cycle of the red giant star R Sculptoris.

    PubMed

    Maercker, M; Mohamed, S; Vlemmings, W H T; Ramstedt, S; Groenewegen, M A T; Humphreys, E; Kerschbaum, F; Lindqvist, M; Olofsson, H; Paladini, C; Wittkowski, M; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Nyman, L-A

    2012-10-11

    The asymptotic-giant-branch star R Sculptoris is surrounded by a detached shell of dust and gas. The shell originates from a thermal pulse during which the star underwent a brief period of increased mass loss. It has hitherto been impossible to constrain observationally the timescales and mass-loss properties during and after a thermal pulse--parameters that determine the lifetime of the asymptotic giant branch and the amount of elements returned by the star. Here we report observations of CO emission from the circumstellar envelope and shell around R Sculptoris with an angular resolution of 1.3″. What was previously thought to be only a thin, spherical shell with a clumpy structure is revealed to also contain a spiral structure. Spiral structures associated with circumstellar envelopes have been previously seen, leading to the conclusion that the systems must be binaries. Combining the observational data with hydrodynamic simulations, we conclude that R Sculptoris is a binary system that underwent a thermal pulse about 1,800 years ago, lasting approximately 200 years. About 3 × 10(-3) solar masses of material were ejected at a velocity of 14.3 km s(-1) and at a rate around 30 times higher than the pre-pulse mass-loss rate. This shows that about three times more mass was returned to the interstellar medium during and immediately after the pulse than previously thought. PMID:23060194

  19. Die Attachment for -120 C to +20 C Thermal Cycling of Microelectronics for Future Mars Rovers: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, Randall K.; Sokolowski, Witold M.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    Active thermal control for electronics on Mars Rovers imposes a serious penalty in weight, volume, power consumption, and reliability. Thus, we propose that thermal control be eliminated for future Rovers. From a functional standpoint there is no reason that the electronics could not operate over the entire temperature range of the Martian environment, which can vary from a low of approximately equal -90 C to a high of approximately equal +20 C during the Martian night and day. The upper end of this range is well within that for conventional electronics. Although the lower end is considerably below that for which conventional--even high-reliability electronics is designed or tested, it is well established that electronic devices can operate to such low temperatures. The primary concern is reliability of the overall electronic system, especially in regard to the numerous daily temperature cycles that it would experience over the duration of a mission on Mars. Accordingly, key reliability issues have been identified for elimination of thermal control on future Mars Rovers. One of these is attachment of semiconductor die onto substrates and into packages. Die attachment is critical since it forms a mechanical, thermal and electrical interface between the electronic device and the substrate or package. This paper summarizes our initial investigation of existing information related to this issue, in order to form an opinion whether die attachment techniques exist, or could be developed with reasonable effort, to withstand the Mars thermal environment for a mission duration of approximately I year. Our conclusion, from a review of literature and personal contacts. is that die attachment can be made sufficiently reliable to satisfy the requirements of future Mars Rovers. Moreover, it appears that there are several possible techniques from which to choose and that the requirements could be met by judicious selection from existing methods using hard solders, soft solders

  20. Thermal Fatigue Evaluation of Pb-Free Solder Joints: Results, Lessons Learned, and Future Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Richard J.; Sweatman, Keith; Arfaei, Babak

    2015-09-01

    Thermal fatigue is a major source of failure of solder joints in surface mount electronic components and it is critically important in high reliability applications such as telecommunication, military, and aeronautics. The electronic packaging industry has seen an increase in the number of Pb-free solder alloy choices beyond the common near-eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu alloys first established as replacements for eutectic SnPb. This paper discusses the results from Pb-free solder joint reliability programs sponsored by two industry consortia. The characteristic life in accelerated thermal cycling is reported for 12 different Pb-free solder alloys and a SnPb control in 9 different accelerated thermal cycling test profiles in terms of the effects of component type, accelerated thermal cycling profile and dwell time. Microstructural analysis on assembled and failed samples was performed to investigate the effect of initial microstructure and its evolution during accelerated thermal cycling test. A significant finding from the study is that the beneficial effect of Ag on accelerated thermal cycling reliability (measured by characteristic lifetime) diminishes as the severity of the accelerated thermal cycling, defined by greater ΔT, higher peak temperature, and longer dwell time increases. The results also indicate that all the Pb-free solders are more reliable in accelerated thermal cycling than the SnPb alloy they have replaced. Suggestions are made for future work, particularly with respect to the continued evolution of alloy development for emerging application requirements and the value of using advanced analytical methods to provide a better understanding of the effect of microstructure and its evolution on accelerated thermal cycling performance.

