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Sample records for accelerated tumor formation

  1. Stat3 accelerates Myc induced tumor formation while reducing growth rate in a mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jhan, Jing-Ru; Andrechek, Eran R.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated Myc expression has been noted in basal breast cancer but therapies targeting Myc directly are lacking. It is therefore critical to characterize the interaction of Myc with other genes and pathways to uncover future potential therapeutic strategies. In this study, we bioinformatically predicted a role for Stat3 in Myc induced mammary tumors and tested it using mouse models. During normal mammary function, loss of Stat3 in Myc transgenic dams resulted in lethality of pups due to lactation deficiencies. We also observed that deletion of Stat3 in the mammary glands of MMTV-Myc mice unexpectedly resulted in increased and earlier hyperplasia and expedited tumorigenesis. However, despite arising earlier, Myc tumors lacking Stat3 grew more slowly with alterations in the resulting histological subtypes, including a dramatic increase in EMT-like tumors. We also observed that these tumors had impaired angiogenesis and a slight decrease in lung metastases. This metastatic finding is distinct from previously published findings in both MMTV-Neu and MMTV-PyMT mouse models. Together, the literature and our current research demonstrate that Stat3 can function as an oncogene or as a tumor repressor depending on the oncogenic driver and developmental context. PMID:27589562

  2. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor micro-environment induces a form of “accelerated aging,” which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy (“self-eating”) in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy “fuel” and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a “mutagenic motor” and allows cancer cells to buffer—at a distance—exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of “accelerated host aging” in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively “cutting off the fuel supply” for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:21654190

  3. Tumor formations in scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Y.; Bull, G.; Pichon, M.

    1984-03-01

    A highly localized incidence of skeletal malformations (tumors) in the scleractinian corals Platygyra pini and P. sinensis on an inshore fringing reef at Cockle Bay, Magnetic Island within the Great Barrier Reef province is reported. These tumors are typified by a localized area of increased growth rate resulting in roughly circular protuberances extending up to 4.5 cm above the colony's surface. In both species, similar proportions of their populations carried tumors (24.1 % in P. pini and 18.7 % in P. sinensis). Larger colonies (>80 cm in diameter) are at least 7 times more likely to possess tumors than smaller colonies (<40 cm in diameter). X-radiographs of the skeletal malformations indicate a point of origin, presumably from a single budded polyp with subsequent, localized, accelerated growth. The mean radial growth rate of the tumorous area was 29 % greater than that of the surrounding normal regions. In contrast to the normal tissue, the tumorous tissue exhibited proliferation of cells, atrophied gastrodermal cells and mesenterial filaments which were larger and disordered in structure. The environmental conditions at Cockle Bay are relatively extreme with high turbidity, periodic exposure of the reef flat, abrupt changes in salinity during the wet season and mechanical damage to corals caused by unpredictable cyclonic storms. It is suggested that a combination of environmental stresses coupled with an injury inflicted on the corals are possible stimuli that initiate the development of these abnormal growth through either bacterial attack or the development of an aberrant polyp during tissue repair.

  4. Heterozygosity for p53 (Trp53+/-) accelerates epithelial tumor formation in fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (Fancd2) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Houghtaling, Scott; Granville, Laura; Akkari, Yassmine; Torimaru, Yumi; Olson, Susan; Finegold, Milton; Grompe, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and an increased susceptibility to cancer. FA is genetically heterogeneous, consisting of at least 11 complementation groups, FA-A through L, including FA-D1 (BRCA2) and D2. We have previously reported an increased incidence of epithelial tumors in Fancd2 knockout mice. To further investigate the role of the FA pathway in tumor prevention, Fancd2 mutant mice were crossed to mice with a null mutation in the tumor suppressor gene, Trp53. The tumor spectrum in Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(+/-) mice included sarcomas expected in Trp53 heterozygotes, as well as mammary and lung adenocarcinomas that occur rarely in Trp53 heterozygotes. These tumors occurred earlier than in Fancd2(-/-) control mice. Therefore, the Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(+/-) mice represent an improved model for the study of adenocarcinoma in FA. In addition, it was found that Fancd2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts but not Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts arrest following DNA damage. Therefore, Trp53 is required for the S phase checkpoint activation observed in Fancd2 mutant cells. Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(-/-) cells showed an increase in aneuploidy and had multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements.

  5. Accelerating Star Formation in Clusters and Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Francesco; Stahler, Steven W.

    2000-09-01

    We use our own, recently developed pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to investigate the star formation histories of relatively nearby associations and clusters. We first employ published luminosities and effective temperatures to place the known members of each region in the H-R diagram. We then construct age histograms detailing that region's history. The groups studied include Taurus-Auriga, Lupus, Chamaeleon, ρ Ophiuchi, Upper Scorpius, IC 348, and NGC 2264. This study is the first to analyze a large number of star-forming regions with the same set of theoretical tracks. Our investigation corroborates and extends our previous results on the Orion Nebula Cluster. In all cases, we find that star formation began at a relatively low level some 107 yr in the past and has more recently undergone a steep acceleration. This acceleration, which lasts several million years, is usually continuing through the present epoch. The one clear exception is the OB association Upper Scorpius, where the formation rate climbed upward, peaked, and has now died off. Significantly, this is also the only region of our list that has been largely stripped of molecular gas. The acceleration represents a true physical phenomenon that cannot be explained away by incompleteness of the samples; nor is the pattern of stellar births significantly affected by observational errors or the presence of unresolved binaries. We speculate that increasing star formation activity arises from contraction of the parent cloud. Despite the short timescale for acceleration, the cloud is likely to evolve quasi-statically. Star formation itself appears to be a critical phenomenon, occurring only in locations exceeding some threshold density. The cloud's contraction must reverse itself, and the remnant gas dissipate, in less than 107 yr, even for aggregates containing no massive stars. In this case, molecular outflows from the stars themselves presumably accomplish the task, but the actual dispersal mechanism

  6. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Dickson, Todd Jay

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  7. Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Tumors with Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steven D.; Doty, James R.; Martin, David P.; Hancock, Steven L.; Adler, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, 79 patients with benign or malignant cavernous sinus tumors, have been treated at Stanford University with linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has been used as (1) a planned second-stage procedure for residual tumor following surgery, (2) primary treatment for patients whose medical conditions preclude surgery, (3) palliation of malignant lesions, and (4) definitive treatment for small, well-localized, poorly accessible tumors. Mean patient age was 52 years (range, 18 to 88); there were 28 males and 51 females. Sixty-one patients had benign tumors; 18 had malignant tumors. Mean tumor volume was 6.8 cm3 (range 0.5 to 22.5 cm3) covered with an average of 2.3 isocenter (range, 1 to 5). Radiation dose averaged 17.1 Gy. Mean follow-up was 46 months. Tumor control or shrinkage, or both, varied with pathology. Radiographic tumor improvement was most pronounced in malignant lesions, with greater than 85% showing reduction in tumor size; benign tumors (meningiomas and schwannomas) had a 63% control rate and 37% shrinkage rate, with none enlarging. We concluded that stereotactic radiosurgery is a valuable tool in managing cavernous sinus tumors. There was excellent control and stabilization of benign tumors and palliation of malignant lesions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171089

  8. Laser-driven ion accelerators for tumor therapy revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, the authors of this report published a first paper on the technical challenges that laser accelerators need to overcome before they could be applied to tumor therapy. Among the major issues were the maximum energy of the accelerated ions and their intensity, control and reproducibility of the laser-pulse output, quality assurance and patient safety. These issues remain today. While theoretical progress has been made for designing transport systems, for tailoring the plumes of laser-generated protons, and for suitable dose delivery, today's best lasers are far from reaching performance levels, in both proton energy and intensity to seriously consider clinical ion beam therapy (IBT) application. This report details these points and substantiates that laser-based IBT is neither superior to IBT with conventional particle accelerators nor ready to replace it.

  9. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kveiborg, Marie; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Mercurio, Arthur M; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-11-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In this study, we found that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 seems to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we show that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma, ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and, only rarely, seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, on the basis of the fact that TGF-β1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-β1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12 synthesis, and growth of these cells in vivo induced more than 200-fold increase in ADAM12 expression. Our observation that ADAM12 expression is significantly higher in the terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) adjacent to human breast carcinoma compared with TDLUs found in normal breast tissue supports our hypothesis that tumor-associated stroma triggers ADAM12 expression.

  10. NRF2 activation by antioxidant antidiabetic agents accelerates tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiufei; Long, Min; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Liao, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yuren; Liao, Qian; Li, Wenjie; Tang, Zili; Tong, Qiang; Wang, Xiaocui; Fang, Fang; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Ouyang, Qin; Zhang, Donna D; Yu, Shicang; Zheng, Hongting

    2016-04-13

    Cancer is a common comorbidity of diabetic patients; however, little is known about the effects that antidiabetic drugs have on tumors. We discovered that common classes of drugs used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the hypoglycemic dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) saxagliptin and sitagliptin, as well as the antineuropathic α-lipoic acid (ALA), do not increase tumor incidence but increase the risk of metastasis of existing tumors. Specifically, these drugs induce prolonged activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated antioxidant response through inhibition of KEAP1-C151-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NRF2, resulting in up-regulated expression of metastasis-associated proteins, increased cancer cell migration, and promotion of metastasis in xenograft mouse models. Accordingly, knockdown of NRF2 attenuated naturally occurring and DPP-4i-induced tumor metastasis, whereas NRF2 activation accelerated metastasis. Furthermore, in human liver cancer tissue samples, increased NRF2 expression correlated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that antioxidants that activate NRF2 signaling may need to be administered with caution in cancer patients, such as diabetic patients with cancer. Moreover, NRF2 may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for tumor metastasis.

  11. Vibration acceleration promotes bone formation in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Ryohei; Nakata, Ken; Kawano, Fuminori; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Ogasawara, Issei; Nakai, Naoya; Mae, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Tomohiko; Tachibana, Yuta; Yokoi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    All living tissues and cells on Earth are subject to gravitational acceleration, but no reports have verified whether acceleration mode influences bone formation and healing. Therefore, this study was to compare the effects of two acceleration modes, vibration and constant (centrifugal) accelerations, on bone formation and healing in the trunk using BMP 2-induced ectopic bone formation (EBF) mouse model and a rib fracture healing (RFH) rat model. Additionally, we tried to verify the difference in mechanism of effect on bone formation by accelerations between these two models. Three groups (low- and high-magnitude vibration and control-VA groups) were evaluated in the vibration acceleration study, and two groups (centrifuge acceleration and control-CA groups) were used in the constant acceleration study. In each model, the intervention was applied for ten minutes per day from three days after surgery for eleven days (EBF model) or nine days (RFH model). All animals were sacrificed the day after the intervention ended. In the EBF model, ectopic bone was evaluated by macroscopic and histological observations, wet weight, radiography and microfocus computed tomography (micro-CT). In the RFH model, whole fracture-repaired ribs were excised with removal of soft tissue, and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Ectopic bones in the low-magnitude group (EBF model) had significantly greater wet weight and were significantly larger (macroscopically and radiographically) than those in the other two groups, whereas the size and wet weight of ectopic bones in the centrifuge acceleration group showed no significant difference compared those in control-CA group. All ectopic bones showed calcified trabeculae and maturated bone marrow. Micro-CT showed that bone volume (BV) in the low-magnitude group of EBF model was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (3.1±1.2mm3 v.s. 1.8±1.2mm3 in high-magnitude group and 1.3±0.9mm3 in control-VA group), but BV in the

  12. Becoming a nurse: role formation among accelerated baccalaureate students.

    PubMed

    Ostrogorsky, Tanya L; Raber, Anjanette M; McKinley Yoder, Claire; Nielsen, Ann E; Lutz, Kristin F; Wros, Peggy L

    2015-01-01

    To understand nursing role formation for students enrolled in an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program, end-of-term narrative reflections from 34 students were analyzed over the course of the 15-month program. Using thematic analysis, 4 major themes were identified: evolving role perception, extending nursing student-patient interaction, engaging with health care team and systems of care, and expanding clinical thinking.

  13. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  14. Retention of Information Taught in Introductory Psychology Courses across Different Accelerated Course Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deichert, Nathan T.; Maxwell, Shannon J.; Klotz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The current study is a quasi-experimental examination of the effects of traditional and accelerated course formats on learning retention. The study analyzed data on an end-of-course exam collected from 132 students enrolled in introductory psychology courses across 3 course formats: a traditional 16-week format, a 5-week accelerated format, and an…

  15. The mechanisms by which polyamines accelerate tumor spread.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kuniyasu

    2011-10-11

    Increased polyamine concentrations in the blood and urine of cancer patients reflect the enhanced levels of polyamine synthesis in cancer tissues arising from increased activity of enzymes responsible for polyamine synthesis. In addition to their de novo polyamine synthesis, cells can take up polyamines from extracellular sources, such as cancer tissues, food, and intestinal microbiota. Because polyamines are indispensable for cell growth, increased polyamine availability enhances cell growth. However, the malignant potential of cancer is determined by its capability to invade to surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant organs. The mechanisms by which increased polyamine levels enhance the malignant potential of cancer cells and decrease anti-tumor immunity are reviewed. Cancer cells with a greater capability to synthesize polyamines are associated with increased production of proteinases, such as serine proteinase, matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins, and plasminogen activator, which can degrade surrounding tissues. Although cancer tissues produce vascular growth factors, their deregulated growth induces hypoxia, which in turn enhances polyamine uptake by cancer cells to further augment cell migration and suppress CD44 expression. Increased polyamine uptake by immune cells also results in reduced cytokine production needed for anti-tumor activities and decreases expression of adhesion molecules involved in anti-tumor immunity, such as CD11a and CD56. Immune cells in an environment with increased polyamine levels lose anti-tumor immune functions, such as lymphokine activated killer activities. Recent investigations revealed that increased polyamine availability enhances the capability of cancer cells to invade and metastasize to new tissues while diminishing immune cells' anti-tumor immune functions.

  16. Deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and alters amylin fiber structure

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Buchanan, Lauren E.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Deamidation of asparagine and glutamine is the most common non-enzymatic, post-translational modification. Deamidation can influence the structure, stability, folding, and aggregation of proteins and has been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation. However there are no structural studies of the consequences of deamidation on amyloid fibers, in large part because of the difficulty of studying these materials using conventional methods. Here we examine the effects of deamidation on the kinetics of amyloid formation by amylin, the causative agent of type 2 diabetes. We find that deamidation accelerates amyloid formation and the deamidated material is able to seed amyloid formation by unmodified amylin. Using site-specific isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we show that fibers formed by samples that contain deamidated polypeptide contain reduced amounts of β-sheet. Deamidation leads to disruption of the N-terminal β-sheet between Ala-8 and Ala-13, but β-sheet is still retained near Leu-16. The C-terminal sheet is disrupted near Leu-27. Analysis of potential sites of deamidation together with structural models of amylin fibers reveals that deamidation in the N-terminal β-sheet region may be the cause for the disruption of the fiber structure at both the N- and C-terminal β-sheet. Thus, deamidation is a post-translational modification that creates fibers which have an altered structure, but can still act as a template for amylin aggregation. Deamidation is very difficult to detect with standard methods used to follow amyloid formation, but isotope labeled IR spectroscopy provides a means for monitoring sample degradation and investigating the structural consequences of deamidation. PMID:22734583

  17. Interacting network of Hippo, Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling represses liver tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wantae; Khan, Sanjoy Kumar; Yang, Yingzi

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring a selective growth advantage by breaking the proliferation barrier established by gatekeeper genes is a centrally important event in tumor formation. Removal of the mammalian Hippo kinase Mst1 and Mst2 in hepatocytes leads to rapid hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) formation, indicating that the Hippo signaling pathway is a critical gatekeeper that restrains abnormal growth in hepatocytes. By rigorous genetic approaches, we identified an interacting network of the Hippo, Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways that control organ size and HCC development. We found that in hepatocytes, the loss of Mst1/2 leads to the activation of Notch signaling, which forms a positive feedback loop with Yap/Taz (transcription factors controlled by Mst1/2). This positive feedback loop results in severe liver enlargement and rapid HCC formation. Blocking the Yap/Taz-Notch positive feedback loop by Notch inhibition in vivo significantly reduced the Yap/Taz activities, hepatocyte proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, we uncovered a surprising inhibitory role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to Yap/Taz activities, which are important in tumor initiation. Genetic removal of β-catenin in the liver of the Mst1/2 mutants significantly accelerates tumoriogenesis. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, known for its oncogenic property, exerts an unexpected function in restricting Yap/Taz and Notch activities in HCC initiation. The molecular interplay between the three signaling pathways identified in our study provides new insights in developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat liver tumors. PMID:27881216

  18. Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, T. E. Pasley, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.

    2014-10-15

    Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

  19. Caveolin-1 and Accelerated Host Aging in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M.; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G.; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1+/+ versus Cav-1−/− age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1–deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues). PMID:22698676

  20. Overexpression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 correlates with breast tumor formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Serge; Wong, Nau Nau; Muller, William J; Park, Morag; Tremblay, Michel L

    2010-11-01

    The PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3 phosphatases are prenylated protein tyrosine phosphatases with oncogenic activity that are proposed to drive tumor metastasis. We found that PRL-2 mRNA is elevated in primary breast tumors relative to matched normal tissue, and also dramatically elevated in metastatic lymph nodes compared with primary tumors. PRL-2 knockdown in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, suggesting that the malignant phenotype of these cells is mediated at least in part through PRL-2 signaling. In different mouse mammary tumor-derived cell lines overexpressing PRL-2, we confirmed its role in anchorage-independent growth and cell migration. Furthermore, injection of PRL-2-overexpressing cells into the mouse mammary fat pad promoted extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and tumor formation. MMTV-PRL-2 transgenic mice engineered to overexpress the enzyme in mammary tissue did not exhibit spontaneous tumorigenesis, but they exhibited an accelerated development of mammary tumors initiated by introduction of an MMTV-ErbB2 transgene. Together, our results argue that PRL-2 plays a role in breast cancer progression.

  1. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment: connecting aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor microenvironment induces a form of "accelerated aging," which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy ("self-eating") in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy "fuel" and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a "mutagenic motor" and allows cancer cells to buffer-at a distance-exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of "accelerated host aging" in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively "cutting off the fuel supply" for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  2. Enhanced Tumor Formation in Mice Heterozygous for Blm Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Risinger, Mary A.; Kordich, Jennifer J.; Sanz, Maureen M.; Straughen, Joel E.; Slovek, Lisa E.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; German, James; Boivin, Gregory P.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-09-01

    Persons with the autosomal recessive disorder Bloom syndrome are predisposed to cancers of many types due to loss-of-function mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a recQ-like helicase. Here we show that mice heterozygous for a targeted null mutation of Blm, the murine homolog of BLM, develop lymphoma earlier than wild-type littermates in response to challenge with murine leukemia virus and develop twice the number of intestinal tumors when crossed with mice carrying a mutation in the Apctumor suppressor. These observations indicate that Blm is a modifier of tumor formation in the mouse and that Blm haploinsufficiency is associated with tumor predisposition, a finding with important implications for cancer risk in humans.

  3. Accelerated tumor progression in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Elena; Capece, Marina; Franceschini, Alessia; Falzoni, Simonetta; Giuliani, Anna L; Rotondo, Alessandra; Sarti, Alba C; Bonora, Massimo; Syberg, Susanne; Corigliano, Domenica; Pinton, Paolo; Jorgensen, Niklas R; Abelli, Luigi; Emionite, Laura; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito; Di Virgilio, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The ATP receptor P2X7 (P2X7R or P2RX7) has a key role in inflammation and immunity, but its possible roles in cancer are not firmly established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of host genetic deletion of P2X7R in the mouse on the growth of B16 melanoma or CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Tumor size and metastatic dissemination were assessed by in vivo calliper and luciferase luminescence emission measurements along with postmortem examination. In P2X7R-deficient mice, tumor growth and metastatic spreading were accelerated strongly, compared with wild-type (wt) mice. Intratumoral IL-1β and VEGF release were drastically reduced, and inflammatory cell infiltration was abrogated nearly completely. Similarly, tumor growth was also greatly accelerated in wt chimeric mice implanted with P2X7R-deficient bone marrow cells, defining hematopoietic cells as a sufficient site of P2X7R action. Finally, dendritic cells from P2X7R-deficient mice were unresponsive to stimulation with tumor cells, and chemotaxis of P2X7R-less cells was impaired. Overall, our results showed that host P2X7R expression was critical to support an antitumor immune response, and to restrict tumor growth and metastatic diffusion.

  4. Hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates growth of breast tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Coticchia, Christine M; Curatolo, Adam S; Schaffner, Carl P; Zurakowski, David; Solomon, Keith R; Moses, Marsha A

    2014-07-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to an increased prevalence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. A common feature of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a Western diet rich in saturated fat is a high level of circulating cholesterol. Epidemiological reports investigating the relationship between high circulating cholesterol levels, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and breast cancer are conflicting. Here, we modeled this complex condition in a well-controlled, preclinical animal model using innovative isocaloric diets. Female severe combined immunodeficient mice were fed a low-fat/no-cholesterol diet and then randomized to four isocaloric diet groups: low-fat/no-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe (cholesterol-lowering drug), and high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe. Mice were implanted orthotopically with MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast tumors from animals fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet exhibited the fastest progression. Significant differences in serum cholesterol level between groups were achieved and maintained throughout the study; however, no differences were observed in intratumoral cholesterol levels. To determine the mechanism of cholesterol-induced tumor progression, we analyzed tumor proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis and found a significantly greater percentage of proliferating cells from mice fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Tumors from hypercholesterolemic animals displayed significantly less apoptosis compared with the other groups. Tumors from high-fat/high-cholesterol mice had significantly higher microvessel density compared with tumors from the other groups. These results demonstrate that hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates breast tumor growth in vivo.

  5. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  6. Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, Daniel; Waters, Tim

    2015-05-01

    In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, thermal instability (TI) is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field’s theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one- and two-dimensional (1D/2D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1D simulations demonstrate that the TI can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to supersonic velocities. However, our 2D simulations reveal that a single cloud with a simple morphology cannot be maintained due to destructive processes, triggered by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and followed by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Nevertheless, the resulting cold gas structures are still significantly accelerated before they are ultimately dispersed.

  7. CLOUD FORMATION AND ACCELERATION IN A RADIATIVE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Proga, Daniel; Waters, Tim

    2015-05-10

    In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, thermal instability (TI) is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field’s theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound–free and bound–bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one- and two-dimensional (1D/2D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1D simulations demonstrate that the TI can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to supersonic velocities. However, our 2D simulations reveal that a single cloud with a simple morphology cannot be maintained due to destructive processes, triggered by the Rayleigh–Taylor instability and followed by the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. Nevertheless, the resulting cold gas structures are still significantly accelerated before they are ultimately dispersed.

  8. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  9. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Angiogenesis and Accelerates Growth of Breast Tumors in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, Kristine; Coticchia, Christine M.; Curatolo, Adam S.; Schaffner, Carl P.; Zurakowski, David; Solomon, Keith R.; Moses, Marsha A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to an increased prevalence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. A common feature of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a Western diet rich in saturated fat is a high level of circulating cholesterol. Epidemiological reports investigating the relationship between high circulating cholesterol levels, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and breast cancer are conflicting. Here, we modeled this complex condition in a well-controlled, preclinical animal model using innovative isocaloric diets. Female severe combined immunodeficient mice were fed a low-fat/no-cholesterol diet and then randomized to four isocaloric diet groups: low-fat/no-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe (cholesterol-lowering drug), and high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe. Mice were implanted orthotopically with MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast tumors from animals fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet exhibited the fastest progression. Significant differences in serum cholesterol level between groups were achieved and maintained throughout the study; however, no differences were observed in intratumoral cholesterol levels. To determine the mechanism of cholesterol-induced tumor progression, we analyzed tumor proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis and found a significantly greater percentage of proliferating cells from mice fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Tumors from hypercholesterolemic animals displayed significantly less apoptosis compared with the other groups. Tumors from high-fat/high-cholesterol mice had significantly higher microvessel density compared with tumors from the other groups. These results demonstrate that hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates breast tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24952430

  10. Combined Deletion of Vhl and Kif3a Accelerates Renal Cyst Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Holger; Vicari, Daniele; Wild, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) is believed to develop from cystic precursor lesions. Loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) predisposes renal epithelial cells to loss of the primary cilium in response to specific signals. Because the primary cilium suppresses renal cyst formation, loss of the cilium may be an initiating event in the formation of ccRCC. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the consequences of inducible renal epithelium–specific deletion of Vhl together with ablation of the primary cilium via deletion of the kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a) gene. We developed a microcomputed tomography–based imaging approach to allow quantitative longitudinal monitoring of cystic burden, revealing that combined loss of Vhl and Kif3a shortened the latency of cyst initiation, increased the number of cysts per kidney, and increased the total cystic burden. In contrast with findings in other cystic models, cysts in Kif3a mutant mice did not display accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α), and deletion of both Hif1a and Kif3a did not affect cyst development or progression. Vhl/Kif3a double mutation also increased the frequency of cysts that displayed multilayered epithelial growth, which correlated with an increased frequency of misoriented cystic epithelial cell divisions. These results argue against the involvement of HIF1α in promoting renal cyst growth and suggest that the formation of simple and atypical renal cysts that resemble ccRCC precursor lesions is greatly accelerated by the combined loss of Vhl and the primary cilium. PMID:25788526

  11. Combined Deletion of Vhl and Kif3a Accelerates Renal Cyst Formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Holger; Vicari, Daniele; Wild, Peter J; Frew, Ian J

    2015-11-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) is believed to develop from cystic precursor lesions. Loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) predisposes renal epithelial cells to loss of the primary cilium in response to specific signals. Because the primary cilium suppresses renal cyst formation, loss of the cilium may be an initiating event in the formation of ccRCC. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the consequences of inducible renal epithelium-specific deletion of Vhl together with ablation of the primary cilium via deletion of the kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a) gene. We developed a microcomputed tomography-based imaging approach to allow quantitative longitudinal monitoring of cystic burden, revealing that combined loss of Vhl and Kif3a shortened the latency of cyst initiation, increased the number of cysts per kidney, and increased the total cystic burden. In contrast with findings in other cystic models, cysts in Kif3a mutant mice did not display accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α), and deletion of both Hif1a and Kif3a did not affect cyst development or progression. Vhl/Kif3a double mutation also increased the frequency of cysts that displayed multilayered epithelial growth, which correlated with an increased frequency of misoriented cystic epithelial cell divisions. These results argue against the involvement of HIF1α in promoting renal cyst growth and suggest that the formation of simple and atypical renal cysts that resemble ccRCC precursor lesions is greatly accelerated by the combined loss of Vhl and the primary cilium.

  12. Inactivation of the Wwox gene accelerates forestomach tumor progression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Hagan, John P; Aqeilan, Haifa A; Pichiorri, Flavia; Fong, Louise Y Y; Croce, Carlo M

    2007-06-15

    The WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor spanning the second most common human fragile site, FRA16D. Targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice led to an increased incidence of spontaneous and ethyl nitrosourea-induced tumors. In humans, loss of heterozygosity and reduced or loss of WWOX expression has been reported in esophageal squamous cell cancers (SCC). In the present study, we examined whether inactivation of the Wwox gene might lead to enhanced esophageal/forestomach tumorigenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine. Wwox+/- and Wwox+/+ mice were treated with six intragastric doses of N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine and observed for 15 subsequent weeks. Ninety-six percent (25 of 26) of Wwox+/- mice versus 29% (10 of 34) of Wwox+/+ mice developed forestomach tumors (P = 1.3 x 10(-7)). The number of tumors per forestomach was significantly greater in Wwox+/- than in Wwox+/+ mice (3.2 +/- 0.34 versus 0.47 +/- 0.17; P < 0.0001). In addition, 27% of Wwox+/- mice had invasive SCC in the forestomach, as compared with 0% of wild-type controls (P = 0.002). Intriguingly, forestomachs from Wwox+/- mice displayed moderately strong Wwox protein staining in the near-normal epithelium, but weak and diffuse staining in SCC in the same tissue section, a result suggesting that Wwox was haploinsufficient for the initiation of tumor development. Our findings provide the first in vivo evidence of the tumor suppressor function of WWOX in forestomach/esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest that inactivation of one allele of WWOX accelerates the predisposition of normal cells to malignant transformation.

  13. Note: Numerical simulation and experimental validation of accelerating voltage formation for a pulsed electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, I.

    2014-06-15

    This paper describes the development of a computation model of a pulsed voltage generator for a repetitive electron accelerator. The model is based on a principle circuit of the generator, supplemented with the parasitics elements of the construction. Verification of the principle model was achieved by comparison of simulation with experimental results, where reasonable agreement was demonstrated for a wide range of generator load resistance.

  14. Urokinase Receptor Promotes Skin Tumor Formation by Preventing Epithelial Cell Activation of Notch1.

    PubMed

    Mazzieri, Roberta; Pietrogrande, Giovanni; Gerasi, Laura; Gandelli, Alessandro; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Moi, Davide; Brombin, Chiara; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Danese, Silvio; Mignatti, Paolo; Blasi, Francesco; D'Alessio, Silvia

    2015-11-15

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has a well-established role in cancer progression, but it has been little studied at earlier stages of cancer initiation. Here, we show that uPAR deficiency in the mouse dramatically reduces susceptibility to the classical two-stage protocol of inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. uPAR genetic deficiency decreased papilloma formation and accelerated keratinocyte differentiation, effects mediated by Notch1 hyperactivation. Notably, Notch1 inhibition in uPAR-deficient mice rescued their susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis. Clinically, we found that human differentiated keratoacanthomas expressed low levels of uPAR and high levels of activated Notch1, with opposite effects in proliferating tumors, confirming the relevance of the observations in mice. Furthermore, we found that TACE-dependent activation of Notch1 in basal kerantinocytes was modulated by uPAR. Mechanistically, uPAR sequestered TACE within lipid rafts to prevent Notch1 activation, thereby promoting cell proliferation and tumor formation. Given that uPAR signaling is nonessential for normal epidermal homeostasis, our results argue that uPAR may present a promising disease-specific target for preventing skin cancer development.

  15. Tumor growth accelerated by chemotherapy-induced senescent cells is suppressed by treatment with IL-12 producing cellular vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Simova, Jana; Sapega, Olena; Imrichova, Terezie; Stepanek, Ivan; Kyjacova, Lenka; Mikyskova, Romana; Indrova, Marie; Bieblova, Jana; Bubenik, Jan; Bartek, Jiri; Hodny, Zdenek; Reinis, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Standard-of-care chemo- or radio-therapy can induce, besides tumor cell death, also tumor cell senescence. While senescence is considered to be a principal barrier against tumorigenesis, senescent cells can survive in the organism for protracted periods of time and they can promote tumor development. Based on this emerging concept, we hypothesized that elimination of such potentially cancer-promoting senescent cells could offer a therapeutic benefit. To assess this possibility, here we first show that tumor growth of proliferating mouse TC-1 HPV-16-associated cancer cells in syngeneic mice becomes accelerated by co-administration of TC-1 or TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer cells made senescent by pre-treatment with the anti-cancer drug docetaxel, or lethally irradiated. Phenotypic analyses of tumor-explanted cells indicated that the observed acceleration of tumor growth was attributable to a protumorigenic environment created by the co-injected senescent and proliferating cancer cells rather than to escape of the docetaxel-treated cells from senescence. Notably, accelerated tumor growth was effectively inhibited by cell immunotherapy using irradiated TC-1 cells engineered to produce interleukin IL-12. Collectively, our data document that immunotherapy, such as the IL-12 treatment, can provide an effective strategy for elimination of the detrimental effects caused by bystander senescent tumor cells in vivo. PMID:27448982

  16. Geyser Formation in Oxygen when Subjected to fast Acceleration Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandikota, G.; Pichavant, G.; Chatain, D.; Amiroudine, S.; Beysens, D.

    2015-03-01

    Large bubbles of oxygen are magnetically levitated inside a liquid column of oxygen. Then the magnetic field is rapidly quenched resulting in the formation of a geyser. This configuration reproduces the conditions of rocket re-ignition in orbit. Two bubbles with fill factors 6 % and 15 % were used. Two-dimensional numerical simulations based on VOF-PLIC method are also carried out. Comparison of the experimental, numerical and theoretical results shows good agreement. The method can thus be used for further more focused studies with oxygen for various gravity quenches, fill ratios and pressure values.

  17. Accelerated glycerol fermentation in Escherichia coli using methanogenic formate consumption.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli can ferment glycerol anaerobically only under very defined restrictive conditions. Hence, it was the aim of this study to overcome this limitation via a co-cultivation approach. Anaerobic glycerol fermentation by a pure E. coli culture was compared to a co-culture that also contained the formate-oxidizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Co-cultivation of the two strains led to a more than 11-fold increased glycerol consumption. Furthermore, it supported a constantly neutral pH and a shift from ethanol to succinate production. Moreover, M. formicicum was analyzed for its ability to grow on different standard media and a surprising versatility could be demonstrated.

  18. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  19. Sustained trophism of the mammary gland is sufficient to accelerate and synchronize development of ErbB2/Neu-induced tumors

    PubMed Central

    Landis, MD; Seachrist, DD; Abdul-Karim, FW; Keri, RA

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that parity enhances HER2/ErbB2/Neu-induced breast tumorigenesis. Furthermore, recent studies using multiparous, ErbB2/Neu-overexpressing mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-Neu) mice have shown that parity induces a population of cells that are targeted for ErbB2/Neu-induced transformation. Although parity accelerates mammary tumorigenesis, the pattern of tumor development in multiparous MMTV-Neu mice remains stochastic, suggesting that additional events are required for ErbB2/Neu to cause mammary tumors. Whether such events are genetic in nature or reflective of the dynamic hormonal control of the gland that occurs with pregnancy remains unclear. We postulated that young age at pregnancy initiation or chronic trophic maintenance of mammary epithelial cells might provide a cellular environment that significantly increases susceptibility to ErbB2/Neu-induced tumorigenesis. MMTV-Neu mice that were maintained pregnant or lactating beginning at 3 weeks of age demonstrated accelerated tumorigenesis, but this process was still stochastic, indicating that early pregnancy does not provide the requisite events of tumorigenesis. However, bitransgenic mice that were generated by breeding MMTV-Neu mice with a luteinizing hormone-overexpressing mouse model of ovarian hyperstimulation developed multifocal mammary tumors in an accelerated, synchronous manner compared to virgin MMTV-Neu animals. This synchrony of tumor development in the bitransgenic mice suggests that trophic maintenance of the mammary gland provides the additional events required for tumor formation and maintains the population of cells that are targeted by ErbB2/Neu for transformation. Both the synchrony of tumor appearance and the ability to characterize a window of commitment by ovariectomy/palpation studies permitted microarray analysis to evaluate changes in gene expression over a defined timeline that spans the progression from normal to preneoplastic mammary tissue. These

  20. Loss of Dnmt3b function upregulates the tumor modifier Ment and accelerates mouse lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hlady, Ryan A; Novakova, Slavomira; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Peters, Staci L; Bies, Juraj; Hannah, Jay; Iqbal, Javeed; Anderson, Kristi M; Siebler, Hollie M; Smith, Lynette M; Greiner, Timothy C; Bastola, Dhundy; Joshi, Shantaram; Lockridge, Oksana; Simpson, Melanie A; Felsher, Dean W; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Chan, Wing C; Christman, Judith K; Opavsky, Rene

    2012-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (Dnmt3b) belongs to a family of enzymes responsible for methylation of cytosine residues in mammals. DNA methylation contributes to the epigenetic control of gene transcription and is deregulated in virtually all human tumors. To better understand the generation of cancer-specific methylation patterns, we genetically inactivated Dnmt3b in a mouse model of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis. Ablation of Dnmt3b function using a conditional knockout in T cells accelerated lymphomagenesis by increasing cellular proliferation, which suggests that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor. Global methylation profiling revealed numerous gene promoters as potential targets of Dnmt3b activity, the majority of which were demethylated in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas, but not in Dnmt3b-/- pretumor thymocytes, implicating Dnmt3b in maintenance of cytosine methylation in cancer. Functional analysis identified the gene Gm128 (which we termed herein methylated in normal thymocytes [Ment]) as a target of Dnmt3b activity. We found that Ment was gradually demethylated and overexpressed during tumor progression in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas. Similarly, MENT was overexpressed in 67% of human lymphomas, and its transcription inversely correlated with methylation and levels of DNMT3B. Importantly, knockdown of Ment inhibited growth of mouse and human cells, whereas overexpression of Ment provided Dnmt3b+/+ cells with a proliferative advantage. Our findings identify Ment as an enhancer of lymphomagenesis that contributes to the tumor suppressor function of Dnmt3b and suggest it could be a potential target for anticancer therapies.

  1. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  2. Accelerated wound healing in tumor necrosis factor receptor p55-deficient mice with reduced leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kondo, Toshikazu; Ohshima, Tohru; Ishida, Yuko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2002-07-01

    To clarify biological roles of tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNF-Rp55) -mediated signals in wound healing, skin excisions were prepared in BALB/c (WT) and TNF-Rp55-deficient (KO) mice. In WT mice, the wound area was reduced to 50% of the original area 6 days after injury, with angiogenesis and collagen accumulation. Histopathologically, reepithelialization rate was approximately 80% 6 days. Myeloperoxidase activity and macrophage recruitment were the most evident 1 and 6 days after injury, respectively. Gene expression of adhesion molecules, interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-2, transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, and Flk-1 was enhanced at the wound site. In KO mice, an enhancement in angiogenesis, collagen content, and reepithelialization was accelerated with the increased gene expression of TGF-beta1, CTGF, VEGF, Flt-1, and Flk-1 at the wound sites, resulting in accelerated wound healing compared with WT mice. In contrast, leukocyte infiltration, mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, and cytokines were significantly reduced in KO mice. These observations suggest that TNF-Rp55-mediated signals have some role in promoting leukocyte infiltration at the wound site and negatively affect wound healing, probably by reducing angiogenesis and collagen accumulation.

  3. Nonlinear ghost waves accelerate the progression of high-grade brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Rosa; Martínez-González, Alicia; Pérez-García, Víctor M.

    2016-10-01

    We study a reduced continuous model describing the evolution of high grade gliomas in response to hypoxic events through the interplay of different cellular phenotypes. We show that hypoxic events, even when sporadic and/or limited in space, may have a crucial role on the acceleration of high grade gliomas growth. Our modeling approach is based on two cellular phenotypes. One of them is more migratory and a second one is more proliferative. Transitions between both phenotypes are driven by the local oxygen values, assumed in this simple model to be uniform. Surprisingly, even very localized in time hypoxia events leading to transient migratory populations have the potential to accelerate the tumor's invasion speed up to speeds close to those of the migratory phenotype. The high invasion speed persists for times much longer than the lifetime of the hypoxic event. Moreover, the phenomenon is observed both when the migratory cells form a persistent wave of cells located on the invasion front and when they form a evanescent "ghost" wave disappearing after a short time by decay to the more proliferative phenotype. Our findings are obtained through numerical simulations of the model equations both in 1D and higher dimensional scenarios. We also provide a deeper mathematical analysis of some aspects of the problem such as the conditions for the existence of persistent waves of cells with a more migratory phenotype.

  4. Regulation of Mammary Tumor Formation and Lipid Biosynthesis by Spot14

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    alter tumor latency. Impaired fatty acid synthesis was associated with reduced solid tumor cell proliferation, the formation of cystic lesions in some...content and nurse offspring with runted development. It has become increasingly clear that tumors display alterations in de novo fatty acid synthesis...acids in vitro 4. To determine whether the loss of S14 from mammary tumors altered the amount of fatty acids present, GC-Mass Spectrometry was used to

  5. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  6. Learner-Responsive Instructional Strategies for Adults in Accelerated Classroom Formats: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    This study was focused on investigating inclusive learning environments in accelerated classroom formats. Three 8-week sections of an undergraduate course at Regis University were examined. Results from observations and surveys were analyzed to determine the effectiveness and consistency of 13 inclusive strategies derived from Wlodkowski and…

  7. Exploring Teacher Beliefs and Use of Acceleration, Ability Grouping, and Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missett, Tracy C.; Brunner, Marguerite M.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Moon, Tonya R.; Azano, Amy Price

    2014-01-01

    Few academic interventions for gifted students have generated more empirical support than acceleration and ability grouping, and formative assessment is advocated as a tool that educators can use to appropriately integrate accelerative practices and ability grouping into the classroom. However, the empirical support for accelerative practices,…

  8. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on tumor cells viability and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Dobrydnev, Alexey V.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the impact of different concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on cell viability of breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 line, and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Chemical composition and purity of nanotubes is controlled by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strength and direction of the influence of SWCNTs on the tumor cell population was assessed by cell counting and measurement of the volume of multicellular tumor spheroids. Effect of SWCNTs on the formation of multicellular spheroids was compared with the results obtained by culturing tumor cells with ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs). Our results demonstrated that SWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 μg/ml did not have cytotoxic influence on tumor cells; instead, they had weak cytostatic effect. The increasing of SWCNTs concentration to 100 to 200 μg/ml stimulated proliferation of tumor cells, especially in suspension fractions. The result of this influence was in formation of more MTS in cell culture with SWCNTs compared with UDDs and control samples. In result, the median volume of MTS after cultivation with SWCNTs at 100 to 200 μg/ml concentrations is 3 to 5 times greater than that in samples which were incubated with the UDDs and is 2.5 times greater than that in control cultures. So, if SWCNTs reduced cell adhesion to substrate and stimulated formation of tumor cell aggregates volume near 7 · 10-3 mm3, at the same time, UDDs reduced adhesion and cohesive ability of cells and stimulated generation of cell spheroids volume no more than 4 · 10-3 mm3. Our results could be useful for the control of cell growth in three-dimensional culture.

  9. Platelet aggregation in the formation of tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruo, Takashi; Fujita, Naoya

    2008-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death from cancer, yet the optimal strategy against it remains uncertain. The pathogenesis of hematogenous metastasis is dynamic and consists of the following steps: 1) detachment of tumor cells from the primary site, 2) invasion into the host’s blood vessels, 3) migration in the host’s blood stream, 4) transport along the circulation, 5) arrest in or adhesion to the capillary in a distant organ, 6) extravasation, and 7) proliferation within the foreign tissues. A key to successful hematogenous metastasis is tumor survival in the bloodstream because most circulating tumor cells are rapidly destroyed by the shear forces or are attacked by the immune system. Less than 0.01% of these cells result in metastasis. Tumor cell–induced platelet aggregation has been reported to facilitate hematogenous metastasis by increasing the arrest of tumor cell emboli in the microcirculation. Platelet aggregation is also believed to protect tumor cells from immunological assault in the circulation. We have identified Aggrus as a platelet–aggregating factor expressed on a number of human cancers. Because hematogenous metastasis is reduced when neutralizing antibodies or eliminating carbohydrates attenuates Aggrus function, Aggrus’s main contribution to hematogenous metastasis of Aggrus–expressing cells, then, is by promoting platelet aggregation. Aggrus could serve as an ideal target for drug development to block metastasis. PMID:18941298

  10. Pathophysiological Basis for the Formation of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Michael R.; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Poor microenvironmental conditions are a characteristic feature of solid tumors. Such conditions occur because the tumor vascular supply, which develops from the normal host vasculature by the process of angiogenesis, is generally inadequate in meeting the oxygen and nutrient demands of the growing tumor mass. Regions of low oxygenation (hypoxia) is believed to be the most critical deficiency, since it has been well documented to play a significant role in influencing the response to conventional radiation and chemotherapy treatments, as well as influencing malignant progression in terms of aggressive growth and recurrence of the primary tumor and its metastatic spread. As a result, significant emphasis has been placed on finding clinically applicable approaches to identify those tumors that contain hypoxia and realistic methods to target this hypoxia. However, most studies consider hypoxia as a single entity, yet we now know that it is multifactorial. Furthermore, hypoxia is often associated with other microenvironmental parameters, such as elevated interstitial fluid pressure, glycolysis, low pH, and reduced bioenergetic status, and these can also influence the effects of hypoxia. Here, we review the various aspects of hypoxia, but also discuss the role of the other microenvironmental parameters associated with hypoxia. PMID:27148472

  11. Vortex Formation and Acceleration of a Fish-Inspired Robot Performing Starts from Rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoria, Adam; Bapst, Jonathan; Ringuette, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the unsteady flow of a fish-inspired robot executing starts from rest, with the objective of understanding the connection among the kinematics, vortex formation, and acceleration performance. Several fish perform ``fast starts,'' where the body bends into a ``C'' or ``S'' shape while turning (phase I), followed by a straightening of the body and caudal fin and a linear acceleration (phase II). The resulting highly 3-D, unsteady vortex formation and its relationship to the acceleration are not well understood. The self-propelled robotic model contains motor-driven joints with programmable motion to emulate phase II of a simplified C-start. The experiments are conducted in a water tank, and the model is constrained to 1 direction along rails. The velocity is measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) in multiple planes. Vortex boundaries are identified using the finite-time Lyapunov exponent, then the unsteady vortex circulation is computed. The thrust is estimated from the identified vortices, and correlated with the circulation and model acceleration for different kinematics.

  12. Tumor formation in Hoffa's infrapatellar fat: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; da Silveira Moller, João Victor; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Although tumors or pseudotumoral lesions are rare in the infrapatellar fat, they may affect it. Osteochondroma is the commonest benign bone tumor. However, extraskeletal presentations are rare. There are three extraskeletal variants of osteochondroma: synovial chondromatosis, para-articular chondroma and soft-tissue chondroma. We present a case of a single intra-articular lesion in the area of Hoffa's fat, in a 78-year-old female patient with a complaint of progressive knee pain associated with severe arthrosis. From the clinical and radiological findings, the diagnosis was para-articular osteochondroma. However, the histopathological findings, after excision of the lesion, showed that this was synovial chondromatosis secondary to osteoarthrosis.

  13. Role of stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator in treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Rossitch, E; Siddon, R; Moore, M R; Rockoff, M A; Alexander, E

    1990-05-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, 16 children were treated for 10 arteriovenous malformations and 6 recurrent intracranial tumors with stereotactic radiation therapy using a modified Clinac 6/100 linear accelerator. The median age of our patients was 10.5 years. For the group with arteriovenous malformation, follow-up ranged from 6 months to 37 months (median was 20 months). No patient bled during the follow-up period. Five of eight patients with follow-up longer than 12 months have achieved complete obliteration of their arteriovenous malformation by angiogram. The four remaining patients who have not achieved a complete obliteration are awaiting their 2-year posttreatment angiogram. The other patient has been treated within the year and have not yet been studied. Five of the six recurrent tumor patients are alive with a median follow-up of 8 months. The remaining patient was controlled locally, but he died of recurrent disease outside the area treated with radiosurgery. The radiographic responses of these patients have included three complete responses, two substantial reductions in tumor volume (greater than 50%) and one stabilization. Despite previous radiotherapy, there have been no significant complications in these patients. We conclude that stereotactic radiation therapy using a standard linear accelerator is an effective and safe technique in the treatment of selected intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children. In addition, stereotactic radiosurgery may have unique applications in the treatment of localized primary and recurrent pediatric brain tumors.

  14. Current Sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-01-01

    Data from an inductive conical theta pinch accelerator are presented to gain insight into the process of inductive current sheet formation in the presence of a preionized background gas produced by a steady-state RF-discharge. The presence of a preionized plasma has been previously shown to allow for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages and energies than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerator concepts, leading to greater accelerator efficiencies at lower power levels. Time-resolved magnetic probe measurements are obtained for different background pressures and pulse energies to characterize the effects of these parameters on current sheet formation. Indices are defined that describe time-resolved current sheet characteristics, such as the total current owing in the current sheet, the time-integrated total current ('strength'), and current sheet velocity. It is found that for a given electric field strength, maximums in total current, strength, and velocity occur for one particular background pressure. At other pressures, these current sheet indices are considerably smaller. The trends observed in these indices are explained in terms of the principles behind Townsend breakdown that lead to a dependence on the ratio of the electric field to the background pressure. Time-integrated photographic data are also obtained at the same experimental conditions, and qualitatively they compare quite favorably with the time-resolved magnetic field data.

  15. Appalachian mountaintop mining particulate matter induces neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells and promotes tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Chen, Michael; Knuckles, Travis; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Juhua; Ellis, Emily; Hendryx, Michael; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-11-04

    Epidemiological studies suggest that living near mountaintop coal mining (MTM) activities is one of the contributing factors for high lung cancer incidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term carcinogenic potential of MTM particulate matter (PMMTM) exposure on human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results show that chronic exposure (3 months) to noncytotoxic, physiological relevant concentration (1 μg/mL) of PMMTM, but not control particle PMCON, induced neoplastic transformation, accelerated cell proliferation, and enhanced cell migration of the exposed lung cells. Xenograft transplantation of the PMMTM-exposed cells in mice caused no apparent tumor formation, but promoted tumor growth of human lung carcinoma H460 cells, suggesting the tumor-promoting effect of PMMTM. Chronic exposure to the main inorganic chemical constituent of PMMTM, molybdenum but not silica, similarly induced cell transformation and tumor promotion, suggesting the contribution of molybdenum, at least in part, in the PMMTM effects. These results provide new evidence for the carcinogenic potential of PMMTM and support further risk assessment and implementation of exposure control for PMMTM.

  16. Mutant PIK3CA accelerates HER2-driven transgenic mammary tumors and induces resistance to combinations of anti-HER2 therapies.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Ariella B; Pfefferle, Adam D; Balko, Justin M; Kuba, María Gabriela; Young, Christian D; Sánchez, Violeta; Sutton, Cammie R; Cheng, Hailing; Perou, Charles M; Zhao, Jean J; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-08-27

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ERBB2) amplification and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutations often co-occur in breast cancer. Aberrant activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been shown to correlate with a diminished response to HER2-directed therapies. We generated a mouse model of HER2-overexpressing (HER2(+)), PIK3CA(H1047R)-mutant breast cancer. Mice expressing both human HER2 and mutant PIK3CA in the mammary epithelium developed tumors with shorter latencies compared with mice expressing either oncogene alone. HER2 and mutant PIK3CA also cooperated to promote lung metastases. By microarray analysis, HER2-driven tumors clustered with luminal breast cancers, whereas mutant PIK3CA tumors were associated with claudin-low breast cancers. PIK3CA and HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors expressed elevated transcripts encoding markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stem cells. Cells from HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors more efficiently formed mammospheres and lung metastases. Finally, HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors were resistant to trastuzumab alone and in combination with lapatinib or pertuzumab. Both drug resistance and enhanced mammosphere formation were reversed by treatment with a PI3K inhibitor. In sum, PIK3CA(H1047R) accelerates HER2-mediated breast epithelial transformation and metastatic progression, alters the intrinsic phenotype of HER2-overexpressing cancers, and generates resistance to approved combinations of anti-HER2 therapies.

  17. Dedifferentiation of Neurons Precedes Tumor Formation in lola Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Southall, Tony D.; Davidson, Catherine M.; Miller, Claire; Carr, Adrian; Brand, Andrea H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ability to reprogram differentiated cells into a pluripotent state has revealed that the differentiated state is plastic and reversible. It is evident, therefore, that mechanisms must be in place to maintain cells in a differentiated state. Transcription factors that specify neuronal characteristics have been well studied, but less is known about the mechanisms that prevent neurons from dedifferentiating to a multipotent, stem cell-like state. Here, we identify Lola as a transcription factor that is required to maintain neurons in a differentiated state. We show that Lola represses neural stem cell genes and cell-cycle genes in postmitotic neurons. In lola mutants, neurons dedifferentiate, turn on neural stem cell genes, and begin to divide, forming tumors. Thus, neurons rather than stem cells or intermediate progenitors are the tumor-initiating cells in lola mutants. PMID:24631403

  18. Carbon-based nanomaterials accelerate arteriolar thrombus formation in the murine microcirculation independently of their shape.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Martin; Bihari, Peter; Praetner, Marc; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph; Fent, Janos; Vippola, Minnamari; Lakatos, Susan; Krombach, Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Although carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have been shown to exert prothrombotic effects in microvessels, it is poorly understood whether CBNs also have the potential to interfere with the process of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and whether the shape of CBNs plays a role in these processes. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of two differently shaped CBNs, fiber-shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and spherical ultrafine carbon black (CB), on thrombus formation as well as on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and leukocyte transmigration in the murine microcirculation upon systemic administration in vivo. Systemic administration of both SWCNT and CB accelerated arteriolar thrombus formation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) body weight, whereas SWCNT exerted a prothrombotic effect also at a lower dose (0.1 mg kg(-1) body weight). In vitro, both CBNs induced P-selectin expression on human platelets and formation of platelet-granulocyte complexes. In contrast, injection of fiber-shaped SWCNT or of spherical CB did not induce leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions or leukocyte transmigration. In vitro, both CBNs slightly increased the expression of activation markers on human monocytes and granulocytes. These findings suggest that systemic administration of CBNs accelerates arteriolar thrombus formation independently of the CBNs' shape, but does not induce leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions or leukocyte transmigration.