  1. TEM and HRTEM study of influence of thermal cycles with stress on dynamic recrystallization in Ti46Al8Nb1B during creep.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningan; Jiang, Hui; Wu, Xingfang

    2008-12-01

    Short-term tension creep and thermal cycles under compressive stress were performed on Ti46Al8Nb1B in order to explore the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) grains formed during the creep and the impact of thermal cycles under stress to the DRX. After 1600 times' thermal cycles from 300 degrees C to 800 degrees C under 300 MPa compressive stress, high density of ledges and thick ledges are found in the interfaces. Two kinds of moiré fringes, instead of 9R structure, can be found in the thick ledges. Ti46Al8Nb1B sample and another sample which was treated by thermal cycles with stress were crept under 300 MPa compressive stress at 800 degrees C. DRX grains are found in the interfaces in those samples. Those grains, formed at the ledges, have an orientation relationship of [101](gamma)//[011](gammaR), (1 1 1)(gamma)//(1 11 )(gammaR) with the matrix of gamma phases. Thermal cycles with stress could lead to more DRX grains during creep. PMID:18635364

  2. Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F. C.; McClenahan, J. D.

    1981-02-01

    Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single unit dwellings, 10 unit, and 200 unit apartment complexes in 50, 200, 400, and 1000 unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system.

  3. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  4. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF V344 Lyrae: CONSTRAINING THE THERMAL-VISCOUS LIMIT CYCLE INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Cannizzo, J. K.; Howell, S. B.; Wood, M. A.; Smale, A. P. E-mail: Martin.D.Still@nasa.go

    2010-12-20

    We present time-dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 270 d light curve of the short-period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long-term light curves. The data encompass two superoutbursts and 17 normal (i.e., short) outbursts. The main decay of the superoutbursts is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate {approx}12 d mag{sup -1}, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. Our modeling using the basic accretion disk limit cycle can produce the main features of the V344 Lyr light curve, including the peak outburst brightness. Nevertheless, there are obvious deficiencies in our model light curves. (1) The rise times we calculate, both for the normal and superoutbursts, are too fast. (2) The superoutbursts are too short. (3) The shoulders on the rise to superoutburst have more structure than the shoulders in the observed superoutbursts and are too slow, comprising about a third to half of the total viscous plateau, rather than the {approx}10% observed. However, one of the {alpha}{sub cold} {r_reversible} {alpha}{sub hot} interpolation schemes we investigate (one that is physically motivated) does yield longer superoutbursts with suitably short, less structured shoulders.

  5. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (<5 pr-micrometer) is observed at middle and high latitudes in the fall and winter of both hemispheres. There are large differences in the hemispheric (north versus south) and seasonal (perihelion versus aphelion) behavior of water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  6. Simulations and Measurements for a concept of powering CALICE-AHCAL at a train-cycled accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttlicher, P.

    2013-01-01

    Improving calorimetry by usage of the particle-flow algorithm requires to record the details of the shower development. Therefore a high granularity analogue readout hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) with small sensors and with electronics handling the enormous amount of channels, ≈ 40 000/m3, is required. Homogeneity is maintained by avoiding cooling tubes in the active volume and only cooling at the service end. For this concept low power consumption per channel, 40 μW, is essential. Future linear e+e-- collider designs, ILC or CLIC, foresee duty cycles for the bunch delivery. At ILC bunch trains of 1 ms duration are followed by long breaks of 200 ms. Power cycling the front end electronics with the train structure can reduce power consumption by a factor 100. However for a full scale CALICE-AHCAL switched currents reach magnitudes of kilo-amperes. This paper describes the design chain from front end PCB's through to external power supplies. By simulations a concept is developed, in which effects of electromagnetic interferences are kept small and localized. The goal is to keep current loops small, to limit the switched current to the region near the switched consumer and to allow only small frequency currents to spread out further into the system. By that analogue performance can be kept high and parasitic couplings to the surrounding metal structures and other sub-detectors will be minimized. Measurements with existing prototypes support the validity of the simulations.