  19. Diaphragm opening effects on shock wave formation and acceleration in a rectangular cross section channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdaman, S. A.; Garcia, M.; Teh, E.; Lincoln, D.; Trivedi, M.; Alves, M.; Johansen, C.

    2016-11-01

    Shock wave formation and acceleration in a high-aspect ratio cross section shock tube were studied experimentally and numerically. The relative importance of geometric effects and diaphragm opening time on shock formation are assessed. The diaphragm opening time was controlled through the use of slit-type (fast opening time) and petal-type (slow opening time) diaphragms. A novel method of fabricating the petal-type diaphragms, which results in a consistent burst pressure and symmetric opening without fragmentation, is presented. High-speed schlieren photography was used to visualize the unsteady propagation of the lead shock wave and trailing gas dynamic structures. Surface-mounted pressure sensors were used to capture the spatial and temporal development of the pressure field. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation predictions using the shear-stress-transport turbulence model are compared to the experimental data. Simulation results are used to explain the presence of high-frequency pressure oscillations observed experimentally in the driver section as well as the cause of the initial acceleration and subsequent rapid decay of shock velocity measured along the top and bottom channel surfaces. A one-dimensional theoretical model predicting the effect of the finite opening time of the diaphragm on the rate of driver depressurization and shock acceleration is proposed. The model removes the large amount of empiricism that accompanies existing models published in the literature. Model accuracy is assessed through comparisons with experiments and simulations. Limitations of and potential improvements in the model are discussed.

  20. Collisionless shock formation and the prompt acceleration of solar flare ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Goodrich, C. C.; Vlahos, L.

    1988-01-01

    The formation mechanisms of collisionless shocks in solar flare plasmas are investigated. The priamry flare energy release is assumed to arise in the coronal portion of a flare loop as many small regions or 'hot spots' where the plasma beta locally exceeds unity. One dimensional hybrid numerical simulations show that the expansion of these 'hot spots' in a direction either perpendicular or oblique to the ambient magnetic field gives rise to collisionless shocks in a few Omega(i), where Omega(i) is the local ion cyclotron frequency. For solar parameters, this is less than 1 second. The local shocks are then subsequently able to accelerate particles to 10 MeV in less than 1 second by a combined drift-diffusive process. The formation mechanism may also give rise to energetic ions of 100 keV in the shock vicinity. The presence of these energetic ions is due either to ion heating or ion beam instabilities and they may act as a seed population for further acceleration. The prompt acceleration of ions inferred from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission can thus be explained by this mechanism.

  1. Benzalkonium chloride accelerates the formation of the amyloid fibrils of corneal dystrophy-associated peptides.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-08-30

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies.

  2. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  3. Increased biofilm formation ability and accelerated transport of Staphylococcus aureus along a catheter during reciprocal movements.

    PubMed

    Haraga, Isao; Abe, Shintaro; Jimi, Shiro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamaura, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus spp. is a major cause of device-related infections. However, the mechanisms of deep-tissue infection by staphylococci from the skin surface remain unclear. We performed in vitro experiments to determine how staphylococci are transferred from the surface to the deeper layers of agar along the catheter for different strains of Staphylococcus aureus with respect to bacterial concentrations, catheter movements, and biofilm formation. We found that when 5-mm reciprocal movements of the catheter were repeated every 8h, all catheter samples of S. aureus penetrated the typical distance of 50mm from the skin to the epidural space. The number of reciprocal catheter movements and the depth of bacterial growth were correlated. A greater regression coefficient for different strains implied faster bacterial growth. Enhanced biofilm formation by different strains implied larger regression coefficients. Increased biofilm formation ability may accelerate S. aureus transport along a catheter due to physical movements by patients.

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Tan, Shu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Bellone, Stefania; Xu, Xiaocao; Zhang, Haifeng; Santin, Alessandro D.; Lou, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence ovarian cancer growth, migration, and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis remain unclear. Here, we have shown a strong correlation between TAM-associated spheroids and the clinical pathology of ovarian cancer. Further, we have determined that TAMs promote spheroid formation and tumor growth at early stages of transcoelomic metastasis in an established mouse model for epithelial ovarian cancer. M2 macrophage–like TAMs were localized in the center of spheroids and secreted EGF, which upregulated αMβ2 integrin on TAMs and ICAM-1 on tumor cells to promote association between tumor cells and TAM. Moreover, EGF secreted by TAMs activated EGFR on tumor cells, which in turn upregulated VEGF/VEGFR signaling in surrounding tumor cells to support tumor cell proliferation and migration. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR or antibody neutralization of ICAM-1 in TAMs blunted spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. These findings suggest that EGF secreted from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. As transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our findings uncover a mechanism for TAM-mediated spheroid formation and provide a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastatic cancers. PMID:27721235

  5. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    PubMed

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Jung-Ho; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Paik, Seung R

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  6. Formation of GEMS from shock-accelerated crystalline dust in Superbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A; Bradley, J P

    2004-12-08

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain enigmatic sub-micron components called GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides). The compositions and structures of GEMS indicate that they have been processed by exposure to ionizing radiation but details of the actual irradiation environment(s) have remained elusive. Here we propose a mechanism and astrophysical site for GEMS formation that explains for the first time the following key properties of GEMS; they are stoichiometrically enriched in oxygen and systematically depleted in S, Mg, Ca and Fe (relative to solar abundances), most have normal (solar) oxygen isotopic compositions, they exhibit a strikingly narrow size distribution (0.1-0.5 {micro}m diameter), and some of them contain ''relict'' crystals within their silicate glass matrices. We show that the compositions, size distribution, and survival of relict crystals are inconsistent with amorphization by particles accelerated by diffusive shock acceleration. Instead, we propose that GEMS are formed from crystalline grains that condense in stellar outflows from massive stars in OB associations, are accelerated in encounters with frequent supernova shocks inside the associated superbubble, and are implanted with atoms from the hot gas in the SB interior. We thus reverse the usual roles of target and projectile. Rather than being bombarded at rest by energetic ions, grains are accelerated and bombarded by a nearly monovelocity beam of atoms as viewed in their rest frame. Meyer, Drury and Ellison have proposed that galactic cosmic rays originate from ions sputtered from such accelerated dust grains. We suggest that GEMS are surviving members of a population of fast grains that constitute the long-sought source material for galactic cosmic rays. Thus, representatives of the GCR source material may have been awaiting discovery in cosmic dust labs for the last thirty years.

  7. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Weng, S. M.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Chen, M.; Mulser, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zheng, X. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strong time-oscillating electric field accompanying the laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma.

  8. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  9. A new experimental system for irradiating tumors in mice using a linear accelerator under specific pathogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Inamura, K; Tahara, S; Kurabayashi, Y; Akagi, T; Asaumi, J; Togami, I; Takemoto, M; Honda, O; Morioka, Y; Kawasaki, S; Hiraki, Y

    1999-06-01

    We developed a reliable system for the irradiation of xenografted tumors in mice which allows for accurate local irradiation under specific pathogen-free conditions. The system presented here consists of acrylic supports for mice and an acrylic box connected to a pump through 0.22 microns pore-sized filters. Mice with xenotransplanted tumors growing on their right hind legs were set on the supports and put into the box in a laminar flow hood. The tumors of 7 mice were irradiated simultaneously with X-rays of 6 and 10 MV generated by a linear accelerator at a dose rate of 3.1-4.7 Gy/min. The air was ventilated through filters during irradiation in the closed box. Microorganism tests confirmed that no bacteria entered or left the box. One of the significant characteristics of this setup is that it allows for irradiation under conditions of acute hypoxia, which is obtained using an integrated tourniquet. The dose variation among 7 tumors was less than 1%. The rest of the mouse's body was shielded effectively by a half-field technique and a lead block. As a result, the whole body dose for the mice was 0-4% of the total dose absorbed by the tumor. Due to the high dose rate and the ability to irradiate 7 mice simultaneously under specific pathogen-free conditions, this new system can be considered a time-saving and valuable tool for radiation oncology research.

  10. LGR5 promotes the proliferation and tumor formation of cervical cancer cells through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Cao, Hao-Zhe; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a seven transmembrane receptor known as a potential stem cell marker for intestinal crypts and hair follicles, has recently been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of LGR5 in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, the expression of LGR5 gradually increases from normal cervix to cervical cancer in situ and to cervical cancers as revealed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses. Through knocking down or overexpressing LGR5 in SiHa and HeLa cells, the expression level of LGR5 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro and to tumor formation in vivo. Further investigation indicated that LGR5 protein could significantly promote the acceleration of cell cycle. Moreover, the TOP-Flash reporter assay and western blot for β-catenin, cyclinD1, and c-myc proteins, target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, indicated that LGR5 significantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Additionally, the blockage of Wnt/β-catenin pathway resulted in a significant inhibition of cell proliferation induced by LGR5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LGR5 can promote proliferation and tumor formation in cervical cancer cells by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25193857

  11. Accelerated thermokarst formation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph S.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.; Okal, Marianne; Marchant, David R.; Watters, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst is a land surface lowered and disrupted by melting ground ice. Thermokarst is a major driver of landscape change in the Arctic, but has been considered to be a minor process in Antarctica. Here, we use ground-based and airborne LiDAR coupled with timelapse imaging and meteorological data to show that 1) thermokarst formation has accelerated in Garwood Valley, Antarctica; 2) the rate of thermokarst erosion is presently ~ 10 times the average Holocene rate; and 3) the increased rate of thermokarst formation is driven most strongly by increasing insolation and sediment/albedo feedbacks. This suggests that sediment enhancement of insolation-driven melting may act similarly to expected increases in Antarctic air temperature (presently occurring along the Antarctic Peninsula), and may serve as a leading indicator of imminent landscape change in Antarctica that will generate thermokarst landforms similar to those in Arctic periglacial terrains. PMID:23881292

  12. Accelerated thermokarst formation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Levy, Joseph S; Fountain, Andrew G; Dickson, James L; Head, James W; Okal, Marianne; Marchant, David R; Watters, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst is a land surface lowered and disrupted by melting ground ice. Thermokarst is a major driver of landscape change in the Arctic, but has been considered to be a minor process in Antarctica. Here, we use ground-based and airborne LiDAR coupled with timelapse imaging and meteorological data to show that 1) thermokarst formation has accelerated in Garwood Valley, Antarctica; 2) the rate of thermokarst erosion is presently ~ 10 times the average Holocene rate; and 3) the increased rate of thermokarst formation is driven most strongly by increasing insolation and sediment/albedo feedbacks. This suggests that sediment enhancement of insolation-driven melting may act similarly to expected increases in Antarctic air temperature (presently occurring along the Antarctic Peninsula), and may serve as a leading indicator of imminent landscape change in Antarctica that will generate thermokarst landforms similar to those in Arctic periglacial terrains.

  13. LANDSAT-D accelerated payload correction subsystem output computer compatible tape format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The NASA GSFC LANDSAT-D Ground Segment (GS) is developing an Accelerated Payload Correction Subsystem (APCS) to provide Thematic Mapper (TM) image correction data to be used outside the GS. This correction data is computed from a subset of the TM Payload Correction Data (PCD), which is downlinked from the spacecraft in a 32 Kbps data stream, and mirror scan correction data (MSCD), which is extracted from the wideband video data. This correction data is generated in the GS Thematic Mapper Mission Management Facility (MMF-T), and is recorded on a 9-track 1600 bit per inch computer compatible tape (CCT). This CCT is known as a APCS Output CCT (AOT). The AOT follows standardized corrections with respect to data formats, record construction and record identification. Applicable documents are delineated; common conventions which are used in further defining the structure, format and content of the AOT are defined; and the structure and content of the AOT are described.

  14. Food-grade titanium dioxide exposure exacerbates tumor formation in colitis associated cancer model.

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Ortega, Ismael M; Garduño-Balderas, Luis G; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Flores-Flores, José O; González-Robles, Arturo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Terrazas, Luis I; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth worldwide cause of death and even if some dietary habits are consider risk factors, the contribution of food additives including foodgrade titanium dioxide (TiO2), designated as E171, has been poorly investigated. We hypothesized that oral E171 intake could have impact on the enhancement of colorectal tumor formation and we aimed to investigate if E171 administration could enhance tumor formation in a colitis associated cancer (CAC) model. BALB/c male mice were grouped as follows: a) control, b) E171, c) CAC and d) CAC + E171 group (n = 6). E171 used in this study formed agglomerates of 300 nm in water. E171 intragastric administration (5 mg/kg body weight/5 days/10 weeks) was unable to induce tumor formation but dysplastic alterations were observed in the distal colon but enhanced the tumor formation in distal colon (CAC + E171 group) measured by tumor progression markers. Some E171 particles were internalized in colonic cells of the E171 and CAC + E171 groups and both groups showed a decrease in goblet cells in the distal colon. However the CAC + E171 group showed a higher decrease of these cells that act as protection barrier in colon. These results suggest that E171 could worsen pre-existent intestinal diseases.

  15. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  16. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity.

  17. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-02-23

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development-a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  18. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development—a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  19. Evaluation of a Novel Thermal Accelerant for Augmentation of Microwave Energy during Image-guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Park, William Keun Chan; Maxwell, Aaron Wilhelm Palmer; Frank, Victoria Elizabeth; Primmer, Michael Patrick; Collins, Scott Andrew; Baird, Grayson Luderman; Dupuy, Damian Edward

    2017-01-01

    The primary challenge in thermal ablation of liver tumors (e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal cancer) is the relatively high recurrence rate (~30%) for which incomplete ablation at the periphery of the tumor is the most common reason. In an attempt to overcome this, we have developed a novel thermal accelerant (TA) agent capable of augmenting microwave energy from a distance normally unattainable by a single microwave ablation antenna. This cesium-based block co-polymer compound transforms from a liquid to a gel at body temperature and is intrinsically visible by computed tomography. Using an agarose phantom model, herein we demonstrate that both the rate and magnitude of temperature increase during microwave ablation were significantly greater in the presence of TA when compared with controls. These results suggest robust augmentation of microwave energy, and may translate into larger ablation zone volumes within biologic tissues. Further work using in vivo techniques is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:28382173

  20. Monoallelic Loss of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Tumor Formation in Irradiated Nf1+/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Huang, Brian; Braunstein, Steve; Firestone, Ari J.; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from only one parental allele and heterozygous loss involving the expressed allele is sufficient to produce complete loss of protein expression. Genetic alterations are common in tumorigenesis but the role of imprinted genes in this process is not well understood. In earlier work we mutagenized mice heterozygous for the Neurofibromatosis I tumor suppressor gene (NF1) to model radiotherapy-associated second malignant neoplasms that arise in irradiated NF1 patients. Expression analysis of tumor cell lines established from our mouse models identified Grb10 expression as widely absent. Grb10 is an imprinted gene and polymorphism analysis of cell lines and primary tumors demonstrates that the expressed allele is commonly lost in diverse Nf1 mutant tumors arising in our mouse models. We performed functional studies to test whether Grb10 restoration or loss alter fundamental features of the tumor growth. Restoring Grb10 in Nf1 mutant tumors decreases proliferation, decreases soft agar colony formation and downregulates Ras signaling. Conversely, Grb10 silencing in untransformed mouse embryo fibroblasts significantly increased cell proliferation and increased Ras-GTP levels. Expression of a constitutively activated MEK rescued tumor cells from Grb10-mediated reduction in colony formation. These studies reveal that Grb10 loss can occur during in vivo tumorigenesis, with a functional consequence in untransformed primary cells. In tumors, Grb10 loss independently promotes Ras pathway hyperactivation, which promotes hyperproliferation, an early feature of tumor development. In the context of a robust Nf1 mutant mouse model of cancer this work identifies a novel role for an imprinted gene in tumorigenesis. PMID:26000738

  1. Current sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-Frequency Assisted Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    The inductive formation of current sheets in a conical theta pinch FARAD (Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge) thruster is investigated experimentally with time-integrated photography. The goal is to help in understanding the mechanisms and conditions controlling the strength and extent of the current sheet, which are two indices important for FARAD as a propulsion concept. The profiles of these two indices along the inside walls of the conical acceleration coil are assumed to be related to the profiles of the strength and extent of the luminosity pattern derived from photographs of the discharge. The variations of these profiles as a function of uniform back-fill neutral pressure (with no background magnetic field and all parameters held constant) provided the first clues on the nature and qualitative dependencies of current sheet formation. It was found that there is an optimal pressure for which both indices reach a maximum and that the rate of change in these indices with pressure differs on either side of this optimal pressure. This allowed the inference that current sheet formation follows a Townsend-like breakdown mechanism modified by the existence of a finite pressure-dependent radio-frequency-generated electron density background. The observation that the effective location of the luminosity pattern favors the exit-half of the conical coil is explained as the result of the tendency of the inductive discharge circuit to operate near its minimal self-inductance. Movement of the peak in the luminosity pattern towards the upstream side of the cone with increasing pressure is believed to result from the need of the circuit to compensate for the increase in background plasma resistivity due to increasing pressure.

  2. Identification of vitronectin as an extrinsic inducer of cancer stem cell differentiation and tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Elaine M; Chan, King; Serrat, Maria Ana Duhagon; Thomas, Suneetha B; Veenstra, Timothy D; Farrar, William L

    2010-03-31

    There is mounting evidence that tumors are initiated by a rare subset of cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are generally quiescent, self-renew, form tumors at low numbers, and give rise to the heterogeneous cell types found within a tumor. CSCs isolated from multiple tumor types differentiate both in vivo and in vitro when cultured in serum, yet the factors responsible for their differentiation have not yet been identified. Here we show that vitronectin is the component of human serum driving stem cell differentiation through an integrin alpha V beta 3-dependent mechanism. CSCs cultured on vitronectin result in downregulation of stem cell genes, modulation of differentiation markers, and loss of beta-catenin nuclear localization. Blocking integrin alpha V beta 3 inhibits differentiation and subsequently tumor formation. Thus, CSCs must be engaged by one or more extracellular signals to differentiate and initiate tumor formation, defining a new axis for future novel therapies aimed at both the extrinsic and intracellular pathways.

  3. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal

  4. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Crane, R.; Anderson, D. J.; Bouzalakos, S.; Whelan, M.; McGeeney, D.; Rahman, P. F.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low-permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from coal and other strata, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and realistic vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) measurements of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can constrain and compliment larger-scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady-state fluid velocity through a low-K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g level) in a centrifuge permeameter (CP) unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. A CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum) with a capacity for sample dimensions up to 100 mm diameter and 200 mm length, and a total stress of ˜ 2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink-swell phenomena, which may alter the permeability. Kv results from CP testing of minimally disturbed cores from three sites within a clayey-silt formation varied from 10-10 to 10-7 m s-1 (number of samples, n = 18). Additional tests were focussed on the Cattle Lane (CL) site, where Kv within the 99 % confidence interval (n = 9) was 1.1 × 10-9 to 2.0 × 10-9 m s-1. These Kv results were very similar to an independent in situ Kv method based on pore pressure propagation though the sequence. However, there was less certainty at two other core sites due to limited and variable Kv data. Blind standard 1 g column tests underestimated Kv compared to CP and in situ Kv data, possibly due to deionised water interactions with clay, and were more time-consuming than CP tests. Our Kv results were compared with the set-up of a flow model for the region, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and

  5. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  6. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  7. Influence of solidification accelerators on structure formation of anhydrite-containing binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikanova, L.; Volkova, O.; Kudyakov, A.; Sarkisov, Y.; Tolstov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of scientific analysis of chemical additives influence on acid fluoride binder. It was found that the influence of sulfate nature additives on the process of hydration and solidification of the binder is similar to influence of additives on indissoluble anhydrite. Additives with SO42- anion NO- are more efficient. The mentioned additives according to accelerating effect belong to the following succession: K2SO4 > Na2SO4 > FeSO4 > MgSO4. Facilitation of the process of hydration and solidification of the binder, increase in density and durability of the binder (32 MPa) is to the greatest extent achieved with the introduction of 2% sodium sulfate additive of the binder's mass into the composition of the binder along with the ultrasonic treatment of water solution. Directed crystal formation process with healing of porous structure by new growths presented as calcium sulfate dehydrate and hydroglauberite provides positive effect.

  8. Zinc promotes clot stability by accelerating clot formation and modifying fibrin structure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sara J; Xia, Jing; Wu, Huayin; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, David A; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-03-01

    Zinc released from activated platelets binds fibrin(ogen) and attenuates fibrinolysis. Although zinc also affects clot formation, the mechanism and consequences are poorly understood. To address these gaps, the effect of zinc on clot formation and structure was examined in the absence or presence of factor (F) XIII. Zinc accelerated a) plasma clotting by 1.4-fold, b) fibrinogen clotting by 3.5- and 2.3-fold in the absence or presence of FXIII, respectively, c) fragment X clotting by 1.3-fold, and d) polymerisation of fibrin monomers generated with thrombin or batroxobin by 2.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively. Whereas absorbance increased up to 3.3-fold when fibrinogen was clotted in the presence of zinc, absorbance of fragment X clots was unaffected by zinc, consistent with reports that zinc binds to the αC-domain of fibrin(ogen). Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed a two-fold increase in fibre diameter in the presence of zinc and in permeability studies, zinc increased clot porosity by 30-fold with or without FXIII. Whereas FXIII increased clot stiffness from 128 ± 19 Pa to 415 ± 27 Pa in rheological analyses, zinc reduced clot stiffness by 10- and 8.5-fold in the absence and presence of FXIII, respectively. Clots formed in the presence of zinc were more stable and resisted rupture with or without FXIII. Therefore, zinc accelerates clotting and reduces fibrin clot stiffness in a FXIII-independent manner, suggesting that zinc may work in concert with FXIII to modulate clot strength and stability.

  9. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to not only increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation directly but also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOCs. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOAs in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global-scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions respectively from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold, resulting in 200-1000-fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global-scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10 % of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480 %) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45 %). Satellite observations indicated a 2-fold increase in aerosol optical depth over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  10. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-04-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from vegetation directly, but will also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOC. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOA in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions, respectively, from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold resulting in 200-1000 fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10% of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480%) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45%). Satellite observations indicated a two-fold increase in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  11. Formation of electrostatic structures by wakefield acceleration in ultrarelativistic plasma flows: Electron acceleration to cosmic ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M.E.; Shukla, P.K.; Eliasson, B.

    2006-06-15

    The ever increasing performance of supercomputers is now enabling kinetic simulations of extreme astrophysical and laser produced plasmas. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic shocks have revealed highly filamented spatial structures and their ability to accelerate particles to ultrarelativistic speeds. However, these PIC simulations have not yet revealed mechanisms that could produce particles with tera-electron volt energies and beyond. In this work, PIC simulations in one dimension (1D) of the foreshock region of an internal shock in a gamma ray burst are performed to address this issue. The large spatiotemporal range accessible to a 1D simulation enables the self-consistent evolution of proton phase space structures that can accelerate particles to giga-electron volt energies in the jet frame of reference, and to tens of tera-electron volt in the Earth's frame of reference. One potential source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays may thus be the thermalization of relativistically moving plasma.

  12. No role of IFITM3 in brain tumor formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ella L.; Bros, Matthias; Giese, Alf

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal solid tumors in adults. Despite aggressive treatment approaches for patients, GBM recurrence is inevitable, in part due to the existence of stem-like brain tumor-propagating cells (BTPCs), which produce factors rendering them resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Comparative transcriptome analysis of irradiated, patient-derived BTPCs revealed a significant upregulation of the interferon-inducible transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3), suggesting the protein as a factor mediating radio resistance. Previously, IFITM3 has been described to affect glioma cells; therefore, the role of IFITM3 in the formation and progression of brain tumors has been investigated in vivo. Intracranial implantation studies using radio-selected BTPCs alongside non-irradiated parental BTPCs in immunodeficient mice displayed no influence of irradiation on animal survival. Furthermore, gain and loss of function studies using BTPCs ectopically expressing IFITM3 or having IFITM3 down-modulated by a shRNA approach, did affect neither tumor growth nor animal survival. Additionally, a syngeneic model based on the mouse glioma cell line GL261 was applied in order to consider the possibility that IFITM3 relies on an intact immune system to unfold its tumorigenic potential. GL261 cells ectopically expressing IFITM3 were implanted into the striatum of immunocompetent mice without influencing the survival of glioma-bearing animals. Lastly, the vasculature and the extent of microglia/macrophage invasion into the tumor were studied in BTPC and GL261 tumors but neither parameter was altered by IFITM3. This report presents for the first time that IFITM3 is upregulated in patient-derived BTPCs upon irradiation but does not affect brain tumor formation or progression in vivo. PMID:27835870

  13. Disruption of protein kinase Ceta results in impairment of wound healing and enhancement of tumor formation in mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chida, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takeshi; Hirai, Takaaki; Konishi, Chieko; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Aiba, Atsu; Katsuki, Motoya; Kuroki, Toshio

    2003-05-15

    We have generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase C (PKC) eta to evaluate its significance in epithelial organization and tumor formation. The PKCeta-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. The tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCeta suppresses tumor promotion. Epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was prolonged in the mutant mice. The enhanced tumor formation may be closely associated with the prolonged hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment. In the mutant mice, after inflicting injury by punch biopsy, wound healing on the dorsal skin, particularly reepithelialization, was significantly delayed and impaired in structure. Impairment of epithelial regeneration in wound healing indicates a possibility that PKCeta plays a role in maintenance of epithelial architecture. Homeostasis in epithelial tissues mediated by PKCeta is important for tumor formation in vivo. We propose that PKCeta is involved in tumor formation modulated by regulation of proliferation and remodeling of epithelial cells in vivo.

  14. Carbon nanotubes with high bone-tissue compatibility and bone-formation acceleration effects.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Narita, Nobuyo; Murakami, Narumichi; Nakamura, Isao; Nakamura, Koichi; Ishigaki, Norio; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Taruta, Seiichi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Saito, Naoto

    2008-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used in various fields as composites with other substances or alone to develop highly functional materials. CNTs hold great interest with respect to biomaterials, particularly those to be positioned in contact with bone such as prostheses for arthroplasty, plates or screws for fracture fixation, drug delivery systems, and scaffolding for bone regeneration. Accordingly, bone-tissue compatibility of CNTs and CNT influence on bone formation are important issues, but the effects of CNTs on bone have not been delineated. Here, it is found that multi-walled CNTs adjoining bone induce little local inflammatory reaction, show high bone-tissue compatibility, permit bone repair, become integrated into new bone, and accelerate bone formation stimulated by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This study provides an initial investigational basis for CNTs in biomaterials that are used adjacent to bone, including uses to promote bone regeneration. These findings should encourage development of clinical treatment modalities involving CNTs.