  7. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  8. Investigation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CuCrZr after manufacturing thermal cycle for plasma facing component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Yong; Jung, Yang-Il; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Jung-Suk; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Hong, Bong Guen

    2011-10-01

    The effects of manufacturing thermal cycle on the various mechanical properties of CuCrZr were investigated. Vickers hardness was changed with an aging temperature in an identical manner with the strength change in a wide range of heat treatment. The change of Charpy impact energy with an aging temperature exhibited an opposite trend to the changes of the strength and hardness. At least in terms of the impact energy of CuCrZr, aging at a higher temperate would be preferable if the strength of CuCrZr could be maintained higher than the limitation value after the completion of the fabrication of ITER first wall. The fatigue life of CuCrZr was influenced to a certain extent by the cooling rate and the aging temperature. Especially in the higher strain amplitude, the contribution of the elastic and plastic components to the fatigue response was dependent on the yield strength which is determined by the aging temperature.

  9. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  10. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence as a cycling process between excited singlet and triplet states: Application to the fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Berberan-Santos, Mário N.

    2007-05-01

    In efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) the excited chromophore alternates randomly between the singlet and triplet manifolds a large number of times before emission occurs. In this work, the average number of cycles n¯ is obtained and is shown to have a simple experimental meaning: n¯+1 is the intensification factor of the prompt fluorescence intensity, owing to the occurrence of TADF. A new method of data analysis for the determination of the quantum yield of triplet formation, combining steady-state and time-resolved data in a single plot, is also presented. Application of the theoretical results to the TADF of [70]fullerenes shows a general good agreement between different methods of fluorescence analysis and allows the determination of several photophysical parameters.

  11. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  12. Longitudinal painting with large amplitude second harmonic rf voltages in the rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito; Ohmori, Chihiro; Nomura, Masahiro; Schnase, Alexander; Toda, Makoto; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Taihei; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi

    2009-04-01

    In the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the longitudinal painting is important to alleviate the space-charge effects. It is known that the momentum offset injection and applying the second harmonic rf voltage improves the bunching factor, which is defined as the ratio of average and peak current. Our simulation studies show that the large-amplitude second harmonic, 80% to the fundamental, is optimum, and the second harmonic phase sweep improves the bunching factor at the beginning of the injection period. We performed the beam tests of longitudinal painting in the J-PARC RCS. We proved that the longitudinal painting with the 80% second harmonic, the momentum offset of -0.2%, and the second harmonic phase sweep improved bunching factors significantly.

  13. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.

  14. Approach to the realization of a closed cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion /OTEC/ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, T.

    1981-08-01

    The design and operational features and goals of a Japanese 1 MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) demonstration plant are described. Japan research and development efforts in OTEC systems are reviewed, along with results which have encouraged the decision to construct the demonstration plant. The plant is being designed for implementation in the seas around Japan, is required to function for 6 mos/yr, and will provide engineering data on the performance of both tube and shell type heat exchangers. The initial test will be run using Freon 22 as the working fluid, followed by NH3 in subsequent trials. The system will be barge-mounted and have a cooling water pipe fixed by single-point mooring. Mainly a proof of principle in large-scale OTEC, the plant will provide a test bed for environmental monitoring and power transmission through the sea, and will serve as a model for a 10 MWe plant.

  15. A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation

    SciTech Connect

    SHADDAY, MARTIN

    2005-07-12

    The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

  16. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  17. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and

  18. Scaling of Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments for a Space Rankine Cycle and Selection of a Preconceptual Scaled Experiment Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, CD

    2006-01-27

    To assist with the development of a space-based Rankine cycle power system using liquid potassium as the working fluid, a study has been conducted on possible scaled experiments with simulant fluids. This report will consider several possible working fluids and describe a scaling methodology to achieve thermal-hydraulic similarity between an actual potassium system and scaled representations of the Rankine cycle boiler or condenser. The most practical scaling approach examined is based on the selection of perfluorohexane (FC-72) as the simulant. Using the scaling methodology, a series of possible solutions have been calculated for the FC-72 boiler and condenser. The possible scaled systems will then be compared and preconceptual specifications and drawings given for the most promising design. The preconceptual design concept will also include integrating the scaled boiler and scaled condenser into a single experimental loop. All the preconceptual system specifications appear practical from a fabrication and experimental standpoint, but further work will be needed to arrive at a final experiment design.

  19. Hysteretic melting and freezing of nanoscale indium islands using local thermal cycling for phase-change memory nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brintlinger, Todd; Hussain Baloch, Kamal; Qi, Yi; Cullen, William G.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cumings, John

    2007-03-01

    Using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) operating in dark-field mode, the melting and freezing transition in nanoscale (approximately 20-200nm diameter) metal islands can be imaged at video rates (33ms/frame). The metal, typically indium, islands are thermally evaporated on one side of a 100nm thick SiN membrane. Local thermal gradients produced by Joule heating of lithographically defined electrodes on the opposite side of the membrane show a hysteretic effect in the melting/freezing of the metal islands. Read and write cycles are accomplished with 5-10 microW power, while a quiescent power of 80-100 microW is required to keep an island near its melting point. The hysteresis indicates a finite nucleation energy during freezing of individual islands. While TEM is not a practical readout mechanism, the behavior suggests a type of phase-change memory node on an inherently nanometer scale. Results for all the aforementioned will be shown, including micrographs, video, and related discussion.