  15. Biogenic polyamines capture CO2 and accelerate extracellular bacterial CaCO3 formation.

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, Ko; Yasumoto-Hirose, Mina; Yasumoto, Jun; Murata, Ryo; Sato, Shun-Ichi; Baba, Megumi; Mori-Yasumoto, Kanami; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Kusumi, Takenori; Watabe, Shugo

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria, including cyanobacteria, as well as some fungi, are known to deposit calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) extracellularly in calcium-containing artificial medium. Despite extensive investigation, the mechanisms involved in extracellular formation of CaCO(3) by bacteria have remained unclear. The ability of synthetic amines to remove carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from natural gas led us to examine the role of biogenic polyamines in CaCO(3) deposition by bacteria. Here, we demonstrated that biogenic polyamines such as putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were able to react with atmospheric CO(2) and the resultant carbamate anion was characterized by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Biogenic polyamines accelerated the formation of CaCO(3), and we artificially synthesized the dumbbell-shaped calcites, which had the same form as observed with bacterial CaCO3 precipitates, under nonbacterial conditions by using polyamines. The reaction rate of calcification increased with temperature with an optimum of around 40 °C. Our observation suggests a novel scheme for CO(2) dissipation that could be a potential tool in reducing atmospheric CO(2) levels and, therefore, global warming.

  16. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  17. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  18. Inhibition by alcohols of the localization of radioactive nitrosonornicotine in sites of tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, W.J.; Marlowe, C.

    1983-06-01

    Oral administration of ethanol, n-butanol, or t-butanol to mice 20 minutes before injection of carbon-14-labeled nitrosonornicotine inhibited the localization of radioactivity in bronchial and salivary duct epithelium and in the liver. Localization of radioactivity in the nasal epithelium and esophagus was not significantly reduced. These alcohols therefore may selectively inhibit tumor formation in three of the five sites where this carcinogen typically acts.

  19. Acceleration of Dominant Supermassive Black Hole Singularities Serving as the Catalyst of Dark Energy in the Formation of Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John

    2013-04-01

    Cosmological process analysis is used to develop the singularity acceleration hypothesis which is based on nine universe formation axioms. Singularity acceleration universe formation is a cyclic process analogous to a branching universe having the following seven phases reoccurring in each daughter universe: 1. A phase transition big bang that forms a new universe 2. Expansion of the new universe and its structure 3. Dispersion of its mass and increasing entropy 4. Isolation of its galaxy clusters and supercluster complexes beyond event horizons 5. Many separate consolidations of all forms of matter, forces, and energy within these supercluster complexes into dominant supermassive black hole gravitational singularities 6. The resulting acceleration of singularities warping space to the speed of light 7. The independent separation of each of these singularities from the universe causing a big bang phase transition and producing all forms of matter, forces, and energy in a new universe.

  20. Tumor-Specific Formation of Enzyme-Instructed Supramolecular Self-Assemblies as Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Jing; Hu, Hao; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Yan, Xuefeng; Tang, Yuxia; Jin, Albert; Song, Jibin; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Horkay, Ferenc; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the effort of developing various nanodelivery systems, most of them suffer from undesired high uptakes by the reticuloendothelial system, such as liver and spleen. Herein we develop an endogenous phosphatase-triggered coassembly strategy to form tumor-specific indocyanine green (ICG)-doped nanofibers (5) for cancer theranostics. Based on coordinated intermolecular interactions, 5 significantly altered near-infrared absorbance of ICG, which improves the critical photoacoustic and photothermal properties. The phosphatase-instructed coassembly process, as well as its theranostic capability, was successfully conducted at different levels ranging from in vitro, living cell, tissue mimic, to in vivo. Specifically, the tumor uptake of ICG was markedly increased to 15.05 ± 3.78%ID/g, which was 25-fold higher than that of free ICG (0.59 ± 0.24%ID/g) at 4 h after intravenous injection. The resulting ultrahigh T/N ratios (>15) clearly differentiated tumors from the surrounding normal tissue. Complete tumor elimination with high therapeutic accuracy has been successfully achieved upon laser irradiation (0.8 W/cm2, 5 min) within 24–48 h postinjection. As the first example, in vivo formation of tumor-specific ICG-doped nanofiber for PTT theranostics owns the immense potential for clinical translation of personalized nanomedicine with targeted drug delivery as well as for cancer theranostics. PMID:26301492

  1. The use of nanoimprinted scaffolds as 3D culture models to facilitate spontaneous tumor cell migration and well-regulated spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Waki, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kaori; Kakezuka, Anna; Kobayashi, Maki; Namiki, Hideo; Kuroda, Yusei; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Takako; Asai, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Gelovani, Juri G; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures are essential for drug development and tumor research. However, the limitations of 2D cultures are widely recognized, and a better technique is needed. Recent studies have indicated that a strong physical contact between cells and 2D substrates induces cellular characteristics that differ from those of tumors growing in vivo. 3D cell cultures using various substrates are then developing; nevertheless, conventional approaches have failed in maintenance of cellular proliferation and viability, uniformity, reproducibility, and/or simplicity of these assays. Here, we developed a 3D culture system with inorganic nanoscale scaffolding using nanoimprinting technology (nano-culture plates), which reproduced the characteristics of tumor cells growing in vivo. Diminished cell-to-substrate physical contact facilitated spontaneous tumor cell migration, intercellular adhesion, and multi-cellular 3D-spheroid formation while maintaining cellular proliferation and viability. The resulting multi-cellular spheroids formed hypoxic core regions similar to tumors growing in vivo. This technology allows creating uniform and highly-reproducible 3D cultures, which is easily applicable for microscopic and spectrophotometric assays, which can be used for high-throughput/high-content screening of anticancer drugs and should accelerate discovery of more effective anticancer therapies.

  2. Ghrelin accelerates synapse formation and activity development in cultured cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While ghrelin was initially related to appetite stimulation and growth hormone secretion, it also has a neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases and regulates cognitive function. The cellular basis of those processes is related to synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin not only stimulates synapse formation in cultured cortical neurons and hippocampal slices, but also alters some of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the hypothalamus, amygdala and other subcortical areas. However, direct evidence for ghrelin’s ability to modulate the activity in cortical neurons is not available yet. In this study, we investigated the effect of acylated ghrelin on the development of the activity level and activity patterns in cortical neurons, in relation to its effect on synaptogenesis. Additionally, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of the receptor for acylated ghrelin – growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a) during development. Results We performed electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry on dissociated cortical cultures from neonates, treated chronically with acylated ghrelin. On average 76 ± 4.6% of the cortical neurons expressed GHSR-1a. Synapse density was found to be much higher in ghrelin treated cultures than in controls across all age groups (1, 2 or 3 weeks). In all cultures (control and ghrelin treated), network activity gradually increased until it reached a maximum after approximately 3 weeks, followed by a slight decrease towards a plateau. During early developmental stages (1–2 weeks), the activity was much higher in ghrelin treated cultures and consequently, they reached the plateau value almost a week earlier than controls. Conclusions Acylated ghrelin leads to earlier network formation and activation in cultured cortical neuronal networks, the latter being a possibly consequence of accelerated synaptogenesis. PMID:24742241

  3. Influence of solidification accelerators on structure formation of anhydrite-containing binders

    SciTech Connect

    Anikanova, L. Volkova, O. Kudyakov, A.; Sarkisov, Y.; Tolstov, D.

    2016-01-15

    The article presents results of scientific analysis of chemical additives influence on acid fluoride binder. It was found that the influence of sulfate nature additives on the process of hydration and solidification of the binder is similar to influence of additives on indissoluble anhydrite. Additives with SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anion NO{sup −} are more efficient. The mentioned additives according to accelerating effect belong to the following succession: K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} > Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} > FeSO{sub 4} > MgSO{sub 4}. Facilitation of the process of hydration and solidification of the binder, increase in density and durability of the binder (32 MPa) is to the greatest extent achieved with the introduction of 2% sodium sulfate additive of the binder’s mass into the composition of the binder along with the ultrasonic treatment of water solution. Directed crystal formation process with healing of porous structure by new growths presented as calcium sulfate dehydrate and hydroglauberite provides positive effect.

  4. Caveolin-1 and accelerated host aging in the breast tumor microenvironment: chemoprevention with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and anti-aging drug.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1(+/+) versus Cav-1(-/-) age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1-deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues).

  5. Macrophage-dependent tumor cell transendothelial migration is mediated by Notch1/MenaINV-initiated invadopodium formation

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Gandhi, Saumil J.; Wang, Yarong; Chen, Xiaoming; Eddy, Robert J.; Xue, Alice; Singer, Robert H.; Hodgson, Louis; Oktay, Maja H.; Condeelis, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The process of intravasation involving transendothelial migration is a key step in metastatic spread. How the triple cell complex composed of a macrophage, Mena over-expressing tumor cell and endothelial cell, called the tumor microenvironment of metastasis (TMEM), facilitates tumor cell transendothelial migration is not completely understood. Previous work has shown that the physical contact between a macrophage and tumor cell results in the formation of invadopodia, actin-rich matrix degrading protrusions, important for tumor cell invasion and transendothelial migration and tumor cell dissemination. Herein, we show that the macrophage-induced invadopodium is formed through a Notch1/MenaINV signaling pathway in the tumor cell upon macrophage contact. This heterotypic tumor cell – macrophage interaction results in the upregulation of MenaINV through the activation of MENA transcription. Notch1 and MenaINV expression are required for tumor cell transendothelial migration, a necessary step during intravasation. Inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway blocked macrophage-induced invadopodium formation in vitro and the dissemination of tumor cells from the primary tumor in vivo. Our findings indicate a novel role for Notch1 signaling in the regulation of MenaINV expression and transendothelial migration and provide mechanistic information essential to the use of therapeutic inhibitors of metastasis. PMID:27901093

  6. [Formation of optimum dose fields in contact radiation therapy of malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Klepper, L Ia

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the homogeneity of a dose field in the contact radiation therapy for malignant tumors is introduced. The mathematical interpretation of problems in the formation of optimum dose fields, to which the maximum homogeneity of a dose field at the site of lesion corresponds, is presented. It is shown that the problems in the formation of optimum dose fields may be divided into two subsets in relation to whether the sources of radiation are located at the site of lesion or adjacent to the latter (application techniques of radiation). An analytical method for solving a problem in the formation of an optimal dose field in the ring circle by means of one ring source of radiation (the first type of problems). The investigation was conducted with the support of the Russian Fund of Fundamental Investigations (RFFI 01-01-00137).

  7. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio; Harada, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2014-05-01

    Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H2 atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H+ with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air.

  8. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  9. Boric Acid Reduces the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Accelerates Wound Healing Process.

    PubMed

    Tepedelen, Burcu Erbaykent; Soya, Elif; Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Boron is absorbed by the digestive and respiratory system, and it was considered that it is converted to boric acid (BA), which was distributed to all tissues above 90 %. The biochemical essentiality of boron element is caused by boric acid because it affects the activity of several enzymes involved in the metabolism. DNA damage repair mechanisms and oxidative stress regulation is quite important in the transition stage from normal to cancerous cells; thus, this study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of boric acid on DNA damage and wound healing in human epithelial cell line. For this purpose, the amount of DNA damage occurred with irinotecan (CPT-11), etoposide (ETP), doxorubicin (Doxo), and H2O2 was determined by immunofluorescence through phosphorylation of H2AX((Ser139)) and pATM((Ser1981)) in the absence and presence of BA. Moreover, the effect of BA on wound healing has been investigated in epithelial cells treated with these agents. Our results demonstrated that H2AX((Ser139)) foci numbers were significantly decreased in the presence of BA while wound healing was accelerated by BA compared to that in the control and only drug-treated cells. Eventually, the results indicate that BA reduced the formation of DNA double strand breaks caused by agents as well as improving the wound healing process. Therefore, we suggest that boric acid has important therapeutical effectiveness and may be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases where oxidative stress and wound healing process plays an important role.

  10. Blockage of neddylation modification stimulates tumor sphere formation in vitro and stem cell differentiation and wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaochen; Tan, Mingjia; Nyati, Mukesh K; Zhao, Yongchao; Wang, Gongxian; Sun, Yi

    2016-05-24

    MLN4924, also known as pevonedistat, is the first-in-class inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme, which blocks the entire neddylation modification of proteins. Previous preclinical studies and current clinical trials have been exclusively focused on its anticancer property. Unexpectedly, we show here, to our knowledge for the first time, that MLN4924, when applied at nanomolar concentrations, significantly stimulates in vitro tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis and differentiation of human cancer cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. These stimulatory effects are attributable to (i) c-MYC accumulation via blocking its degradation and (ii) continued activation of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and its downstream pathways, including PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK, via inducing EGFR dimerization. Finally, MLN4924 accelerates EGF-mediated skin wound healing in mouse and stimulates cell migration in an in vitro culture setting. Taking these data together, our study reveals that neddylation modification could regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation and that a low dose of MLN4924 might have a therapeutic value for stem cell therapy and tissue regeneration.

  11. Blockage of neddylation modification stimulates tumor sphere formation in vitro and stem cell differentiation and wound healing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaochen; Tan, Mingjia; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Zhao, Yongchao; Wang, Gongxian; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MLN4924, also known as pevonedistat, is the first-in-class inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme, which blocks the entire neddylation modification of proteins. Previous preclinical studies and current clinical trials have been exclusively focused on its anticancer property. Unexpectedly, we show here, to our knowledge for the first time, that MLN4924, when applied at nanomolar concentrations, significantly stimulates in vitro tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis and differentiation of human cancer cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. These stimulatory effects are attributable to (i) c-MYC accumulation via blocking its degradation and (ii) continued activation of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and its downstream pathways, including PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK, via inducing EGFR dimerization. Finally, MLN4924 accelerates EGF-mediated skin wound healing in mouse and stimulates cell migration in an in vitro culture setting. Taking these data together, our study reveals that neddylation modification could regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation and that a low dose of MLN4924 might have a therapeutic value for stem cell therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:27162365

  12. Evaluation of accelerated UV and thermal testing for benzene formation in beverages containing benzoate and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Patricia J; Wamer, Wayne G; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W; Perfetti, Gracia A

    2010-04-01

    Under certain conditions, benzene can form in beverages containing benzoic and ascorbic acids. The American Beverage Assn. (ABA) has published guidelines to help manufacturers mitigate benzene formation in beverages. These guidelines recommend accelerated testing conditions to test product formulations, because exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light and elevated temperature over the shelf life of the beverage may result in benzene formation in products containing benzoic and ascorbic acids. In this study, the effects of UVA exposure on benzene formation were determined. Benzene formation was examined for samples contained in UV stabilized and non-UV stabilized packaging. Additionally, the usefulness of accelerated thermal testing to simulate end of shelf-life benzene formation was evaluated for samples containing either benzoic or ascorbic acid, or both. The 24 h studies showed that under intense UVA light benzene levels increased by as much as 53% in model solutions stored in non-UV stabilized bottles, whereas the use of UV stabilized polyethylene terephthalate bottles reduced benzene formation by about 13% relative to the non-UV stabilized bottles. Similar trends were observed for the 7 d study. Retail beverages and positive and negative controls were used to study the accelerated thermal testing conditions. The amount of benzene found in the positive controls and cranberry juice suggests that testing at 40 degrees C for 14 d may more reliably simulate end of shelf-life benzene formation in beverages. Except for cranberry juice, retail beverages were not found to contain detectable amounts of benzene (<0.05 ng/g) at the end of their shelf lives.

  13. Leukemia-associated NOTCH1 alleles are weak tumor initiators but accelerate K-ras–initiated leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Mark Y.; Xu, Lanwei; Shestova, Olga; Histen, Gavin; L’Heureux, Sarah; Romany, Candice; Childs, M. Eden; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Aster, Jon C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations are found in 50%–70% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) cases. Gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiate strong downstream signals induce leukemia in mice, but it is unknown whether the gain-of-function NOTCH1 mutations most commonly found in individuals with T-ALL generate downstream signals of sufficient strength to induce leukemia. We addressed this question by expressing human gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles of varying strength in mouse hematopoietic precursors. Uncommon gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles that initiated strong downstream signals drove ectopic T cell development and induced leukemia efficiently. In contrast, although gain-of-function alleles that initiated only weak downstream signals also induced ectopic T cell development, these more common alleles failed to efficiently initiate leukemia development. However, weak gain-of-function NOTCH1 alleles accelerated the onset of leukemia initiated by constitutively active K-ras and gave rise to tumors that were sensitive to Notch signaling pathway inhibition. These data show that induction of leukemia requires doses of Notch1 greater than those needed for T cell development and that most NOTCH1 mutations found in T-ALL cells do not generate signals of sufficient strength to initiate leukemia development. Furthermore, low, nonleukemogenic levels of Notch1 can complement other leukemogenic events, such as activation of K-ras. Even when Notch1 participates secondarily, the resulting tumors show “addiction” to Notch, providing a further rationale for evaluating Notch signaling pathway inhibitors in leukemia. PMID:18677410

  14. 17AAG Treatment Accelerates Doxorubicin Induced Cellular Senescence: Hsp90 Interferes with Enforced Senescence of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Upasana; Paithankar, Khande Rao; Kumar, Jonnala Ujwal; Subramaniam, Vaidyanathan; Sreedhar, Amere Subbarao

    2012-01-01

    Hsp90 chaperone has been identified as an attractive pharmacological target to combat cancer. However, some metastatic tumors either fail to respond to Hsp90 inhibition or show recovery necessitating irreversible therapeutic strategies. In response to this enforced senescence has been proposed as an alternate strategy. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting Hsp90 with 17AAG sensitizes human neuroblastoma to DNA damage response mediated cellular senescence. Among individual and combination drug treatments, 17AAG pre-treatment followed by doxorubicin treatment exhibited senescence-like characteristics such as increased nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, cell cycle arrest, SA-β-gal staining and the perpetual increase in SAHF. Doxorubicin induced senescence signaling was mediated by p53-p21CIP/WAF-1 and was accelerated in the absence of functional Hsp90. Sustained p16INK4a and H3K4me3 expressions correlating with unaffected telomerase activation annulled replicative senescence and appraised stress induced senescence. Despite increases in [(ROS)i] and [(Ca2+)i], a concomitant increase in cellular antioxidant defense system suggested oxidation independent senescence activation. Sustained activation of survival (Akt) and proliferative (ERK1/2) kinases fosters robustness of cells. Invigorating senescent cells with growth factor or snooping with mTOR or PI3 kinase inhibitors compromised cell survival but not senescence. Intriguingly, senescence-associated secretory factors from the senescence cells manifested established senescence in neuroblastoma, which offers clinical advantage to our approach. Our study discusses tumor selective functions of Hsp90 and discusses irrefutable strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in anticancer treatments. PMID:22915839

  15. The formation of kappa-distribution accelerated electron populations in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Stackhouse, Duncan J.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon E-mail: d.stackhouse.1@research.gla.ac.uk E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-12-01

    Driven by recent RHESSI observations of confined loop-top hard X-ray sources in solar flares, we consider stochastic acceleration of electrons in the presence of Coulomb collisions. If electron escape from the acceleration region can be neglected, the electron distribution function is determined by a balance between diffusive acceleration and collisions. Such a scenario admits a stationary solution for the electron distribution function that takes the form of a kappa distribution. We show that the evolution toward this kappa distribution involves a 'wave front' propagating forward in velocity space, so that electrons of higher energy are accelerated later; the acceleration timescales with energy according to τ{sub acc} ∼ E {sup 3/2}. At sufficiently high energies escape from the finite-length acceleration region will eventually dominate. For such energies, the electron velocity distribution function is obtained by solving a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation in the 'leaky-box' approximation. Solutions are obtained in the limit of a small escape rate from an acceleration region that can effectively be considered a thick target.

  16. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2006-05-02

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  17. One-Dimensional Shock Wave Formation by an Accelerating Piston. Ph.D. Thesis - Ohio State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of a shock wave by a solid accelerating piston was studied. A theoretical solution using the method of characteristics for a perfect gas showed that a complex wave system exists, and that the compressed gas can have large gradients in temperature, density and entropy. Experiments were performed with a piston tube where piston speed, shock speed and pressure were measured. The comparison of theory and experiment was good.

  18. alpha-Lactalbumin species variation, HAMLET formation, and tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Jenny; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2006-06-23

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of apo alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, formed in casein after low pH treatment of human milk. This study examined if HAMLET-like complexes are present in casein from different species and if isolated alpha-lactalbumin from those species can form such complexes with oleic acid. Casein from human, bovine, equine, and porcine milk was separated by ion exchange chromatography and active complexes were only found in human casein. This was not explained by alpha-lactalbumin sequence variation, as purified bovine, equine, porcine, and caprine alpha-lactalbumins formed complexes with oleic acid with biological activity similar to HAMLET. We conclude that structural variation of alpha-lactalbumins does not preclude the formation of HAMLET-like complexes and that natural HAMLET formation in casein was unique to human milk, which also showed the highest oleic acid content.

  19. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  20. A Novel Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-3 Activator (Alda-89) Protects Submandibular Gland Function from Irradiation without Accelerating Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin; Chen, Che-Hong; Kong, Christina S.; Ali, Rehan; Chan, Cato; Sirjani, Davud; Graves, Edward; Koong, Albert; Giaccia, Amato; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of Alda-89 (an ALDH3 activitor) on (1) the function of irradiated (RT) submandibular gland (SMG) in mice, (2) its toxicity profile and (3) its effect on the growth of head and neck cancer (HNC) in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design Adult mice were infused with Alda-89 or vehicle before, during and after RT. Saliva secretion was monitored weekly. Hematology, metabolic profile and post-mortem evaluation for toxicity were examined at the time of sacrifice. Alda-89 or vehicle was applied to HNC cell lines in vitro, and SCID mice transplanted with HNC in vivo with or without radiation; HNC growth was monitored. The ALDH3A1 and ALDH3A2 protein expression was evaluated in 89 HNC patients and correlated to freedom from relapse (FFR) and overall survival (OS). Results Alda-89 infusion significantly resulted in more whole saliva production and a higher percentage of preserved acini after RT compared to vehicle control. There was no difference in the complete blood count, metabolic profile, and major organ morphology between the Alda-89 and vehicle groups. Compared to vehicle control, Alda-89 treatment did not accelerate HNC cell proliferation in vitro, nor did it affect tumor growth in vivo with or without RT. Higher expression of ALDH3A1 or ALDH3A2 was not significantly associated with worse FFR or OS in either HPV-positive or HPV-negative group. Conclusion Alda-89 preserves salivary function after RT without affecting HNC growth or causing measurable toxicity in mice. It is a promising candidate to mitigate RT-related xerostomia. PMID:23812668

  1. The tumor suppressor PTEN and the PDK1 kinase regulate formation of the columnar neural epithelium.

    PubMed

    Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Castel, Pau; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Baselga, José; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2016-01-26

    Epithelial morphogenesis and stability are essential for normal development and organ homeostasis. The mouse neural plate is a cuboidal epithelium that remodels into a columnar pseudostratified epithelium over the course of 24 hr. Here we show that the transition to a columnar epithelium fails in mutant embryos that lack the tumor suppressor PTEN, although proliferation, patterning and apical-basal polarity markers are normal in the mutants. The Pten phenotype is mimicked by constitutive activation of PI3 kinase and is rescued by the removal of PDK1 (PDPK1), but does not depend on the downstream kinases AKT and mTORC1. High resolution imaging shows that PTEN is required for stabilization of planar cell packing in the neural plate and for the formation of stable apical-basal microtubule arrays. The data suggest that appropriate levels of membrane-associated PDPK1 are required for stabilization of apical junctions, which promotes cell elongation, during epithelial morphogenesis.

  2. Tumor-environment biomimetics delay peritoneal metastasis formation by deceiving and redirecting disseminated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlieghere, Elly; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; Mariën, Lore; Jones, Christopher J; De Craene, Bram; Berx, Geert; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Remon, Jean-Paul; Ceelen, Wim; Demetter, Pieter; Bracke, Marc; De Geest, Bruno G; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is life threatening and is the result of an extensive communication between disseminated cancer cells, mesothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). CAFs secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins creating a receptive environment for peritoneal implantation. Considering cancer as an ecosystem may provide opportunities to exploit CAFs to create biomimetic traps to deceive and redirect cancer cells. We have designed microparticles (MP) containing a CAF-derived ECM-surface that is intended to compete with natural niches. CAFs were encapsulated in alginate/gelatine beads (500-750 μm in diameter) functionalised with a polyelectrolyte coating (MP[CAF]). The encapsulated CAFs remain viable and metabolically active (≥35 days), when permanently encapsulated. CAF-derived ECM proteins are retained by the non-biodegradable coating. Adhesion experiments mimicking the environment of the peritoneal cavity show the selective capture of floating cancer cells from different tumor origins by MP[CAF] compared to control MP. MP[CAF] are distributed throughout the abdominal cavity without attachment to intestinal organs and without signs of inflammatory reaction. Intraperitoneal delivery of MP[CAF] and sequential removal redirects cancer cell adhesion from the surgical wound to the MP[CAF], delays peritoneal metastasis formation and prolongs animal survival. Our experiments suggest the use of a biomimetic trap based on tumor-environment interactions to delay peritoneal metastasis.

  3. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  4. Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a pulsed plasma thruster and has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approximately 50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet structure has been photographed with 10 ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure. Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma transit at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  5. Chemotherapy enhances tumor vascularization via Notch signaling-mediated formation of tumor-derived endothelium in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; He, Dongxu; Chen, Zhen; Pan, Qiongxi; Du, Fangfang; Zang, Xian; Wang, Yan; Tang, Chunlei; Li, Hong; Lu, He; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Jin, Jian; Ma, Xin

    2016-10-15

    It is believed that tumor cells can give rise to endothelial cells and tumor endothelium has a neoplastic origin. Yet, the stimuli and underlying mechanism remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that adriamycin or paclitaxel, first-line chemotherapy agent, induced breast cancer cells to generate morphological, phenotypical and functional features of endothelial cells in vitro. In xenografts models, challenges from adriamycin or paclitaxel induced cancer cells to generate the majority of microvessels. Importantly, in breast cancer specimens from patients with neoadjuvant anthracycline-based or taxane-based chemotherapy, tumor-derived endothelial microvessels, lined by EGFR-amplified or/and TP53(+)-CD31(+) endothelial cells, was significantly higher in patients with progressive or stable disease (PD/SD) than in those with a partial or complete response (PR/CR). Further, exposure to the Notch signaling inhibitor and gene silencing studies showed that Notch signaling inhibition or silencing Nothc4/Dll3 decreased endothelial markers and function of tumor-derived endothelial cells under chemotherapy treatment, which may be through VEGFR3. Thus, our findings demonstrate that chemotherapy induces functional tumor-derived endothelial microvessels by mediating Notch signaling and VEGF signaling, and may provide new targets for anti-angiogenesis therapy in breast cancer.

  6. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated

  7. Soy isoflavone exposure through all life stages accelerates 17β-estradiol-induced mammary tumor onset and growth, yet reduces tumor burden, in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Möller, Frank Josef; Pemp, Daniela; Soukup, Sebastian T; Wende, Kathleen; Zhang, Xiajie; Zierau, Oliver; Muders, Michael H; Bosland, Maarten C; Kulling, Sabine E; Lehmann, Leane; Vollmer, Günter

    2016-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether the intake of soy-derived isoflavones (sISO) mediates beneficial or adverse effects with regard to breast cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated whether nutritional exposure to a sISO-enriched diet from conception until adulthood impacts on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced carcinogenesis in the rat mammary gland (MG). August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats were exposed to dietary sISO from conception until postnatal day 285. Silastic tubes containing E2 were used to induce MG tumorigenesis. Body weight, food intake, and tumor growth were recorded weekly. At necropsy, the number, position, size, and weight of each tumor were determined. Plasma samples underwent sISO analysis, and the morphology of MG was analyzed. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were reduced by 20 and 56 %, respectively, in the sISO-exposed rats compared to the control rats. Time-to-tumor onset was shortened from 25 to 20 weeks, and larger tumors developed in the sISO-exposed rats. The histological phenotype of the MG tumors was independent of the sISO diet received, and it included both comedo and cribriform phenotypes. Morphological analyses of the whole-mounted MGs also showed no diet-dependent differences. Lifelong exposure to sISO reduced the overall incidence of MG carcinomas in ACI rats, although the time-to-tumor was significantly shortened.

  8. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.

    2010-02-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  9. Dosimetric characterization of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery of large or complex brain tumors versus linear accelerator-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Braunstein, Steve; Theodosopoulos, Philip; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Ma, Lijun

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Noninvasive Gamma Knife (GK) platforms, such as the relocatable frame and on-board imaging, have enabled hypofractionated GK radiosurgery of large or complex brain lesions. This study aimed to characterize the dosimetric quality of such treatments against linear accelerator-based delivery systems that include the CyberKnife (CK) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). METHODS Ten patients treated with VMAT at the authors' institution for large brain tumors (> 3 cm in maximum diameter) were selected for the study. The median prescription dose was 25 Gy (range 20-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 9.57 cm(3) (range 1.94-24.81 cm(3)). Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse External Beam Planning V11 for VMAT on the Varian TrueBeam system, Multiplan V4.5 for the CyberKnife VSI System, and Leksell GammaPlan V10.2 for the Gamma Knife Perfexion system. The percentage of the PTV receiving at least the prescription dose was normalized to be identical across all platforms for individual cases. The prescription isodose value for the PTV, conformity index, Paddick gradient index, mean and maximum doses for organs at risk, and normal brain dose at variable isodose volumes ranging from the 5-Gy isodose volume (V5) to the 15-Gy isodose volume (V15) were compared for all of the cases. RESULTS The mean Paddick gradient index was 2.6 ± 0.2, 3.2 ± 0.5, and 4.3 ± 1.0 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p < 0.002). The mean V15 was 7.5 ± 3.7 cm(3) (range 1.53-13.29 cm(3)), 9.8 ± 5.5 cm(3) (range 2.07-18.45 cm(3)), and 16.1 ± 10.6 cm(3) (range 3.58-36.53 cm(3)) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p ≤ 0.03, paired 2-tailed t-tests). However, the average conformity index was 1.18, 1.12, and 1.21 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p > 0.06). The average prescription isodose values were 52% (range 47%-69%), 60% (range 46%-68%), and 88% (range 70%-94%) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively, thus producing significant variations in

  10. Accelerated Plaque Formation by Fowlpox Virus in the Presence of Chymotrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Asch, Bonnie B.; Gifford, George E.

    1969-01-01

    Chymotrypsin enhanced fowlpox virus plaque formation in chick embryo cell cultures. A simplified plaque assay for fowlpox virus is described. Plaques were produced in 3 days when chymotrypsin was included in a serum-free fluid overlay. Plaques were also produced in 5 to 6 days under an agar overlay when a medium containing fetal calf serum was employed. Kinetics of plaque formation were also studied, and it was shown that fowlpox virus plaque diameters grow at a linear rate. Images PMID:4905607

  11. Expression of wilms' tumor gene and protein localization during ovarian formation and follicular development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Logan, Kathleen A; McNatty, Kenneth P; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2003-02-01

    Wilms' tumor protein (WT1) is a transcriptional repressor essential for the development of mammalian kidneys and gonads. To gain insight into possible roles of WT1 in ovarian formation and follicular function, we studied patterns of mRNA and protein localization throughout fetal gonadal development and in ovaries of 4-wk-old and adult sheep. At Day 24 after conception, strong expression of WT1 mRNA and protein was observed in the coelomic epithelial region of the mesonephros where the gonad was forming. By Day 30, expression was observed in the surface epithelium and in many mesenchymal and endothelial cells of the gonad. Epithelial cells continued to express WT1 throughout gonadal development, as did pregranulosa cells during the process of follicular formation. However, WT1 expression was not observed in germ cells. During follicular growth, granulosa cells expressed WT1 from the type 1 (primordial) to the type 4 stages, but thereafter expression was reduced in type 5 (antral) follicles, consistent with the differentiation of granulosa cells into steroid-producing cells. The possible progenitor cells for the theca interna (i.e., the cell streams in the ovarian interstitium) expressed WT1 heterogeneously. However, differentiated theca cells in antral follicles did not express WT1. Strong expression of WT1 was observed during gonadal development, which is consistent with a role for WT1 in ovarian and follicular formation in the ewe. WT1 was identified in many cells of the neonatal and adult ovaries, including granulosa cells, suggesting that this factor is important for preantral follicular growth. However, the decline in WT1 expression in antral follicles suggests that WT1 may prevent premature differentiation of somatic cells of the follicle during early follicular growth.

  12. Corticotropin releasing factor stimulates cAMP formation in pituitary corticotropic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, M.; Cantalamessa, L.; Catania, A.; Reschini, E.; Mueller, E.E.

    1984-01-23

    Addition of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) to membranes from two ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors strikingly increased in a dose-dependent fashion adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Stimulation of AC activity by CRF in membranes from non-tumoral tissue adjacent to tumoral corticotrophs was considerably lower, and was lacking in membranes from a growth hormone secreting tumor. These data correlated well with in vivo pre-surgery and post-surgery ACTH responsiveness to CRF of the tumor bearing patients. Basal AC activity was higher in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral adjacent tissue.

  13. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 accelerates mushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Vos, Aurin M; Scholtmeijer, Karin; Hendrix, Ed; Baars, Johan J P; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Lugones, Luis G; Wösten, Han A B

    2016-08-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button mushroom forming basidiomycete using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphology, cap expansion rate, and total number and biomass of mushrooms were not affected by over-expression of c2h2. However, yield per day of the c2h2 over-expression strains peaked 1 day earlier. These data and expression analysis indicate that C2H2 impacts timing of mushroom formation at an early stage of development, making its encoding gene a target for breeding of commercial mushroom strains.

  14. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with fibroblast growth factor accelerate proliferation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells and bone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Venturelli, Enrica; Takita, Hiroko; Watari, Fumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2013-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were functionalized with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and the advantages of their use as scaffolds for bone augmentation were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The activity of FGF was assessed by measuring the effect on the proliferation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (RBMSCs). The presence of FGF enhanced the proliferation of RBMSCs and the FGF covalently conjugated to the nanotubes (FGF-CNT) showed the same effect as FGF alone. In addition, FGF-CNT coated sponges were implanted between the parietal bone and the periosteum of rats and the formation of new bone was investigated. At day 14 after implantation, a larger amount of newly formed bone was clearly observed in most pores of FGF-CNT coated sponges. These findings indicated that MWCNTs accelerated new bone formation in response to FGF, as well as the integration of particles into new bone during its formation. Scaffolds coated with FGF-CNT could be considered as promising novel substituting materials for bone regeneration in future tissue engineering applications.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H.; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-α (p < 0.005) and accomplished by MMPs (p < 0.005). Levels of the collagenases MMP-8 and MMP-13 were insignificant and neither MMP-2 nor MMP-14 were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-α increased secretion of MMP-1 (p < 0.01) but had no impact on MMP-1 quantities in the tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed similar tissue MMP-1 expression with or without TNF-α with epidermis being the major source of MMP-1. Increased tissue-derived collagenolytic activity with TNF-α exposure was blocked by neutralizing MMP-1 monoclonal antibody and was not due to down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. TNF-α increased production (p < 0.01), tissue levels (p < 0.005) and catalytic activity of the endogenous MMP-1 activator MMP-3. Type I collagen degradation correlated with MMP-3 tissue levels (rs = 0.68, p < 0.05) and was attenuated with selective MMP-3 inhibitor. Type I collagen formation was down-regulated in cultured compared with native skin explants but was not reduced further by TNF-α. TNF-α had no significant effect on epidermal apoptosis. Our data indicate that TNF-α augments collagenolytic activity of MMP-1, possibly through up-regulation of MMP-3 leading to gradual loss of type I collagen in human skin. PMID:25457675

  16. Sterol and triterpene derivatives from plants inhibit the effects of a tumor promoter, and sitosterol and betulinic acid inhibit tumor formation in mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, K; Takido, M; Matsumoto, T; Takeuchi, M; Nakagawa, S

    1991-01-01

    A single topical application of 1 microgram of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) to the ears of mice was shown to induce edema, and this TPA-induced inflammation was inhibited by 4-methylsterol and triterpene derivatives. The ED50 of these compounds against TPA-induced inflammation was 0.1-3 mumol. Phytosterols had only slight inhibitory effects. Furthermore, application of 5 micrograms TPA to mouse skin rapidly caused accumulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Similarly, sitosterol and lupane-type triterpene derivatives markedly inhibited this TPA-induced ODC accumulation. In addition, 5 mumol betulinic acid markedly inhibited the promoting effect of 2.5 micrograms TPA applied twice weekly on skin tumor formation in mice initiated with 50 micrograms of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 5 mumol of sitosterol caused slight suppression. Thus, the inhibitory effects of sterol and triterpene derivatives on TPA-induced inflammation roughly parallelled their inhibitory activities against tumor promotion.

  17. Beta-glycerophosphate accelerates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Noh, A Long Sae Mi; Yim, Mijung

    2011-03-01

    Despite numerous reports of the synergistic effects of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid in inducing the differentiation of osteoblasts, little is known about their roles in osteoclastic differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of beta-glycerophosphate on osteoclastogenesis in the presence of ascorbic acid using primary mouse bone marrow cultures treated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Beta-Glycerophosphate dose-dependently increased RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid. This stimulatory effect was apparent when beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid were only added during the late stages of the culture period, indicating that they influence later events in osteoclastic differentiation. While the combination of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid inhibited RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK and p38, and degradation of IkappaB, it increased the induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. In addition, beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid together enhanced the induction of COX-2 following RANKL stimulation. Taken together, our data suggest that beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid have synergistic effects on osteoclast formation, increasing RANKL-mediated induction of c-Fos, NFATc1 and COX-2 in osteoclast precursors.

  18. Acceleration of raindrop formation due to the tangling-clustering instability in a turbulent stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Krasovitov, B.; Kulmala, M.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-07-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50- to 100 -μ m droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 min. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation." We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence [Phys. Fluids 25, 085104 (2013), 10.1063/1.4816643] results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities. The mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is much more effective than the previously considered by us the inertial clustering instability caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. This is the reason of strong enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mean-field theory of the droplet growth developed in this study can be useful for explanation of the observed fast growth of cloud droplets in warm clouds from the initial 1 -μ m -size droplets to 40- to 50 -μ m -size droplets within 15-20 min.

  19. The nonhomologous end joining factor Artemis suppresses multi-tissue tumor formation and prevents loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y; Wright, S M; Maas, S A; Alley, T L; Caddle, L B; Kamdar, S; Affourtit, J; Foreman, O; Akeson, E C; Shaffer, D; Bronson, R T; Morse, H C; Roopenian, D; Mills, K D

    2007-09-06

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a critical DNA repair pathway, with proposed tumor suppression functions in many tissues. Mutations in the NHEJ factor ARTEMIS cause radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency in humans and may increase susceptibility to lymphoma in some settings. We now report that deficiency for Artemis (encoded by Dclre1c/Art in mouse) accelerates tumorigenesis in several tissues in a Trp53 heterozygous setting, revealing tumor suppression roles for NHEJ in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. We also show that B-lineage lymphomas in these mice undergo loss of Trp53 heterozygosity by allele replacement, but arise by mechanisms distinct from those in Art Trp53 double null mice. These findings demonstrate a general tumor suppression function for NHEJ, and reveal that interplay between NHEJ and Trp53 loss of heterozygosity influences the sequence of multi-hit oncogenesis. We present a model where p53 status at the time of tumor initiation is a key determinant of subsequent oncogenic mechanisms. Because Art deficient mice represent a model for radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, our findings suggest that these patients may be at risk for both lymphoid and non-lymphoid cancers.

  20. Impaired tumor growth in colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-deficient, macrophage-deficient op/op mouse: evidence for a role of CSF-1-dependent macrophages in formation of tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Szenajch, J; Ostrowska, G; Wojtowicz, A; Wojtowicz, K; Kruszewski, A A; Maruszynski, M; Aukerman, S L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W

    1996-01-03

    Macrophages have been suggested to play a major role in the immune response to cancer. They have also been suggested to stimulate the formation of tumor stroma and to promote tumor vascularization. The availability of the op/op mouse, which has no endogenous colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) and which possesses a profound macrophage deficiency, provides a new model to verify these notions. Subcutaneous growth of transplantable Lewis lung cancer (LLC) is markedly impaired in the op/op mice compared with normal littermates. Treatment of tumor-bearing op/op mice with human recombinant CSF-1 corrects this impairment. Histological analysis of tumors grown in op/op and normal mice revealed marked differences. Tumors grown in op/op mice display a decreased mitotic index and pronounced necrosis, particularly hemorrhagic. Moreover, particularly in the op/op tumors, peculiar sinusoid-like abortive vessels (not filled with blood) have been observed. These tumors, in contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, are almost deprived of regular arteries and veins. In contrast to tumors grown in normal mice, they exhibit almost no Sirius red-stained collagenous fibers and Gomori silver-stained reticular fibers. Our data suggest that the CSF-1-dependent macrophage subpopulation missing in op/op mice plays a primary role in supporting tumor stroma formation and tumor vascularization in murine LLC tumors.

  1. Regression of progestin-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats by p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hyder, Salman M

    2009-03-01

    p53 Reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis (PRIMA-1) is a small-molecule compound that reactivates mutant p53, restoring its normal tumor suppressor function. PRIMA-1 effectively suppresses the growth of homogeneous p53-deficient tumor xenografts in immunosuppressed mice; however, the ability of PRIMA-1 to suppress the growth of mammary tumors in rodents and other species is not well characterized. Here, we examined the ability of PRIMA-1 to suppress the growth of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced and progestin-accelerated DMBA-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats. Mammary tumors were induced in female rats with DMBA or DMBA plus progestin treatment. After tumors had reached 5-25 mm(2) in size, PRIMA-1 was administered twice a day for 3 days via tail vein injection (20 or 50 mg/kg). Tumor size was monitored every day following PRIMA-1 for at least 15 days prior to killing. PRIMA-1 caused regression of approximately 40% of progestin-accelerated DMBA-induced mammary tumors, but did not induce regression of native non-progestin-accelerated DMBA-induced tumors. Importantly, PRIMA-1 also suppressed the emergence of any new progestin-accelerated tumors in this model. Immunological studies with an antibody that selectively reacts with mutant p53 suggested that none of the native DMBA-induced tumors expressed mutant p53. By contrast, six out of eight progestin-accelerated DMBA-induced tumors stained for mutant p53 protein. In PRIMA-1-treated tumor-bearing rats, tumor regression correlated with conversion of mutant to wild-type p53 conformation, reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and estrogen receptor, lack of blood vessel perfusion, increased expression of p21, and massively increased expression of anti-angiogenic protein, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine. These pre-clinical results suggest that PRIMA-1, as a single agent or in combination with other anti-cancer compounds, has potential as a novel

  2. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  3. Revisiting tumor angiogenesis: vessel co-option, vessel remodeling, and cancer cell-derived vasculature formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan; Tan, Min-Han; Yang, Jun-Ping; Cao, Yun

    2016-01-08

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on the establishment of tumor vasculature to provide oxygen, nutrients, and other essential factors. The well-known vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is crucial for sprouting angiogenesis as well as recruitment of circulating progenitor endothelial cells to tumor vasculature, which has become therapeutic targets in clinical practice. However, the survival benefits gained from targeting VEGF signaling have been very limited, with the inevitable development of treatment resistance. In this article, we discuss the most recent findings and understanding on how solid tumors evade VEGF-targeted therapy, with a special focus on vessel co-option, vessel remodeling, and tumor cell-derived vasculature establishment. Vessel co-option may occur in tumors independently of sprouting angiogenesis, and sprouting angiogenesis is not always required for tumor growth. The differences between vessel-like structure and tubule-like structure formed by tumor cells are also introduced. The exploration of the underlying mechanisms of these alternative angiogenic approaches would not only widen our knowledge of tumor angiogenesis but also provide novel therapeutic targets for better controlling cancer growth and metastasis.

  4. Accelerated neointima formation after vascular injury in mice with stromelysin-3 (MMP-11) gene inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Vanlinthout, I; Verstreken, M; Rio, M C; Collen, D

    1999-12-01

    The hypothesis that stromelysin-3 (MMP-11), a unique member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, plays a role in neointima formation was tested with the use of a vascular injury model in wild-type (MMP-11(+/+)) and MMP-11-deficient (MMP-11(-/-)) mice. Neointima formation 2 to 3 weeks after electric injury of the femoral artery was significantly enhanced in MMP-11(-/-) as compared with MMP-11(+/+) mice, in both mice of a pure 129SV genetic background (0.014 versus 0.0010 mm(2) at 2 weeks, P<0.001) and those of a 50/50 mixed 129SV/BL6 background (0.030 versus 0.013 mm(2) at 3 weeks, P<0.05). The medial areas were comparable, resulting in intima/media ratios that were significantly increased in MMP-11(-/-) as compared with MMP-11(+/+) arteries, in mice of both the 129SV (1. 0 versus 0.18, P<0.001) and mixed (1.5 versus 0.70, P<0.05) backgrounds. Nuclear cell counts in cross-sectional areas of the intima of the injured region were higher in arteries from MMP-11(-/-) mice than in those from MMP-11(+/+) mice (210 versus 48, P<0.001, in pure 129SV mice and 290 versus 150, P<0.01, in mice of the mixed genetic background). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that alpha-actin-positive and CD45-positive cells were more abundant in intimal sections of MMP-11(-/-) mice. Degradation of the internal elastic lamina was more extensive in arteries of MMP-11(-/-) mice than in those of MMP-11(+/+) mice (39% versus 6.8% at 3 weeks, P<0. 005). The mechanisms by which MMP-11 could impair elastin degradation and cellular migration in this model remain, however, unknown.

  5. Biomaterials with persistent growth factor gradients in vivo accelerate vascularized tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Akar, Banu; Jiang, Bin; Somo, Sami I; Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Brey, Eric M

    2015-12-01

    Gradients of soluble factors play an important role in many biological processes, including blood vessel assembly. Gradients can be studied in detail in vitro, but methods that enable the study of spatially distributed soluble factors and multi-cellular processes in vivo are limited. Here, we report on a method for the generation of persistent in vivo gradients of growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial system. Fibrin loaded porous poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffolds were generated using a particulate leaching method. Platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) was encapsulated into poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which were placed distal to the tissue-material interface. PLGA provides sustained release of PDGF-BB and its diffusion through the porous structure results in gradient formation. Gradients within the scaffold were confirmed in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and gradients were present for more than 3 weeks. The diffusion of PDGF-BB was modeled and verified with in vivo imaging findings. The depth of tissue invasion and density of blood vessels formed in response to the biomaterial increased with magnitude of the gradient. This biomaterial system allows for generation of sustained growth factor gradients for the study of tissue response to gradients in vivo.

  6. Power versus performance tradeoffs of GPU-accelerated backprojection-based synthetic aperture radar image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Ricardo; Arunagiri, Sarala; Teller, Patricia J.; Park, Song J.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Deroba, Joseph C.; Shires, Dale

    2011-06-01

    The continuing miniaturization and parallelization of computer hardware has facilitated the development of mobile and field-deployable systems that can accommodate terascale processing within once prohibitively small size and weight constraints. General-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are prominent examples of such terascale devices. Unfortunately, the added computational capability of these devices often comes at the cost of larger demands on power, an already strained resource in these systems. This study explores power versus performance issues for a workload that can take advantage of GPU capability and is targeted to run in field-deployable environments, i.e., Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Specifically, we focus on the Image Formation (IF) computational phase of SAR, often the most compute intensive, and evaluate two different state-of-the-art GPU implementations of this IF method. Using real and simulated data sets, we evaluate performance tradeoffs for single- and double-precision versions of these implementations in terms of time-to-solution, image output quality, and total energy consumption. We employ fine-grain direct-measurement techniques to capture isolated power utilization and energy consumption of the GPU device, and use general and radarspecific metrics to evaluate image output quality. We show that double-precision IF can provide slight image improvement to low-reflective areas of SAR images, but note that the added quality may not be worth the higher power and energy costs associated with higher precision operations.

  7. Accelerated fluctuation analysis by graphic cards and complex pattern formation in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Virnau, Peter; Paul, Wolfgang; Schneider, Johannes J.

    2009-09-01

    The compute unified device architecture is an almost conventional programming approach for managing computations on a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a data-parallel computing device. With a maximum number of 240 cores in combination with a high memory bandwidth, a recent GPU offers resources for computational physics. We apply this technology to methods of fluctuation analysis, which includes determination of the scaling behavior of a stochastic process and the equilibrium autocorrelation function. Additionally, the recently introduced pattern formation conformity (Preis T et al 2008 Europhys. Lett. 82 68005), which quantifies pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series, is calculated on a GPU and analyzed in detail. Results are obtained up to 84 times faster than on a current central processing unit core. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series of the German BUND future, we find significant pattern-based correlations on short time scales. Furthermore, an anti-persistent behavior can be found on short time scales. Additionally, we compare the recent GPU generation, which provides a theoretical peak performance of up to roughly 1012 floating point operations per second with the previous one. .

  8. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Roberta; Palazzo, Elisabetta; Petrachi, Tiziana; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Saltari, Annalisa; Truzzi, Francesca; Quadri, Marika; Puviani, Mario; Maiorana, Antonino; Marconi, Alessandra; Pincelli, Carlo

    2016-01-12

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC) originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD) and non-RAD (NRAD) cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β₁-integrin), while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin). Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in Ras(G12V)-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  9. Identification of immune system and response genes, and novel mutations causing melanotic tumor formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Zhou, Zhijian; Tang, My Lien

    1996-06-01

    We are using Drosophila as a model system for analysis of immunity and tumor formation and have conducted two types of screens using enhancer detector strains to find genes related to these processes: genes expressed in the immune system (type A; hemocytes, lymph glands and fat body) and genes increased in expression by bacterial infection (type B). For type A, tissue-specific reporter gene activity was determined. For type B, a variation of enhancer detection was devised in which {beta}-galactosidase is assayed spectrophotometrically with and without bacterial infection. Because of immune system involvement in melanotic tumor formation, a third type was hypothesized to be found among types A and B: genes that, when mutated, have a melanotic tumor phenotype. Enhancer detector strains (2800) were screened for type A, 900 for B, and 11 retained for further analysis. Complementation tests, cytological mapping, P-element mobilization, and determination of lethal phase and mutant phenotype have identified six novel genes, Dorothy, wizard, toto, viking, Thor and dappled, and one previously identified gene, Collagen IV. All are associated with reporter gene expression in at least one immune system tissue. Thor has increased expression upon infection. Mutations of wizard and dappled have a melanotic tumor phenotype. 72 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yijie; Han, Shichao; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Liu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated physiological process consisting of a complex events, and scarless wound healing is highly desired for the development and application in clinical medicine. Recently, we have demonstrated that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) promoted wound healing and inhibited scar formation through a paracrine mechanism. However, exosomes (Exo) are one of the most important paracrine factors. Whether exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs-Exo) have positive effects on scarless wound healing have not been reported yet. In this study, we examined the role of hAECs-Exo on wound healing in a rat model. We found that hAECs, which exhibit characteristics of both embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. hAECs-Exo ranged from 50 to 150 nm in diameter, and positive for exosomal markers CD9, CD63, CD81, Alix, TSG101 and HLA-G. Internalization of hAECs-Exo promoted the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. Moreover, the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) were partly abolished by the treatment of high concentration of hAECs-Exo (100 μg/mL), which may be through stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo animal experiments showed that hAECs-Exo improved the skin wound healing with well-organized collagen fibers. Taken together, These findings represent that hAECs-Exo can be used as a novel hope in cell-free therapy for scarless wound healing.