  20. Leap Frog and Time Step Sub-Cycle Scheme for Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulic Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.

    2002-07-01

    As the result of the advancing TCP/IP based inter-process communication technology, more and more legacy thermal-hydraulic codes have been coupled with neutronics codes to provide best-estimate capabilities for reactivity related reactor transient analysis. Most of the coupling schemes are based on closely coupled serial or parallel approaches. Therefore, the execution of the coupled codes usually requires significant CPU time, when a complicated system is analyzed. Leap Frog scheme has been used to reduce the run time. The extent of the decoupling is usually determined based on a trial and error process for a specific analysis. It is the intent of this paper to develop a set of general criteria, which can be used to invoke the automatic Leap Frog algorithm. The algorithm will not only provide the run time reduction but also preserve the accuracy. The criteria will also serve as the base of an automatic time step sub-cycle scheme when a sudden reactivity change is introduced and the thermal-hydraulic code is marching with a relatively large time step. (authors)

  1. Life cycle assessment of hemp cultivation and use of hemp-based thermal insulator materials in buildings.

    PubMed

    Zampori, Luca; Dotelli, Giovanni; Vernelli, Valeria

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this research is to assess the sustainability of a natural fiber, such as hemp (Cannabis sativa), and its use as thermal insulator for building applications. The sustainability of hemp was quantified by life cycle assessment (LCA) and particular attention was given to the amount of CO2eq of the whole process, and the indicator greenhouse gas protocol (GGP) was selected to quantify CO2eq emissions. In this study also CO2 uptake of hemp was considered. Two different allocation procedures (i.e., mass and economic) were adopted. Other indicators, such as Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) and EcoIndicator99 H were calculated. The production of 1 ha yielded 15 ton of hemp, whose global warming potential (GWP100) was equal to about -26.01 ton CO2eq: the amount allocated to the technical fiber (20% of the total amount of hemp biomass) was -5.52 ton CO2eq when mass allocation was used, and -5.54 ton CO2eq when economic allocation was applied. The sustainability for building applications was quantified by considering an insulation panel made by hemp fiber (85%) and polyester fiber (15%) in 1 m(2) of wall having a thermal transmittance (U) equal to 0.2 W/m(2)_K. The environmental performances of the hemp-based panel were compared to those of a rockwool-based one. PMID:23745970

  2. FEA of Electrode Velocity Effect on Thermal Cycle and Residual Stress in Pipes Connected by Multi Pass Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalami-Aleagha, M. E.; Feli, S.; Foroutan, M.; Borzabadyfarahany, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study is involved on modeling a standard welding procedure specification (SWPS) for a multi pass weld of pipes, and the effect of increase in electrode velocity on thermal cycle and induced residual stress have been investigated. A double ellipsoidal model for weld heat source density and an appropriate coordinate system with a rotation around the pipe is adopted to simulate properly the sequence of weld properly. A 3D finite element analysis (FEA) is carried out using a commercial code and the validation of the model is confirmed by previous works. Temperature-dependent thermo-mechanical behavior for material properties and birth and death technique for elements of deposited filler layer are employed to model the weld. By a thermal analysis and uncouple residual stress the peak temperature, cooling rate, weld pool geometry and induced residual stress in heat affected zone (HAZ) are evaluated. The results indicate that peak temperatures against the time reasonably follows the sequence of weld and by increasing electrode velocity, the value of peak temperatures in a certain point of HAZ is reduced. The final hoop residual stress pattern for points underlying in HAZ influenced by the rise in electrode velocity, however the axial residual stress seems to be more influenced.

  3. Seismic-frequency laboratory measurements of shear mode viscoelasticity in crustal rocks I: competition between cracking and plastic flow in thermally cycled Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cao; Jackson, Ian

    1996-03-01

    In the first phase of a seismic-frequency study of the viscoelasticity of cracked and fluid-saturated crustal rocks, forced torsional oscillation experiments have been conducted on specimens of Carrara marble subjected to multiple thermal cycles up to 560°C, under confining pressure of 50 MPa. The experimental results showed distinctly different behaviour of both the shear modulus and internal friction between the first and subsequent thermal cycles. A pronounced reduction in shear modulus ( G) observed during the first series of thermal cycles at temperature T < 300°C is attributed to thermal cracking. This large modulus deficit is recovered at higher temperatures, presumably through crack closure by plastic deformation processes that are also reflected in time dependence (over hours) of the shear modulus at temperatures above 300°C. Following the first excursion to 500°C, the shear modulus varies reproducibly with thermal cycling with a monotonic temperature dependence dominated by intrinsic (anharmonic) effects. It is inferred that thermal cracking in Carrara marble is suppressed by plastic flow following the first cycle to 500°C. The experimental results suggest that thermal history has strong effects on mechanical properties of calcite rock (Carrara marble) measured at relatively low temperatures. Internal friction or attenuation of Carrara marble is generally low and temperature-insensitive at low temperatures (< 400°C), but increases dramatically at 400-500°C. The frequency-dependence of internal friction at high temperatures (> 400°C), presumably due to dislocation relaxation, contrasts with frequency-independent Q-1 at lower temperatures. The relatively sudden onset of markedly frequency-dependence seismic wave attenuation might prove to be a useful diagnostic of temperature under crustal conditions.

  4. (abstract) Variations in Polarimetric Backscatter of Saline Ice Grown Under Diurnal Thermal Cycling Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Kong, J. A.; Hsu, C. C.; Ding, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in January 1994 at the Geophysical Research Facility in the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. To investigate effects on polarimetric scattering signatures of sea ice growth under diurnal temperature variations, an ice sheet was grown for 2.5 days for the thickness of 10 cm and a polarimetric radar operating at C-band was used to obtain backscattering data in conjunction with ice-characterization measurements. The ice sheet was grown in the late morning of January 19, 1994. The initial growth rate was slow due to high insolation and temperature. As the air temperature dropped during the night, the growth rate increased significantly. The air temperature changed drastically from about -10(deg)C to -35(deg)C between day and night. The temperature cycle was repeated during the next day and the growth rate varied in the same manner. The surface of the ice was partially covered by frost flowers and the areal coverage increased as the ice became thicker. Throughout the ice growth duration of 2.5 days, polarimetric backscatter data were collected at roughly every centimeter of ice growth. For each set of radar measurements of saline ice, a set of calibration measurements was carried out with trihedrial corner reflectors and a metallic sphere. Measured polarimetric backscattering coefficients of the ice sheet reveal a strong correlation between radar data and temperature variations. As the temperature increased (decreased), the backscatter increased (decreased) correspondingly. From the ice-characterization data, temperatures of the air, at the ice-air interface, and in the ice layer had the same variation trend. Another interesting experimental observation is that the salinity measured as a function of ice depth from a sample of 10-cm thich ice indicated that the salinity variations had a similar cycle as the temperature; i.e., the salinity profile recorded the history of the temperature variations. Characterization data of the

  5. Does thermal variability experienced at the egg stage influence life history traits across life cycle stages in a small invertebrate?

    PubMed

    Xing, Kun; Hoffmann, Ary A; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Although effects of thermal stability on eggs have often been considered in vertebrates, there is little data thermal stability in insect eggs even though these eggs are often exposed in nature to widely fluctuating ambient conditions. The modularity of development in invertebrates might lead to compensation across life cycle stages but this remains to be tested particularly within the context of realistic temperature fluctuations encountered in nature. We simulated natural temperate fluctuations on eggs of the worldwide cruciferous insect pest, the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), while maintaining the same mean temperature (25°C±0°C, 25±4°C, 25±6°C, 25±8°C, 25±10°C, 25±12°C) and assessed egg development, survival and life history traits across developmental stages. Moderate fluctuations (25±4°C, 25±6°C) did not influence performance compared to the constant temperature treatment, and none of the treatments influenced egg survival. However the wide fluctuating temperatures (25±10°C, 25±12°C) slowed development time and led to an increase in pre-pupal mass, although these changes did not translate into any effects on longevity or fecundity at the adult stage. These findings indicate that environmental effects can extend across developmental stages despite the modularity of moth development but also highlight that there are few fitness consequences of the most variable thermal conditions likely to be experienced by Plutella xylostella. PMID:24911213

  6. Impact of Total Ionizing Dose Radiation Testing and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on the Operation of CMF20120D Silicon Carbide Power MOSFET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Scheick, Leif; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Power systems designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and extreme temperature exposures. Silicon carbide devices show great promise for use in future power electronics systems, but information pertaining to performance of the devices in the space environment is very scarce. A silicon carbide N-channel enhancement-mode power MOSFET called the CMF20120 is of interest for use in space environments. Samples of the device were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling to address their reliability for use in space applications. The results of the experimental work are presentd and discussed.