  11. Local delivery of FTY720 accelerates cranial allograft incorporation and bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cynthia; Das, Anusuya; Barker, Daniel; Tholpady, Sunil; Wang, Tiffany; Cui, Quanjun; Ogle, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous stem cell recruitment to the site of skeletal injury is key to enhanced osseous remodeling and neovascularization. To this end, this study utilized a novel bone allograft coating of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) to sustain the release of FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors, from calvarial allografts. Uncoated allografts, vehicle-coated, low dose FTY720 in PLAGA (1:200 w:w) and high dose FTY720 in PLAGA (1:40) were implanted into critical size calvarial bone defects. The ability of local FTY720 delivery to promote angiogenesis, maximize osteoinductivity and improve allograft incorporation by recruitment of bone progenitor cells from surrounding soft tissues and microcirculation was evaluated. FTY720 bioactivity after encapsulation and release was confirmed with sphingosine kinase 2 assays. HPLC-MS quantified about 50% loaded FTY720 release of the total encapsulated drug (4.5 µg) after 5 days. Following 2 weeks of defect healing, FTY720 delivery led to statistically significant increases in bone volumes compared to controls, with total bone volume increases for uncoated, coated, low FTY720 and high FTY720 of 5.98, 3.38, 7.2 and 8.9 mm3, respectively. The rate and extent of enhanced bone growth persisted through week 4 but, by week 8, increases in bone formation in FTY720 groups were no longer statistically significant. However, micro-computed tomography (microCT) of contrast enhanced vascular ingrowth (MICROFIL®) and histological analysis showed enhanced integration as well as directed bone growth in both high and low dose FTY720 groups compared to controls. PMID:21863314

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora; Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  13. Nur77 deficiency in mice accelerates tumor invasion and metastasis by facilitating TNFα secretion and lowering CSF-1R expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shang-Shang; He, Xiao-Shun; Li, Jiang-Nan; Yang, Tian-Yu; Zhang, Shen; Gan, Wen-Juan; Li, Jian-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Nur77, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays critical roles in inflammation and immunity. However, the role of Nur77 in tumor microenvironment remains elusive. Results showed that deletion of Nur77 strikingly enhanced tumor metastasis compared to WT mice. Additionally, compared to the conditioned media derived from Nur77+/+ peritoneal macrophages (CM1), the conditioned media derived from Nur77-/- peritoneal macrophages (CM2) significantly promoted the EMT of cancer cells, and greatly enhanced the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells. Moreover, studies using TNF-α blocking antibody demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was indispensable in supporting CM2-induced EMT to drive cancer cells migration and invasion. Furthermore, we found that Nur77 promoted the expression of CSF-1R, a novel downstream target gene of Nur77, and subsequently enhanced the migration of inflammatory cells. Notably, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the tumors of Nur77-/- mice was markedly abrogated compared to Nur77+/+ mice. Collectively, these results revealed that host Nur77 expression was pivotal in antitumor immune response, and in inhibiting tumor metastasis. PMID:28170411

  14. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm.

  15. Warburg Meets Autophagy: Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Accelerate Tumor Growth and Metastasis via Oxidative Stress, Mitophagy, and Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Stephanos; Vera, Iset; Gandara, Ricardo; Sneddon, Sharon; Pestell, Richard G.; Mercier, Isabelle; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Here, we review certain recent advances in oxidative stress and tumor metabolism, which are related to understanding the contributions of the microenvironment in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In the early 1920s, Otto Warburg, a Nobel Laureate, formulated a hypothesis to explain the “fundamental basis” of cancer, based on his observations that tumors displayed a metabolic shift toward glycolysis. In 1963, Christian de Duve, another Nobel Laureate, first coined the phrase auto-phagy, derived from the Greek words “auto” and “phagy,” meaning “self” and “eating.” Recent Advances: Now, we see that these two ideas (autophagy and aerobic glycolysis) physically converge in the tumor stroma. First, cancer cells secrete hydrogen peroxide. Then, as a consequence, oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts drives autophagy, mitophagy, and aerobic glycolysis. Critical Issues: This “parasitic” metabolic coupling converts the stroma into a “factory” for the local production of recycled and high-energy nutrients (such as L-lactate)—to fuel oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. We believe that Warburg and de Duve would be pleased with this new two-compartment model for understanding tumor metabolism. It adds a novel stromal twist to two very well-established cancer paradigms: aerobic glycolysis and autophagy. Future Directions: Undoubtedly, these new metabolic models will foster the development of novel biomarkers, and corresponding therapies, to achieve the goal of personalized cancer medicine. Given the central role that oxidative stress plays in this process, new powerful antioxidants should be developed in the fight against cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1264–1284. PMID:21883043

  16. A Collision Probability Model of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus Formation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, with a high risk of portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Some promising results have been achieved for venous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, the etiology of PVTT is largely unknown, and it is unclear why the incidence of PVTT is not proportional to its distance from the carcinoma. We attempted to address this issue using physical concepts and mathematical tools. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the probability of a collision event and the microenvironment of the PVTT. Our formulae suggest that the collision probability can alter the tumor microenvironment by increasing the number of tumor cells. PMID:26131562

  17. HER3 Is Required for HER2-Induced Preneoplastic Changes to the Breast Epithelium and Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vaught, David B.; Stanford, Jamie C.; Young, Christian; Hicks, Donna J.; Wheeler, Frank; Rinehart, Cammie; Sánchez, Violeta; Koland, John; Muller, William J.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Cook, Rebecca S.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that HER2-amplified breast cancer cells use HER3/ErbB3 to drive therapeutic resistance to HER2 inhibitors. However, the role of ErbB3 in the earliest events of breast epithelial transformation remains unknown. Using mouse mammary specific models of Cre-mediated ErbB3 ablation, we show that ErbB3 loss prevents the progressive transformation of HER2-overexpressing mammary epithelium. Decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis were seen in MMTV-HER2 and MMTV-Neu mammary glands lacking ErbB3, thus inhibiting premalignant HER2-induced hyperplasia. Using a transgenic model in which HER2 and Cre are expressed from a single polycistronic transcript, we showed that palpable tumor penetrance decreased from 93.3% to 6.7% upon ErbB3 ablation. Penetrance of ductal carcinomas in situ was also decreased. In addition, loss of ErbB3 impaired Akt and p44/42 phosphorylation in preneoplastic HER2-overexpressing mammary glands and in tumors, decreased growth of preexisting HER2-overexpressing tumors, and improved tumor response to the HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib. These events were rescued by reexpression of ErbB3, but were only partially rescued by ErbB36F, an ErbB3 mutant harboring six tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations that block its interaction with phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase. Taken together, our findings suggest that ErbB3 promotes HER2-induced changes in the breast epithelium before, during, and after tumor formation. These results may have important translational implications for the treatment and prevention of HER2-amplified breast tumors through ErbB3 inhibition. PMID:22461506

  18. HER3 is required for HER2-induced preneoplastic changes to the breast epithelium and tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Vaught, David B; Stanford, Jamie C; Young, Christian; Hicks, Donna J; Wheeler, Frank; Rinehart, Cammie; Sánchez, Violeta; Koland, John; Muller, William J; Arteaga, Carlos L; Cook, Rebecca S

    2012-05-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that HER2-amplified breast cancer cells use HER3/ErbB3 to drive therapeutic resistance to HER2 inhibitors. However, the role of ErbB3 in the earliest events of breast epithelial transformation remains unknown. Using mouse mammary specific models of Cre-mediated ErbB3 ablation, we show that ErbB3 loss prevents the progressive transformation of HER2-overexpressing mammary epithelium. Decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis were seen in MMTV-HER2 and MMTV-Neu mammary glands lacking ErbB3, thus inhibiting premalignant HER2-induced hyperplasia. Using a transgenic model in which HER2 and Cre are expressed from a single polycistronic transcript, we showed that palpable tumor penetrance decreased from 93.3% to 6.7% upon ErbB3 ablation. Penetrance of ductal carcinomas in situ was also decreased. In addition, loss of ErbB3 impaired Akt and p44/42 phosphorylation in preneoplastic HER2-overexpressing mammary glands and in tumors, decreased growth of preexisting HER2-overexpressing tumors, and improved tumor response to the HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib. These events were rescued by reexpression of ErbB3, but were only partially rescued by ErbB36F, an ErbB3 mutant harboring six tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations that block its interaction with phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase. Taken together, our findings suggest that ErbB3 promotes HER2-induced changes in the breast epithelium before, during, and after tumor formation. These results may have important translational implications for the treatment and prevention of HER2-amplified breast tumors through ErbB3 inhibition.

  19. Meningioma: The role of a foreign body and irradiation in tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, J.; Silberstein, H.J.; Salner, A.L.; Uphoff, D.F. )

    1991-07-01

    A case of meningioma is reported. At the age of 18 years, the patient had undergone insertion of a Torkildsen shunt through a posteroparietal burr hole for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to a tumor of the pineal region, of which no biopsy had been made. After the hydrocephalus was relieved, he underwent irradiation of the tumor. Thirty years later, he was treated for an intracranial meningioma wrapped around the shunt. The tumor followed the shunt in all of its intracranial course. Microscopy disclosed pieces of the shunt tube within the meningioma. The role of a foreign body and irradiation in the induction of meningiomas is discussed, and a comprehensive review of the literature is presented. 47 references.

  20. Haploid loss of bax leads to accelerated mammary tumor development in C3(1)/SV40-TAg transgenic mice: reduction in protective apoptotic response at the preneoplastic stage.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M A; Liu, M L; Knudson, M C; Shibata, E; Yoshidome, K; Bandey, T; Korsmeyer, S J; Green, J E

    1999-01-01

    The dramatic increase in apoptosis observed during the development of preneoplastic mammary lesions is associated with a significant elevation in Bax expression in C3(1)/SV40 large T antigen (TAg) transgenic mice. The significance of Bax expression during tumor progression in vivo was studied by generating double-transgenic mice carrying the C3(1)/TAg transgene and mutant alleles for bax. C3(1)/TAg transgenic mice carrying mutant bax alleles exhibited accelerated rates of tumor growth, increased tumor numbers, larger tumor mass and decreased survival rates compared with mice carrying wild-type bax. Accelerated tumorigenesis associated with the bax+/- genotype did not require the loss of function of the second bax allele. Thus, haploid insufficiency of bax is enough to accelerate tumor progression, suggesting that the protective effect of Bax is dose-dependent. While levels of apoptosis in the preneoplastic lesions, but not carcinomas, were reduced in bax+/- or bax-/- mice compared with bax+/+ mice, rates of cellular proliferation in mammary lesions were similar among all bax genotypes. These data demonstrate that bax is a critical suppressor of mammary tumor progression at the stage of preneoplastic mammary lesion development through the upregulation of apoptosis, but that this protective effect is lost during the transition from preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma. PMID:10329616

  1. Number of glioma polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) associated with vasculogenic mimicry formation and tumor grade in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) contribute to solid tumor heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationships among PGCCs numbers, vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation, and tumor grades in glioma. Methods A total of 76 paraffin-embedded glioma tissue samples, including 28 cases of low grade and 48 cases of high grade gliomas, were performed with H&E and immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 and hemoglobin. The size of PGCCs nuclei was measured by a micrometer using H&E section and defined as at least three times larger than the nuclei of regular diploid cancer cells. The number of PGCCs and different blood supply patterns were compared in different grade gliomas. Microcirculation patterns in tumors were assessed using CD31 immunohistochemical and PAS histochemical double staining. Human glioma cancer cell line C6 was injected into the chicken embryonating eggs to form xenografts, which was used to observe the PGCCs and microcirculation patterns. Results In human glioma, the number of PGCCs increased with the grade of tumors (χ2 = 4.781, P = 0.015). There were three kinds of microcirculation pattern in human glioma including VM, mosaic vessel (MV) and endothelium dependent vessel. PGCCs were able to generate erythrocytes via budding to form VM. The walls of VM were positive (or negative) for PAS staining and negative for CD31 staining. There were more VM and MVs in high grade gliomas than those in low grade gliomas. The differences have statistical significances for VM (t = 3.745, P = 0.000) and MVs (t = 4.789, P = 0.000). PGCCs, VM and MVs can also be observed in C6 chicken embryonating eggs xenografts. Conclusions The data demonstrated presence of PGCCs, VM and MVs in glioma and PGCCs generating erythrocytes contribute the formation of VM and MVs. PMID:24422894

  2. Long-term stability assessment of a 4D tumor tracking system integrated into a gimbaled linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yokota, Kenji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-09-08

    We assessed long-term stability of tracking accuracy using the Vero4DRT system. This metric was observed between September 2012 and March 2015. A programmable respiratory motion phantom, designed to move phantoms synchronously with respiratory surrogates, was used. The infrared (IR) markers moved in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction as respiratory surrogates, while a cube phantom with a steel ball at the center, representing the tumor, and with radiopaque markers around it moved in the superior-inferior (SI) direction with one-dimensional (1D) sinusoidal patterns. A correlation model between the tumor and IR marker motion (4D model) was created from the training data obtained for 20 s just before beam delivery. The irradiation field was set to 3 × 3 cm2 and 300 monitor units (MUs) of desired MV X-ray beam were delivered. The gantry and ring angles were set to 0° and 45°, respectively. During beam delivery, the system recorded approximately 60 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. We analyzed: 1) the predictive accuracy of the 4D model (EP), defined as the difference between the detected and predicted target positions during 4D model creation, and 2) the tracking accuracy (ET), defined as the difference between the center of the steel ball and the MV X-ray field on the EPID image. The median values of mean plus two standard deviations (SDs) for EP were 0.06, 0.35, and 0.06 mm in the left-right (LR), SI, and AP directions, respectively. The mean values of maximum deviation for ET were 0.38, 0.49, and 0.53 mm and the coefficients of variance (CV) were 0.16, 0.10, and 0.05 in lateral, longitudinal, and 2D directions, respectively. Consequently, the IR Tracking accuracy was consistent over a period of two years. Our proposed method assessed the overall tracking accuracy readily using real-time EPID images, and proved to be a useful QA tool for dynamic tumor tracking with the Vero4DRT system.

  3. Genetic Regulation of Fate Decisions in Therapeutic T Cells to Enhance Tumor Protection and Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Veliça, Pedro; Zech, Mathias; Henson, Sian; Holler, Angelika; Manzo, Teresa; Pike, Rebecca; Santos E Sousa, Pedro; Zhang, Lei; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Pule, Martin; Stauss, Hans; Chakraverty, Ronjon

    2015-07-01

    A key challenge in the field of T-cell immunotherapy for cancer is creating a suitable platform for promoting differentiation of effector cells while at the same time enabling self-renewal needed for long-term memory. Although transfer of less differentiated memory T cells increases efficacy through greater expansion and persistence in vivo, the capacity of such cells to sustain effector functions within immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments may still be limiting. We have therefore directly compared the impact of effector versus memory differentiation of therapeutic T cells in tumor-bearing mice by introducing molecular switches that regulate cell fate decisions via mTOR. Ectopic expression of RAS homolog enriched in brain (RHEB) increased mTORC1 signaling, promoted a switch to aerobic glycolysis, and increased expansion of effector T cells. By rapidly infiltrating tumors, RHEB-transduced T cells significantly reduced the emergence of immunoedited escape variants. In contrast, expression of proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40) inhibited mTORC1, promoted quiescence, and blocked tumor infiltration. Fate mapping studies following transient expression of PRAS40 demonstrated that mTORC1(low) T cells made no contribution to initial tumor control but instead survived to become memory cells proficient in generating recall immunity. Our data support the design of translational strategies for generating heterogeneous T-cell immunity against cancer, with the appropriate balance between promoting effector differentiation and self-renewal. Unlike pharmacologic inhibitors, the genetic approach described here allows for upregulation as well as inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway and is highly selective for the therapeutic T cells without affecting systemic mTORC1 functions.

  4. Formation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing light-absorbing compounds accelerated by evaporation of water from secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (<2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>105 L mol-1 cm-1 at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 103 cm2 g-1 - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH ˜ 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  5. Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Lee, Paula B.; Updyke, Katelyn M.; Bones, David L.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-01-14

    Aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of dlimonene were subjected to dissolution, evaporation, and re-dissolution in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate (AS). Evaporation with AS at pH 4-9 produced chromophores that were stable with respect to hydrolysis and had a distinctive absorption band at 500 nm. Evaporation accelerated the rate of chromophore formation by at least three orders of magnitude compared to the reaction in aqueous solution, which produced similar compounds. Absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) mass spectrometry experiments suggested that the molar fraction of the chromophores was small (< 2%), and that they contained nitrogen atoms. Although the colored products represented only a small fraction of SOA, their large extinction coefficients (>10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 500 nm) increased the effective mass absorption coefficient of the residual organics in excess of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} - a dramatic effect on the optical properties from minor constituents. Evaporation of SOA extracts in the absence of AS resulted in the production of colored compounds only when the SOA extract was acidified to pH {approx} 2 with sulfuric acid. These chromophores were produced by acid-catalyzed aldol condensation, followed by a conversion into organosulfates. The presence of organosulfates was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry experiments. Results of this study suggest that evaporation of cloud or fog droplets containing dissolved organics leads to significant modification of the molecular composition and serves as a potentially important source of light-absorbing compounds.

  6. Induction of mutation and differentiation in mammalian cells by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, cells with appropriate markers for mutagenesis, such as the Chinese hamster V79 cells, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines and aflatoxins, and to establish means to study organ specificity of some chemical carcinogens. However, most short term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  7. Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. A.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  8. A null-mutation in the Znt7 gene accelerates prostate tumor formation in a transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decrease of cellular zinc in the epithelium of the prostate has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. To investigate whether ZnT7, a zinc transporter involved in intracellular zinc accumulation, plays a role in prostate cancer development, we have generated and characterized a trans...

  9. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  10. Deficiency of protein kinase Calpha in mice results in impairment of epidermal hyperplasia and enhancement of tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Saito, Yuriko; Hirai, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Chida, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-15

    We generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and evaluated the significance of the enzyme in epithelial hyperplasia and tumor formation. PKCalpha-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. Tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCalpha suppresses tumor promotion. However, the severity of epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was markedly reduced. In mutant mice, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled epidermal basal keratinocytes increased 16 to 24 hours after topical TPA treatment as in the case of wild-type mice, but significantly decreased at 36 and 48 hours. Furthermore, the regenerating epithelium induced by skin wound significantly decreased in thickness but was not structurally impaired. The enhanced tumor formation may not be associated with epidermal hyperplasia. The induction levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligands, tumor growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, in the skin of mutant mice by TPA treatment were significantly lower than those in the skin of wild-type mice. PKCalpha may regulate the supply of these EGF receptor ligands in basal keratinocytes, resulting in a reduced epidermal hyperplasia severity in the mutant mice. We propose that PKCalpha positively regulates epidermal hyperplasia but negatively regulates tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

  11. DNMT3B7, a truncated DNMT3B isoform expressed in human tumors, disrupts embryonic development and accelerates lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mrinal Y.; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Barnes, Natalie Y.; Figueroa, Maria E.; Kamp, Anna; Hendrick, Christopher; Ostler, Kelly R.; Davis, Elizabeth M.; Lin, Shang; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Moskowitz, Ivan; Melnick, Ari; Pytel, Peter; Godley, Lucy A.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic changes are among the most common alterations observed in cancer cells, yet the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation patterns is not understood. Cancer cells have an altered distribution of DNA methylation and express aberrant DNA methyltransferase 3B transcripts, which encode truncated proteins, some of which lack the C-terminal catalytic domain. To test if a truncated DNMT3B isoform disrupts DNA methylation in vivo, we constructed two lines of transgenic mice expressing DNMT3B7, a truncated DNMT3B isoform commonly found in cancer cells. DNMT3B7 transgenic mice exhibit altered embryonic development, including lymphopenia, craniofacial abnormalities, and cardiac defects, similar to Dnmt3b-deficient animals, but rarely develop cancer. However, when DNMT3B7 transgenic are bred with Eμ-Myc transgenic mice, which model aggressive B cell lymphoma, DNMT3B7 expression increases the frequency of mediastinal lymphomas in Eμ-Myc animals. Eμ-Myc/DNMT3B7 mediastinal lymphomas have more chromosomal rearrangements, increased global DNA methylation levels, and more locus-specific perturbations in DNA methylation patterns compared to Eμ-Myc lymphomas. These data represent the first in vivo modeling of cancer-associated DNA methylation changes and suggest that truncated DNMT3B isoforms contribute to the re-distribution of DNA methylation characterizing virtually every human tumor. PMID:20587527

  12. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate, induces PML nuclear body formation and apoptosis in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Naoyuki; Asakawa, Mayako; Umezawa, Kazuo . E-mail: umezawa@applc.keio.ac.jp; Segawa, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are the nuclear structure consisting of various proteins such as PML, SUMO-1, and p53. PML-NBs are implicated in the regulation of tumor suppression, antiviral responses, and apoptosis. In this study, we searched for bioactive metabolites that would promote the formation of PML-NBs in tumor cells. As a result, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate (2,5-MeC), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced expression and/or stability of PML proteins and induced PML-NB formation in p53 null H1299 cells established from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild-type p53-expressing U2OS cells derived from osteosarcoma. Furthermore, it enhanced apoptosis by exogenously expressed wild type p53 and the expression of p53-responsive genes, such as PUMA and p21, in H1299 cells. 2,5-MeC also activated endogenous p53 and induced apoptosis in U2OS cells. The results suggest that 2,5-MeC is likely to be a promising candidate drug for the clinical treatment of terminal cancer-expressing wild-type p53.

  13. GSK-3β signaling determines autophagy activation in the breast tumor cell line MCF7 and inclusion formation in the non-tumor cell line MCF10A in response to proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gavilán, E; Sánchez-Aguayo, I; Daza, P; Ruano, D

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system and the autophagy–lysosome pathway are the two main mechanisms for eukaryotic intracellular protein degradation. Proteasome inhibitors are used for the treatment of some types of cancer, whereas autophagy seems to have a dual role in tumor cell survival and death. However, the relationship between both pathways has not been extensively studied in tumor cells. We have investigated both proteolytic systems in the human epithelial breast non-tumor cell line MCF10A and in the human epithelial breast tumor cell line MCF7. In basal condition, tumor cells showed a lower proteasome function but a higher autophagy activity when compared with MCF10A cells. Importantly, proteasome inhibition (PI) leads to different responses in both cell types. Tumor cells showed a dose-dependent glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)β inhibition, a huge increase in the expression of the transcription factor CHOP and an active processing of caspase-8. By contrast, MCF10A cells fully activated GSK-3β and showed a lower expression of both CHOP and processed caspase-8. These molecular differences were reflected in a dose-dependent autophagy activation and cell death in tumor cells, while non-tumor cells exhibited the formation of inclusion bodies and a decrease in the cell death rate. Importantly, the behavior of the MCF7 cells can be reproduced in MCF10A cells when GSK-3β and the proteasome were simultaneously inhibited. Under this situation, MCF10A cells strongly activated autophagy, showing minimal inclusion bodies, increased CHOP expression and cell death rate. These findings support GSK-3β signaling as a key mechanism in regulating autophagy activation or inclusion formation in human tumor or non-tumor breast cells, respectively, which may shed new light on breast cancer control. PMID:23559006

  14. Deubiquitinase inhibition by small-molecule WP1130 triggers aggresome formation and tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kapuria, Vaibhav; Peterson, Luke F; Fang, Dexing; Bornmann, William G; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas J

    2010-11-15

    Recent evidence suggests that several deubiquitinases (DUB) are overexpressed or activated in tumor cells and many contribute to the transformed phenotype. Agents with DUB inhibitory activity may therefore have therapeutic value. In this study, we describe the mechanism of action of WP1130, a small molecule derived from a compound with Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) kinase inhibitory activity. WP1130 induces rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated (K48/K63-linked) proteins into juxtanuclear aggresomes, without affecting 20S proteasome activity. WP1130 acts as a partly selective DUB inhibitor, directly inhibiting DUB activity of USP9x, USP5, USP14, and UCH37, which are known to regulate survival protein stability and 26S proteasome function. WP1130-mediated inhibition of tumor-activated DUBs results in downregulation of antiapoptotic and upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, such as MCL-1 and p53. Our results show that chemical modification of a previously described JAK2 inhibitor results in the unexpected discovery of a novel DUB inhibitor with a unique antitumor mechanism.

  15. MYCN-targeting miRNAs are predominantly downregulated during MYCN‑driven neuroblastoma tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Anneleen; Van Peer, Gert; Carter, Daniel R; Mets, Evelien; Althoff, Kristina; Cheung, Belamy B; Schulte, Johannes H; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Marshall, Glenn M; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2015-03-10

    MYCN is a transcription factor that plays key roles in both normal development and cancer. In neuroblastoma, MYCN acts as a major oncogenic driver through pleiotropic effects regulated by multiple protein encoding genes as well as microRNAs (miRNAs). MYCN activity is tightly controlled at the level of transcription and protein stability through various mechanisms. Like most genes, MYCN is further controlled by miRNAs, but the full complement of all miRNAs implicated in this process has not been determined through an unbiased approach. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in regulation of MYCN, we thus explored the MYCN-miRNA interactome to establish miRNAs controlling MYCN expression levels. We combined results from an unbiased and genome-wide high-throughput miRNA target reporter screen with miRNA and mRNA expression data from patients and a murine neuroblastoma progression model. We identified 29 miRNAs targeting MYCN, of which 12 miRNAs are inversely correlated with MYCN expression or activity in neuroblastoma tumor tissue. The majority of MYCN-targeting miRNAs in neuroblastoma showed a decrease in expression during murine MYCN-driven neuroblastoma tumor development. Therefore, we provide evidence that MYCN-targeting miRNAs are preferentially downregulated in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma, suggesting that MYCN negatively controls the expression of these miRNAs, to safeguard its expression.

  16. Formation of Ion-Permeable Channels by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Baldwin, Rae Lynn; Munoz, David; Wisnieski, Bernadine J.

    1992-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, cachectin), a protein secreted by activated macrophages, participates in inflammatory responses and in infectious and neoplastic disease states. The mechanisms by which TNF exerts cytotoxic, hormonal, and other specific effects are obscure. Structural studies of the TNF trimer have revealed a central pore-like region. Although several amino acid side chains appear to preclude an open channel, the ability of TNF to insert into lipid vesicles raised the possibility that opening might occur in a bilayer milieu. Acidification of TNF promoted conformational changes concordant with increased surface hydrophobicity and membrane insertion. Furthermore, TNF formed pH-dependent, voltage-dependent, ion-permeable channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes and increased the sodium permeability of human U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells. Thus, some of the physiological effects of TNF may be elicited through its intrinsic ion channel-forming activity.

  17. Effects of Repeated Anesthesia Containing Urethane on Tumor Formation and Health Scores in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rex, Tonia S; Boyd, Kelli; Apple, Troy; Bricker-Anthony, Courtney; Vail, Krystal; Wallace, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Repeated injection of urethane (ethyl carbamate) is carcinogenic in susceptible strains of mice. Most recent cancer studies involving urethane-induced tumor formation use p53+/– mice, which lack one copy of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, the same protocol elicits at most a single tumor in wildtype C57BL/6 mice. The effect of repeatedly injecting urethane as a component of a ketamine–xylazine anesthetic mixture in the highly prevalent mouse strain C57BL/6 is unknown. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 30; age, 3 mo) were anesthetized once monthly for 4 mo by using 560 mg/kg urethane, 28 mg/kg ketamine, and 5.6 mg/kg xylazine. The physical health of the mice was evaluated according to 2 published scoring systems. The average body condition score (scale, 1 to 5; normal, 3) was 3.3, 3.3, and 3.4 after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th injections, respectively. The visual assessment score was 0 (that is, normal) at all time points examined. Within 1 wk after the 4th injection, the mice were euthanized, necropsied, and evaluated histopathologically. No histopathologic findings were noteworthy. We conclude that repeated monthly injection with urethane as a component of an anesthetic cocktail does not cause clinically detectable abnormalities or induce neoplasia in C57BL/6J mice. These findings are important because urethane combined with low-dose ketamine, unlike other anesthetic regimens, allows for accurate recording of neuronal activity in both the brain and retina. Longitudinal neuronal recordings minimize the number of mice needed and improve the analysis of disease progression and potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:27177562

  18. Zero, minimum and maximum relative radial acceleration for planar formation flight dynamics near triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; Masdemont, J. J.; Gómez, G.; Macau, E. E.; Winter, O. C.