  7. The effect of thermal cycling to 1100 degree C on the alpha (Mo) phase in directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-alpha alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    In gamma/gamma prime - alpha eutectic alloys (Ni-Mo-Al), the resistance of the alpha phase to morphological changes during thermal cycling was found to be dependent on the structure formed during directional solidification. Fine, smooth alpha fibers survived up to 1000 five minute cycles to 1100 C with minor microstructural contour changes, while coarser and irregularly shaped alpha fibers tended to spheroidize. A mechanism to explain this phenomenon is proposed. It is suggested that on heating to 1100 C, the alpha phase is likely to undergo morphological changes, until differential thermal expansion creates a stress free interface between the alpha phase and the gamma/gamma prime matrix.

  8. Experimental evaluation of the Battelle accelerated test design for the solar array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frickland, P. O.; Repar, J.

    1982-01-01

    A previously developed test design for accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules was experimentally evaluated. The studies included a review of relevant field experience, environmental chamber cycling of full size modules, and electrical and physical evaluation of the effects of accelerated aging during and after the tests. The test results indicated that thermally induced fatigue of the interconnects was the primary mode of module failure as measured by normalized power output. No chemical change in the silicone encapsulant was detectable after 360 test cycles.

  9. Experimental evaluation of the Battelle accelerated test design for the solar array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frickland, P. O.; Repar, J.

    1982-04-01

    A previously developed test design for accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules was experimentally evaluated. The studies included a review of relevant field experience, environmental chamber cycling of full size modules, and electrical and physical evaluation of the effects of accelerated aging during and after the tests. The test results indicated that thermally induced fatigue of the interconnects was the primary mode of module failure as measured by normalized power output. No chemical change in the silicone encapsulant was detectable after 360 test cycles.

  10. Four-wall turbine airfoil with thermal strain control for reduced cycle fatigue

    DOEpatents

    Cambell, Christian X

    2013-09-17

    A turbine airfoil (20B) with a thermal expansion control mechanism that increases the airfoil camber (60, 61) under operational heating. The airfoil has four-wall geometry, including pressure side outer and inner walls (26, 28B), and suction side outer and inner walls (32, 34B). It has near-wall cooling channels (31F, 31A, 33F, 33A) between the outer and inner walls. A cooling fluid flow pattern (50C, 50W, 50H) in the airfoil causes the pressure side inner wall (28B) to increase in curvature under operational heating. The pressure side inner wall (28B) is thicker than walls (26, 34B) that oppose it in camber deformation, so it dominates them in collaboration with the suction side outer wall (32), and the airfoil camber increases. This reduces and relocates a maximum stress area (47) from the suction side outer wall (32) to the suction side inner wall (34B, 72) and the pressure side outer wall (26).

  11. Running hotter, faster, shallower: acceleration of the marine nitrogen cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial, and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biologically-available nitrogen is the primary limiting nutrient in the global ocean. The complex physical-biological interdependencies of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, the source and sink of bioavailable nitrogen, have led to uncertainty over their future trajectories under higher CO2. Sedimentary nitrogen isotope evidence suggests that the global rate of denitrification was on the order of 50% lower during the last glacial maximum, and reveals that significant changes in denitrification have occurred on a decadal-centennial timescale. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemistry models simulate similar changes, through physically-driven changes in anoxia, which then feed back on nitrogen fixation through the availability of phosphorus to diazotrophs. In addition, diazotroph culture experiments suggest that nitrogen fixation was further limited during glacial maxima by low CO2, causing an additional slowdown of the nitrogen cycle. The emergent picture suggests that deglaciation accelerated both sides of the N cycle, with more rapid loss encouraged by expanded shallow anoxia, and more rapid gain encouraged by higher CO2. It will be argued that the net effect on the nitrogen inventory can be approximated by knowing the distribution of surface ocean PO4, given the observed correlation of surface PO4 concentrations on the P:C ratio of exported organic matter.

  12. Accelerated ageing in testing bricks used in the conservation of historic buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlendová, Gabriela; Podoba, Rudolf; Baník, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    The effect of accelerated climate ageing on historical bricks in the laboratory is investigated in the paper. Differences in thermal properties are experimentally determined and studied before and after bricks exposure to climate ageing, which consists of 60 freeze-thaw cycles. For measuring thermal conductivity, diffusivity and specific heat, pulse method is used.