    2014-11-01

    Assume a constellation of satellites is flying near a given nominal trajectory around L4 or L5 in the Earth-Moon system in such a way that there is some freedom in the selection of the geometry of the constellation. We are interested in avoiding large variations of the mutual distances between spacecraft. In this case, the existence of regions of zero and minimum relative radial acceleration with respect to the nominal trajectory will prevent from the expansion or contraction of the constellation. In the other case, the existence of regions of maximum relative radial acceleration with respect to the nominal trajectory will produce a larger expansion and contraction of the constellation. The goal of this paper is to study these regions in the scenario of the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem by means of a linearization of the equations of motion relative to the periodic orbits around L4 or L5. This study corresponds to a preliminar planar formation flight dynamics about triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system. Additionally, the cost estimate to maintain the constellation in the regions of zero and minimum relative radial acceleration or keeping a rigid configuration is computed with the use of the residual acceleration concept. At the end, the results are compared with the dynamical behavior of the deviation of the constellation from a periodic orbit.

  19. Synthetic stigmasterol derivatives inhibit capillary tube formation, herpetic corneal neovascularization and tumor induced angiogenesis: Antiangiogenic stigmasterol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Flavia M; Lombardi, María Gabriela; Bueno, Carlos A; Berra, Alejandro; Sales, María Elena; Alché, Laura E

    2016-11-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in initiating and promoting several diseases, such as cancer and herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). Herein, we studied the inhibitory effect of two synthetic stigmasterol derivatives on capillary tube-like structures and on cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC): (22S,23S)-22,23-dihydroxystigmast-4-en-3-one (compound 1) and (22S,23S)-3β-bromo-5α,22,23-trihydroxystigmastan-6-one (compound 2). We also studied their effect on VEGF expression in IL-6 stimulated macrophages and in LMM3 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we investigated the antiangiogenic activity of the compounds on corneal neovascularization in the murine model of HSK and in an experimental model of tumor-induced angiogenesis in mice. Both compounds inhibited capillary tube-like formation, but only compound 1 restrained cell migration. Compound 1, unlike compound 2, was able to reduce VEGF expression. Only compound 1 not only reduced the incidence and severity of corneal neovascularization, when administered at the onset of HSK, but it also restrained the development of neovascular response induced by tumor cells in mice skin. Our results show that compound 1 inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, compound 1 would be a promising drug in the treatment of those diseases where angiogenesis represents one of the main pathogenic events.

  20. MiR-613 suppresses retinoblastoma cell proliferation, invasion, and tumor formation by targeting E2F5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiting; Zhu, Xinyue; Zhu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yan; Liu, Yajun; Yao, Borui; Huang, Zhenping

    2017-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is a common intraocular malignancy that occurs during childhood. MicroRNAs play critical roles in the regulation of retinoblastoma initiation and progression, and aberrant expression of miR-613 had been reported in various types of cancer. However, the role and mechanism of its function in retinoblastoma are still unclear. In this study, we found that miR-613 was downregulated in retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-613 suppressed retinoblastoma cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced cell cycle arrest in vitro. Additionally, overexpressed miR-613 also inhibited tumor formation of retinoblastoma cells in vivo. We further identified E2F5 as a direct target of miR-613. Reintroduction of E2F5 without 3'-untranslated region reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-613 on cell proliferation and invasion. Our data collectively indicate that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor in retinoblastoma through downregulating E2F5, supporting the targeting of the novel miR-613/E2F5 axis as a potentially effective therapeutic approach for retinoblastoma.

  1. Sonication-induced formation of size-controlled self-assemblies of amphiphilic Janus-type polymers as optical tumor-imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Miki, Koji; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Inoue, Tatsuhiro; Matsuoka, Hideki; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ohe, Kouichi

    2014-08-13

    In this study, amphiphilic Janus-type polymers were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), multiple vicinal diol formation, and grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (mPEG). These amphiphilic polymers formed self-assemblies, which were a mixture of micelles and multimicellar aggregates, in water. By choosing suitable Janus-type polymers and irradiating an aqueous solution of polymers using a sonicator, either small micelles or large multimicellar aggregates were obtained selectively. Hydrophobic substituents controlled the aggregation-disaggregation behavior, leading to the formation of metastable self-assemblies by sonication. The formation of self-assemblies with a uniform size was affected by ultrasonic frequency, rather than power. In vivo optical tumor imaging revealed that the large-size multimicellar aggregates persisting for a long time in blood circulation slowly accumulated in tumor tissues. In contrast, the tumor site was rapidly, clearly visualized using the small-size micelles.

  2. Targeting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition for Identification of Inhibitors for Pancreatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Tumor Spheres Formation

    PubMed Central

    Polireddy, Kishore; Dong, Ruochen; McDonald, Peter R.; Wang, Tao; Luke, Brendan; Chen, Ping; Broward, Melinda; Roy, Anuradha; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer has an enrichment of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs) that contribute to chemoresistant tumors prone to metastasis and recurrence. Drug screening assays based on cytotoxicity cannot identify specific CSC inhibitors, because CSCs comprise only a small portion of cancer cell population, and it is difficult to propagate stable CSC populations in vitro for high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Based on the important role of cancer cell epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in promoting CSCs, we hypothesized that inhibition of EMT can be a useful strategy for inhibiting CSCs, and therefore a feasible approach for HTS can be built for identification of CSC inhibitors, based on assays detecting EMT inhibition. Methods An immunofluorescent assay was established and optimized for HTS to identify compounds that enhance E-cadherin expression, as a hallmark of inhibition of EMT. Four chemical libraries containing 41,472 compounds were screened in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line. Positive hits were validated for EMT and CSC inhibition in vitro using sphere formation assay, western blotting, immune fluorescence, and scratch assay. Results Initial hits were refined to 73 compounds with a secondary screening, among which 17 exhibited concentration dependent induction of E-cadherin expression. Six compounds were selected for further study which belonged to 2 different chemical structural clusters. A novel compound 1-(benzylsulfonyl) indoline (BSI, Compound #38) significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. BSI inhibited histone deacetylase, increased histone 4 acetylation preferably, resulting in E-cadherin up-regulation. BSI effectively inhibited tumor spheres formation. Six more analogues of BSI were tested for anti-migration and anti-CSC activities. Conclusion This study demonstrated a feasible approach for discovery of agents targeting EMT and CSCs using HTS, and identified a class of novel chemicals that could be

  3. Interaction between echovirus 7 and its receptor, decay-accelerating factor (CD55): evidence for a secondary cellular factor in A-particle formation.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, R M; Ward, T; Evans, D J; Almond, J W

    1997-01-01

    Soluble forms of decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (CD55), the receptor for echovirus 7, were synthesized in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Purified recombinant protein containing SCR domains 2, 3, and 4, but lacking the serine/threonine rich region, was shown to block infection of susceptible cells by echovirus 7. In contrast to the situation with poliovirus and its receptor, the neutralization of echovirus 7 by soluble DAF was completely reversible and did not lead to the formation of 135S A-particles. Binding of virus to susceptible cells, by contrast, did lead to the formation of A particles, mainly from virus that had been internalized. The data suggest that a secondary factor(s) may contribute to A-particle formation and uncoating of echovirus 7. PMID:9371589

  4. A giant and insidious subphrenic biloma formation due to gallbladder perforation mimicking biliary cystic tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guwei; Zhu, Feipeng; Wang, Ke; Jiao, Chenyu; Shao, Zicheng; Li, Xiangcheng

    2017-01-01

    Gallbladder perforation (GBP) represents a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication of acute cholecystitis. GBP is subdivided into three categories whereas the development of biloma is extremely rare. The present case study reports on a 40-year-old man with a 10-year history of calculus cholecystitis, who was referred to The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (Nanjing, China) for the surgical treatment of an emerging massive hepatic entity with insidious symptoms and normal laboratory tests. A preoperative imaging study demonstrated the collection with internal septations and mural nodules, but no visible communication with the biliary system. Given the suspected biliary cystic tumor, a laparotomy was performed and the lumen was scattered with papillae. An intraoperative frozen section examination illustrated a simple hepatic cyst. Biochemical analysis of the collection and histopathology of the gallbladder and capsule substantiated the diagnosis of biloma formation due to GBP. The purpose of the present case report was to demonstrate how a pinhole-sized perforation with extravasation of unconcentrated bile from the gallbladder may result in insidious clinical presentation and an undetected leak site. According to the clinicopathological characteristics and composition, formation of biloma should be classified as type IV GBP. To differentiate bilomas with intracystic septations and mural nodules from BCTs is difficult via a preoperative examination, and the definitive diagnosis should be based on a histological examination. Laparotomy with frozen section examination may be the optimal approach in such a case. PMID:28123732

  5. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 silencing results in the inhibition of tumor formation ability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FU, HONGBING; YANG, DEJUN; WANG, CHANGMING; XU, JIAPENG; WANG, WEIMIN; YAN, RONGLIN; CAI, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most malignant types of cancer, is the second greatest cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for GC treatment are therefore urgently required. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) has a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of CTDP1 in GC has not previously been explored. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect CTDP1 messenger RNA expression in various GC cell lines. CTDP1 was subsequently silenced in GC cells by lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection, and the effects of CTDP1 inhibition on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell number counting, cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, apoptotic rate with Annexin V staining and FACS analysis, as well as colony formation assay in GC cells. The results revealed that CTDP1 was highly expressed in certain GC cell lines and lentivirus-mediated siRNA infection was able to effectively silence CTDP1 expression in GC cells. CTDP1 inhibition decreased cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis in GC cells. Furthermore, the colony formation ability of GC cells was also suppressed by silencing CTDP1. Taken together these results indicated that CTDP1 has a significant role in the tumor formation ability of GC cells and is a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GC. PMID:26722269

  6. FGF2 and EGF Are Required for Self-Renewal and Organoid Formation of Canine Normal and Tumor Breast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cocola, Cinzia; Molgora, Stefano; Piscitelli, Eleonora; Veronesi, Maria Cristina; Greco, Marianna; Bragato, Cinzia; Moro, Monica; Crosti, Mariacristina; Gray, Brian; Milanesi, Luciano; Grieco, Valeria; Luvoni, Gaia Cecilia; Kehler, James; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Reinbold, Rolland; Zucchi, Ileana; Giordano, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that human tumors are generated from cancer cells with stem cell (SC) properties. Spontaneously occurring cancers in dogs contain a diversity of cells that like for human tumors suggest that certain canine tumors are also generated from cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs, like normal SCs, have the capacity for self-renewal as mammospheres in suspension cultures. To understand how cells with SC properties contribute to canine mammary gland tumor development and progression, comparative analysis between normal SCs and CSCs, obtained from the same individual, is essential. We have utilized the property of sphere formation to develop culture conditions for propagating stem/progenitor cells from canine normal and tumor tissue. We show that cells from dissociated mammospheres retain sphere reformation capacity for several serial passages and have the capacity to generate organoid structures ex situ. Utilizing various culture conditions for passaging SCs and CSCs, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were found to positively or negatively regulate mammosphere regeneration, organoid formation, and multi-lineage differentiation potential. The response of FGF2 and EGF on SCs and CSCs was different, with increased FGF2 and EGF self-renewal promoted in SCs and repressed in CSCs. Our protocol for propagating SCs from normal and tumor canine breast tissue will provide new opportunities in comparative mammary gland stem cell analysis between species and anticancer treatment and therapies for dogs. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 570-584, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. P15, MDM2, NF-κB, and Bcl-2 expression in primary bone tumor and correlation with tumor formation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guibin; Hao, Songnan; Yang, Dawei; Meng, Qinggang

    2015-01-01

    Primary bone tumor is one of the most common malignant tumors in skeletal system. It seriously affected bone movement and development with unclear pathogenesis. In this paper, rabbit VX-2 malignant bone tumor model was applied to explore apoptotic genes P15, MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 correlation with primary bone tumor occurrence and metastasis. 0.3 ml rabbit VX-2 tumor cell suspension (1×106/ml) was injected to the marrow cavity of the right tibia condyle to establish the rabbit malignant bone tumor model, while equal amount of the saline was injected to the left tibia as control. Real-time PCR was applied to determine P15, MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 expression level. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the abovementioned genes expression in lung, stomach, kidney and bladder. Compared with control, P15 expression level in the inoculation site surrounding tissues decreased obviously following the inoculate time elongation (P<0.05), while Bcl-2, MDM2 and NF-κB expression significantly increased (P<0.05). Bcl-2 showed significant correlation with MDM2 and NF-κB (P<0.05). At the 2, 4, 6 weeks, Bcl-2, MDM2 and NF-κB in lung, Bcl-2 in kidney, and Bcl-2 and MDM2 in bladder positively expressed (P<0.05), whereas P15 gene exhibited no significant positive expression in these tissues (P>0.05). P15, MDM2, NF-κB, and Bcl-2 genes expression levels can effectively reflect malignant bone tumor growth of rabbit tibia. MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 genes involved in primary bone tumors metastasis directly. It has important clinical significance for early diagnosis and treatment of primary bone tumor. PMID:26823818

  8. Herpesviral G protein-coupled receptors activate NFAT to induce tumor formation via inhibiting the SERCA calcium ATPase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; He, Shanping; Wang, Yi; Brulois, Kevin; Lan, Ke; Jung, Jae U; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of proteins that transmit signal to regulate an array of fundamental biological processes. Viruses deploy diverse tactics to hijack and harness intracellular signaling events induced by GPCR. Herpesviruses encode multiple GPCR homologues that are implicated in viral pathogenesis. Cellular GPCRs are primarily regulated by their cognate ligands, while herpesviral GPCRs constitutively activate downstream signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. However, the roles of NFAT activation and mechanism thereof in viral GPCR tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here we report that GPCRs of human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (kGPCR) and cytomegalovirus (US28) shortcut NFAT activation by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which is necessary for viral GPCR tumorigenesis. Biochemical approaches, entailing pharmacological inhibitors and protein purification, demonstrate that viral GPCRs target SERCA2 to increase cytosolic calcium concentration. As such, NFAT activation induced by vGPCRs was exceedingly sensitive to cyclosporine A that targets calcineurin, but resistant to inhibition upstream of ER calcium release. Gene expression profiling identified a signature of NFAT activation in endothelial cells expressing viral GPCRs. The expression of NFAT-dependent genes was up-regulated in tumors derived from tva-kGPCR mouse and human KS. Employing recombinant kGPCR-deficient KSHV, we showed that kGPCR was critical for NFAT-dependent gene expression in KSHV lytic replication. Finally, cyclosporine A treatment diminished NFAT-dependent gene expression and tumor formation induced by viral GPCRs. These findings reveal essential roles of NFAT activation in viral GPCR tumorigenesis and a mechanism of "constitutive" NFAT activation by viral GPCRs.

  9. Autophagy is involved in TGF-β1-induced protective mechanisms and formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts phenotype in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Lan; Mo, En-Pan; Yang, Liu; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) present in tumor microenvironment acts in a coordinated fashion to either suppress or promote tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TGF-β1 on tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Our clinical data showed a positive association between TGF-β1 expression and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients. Thus we employed starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and 4T1 cells mixed with NIH3T3 fibroblasts xenograft model in vivo to simulate nutritional deprivation of tumor microenvironment to explore the effects of TGF-β1. We demonstrated that TGF-β1 protected NIH3T3 fibroblasts from Star-induced growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induced the formation of CAFs phenotype in starvation (Star)-treated NIH3T3 fibroblasts and xenografted Balb/c mice, which promoted breast cancer tumor growth. In both models, autophagy agonist rapamycin increased TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotypes, while autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, Atg5 knockdown or TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY-2157299 blocked TGF-β1 induced these effects. Taken together, our results indicated that TGF-β/Smad autophagy was involved in TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotype in tumor microenvironment, which may be used as therapy targets in breast cancer. PMID:26716641

  10. Acceleration of bone formation during fracture healing by injectable collagen powder and human basic fibroblast growth factor containing a collagen-binding domain from Clostridium histolyticum collagenase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Ueno, Masaki; Matsushita, Osamu; Inoue, Gen; Nishi, Nozomu; Ogura, Takayuki; Hattori, Shunji; Fujimaki, Hisako; Tanaka, Keisuke; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    Growth factor delivered with implantable biomaterials has been used to both accelerate and ensure healing of open fractures in human patients. However, a major limitation of implantable biomaterials is the requirement for open surgical placement. Here, we developed an injectable collagen material-based bone formation system consisting of injectable collagen powder with fibril morphology and collagen triple helix conformation, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused to the collagen-binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. The affinity of the CBD towards collagen was confirmed by the results of collagen-binding assays. Moreover, the combination of the collagen binding-bFGF fusion protein (CB-bFGF) with injectable collagen powder induced bone formation at protein concentrations lower than those required for bFGF alone in mice fracture models. Taken together, these properties suggest that the CB-bFGF/collagen powder composite is a promising injectable material for bone repair in the clinical setting.

  11. Janus-faced Acrolein prevents allergy but accelerates tumor growth by promoting immunoregulatory Foxp3+ cells: Mouse model for passive respiratory exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roth-Walter, Franziska; Bergmayr, Cornelia; Meitz, Sarah; Buchleitner, Stefan; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Fazekas, Judit; Moskovskich, Anna; Müller, Mario A.; Roth, Georg A.; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Dvorak, Zdenek; Neunkirchner, Alina; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2017-01-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde, is generated in large amounts during smoking and is best known for its genotoxic capacity. Here, we aimed to assess whether acrolein at concentrations relevant for smokers may also exert immunomodulatory effects that could be relevant in allergy or cancer. In a BALB/c allergy model repeated nasal exposure to acrolein abrogated allergen-specific antibody and cytokine formation, and led to a relative accumulation of regulatory T cells in the lungs. Only the acrolein-treated mice were protected from bronchial hyperreactivity as well as from anaphylactic reactions upon challenge with the specific allergen. Moreover, grafted D2F2 tumor cells grew faster and intratumoral Foxp3+ cell accumulation was observed in these mice compared to sham-treated controls. Results from reporter cell lines suggested that acrolein acts via the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor which could be inhibited by resveratrol and 3′-methoxy-4′-nitroflavone Acrolein- stimulation of human PBMCs increased Foxp3+ expression by T cells which could be antagonized by resveratrol. Our mouse and human data thus revealed that acrolein exerts systemic immunosuppression by promoting Foxp3+ regulatory cells. This provides a novel explanation why smokers have a lower allergy, but higher cancer risk. PMID:28332605

  12. Repression of formate dehydrogenase in Solanum tuberosum increases steady-state levels of formate and accelerates the accumulation of proline in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Ambard-Bretteville, Françoise; Sorin, Céline; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Hourton-Cabassa, Cécile; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine

    2003-08-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2.) is a soluble mitochondrial enzyme capable of oxidizing formate into CO2 in the presence of NAD+. It is abundant in non-green tissues and scarce in photosynthetic tissues. Under stress, FDH transcripts (and protein) accumulate in leaves, and leaf mitochondria acquire the ability to use formate as a respiratory substrate. In this paper, we describe the analysis of transgenic potato plants under-expressing FDH, obtained in order to understand the physiological function of FDH. Plants expressing low FDH activities were selected and the study was focused on a line (AS23) showing no detectable FDH activity. AS23 plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control plants, and grew normally under standard conditions. However, mitochondria isolated from AS23 tubers could not use formate as a respiratory substrate. Steady-state levels of formate were higher in AS23 leaves and tubers than in control plants. Tubers of untransformed plants oxidized 14C formate into 14CO2 but AS23 tubers accumulated it. In order to reveal a possible phenotype under stress conditions, control and AS23 plants were submitted to drought and cold. These treatments dramatically induced FDH transcripts in control plants but, whatever the growth conditions, no 1.4 kb FDH transcripts were detected in leaves of AS23 plants. Amongst various biochemical and molecular differences between stressed AS23 and control plants, the most striking was a dramatically faster accumulation of proline in the leaves of drought-stressed plants under-expressing FDH.

  13. hnRNP F directs formation of an exon 4 minus variant of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Kane, Vanessa D; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2011-11-01

    HUVEC or mouse 3T3 cells infected with SV-40 generate within 3 to 5 days post-infection an ENOX2 species corresponding to the exon-4 minus splice variant of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2 or tNOX) expressed at the cancer cell surface. This study was to seek evidence for splicing factors that might direct formation of the exon 4 minus ENOX2 splice variant. To determine if silencing of ENOX2 exon 4 occurs because of motifs located in exon 4, transfections were performed on MCF-10A (mammary non-cancer), BT-20 (mammary cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells using a GFP minigene construct containing either a constitutively spliced exon (albumin exon 2) or the alternatively spliced ENOX2 exon 4 between the two GFP halves. Removal of exon 4 from the processed RNA of the GFP minigene construct occurred with HeLa and to a lesser extent with BT-20 but not in non-cancer MCF-10A cells. The Splicing Rainbow Program was used to identify all of the possible hnRNPs binding sites of exon 4 of ENOX2. There are 8 Exonic Splicing Silencers (ESSs) for hnRNP binding in the exon 4 sequences. Each of these sites were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to test if any were responsible for the splicing skip. Results showed MutG75 ESS mutation changed the GFP expression which is a sign of splicing silence, while other mutations did not. As MutG75 changed the ESS binding site for hnRNP F, this result suggests that hnRNP F directs formation of the exon 4 minus variant of ENOX2.

  14. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  15. Advanced glycation end products induce in vitro cross-linking of alpha-synuclein and accelerate the process of intracellular inclusion body formation.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shamim; Nicholson, Louise F B

    2008-07-01

    Cross-linking of alpha-synuclein and Lewy body formation have been implicated in the dopaminergic neuronal cell death observed in Parkinson's disease (PD); the mechanisms responsible, however, are not clear. Reactive oxygen species and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been found in the intracellular, alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies in the brains of both PD as well as incidental Lewy body disease patients, suggesting a role for AGEs in alpha-synuclein cross-linking and Lewy body formation. The aims of the present study were to determine 1) whether AGEs can induce cross-linking of alpha-synuclein peptides, 2) the progressive and time-dependent intracellular accumulation of AGEs and inclusion body formation, and 3) the effects of extracellular or exogenous AGEs on intracellular inclusion formation. We first investigated the time-dependent cross-linking of recombinant human alpha-synuclein in the presence of AGEs in vitro, then used a cell culture model based on chronic rotenone treatment of human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) over a period of 1-4 weeks, in the presence of different doses of AGEs. Cells (grown on coverslips) and cell lysates, collected at the end of every week, were analyzed for the presence of intracellular reactive oxygen species, AGEs, alpha-synuclein proteins, and intracellular alpha-synuclein- and AGE-positive inclusion bodies by using immunocytochemical, biochemical, and Western blot techniques. Our results show that AGEs promote in vitro cross-linking of alpha-synuclein, that intracellular accumulation of AGEs precedes alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion body formation, and that extracellular AGEs accelerate the process of intracellular alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion body formation.

  16. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-17

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  17. Formation of Renal Cysts and Tumors in Vhl/Trp53-Deficient Mice Requires HIF1α and HIF2α.

    PubMed

    Schönenberger, Désirée; Harlander, Sabine; Rajski, Michal; Jacobs, Robert A; Lundby, Anne-Kristine; Adlesic, Mojca; Hejhal, Tomas; Wild, Peter J; Lundby, Carsten; Frew, Ian J

    2016-04-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene is inactivated in the majority of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC), but genetic ablation of Vhl alone in mouse models is insufficient to recapitulate human tumorigenesis. One function of pVHL is to regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), which become constitutively activated in the absence of pVHL. In established ccRCC, HIF1α has been implicated as a renal tumor suppressor, whereas HIF2α is considered an oncoprotein. In this study, we investigated the contributions of HIF1α and HIF2α to ccRCC initiation in the context of Vhl deficiency. We found that deleting Vhl plus Hif1a or Hif2a specifically in the renal epithelium did not induce tumor formation. However, HIF1α and HIF2α differentially regulated cell proliferation, mitochondrial abundance and oxidative capacity, glycogen accumulation, and acquisition of a clear cell phenotype in Vhl-deficient renal epithelial cells. HIF1α, but not HIF2α, induced Warburg-like metabolism characterized by increased glycolysis, decreased oxygen consumption, and decreased ATP production in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, providing insights into the cellular changes potentially occurring in Vhl mutant renal cells before ccRCC formation. Importantly, deletion of either Hif1a or Hif2a completely prevented the formation of renal cysts and tumors in Vhl/Trp53 mutant mice. These findings argue that both HIF1α and HIF2α exert protumorigenic functions during the earliest stages of cyst and tumor formation in the kidney. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2025-36. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  19. Biological responses of human solid tumor cells to X-ray irradiation within a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field generated by a magnetic resonance imaging-linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Hoogcarspel, Stan Jelle; Wen, Zhifei; van Vulpen, Marco; Molkentine, David P; Kok, Jan; Lin, Steven H; Broekhuizen, Roel; Ang, Kie-Kian; Bovenschen, Niels; Raaymakers, Bas W; Frank, Steven J

    2016-10-01

    Devices that combine magnetic resonance imaging with linear accelerators (MRL) represent a novel tool for MR-guided radiotherapy. However, whether magnetic fields (MFs) generated by these devices affect the radiosensitivity of tumors is unknown. We investigated the influence of a 1.5-T MF on cell viability and radioresponse of human solid tumors. Human head/neck cancer and lung cancer cells were exposed to single or fractionated 6-MV X-ray radiation; effects of the MF on cell viability were determined by cell plating efficiency and on radioresponsiveness by clonogenic cell survival. Doses needed to reduce the fraction of surviving cells to 37% of the initial value (D0s) were calculated for multiple exposures to MF and radiation. Results were analyzed using Student's t-tests. Cell viability was no different after single or multiple exposures to MRL than after exposure to a conventional linear accelerator (Linac, without MR-generated MF) in 12 of 15 experiments (all P > 0.05). Single or multiple exposures to MF had no influence on cell radioresponse (all P > 0.05). Cells treated up to four times with an MRL or a Linac further showed no changes in D0s with MF versus without MF (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, MF within the MRL does not seem to affect in vitro tumor radioresponsiveness as compared with a conventional Linac. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:471-480, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Down-regulation of CITED2 attenuates breast tumor growth, vessel formation and TGF-β-induced expression of VEGFA

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Swaathi; Doucet, Michele; Kominsky, Scott L

    2017-01-01

    While we previously demonstrated that CITED2 expression in primary breast tumor tissues is elevated relative to normal mammary epithelium and inversely correlated with patient survival, its functional impact on primary tumor development and progression remained unknown. To address this issue, we examined the effect of CITED2 silencing on the growth of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 following orthotopic administration in vivo. Here, we show that CITED2 silencing significantly attenuated MDA-MB-231 primary tumor growth concordant with reduced tumor vascularization, while MDA-MB-468 primary tumor growth and tumor vascularization remained unaffected. Correspondingly, expression of VEGFA was significantly reduced in shCITED2-expressing MDA-MB-231, but not MDA-MB-468 tumors. Consistent with the observed pattern of vascularization and VEGFA expression, we found that TGF-β stimulation induced expression of VEGFA and enhanced CITED2 recruitment to the VEGFA promoter in MDA-MA-231 cells, while failing to induce VEGFA expression in MDA-MB-468 cells. Further supporting its involvement in TGF-β-induced expression of VEGFA, CITED2 silencing prevented TGF-β induction of VEGFA expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Collectively, these data indicate that CITED2 regulates primary breast tumor growth, likely by influencing tumor vasculature via TGF-β-dependent regulation of VEGFA. PMID:28008154

  1. Formation and accumulation of protoporphyrin IX in tumor and nontumor cell lines induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Sandra R.; Milanetto, Marilia; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Imasato, Hidetake; Perussi, Janice R.