  13. Fatigue failure kinetics and structural changes in lead-free interconnects due to mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brent Alan

    Environmental and human health concerns drove European parliament to mandate the Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) for electronics. This was enacted in July 2006 and has practically eliminated lead in solder interconnects. There is concern in the electronics packaging community because modern lead-free solder is rich in tin. Presently, near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solders are favored by industry. These solders are stiffer than the lead-tin near-eutectic alloys, have a higher melting temperature, fewer slip systems, and form intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu, Ni and Ag, each of which tend to have a negative effect on lifetime. In order to design more reliable interconnects, the experimental observation of cracking mechanisms is necessary for the correct application of existing theories. The goal of this research is to observe the failure modes resulting from mode II strain and to determine the damage mechanisms which describe fatigue failures in 95.5 Sn- 4.0 Ag - 0.5 Cu wt% (SAC405) lead-free solder interconnects. In this work the initiation sites and crack paths were characterized for SAC405 ball-grid array (BGA) interconnects with electroless-nickel immersion-gold (ENIG) pad-finish. The interconnects were arranged in a perimeter array and tested in fully assembled packages. Evaluation methods included monotonic and displacement controlled mechanical shear fatigue tests, and temperature cycling. The specimens were characterized using metallogaphy, including optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and precise real-time electrical resistance structural health monitoring (SHM). In mechanical shear fatigue tests, strain was applied by the substrates, simulating dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the board and chip-carrier. This type of strain caused cracks to initiate in the soft Sn-rich solder and grow near the interface between the solder and intermetallic compounds (IMC). The growth near

  14. The effects of free and bonded sulfur both in the presence and absence of vulcanization accelerators on the rheological, technological, aging, and thermal stability of asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Onabajo, A.; Kopsch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Rheological and technological experiments have been carried out on sulfur-modified asphalts in the temperature range of 353 K to 453 K over a wide range of shear rates (0-4800 sec/sup -1/). The results indicated that the activation energy of the viscous flow increased with increasing amount of bonded sulfur. The irreversible shear degradation observed in sulfur-modified asphalts is caused by the high shear forces which rupture the aggregated molecules. Thermogravimetric analysis and aging experiments on asphalts and their sulfurized products, containing varying amounts of free sulfur (0-5.5 wt.-%) and vulcanization accelerators (0.5-2.5 wt.-%), have shown that mixes containing vulcanization accelerators have higher thermal stabilities and are more resistant to thermal and non-thermal aging than the unaccelerated asphalt-sulfur mixed prepared at the same or higher temperatures. The changes in the rheological and physical properties of the mixes with time is not only explained by the changes in the physical state of unreacted free sulfur, that is, from plastic to crystalline state (physical process), but also attributable to the effect of chemical reactions.

  15. Accelerated Rates of Nitrogen Cycling and N2O Production in Salt Marsh Sediments due to Long-Term Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X.; Ji, Q.; Angell, J.; Kearns, P.; Bowen, J. L.; Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intensified sedimentary production of nitrous oxide (N2O), one of the most potent greenhouse gases, is one of the many possible environmental consequences of elevated nitrogen (N) loading into estuarine ecosystems. This study investigates the response to over 40 years of fertilization of nitrogen removal processes in the sediments of the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Falmouth, MA. Sediment slurries were incubated (1.5 hr) with trace amounts (< 10% of ambient concentration) of 15NH4+ + 14NO3- or 15NO3- + 14NH4+. An additional parallel incubation with 15NH4+ + 14NO3- and 1 mM of allylthiourea (ATU) was included to measure rates of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Well-homogenized slurries filled about 10% of the volume in the gas-tight incubation vials, and the rest of the volume was replaced with an O2/He (20%/80%) mixture. The production of 29N2, 44N2O and 45N2O were determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The rate of total N2O production in fertilized sediments (0.89 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight) was 30-fold higher than in unfertilized sediments. The ratio of N2O to N2 production was also significantly higher in fertilized sediments (2.9%) than in unfertilized sediments (1.2%). This highlights the disproportionally large effect of long-term fertilization on N2O production in salt marsh sediments. The reduced oxygen level and higher ammonium concentrations in situ probably contributed to the significant rise in N2O production as a result of long-term fertilization. When detected, anammox and coupled nitrification-denitrification accounted for 10% and 14% of the total N2 production in fertilized sediments (30.5 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight), respectively, whereas neither was detected in unfertilized sediments. Thus these experiments indicate that N loading has important effects on multiple N cycle processes that result in N loss and N2O production.

  16. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  17. The Role of Elastic and Plastic Anisotropy of Sn in Recrystallization and Damage Evolution During Thermal Cycling in SAC305 Solder Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Zhou, Bite; Blair, Lauren; Zamiri, Amir; Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Liu, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-04-08

    Because failures in lead-free solder joints occur at locations other than the most highly shear-strained regions, reliability prediction is challenging. To gain physical understanding of this phenomenon, physically based understanding of how elastic and plastic deformation anisotropy affect microstructural evolution during thermomechanical cycling is necessary. Upon solidification, SAC305 (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu) solder joints are usually single or tricrystals. The evolution of microstructures and properties is characterized statistically using optical and orientation imaging microscopy. In situ synchrotron x-ray measurements during thermal cycling are used to examine how crystal orientation and thermal cycling history change strain history. Extensive characterization of a low-stress plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package design at different stages of cycling history is compared with preliminary experiments using higher-stress package designs. With time and thermal history, microstructural evolution occurs mostly from continuous recrystallization and particle coarsening that is unique to each joint, because of the specific interaction between local thermal and displacement boundary conditions and the strong anisotropic elastic, plastic, expansion, and diffusional properties of Sn crystals. The rate of development of recrystallized microstructures is a strong function of strain and aging. Cracks form at recrystallized (random) boundaries, and then percolate through recrystallized regions. Complications arising from electromigration and corrosion are also considered.

  18. Thaumarchaeal ammonium oxidation and evidence for a nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl, Friedrich W.; Weidler, Gerhard W.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Erhardt, Angelika; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested the presence of ammonium oxidizing Thaumarchaeota as well as nitrite oxidizing Bacteria in the subsurface spring called Franz Josef Quelle (FJQ), a slightly radioactive thermal mineral spring with a temperature of 43.6–47°C near the alpine village of Bad Gastein, Austria. The microbiological consortium of the FJQ was investigated for its utilization of nitrogen compounds and the putative presence of a subsurface nitrogen cycle. Microcosm experiments made with samples from the spring water, containing planktonic microorganisms, or from biofilms, were used in this study. Three slightly different media, enriched with vitamins and trace elements, and two incubation temperatures (30 and 40°C, respectively) were employed. Under aerobic conditions, high rates of conversion of ammonium to nitrite, as well as nitrite to nitrate were measured. Under oxygen-limited conditions nitrate was converted to gaseous compounds. Stable isotope probing with 15NH4Cl or (15NH4)2SO4as sole energy sources revealed incorporation of 15N into community DNA. Genomic DNA as well as RNA were extracted from all microcosms. The following genes or fragments of genes were successfully amplified, cloned and sequenced by standard PCR from DNA extracts: Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), nitrite oxidoreductase subunits A and B (nxrA and nxrB), nitrate reductase (narG), nitrite reductase (nirS), nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB), nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ). Reverse transcription of extracted total RNA and real-time PCR suggested the expression of each of those genes. Nitrogen fixation (as probed with nifH and nifD) was not detected. However, a geological origin of NH+4 in the water of the FJQ cannot be excluded, considering the silicate, granite and gneiss containing environment. The data suggested the operation of a nitrogen cycle in the subsurface environment of the FJQ. PMID:24904540

  19. Development of an accelerated reliability test schedule for terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An accelerated test schedule using a minimum amount of tests and a minimum number of cells has been developed on the basis of stress test results obtained from more than 1500 cells of seven different cell types. The proposed tests, which include bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, power cycle, thermal cycle, and thermal shock tests, use as little as 10 and up to 25 cells, depending on the test type.

  20. A performance comparison of nuclear electric and nuclear thermal propulsion for Mars cargo missions across the 15-17 year synodic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sponaugle, Steven J.; Davis, Steven F.; Everett, Shonn F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of the Earth-Mars synodic cycle on Mars cargo missions. Cargo vehicles that use nuclear thermal propulsion are compared with those that use nuclear electric propulsion. It will be shown that for low energy class cargo missions, nuclear electric systems exhibit far less variation in peak performance over the synodic cycle than comparable nuclear thermal systems. Performance is measured by the amount of usable mass delivered to Mars, as well as the initial mass requirements in nuclear safe orbit. Nuclear electric propulsion systems also have significantly longer injection window opportunities for a given 26 month synodic period, resulting in much greater mission design flexibility. Injection window opportunities over a 20 year period from 2010 to 2030 are examined. This covers a complete synodic cycle and shows its effects on performance for Mars cargo missions.