    2005-04-01

    The endogenous photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a haem precursor and induces the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in mitochondria-containing cells. Due to the slow conversion of porphyrins to haem, high levels of PPIX are found in the tissues, sufficient to produce a photodynamic effect following exposure to light. Since PpIX accumulates effectively in tumor cells, the use of ALA leads to a better photoselectivity than Photofrin. However, this selectivity has not been sufficiently studied. As far as we know there is just one study comparing the amount of accumulated PpIX in non-tumor and tumor cell lines. In this work we attempt to compare not just the production but also the accumulation and cytotoxicity of PpIX in non-tumor (VERO) versus tumor (Hep-2) cells induced by the use of ALA. The results have shown that both non-tumor and tumor cell lines produce the same amount of PpIX but just the tumor cells can accumulate PpIX. So, under illumination, only the tumor cells will be killed.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles Containing P301L Mutant Tau Accelerate Pathological Tau Phosphorylation and Oligomer Formation but Do Not Seed Mature Neurofibrillary Tangles in ALZ17 Mice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Siân; Polanco, Juan Carlos; Götz, Jϋrgen

    2016-10-04

    In Alzheimer's disease, the distribution of neurofibrillary tangles, a histological hallmark comprised of phosphorylated forms of the protein tau, follows a distinct pattern through anatomically connected brain regions. The well-documented correlation between the severity of tau pathology and disease progression implies a prion-like seeding and spreading mechanism for tau. Experimentally, this has been addressed in transgenic mice by the injection of protein lysates isolated from brains of transgenic mice or patients with tauopathies, including AD, that were shown to behave like seeds, accelerating tau pathology and tangle formation in predisposed mice. More specifically, in vivo data suggest that brain lysates from mice harboring the P301S mutation of tau can seed protein aggregation when injected into the hippocampi of human wild-type tau transgenic ALZ17 mice. Here, we compared the seeding potential of lysates and extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes (EVs) from wild-type and human P301L tau transgenic rTg4510 mouse brains. We show that transgenic EVs cause increased tau phosphorylation and soluble oligomer formation in a manner comparable to that of freely available proteins in brain lysates, a prerequisite for the formation of mature protein aggregates.

  3. Androgens inhibit tumor necrosis factor-α-induced cell adhesion and promote tube formation of human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Feng-Yen; Wu, Yi-No; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2012-06-01

    Endothelial cells contribute to the function and integrity of the vascular wall, and a functional aberration may lead to atherogenesis. There is increasing evidence on the atheroprotective role of androgens. Therefore, we studied the effect of the androgens-testosterone and dihydrotestosterone-and estradiol on human coronary artery endothelial cell (HCAEC) function. We found by MTT assay that testosterone is not cytotoxic and enhances HCAEC proliferation. The effect of testosterone (10-50 nM), dihydrotestosterone (5-50 nM), and estradiol (0.1-0.4 nM) on the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated HCAECs was determined at different time points (12-96 h) by assessing their binding with human monocytic THP-1 cells. In addition, the expression of adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), was determined by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone attenuated cell adhesion and the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, androgen treatment for a longer duration inhibited cell migration, as demonstrated by wound-healing assay, and promoted tube formation on a Matrigel. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) increased, whereas that of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) decreased following the 96-h steroid treatment of TNF-α-stimulated HCAECs. Our findings suggest that androgens modulate endothelial cell functions by suppressing the inflammatory process and enhancing wound-healing and regenerative angiogenesis, possibly through an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism.

  4. Cloning and analysis of a gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor that causes accelerated aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H; Kendall, K

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning and analysis of two overlapping DNA fragments from Streptomyces coelicolor that cause aerial mycelium to appear more rapidly than usual when introduced into Streptomyces lividans on a low-copy-number plasmid vector. Colonies of S. lividans TK64 harboring either clone produce visible aerial mycelia after only 48 h of growth, rather than the usual 72 to 96 h. From deletion and sequence analysis, this rapid aerial mycelium (Ram) phenotype appears to be due to a cluster of three genes that we have designated ramA, ramB, and ramR. Both ramA and ramB potentially encode 65-kDa proteins with homology to ATP-dependent membrane-translocating proteins. A chromosomal ramB disruption mutant of S. lividans was found to be severely defective in aerial mycelium formation. ramR could encode a 21-kDa protein with significant homology to the UhpA subset of bacterial two-component response regulator proteins. The overall organization and potential proteins encoded by the cloned DNA suggest that this is the S. coelicolor homolog of the amf gene cluster that has been shown to be important for aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus. However, despite the fact that the two regions probably have identical functions, there is relatively poor homology between the two gene clusters at the DNA sequence level. Images PMID:8206859

  5. The inhibition of 45A ncRNA expression reduces tumor formation, affecting tumor nodules compactness and metastatic potential in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Penna, Ilaria; Gigoni, Arianna; Costa, Delfina; Vella, Serena; Russo, Debora; Poggi, Alessandro; Villa, Federico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Canale, Claudio; Mescola, Andrea; Daga, Antonio; Russo, Claudio; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio; Menichini, Paola; Pagano, Aldo

    2017-01-31

    We recently reported the in vitro over-expression of 45A, a RNA polymerase III-transcribed non-coding (nc)RNA, that perturbs the intracellular content of FE65L1 affecting cell proliferation rate, short-term response to genotoxic stress, substrate adhesion capacity and, ultimately, increasing the tumorigenic potential of human neuroblastoma cells. In this work, to deeply explore the mechanism by which 45A ncRNA contributes to cancer development, we targeted in vitro and in vivo 45A levels by the stable overexpression of antisense 45A RNA.45A downregulation leads to deep modifications of cytoskeleton organization, adhesion and migration of neuroblastoma cells. These effects are correlated with alterations in the expression of several genes including GTSE1 (G2 and S phase-expressed-1), a crucial regulator of tumor cell migration and metastatic potential. Interestingly, the downregulation of 45A ncRNA strongly affects the in vivo tumorigenic potential of SKNBE2 neuroblastoma cells, increasing tumor nodule compactness and reducing GTSE1 protein expression in a subcutaneous neuroblastoma mouse model. Moreover, intracardiac injection of neuroblastoma cells showed that downregulation of 45A ncRNA also influences tumor metastatic ability. In conclusion, our data highlight a key role of 45A ncRNA in cancer development and suggest that its modulation might represent a possible novel anticancer therapeutic approach.

  6. Formation and utilization of acetoin, an unusual product of pyruvate metabolism by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-07-15

    [14C]Pyruvate was rapidly non-oxidatively decarboxylated by Ehrlich tumor mitochondria at a rate of 40 nmol/min/mg of protein in the presence or absence of ADP. A search for decarboxylation products led to significant amounts of acetoin formed when Ehrlich tumor mitochondria were incubated with 1 mM [14C] pyruvate in the presence of ATP. Added acetoin to aerobic tumor mitochondria was rapidly utilized in the presence of ATP at a rate of 65 nmol/min/mg of protein. Citrate has been found as a product of acetoin utilization and was exported from the tumor mitochondria. Acetoin has been found in the ascitic liquid of Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor-bearing animals. These unusual reactions were not observed in control rat liver mitochondria.

  7. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  8. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-sky WISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Catherine; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-04-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in Spitzer IRAC infrared color space: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates (SSFRs) or prolifically forming stars—galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous Spitzer IRAC studies identifying this “canyon” have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate SSFRs. We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color space ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}12}{{f}4.6}\\right]\\right) versus ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}22}{{f}3.4}\\right]\\right) that we use to identify canyon galaxies from the larger sample. We confirm that compact group galaxies show a bimodal distribution in the mid-infrared and identify 37 canyon galaxies with reliable photometry and intermediate mid-IR colors. Morphologically, we find that the canyon harbors a large population of both Sa-Sbc and E/S0 type galaxies, and that they fall on the optical red sequence rather than the green valley. Finally, we provide a catalog of WISE photometry for 567 of 652 galaxies selected from the sample of 163 compact groups.

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  10. Mouse mammary tumor virus infection accelerates mammary carcinogenesis in Wnt-1 transgenic mice by insertional activation of int-2/Fgf-3 and hst/Fgf-4.

    PubMed Central

    Shackleford, G M; MacArthur, C A; Kwan, H C; Varmus, H E

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the Wnt-1 protooncogene modified for expression in mammary epithelial cells exhibit hyperplastic mammary glands and stochastically develop mammary carcinomas, suggesting that additional events are necessary for tumorigenesis. To induce such events and to identify the genes involved, we have infected Wnt-1 transgenic mice with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), intending to insertionally activate, and thereby molecularly tag, cooperating protooncogenes. Infection of breeding female Wnt-1 transgenics decreased the average age at which tumors appeared from approximately 4 months to approximately 2.5 months and increased the average number of primary tumors per mouse from 1-2 to > 5. A smaller effect was observed in virgin females, and infection of transgenic males showed no significant effect on tumor latency. More than half of the tumors from the infected breeding group contained one or more newly acquired MMTV proviruses in a pattern suggesting that most cells in tumors arose from a single infected cell. Analyses of provirus-containing tumors for induced or altered expression of int-2/Fgf-3, hst/Fgf-4, int-3, and Wnt-3 showed activation of int-2 in 39% of tumors, hst in 3%, and both int-2 and hst in 3%. DNA analyses with probes for protooncogenes and MMTV confirmed that the activations resulted from proviral insertions. There was no evidence for proviral insertions at the int-3, Wnt-3, or Wnt-1 loci. These findings provide further evidence that fibroblast growth factors Int-2 and Hst can cooperate with Wnt-1, another secreted factor, in mammary tumorigenesis, and they illustrate the capacity of this system to identify cooperating oncogenes. Images PMID:8380647

  11. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  12. Oral administration of the citrus coumarin, isopimpinellin, blocks DNA adduct formation and skin tumor initiation by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in SENCAR mice.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Heather E; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; Starost, Matthew F; Reed, Melissa J; DiGiovanni, John

    2002-10-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of oral administration of the citrus coumarin, isopimpinellin, on skin tumor initiation by topically applied benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). To evaluate the effects of orally administered isopimpinellin on skin tumor initiation by B[a]P and DMBA, its effects on DNA adduct formation were first evaluated. Female SENCAR mice were pre-treated twice with corn oil, or isopimpinellin (70 mg/kg body wt per os) at 24 h and 2 h prior to topical treatment with B[a]P or DMBA. Another citrus coumarin, imperatorin, was also included in these experiments for comparison. Orally administered isopimpinellin and imperatorin significantly inhibited B[a]P-DNA adduct formation by 37 and 26%, respectively. Imperatorin also blocked DMBA-DNA adduct formation by 43%. In a second dose-response study, orally administered isopimpinellin (35, 70 and 150 mg/kg) blocked DMBA-DNA adduct formation by 23, 56 and 69%, respectively. For the tumor study, mice were pretreated orally with corn oil or isopimpinellin at 24 and 2 h prior to initiation with DMBA, and 2 weeks later promotion began with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Isopimpinellin significantly reduced the mean number of papillomas per mouse by 49, 73 and 78% compared to corn oil controls at 30, 70 and 150 mg/kg body wt, respectively. Orally administered isopimpinellin also significantly reduced the percentage of mice with papillomas at the highest dose tested (150 mg/kg). The effectiveness of isopimpinellin given topically over a broad dose range against DMBA tumor initiation was also evaluated for comparison. As part of this study, several parameters of systemic toxicity were evaluated following oral dosing with isopimpinellin and imperatorin. Mice were treated orally with corn oil, isopimpinellin or imperatorin (35, 70 and 150 mg/kg body wt per os) once daily for four consecutive days, killed at 24 h after the last dose, and livers, lungs

  13. Formation of Neu/ErbB2-induced mammary tumors is unaffected by loss of ErbB4.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Fisher, A J; Bellinger, G; Shum, E; Duong, J K; Perkins, A S; Gassmann, M; Muller, W; Kent Lloyd, K C; Stern, D F

    2006-09-14

    The four members of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases are involved in development and tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Whereas the epidermal growth factor receptor, ErbB2 and ErbB3 are positively associated with various cancers, clinical studies of ErbB4 in breast cancer are contradictory. Results from tissue culture analyses and some clinical studies suggested that ErbB4 is either a tumor suppressor or is a negative regulator of ErbB2-driven tumors. Neu-Cre-ErbB4(flox/null) mice in which ErbB4 was inactivated by Cre-lox-mediated recombination in the mammary gland developed MMTV-Neu-driven mammary tumors with a similar latency period to mice with one or two wild-type ErbB4 alleles. Moreover, there was no difference in the histologies of tumors that developed, nor in the propensity to form lung metastases. Taken together these results suggest that ErbB4 is not a potent, highly penetrant tumor suppressor, nor is it a factor in Neu-mediated tumorigenesis in this model.

  14. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy.Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity

  15. Role of E-cadherin in the induction of apoptosis of HPV16-positive CaSki cervical cancer cells during multicellular tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Haga, Takeshi; Uchide, Noboru; Tugizov, Sharof; Palefsky, Joel M

    2008-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are three dimensional cell culture systems induced by suspension culture. MCTS are widely used in cancer research because of their similarity to solid tumors. CaSki cells are derived from a metastatic cervical cancer containing human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16). Cell death of CaSki cells in MCTS has been previously reported, and our model is used to better characterize the mechanisms of cell death of HPV16-positive keratinocytes. In this study, we found that apoptosis of CaSki cells was induced by suspension culture along with the formation of MCTS after 24 h of incubation. In suspended CaSki cells, monoclonal antibodies blocking E-cadherin function inhibited MCTS formation and suppressed suspension-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot for E-cadherin detected upregulation of the authentic 120 kDa band from MCTS of CaSki cells as well as a shorter 100 kDa band. Addition of EGF, whose receptor is known to form a complex with E-cadherin, abrogated apoptosis of suspended CaSki cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell contact, directly or indirectly, mediates the signal to undergo apoptosis of CaSki cells during MCTS formation, and thus provides new information on the role of E-cadherin in cervical cancer cell apoptosis.

  16. Accelerating NLTE radiative transfer by means of the Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration: A two-level atom line formation in 2D Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, Ivan; Atanacković, Olga

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art methods in multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer are based on the use of local approximate lambda operator within either Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes. Here we propose another approach to the solution of 2D NLTE RT problems, Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration (FBILI), developed earlier for 1D geometry. In order to present the method and examine its convergence properties we use the well-known instance of the two-level atom line formation with complete frequency redistribution. In the formal solution of the RT equation we employ short characteristics with two-point algorithm. Using an implicit representation of the source function in the computation of the specific intensities, we compute and store the coefficients of the linear relations J=a+bS between the mean intensity J and the corresponding source function S. The use of iteration factors in the ‘local’ coefficients of these implicit relations in two ‘inward’ sweeps of 2D grid, along with the update of the source function in other two ‘outward’ sweeps leads to four times faster solution than the Jacobi’s one. Moreover, the update made in all four consecutive sweeps of the grid leads to an acceleration by a factor of 6-7 compared to the Jacobi iterative scheme.

  17. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Formation of Radiolysis By-Products By 13/9 MeV Linear Accelerator of Electrons (LAE) in Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Dziewinski, J.; Hartmann, T.; Marczak, S.; Lu, N.; Walthall, M.; Rafalski, A.; Zagorski, Z. P.

    2002-02-26

    In the near-field chemistry of a salt repository, the radiolytically-induced redox reactions in concentrated saline solution are of particular importance because the radiolysis of saline solutions results in oxidizing chlorine-containing species, which may oxidize actinide species to higher oxidation states. If the brines are irradiated, the solutions containing radiolytic species such as hypochlorite, hypochlorous acid or hydrogen peroxide, their pH and Eh may be altered. The oxidation and complexation states of actinides, which might be present in the salt brine, will change thus influencing their speciation and consequently their mobility. Furthermore, radiolytically formed oxidizing species such as ClO- or H2O2 may enhance the corrosion of the canister material. Therefore, radiation effects on salt brines must be integrated into the database, which described the chemical processes near a disposal site. Investigations in that context usually focus on the radiation chemistry of solid NaCl however our focus is on the radiolytic products, which are formed when salt brines are irradiated by a 10 MeV linear accelerator of electrons (LAE). We attempt to quantify the irradiation-induced formation of typical radiolysis by-products such as the hypochlorite ion (OCl-) by using a 13/9 MeV LAE with doses between 120 KGy to 216 KGy while monitoring the pH of the brine solutions.

  18. Role of Vitamin D3 in Modulation of ΔNp63α Expression during UVB Induced Tumor Formation in SKH-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Amanda R.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.

    2014-01-01

    ΔNp63α, a proto-oncogene, is up-regulated in non-melanoma skin cancers and directly regulates the expression of both Vitamin D receptor (VDR) and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). Since ΔNp63α has been shown to inhibit cell invasion via regulation of VDR, we wanted to determine whether dietary Vitamin D3 protected against UVB induced tumor formation in SKH-1 mice, a model for squamous cell carcinoma development. We examined whether there was a correlation between dietary Vitamin D3 and ΔNp63α, VDR or PTEN expression in vivo in SKH-1 mice chronically exposed to UVB radiation and fed chow containing increasing concentrations of dietary Vitamin D3. Although we observed differential effects of the Vitamin D3 diet on ΔNp63α and VDR expression in chronically irradiated normal mouse skin as well as UVB induced tumors, Vitamin D3 had little effect on PTEN expression in vivo. While low-grade papillomas in mice exposed to UV and fed normal chow displayed increased levels of ΔNp63α, expression of both ΔNp63α and VDR was reduced in invasive tumors. Interestingly, in mice fed high Vitamin D3 chow, elevated levels of ΔNp63α were observed in both local and invasive tumors but not in normal skin suggesting that oral supplementation with Vitamin D3 may increase the proliferative potential of skin tumors by increasing ΔNp63α levels. PMID:25191969

  19. Estrogen decreases chemokine levels in murine mammary tissue: implications for the regulatory role of MIP-1 alpha and MCP-1/JE in mammary tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Peter; Nazareth, Michael; Bucelli, Robert; Mineo, Michael; Gibbs, Kathleen; Kumin, Michael; Grzybek, Kevin; Hoeltke, Janice; Raiber, Lisa; Poppenberg, Kristin; Janis, Kelly; Schwach, Catherine; Aronica, Susan M

    2003-11-01

    Estrogen contributes to the development of breast cancer through mechanisms that are not completely understood. Estrogen influences the function of immune effector cells, primarily through alterations in cytokine expression. Chemokines are proinflammatory cytokines that attract various immune cells to the site of tissue injury or inflammation, and activate many cell types, including T lymphocytes and monocytes. As an initial step toward ultimately determining whether regulation of chemokine expression and/or biological activity by estrogen could potentially be a contributing factor to the development and progression of mammary tumors, we evaluated the effect of estrogen on the expression of specific chemokines in murine mammary tissue. We also evaluated whether exposure of female mice to various chemokines could alter the growth of mammary tumors in the presence of estrogen. We report here that estrogen significantly decreases levels of the chemokines MIP-1alpha and MCP-1/JE in murine mammary tissue. Co-treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen partially reverses the suppressive effect of estrogen on MIP-1alpha levels. Estrogen increases the growth of CCL- 51 cell-based tumors in the mammary glands of female mice. Co-treatment with the chemokine MIP-1alpha or MCP- 1/JE substantially decreases the ability of estrogen to stimulate the formation of CCL-51 cell-based tumors. Our results show that estrogen might influence the bioactivity of specific chemokines through alteration of chemokine expression in mammary tissue, and further suggest that decreases in murine chemokines evoked by estrogen exposure could contribute to the promotion of mammary tumor growth.

  20. Mammary gland specific expression of Brk/PTK6 promotes delayed involution and tumor formation associated with activation of p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ; ductal and lobular carcinomas expressing Brk were significantly more likely to express elevated phospho-p38 MAPK. Conclusions These studies illustrate that forced expression of Brk/PTK6 in non-transformed mammary epithelial cells mediates p38 MAPK phosphorylation and promotes increased cellular survival, delayed involution, and latent tumor formation. Brk expression in human breast tumors may contribute to progression by inducing p38-driven pro-survival signaling pathways. PMID:21923922

  1. Eldecalcitol improves mechanical strength of cortical bones by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in the senescence-accelerated SAM/P6 mice - a comparison with alfacalcidol.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Ayako; Sakai, Sadaoki; Saito, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2014-10-01

    Eldecalcitol (ELD), a 2β-hydroxypropyloxy derivative of 1α,25(OH)2D3, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption that has demonstrated a greater effect at reducing the risk of fracture in osteoporotic patients than alfacalcidol (ALF). In the present study, we used the senescence-accelerated mouse strain P6 (SAM/P6), which has low bone mass caused by osteoblast dysfunction, to evaluate the effect of ELD on cortical bone in comparison with ALF. Four-month-old SAM/P6 mice were given either ELD (0.025 or 0.05μg/kg) or ALF (0.2 or 0.4μg/kg) by oral gavage 5 times/week for 6 weeks. Both ELD and ALF increased serum calcium (Ca) in a dose-dependent manner. Serum Ca levels in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group were comparable to those of the ALF 0.2μg/kg group. ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly improved the bone biomechanical properties of the femur compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.001) and the ALF 0.2μg/kg group (p<0.05) evaluated by 3-point bending test. The cortical area of the mid-femur in the ELD 0.05μg/kg group but not the ALF 0.2μg/kg group was significantly higher than those of the vehicle control group (p<0.001). Bone histomorphometry revealed that in the femoral endocortical surface, the suppression of bone resorption parameters (N.Oc/BS) and bone formation parameters (MS/BS) by ELD (0.05μg/kg) was greater than that by ALF (0.2μg/kg). In contrast, in the femoral periosteal surface, ELD 0.05μg/kg significantly increased bone formation parameters (BFR/BS, MS/BS) compared with the vehicle control group (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively), whereas ALF 0.2μg/kg did not alter these parameters. These results indicate that ELD improved the biomechanical properties of femoral cortical bone not only by inhibiting endocortical bone resorption but also by stimulating the periosteal bone formation in SAM/P6 mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  2. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  3. Epidemiology of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Katharine A

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumors are the commonest solid tumor in children, leading to significant cancer-related mortality. Several hereditary syndromes associated with brain tumors are nonfamilial. Ionizing radiation is a well-recognized risk factor for brain tumors. Several industrial exposures have been evaluated for a causal association with brain tumor formation but the results are inconclusive. A casual association between the common mutagens of tobacco, alcohol, or dietary factors has not yet been established. There is no clear evidence that the incidence of brain tumors has changed over time. This article presents the descriptive epidemiology of the commonest brain tumors of children and adults.

  4. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  5. Primary Tumor-Secreted Lymphangiogenic Factors Induce Pre-Metastatic Lymphvascular Niche Formation at Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wakisaka, Naohiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Miura, Kouki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Junkichi; Sugasawa, Masashi; Moriyama-Kita, Makiko; Endo, Kazuhira; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of lymphvascular niches in lymph nodes of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and investigate the roles of lymphangiogenic and angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D, expressed in the primary tumors. Materials and Methods Forty-four patients with previously untreated clinically late T2 or T3 OSCC of cN0 were evaluated for primary tumors and 166 sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Primary tumors were immunohistochemically analyzed for expressions of VEGFs. Densities of lymphatic vessels (LVDpodoplanin) and high endothelial venules (HEVD) in the SLNs were also calculated using antibodies for each marker, podoplanin and MECA-79, respectively. Results In 25 patients, all lymph nodes were metastasis-negative, whereas, in 19 patients, metastasis was positive for at least one lymph node (either at SLN, non-SLN, or nodal recurrence). From the analyses of 140 SLNs without metastasis, LVDpodoplanin in 50 SLNs of metastasis-positive cases was significantly higher than that in 90 SLNs of metastasis-negative cases (p = 0.0025). HEVD was not associated with lymph node metastasis. The patients with VEGF-A-High or VEGF-D-High tumors had significantly higher LVDpodoplanin than patients with their Low counterparts (p = 0.0233 and p = 0.0209, respectively). In cases with lymph node metastasis, the VEGF-D-expression score was significantly higher than in those without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0006). Conclusions These results suggest that lymph node lymphangiogenesis occurs before metastasis in OSCC. VEGF-A and VEGF-D play critical roles in this process. VEGF-D is a potential predictive marker of positive lymph node metastasis in cN0 patients. PMID:26630663

  6. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  7. A new clinical guideline from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health with a national awareness campaign accelerates brain tumor diagnosis in UK children—“HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware”

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background A national survey in 2006 identified that UK referral practice for pediatric CNS tumors ranked poorly in international comparisons, which led to new National Health Service (NHS) Evidence accredited referral guidelines published in 2008 by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and a campaign to raise awareness of early features of CNS tumors and the need for timely imaging. Methods The “HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware” campaign was launched in June 2011 across the UK as a quality improvement strategy directed at reducing the total diagnostic interval (TDI) from a pre-campaign (2006) median of 14 (mean, 35.4) weeks to a target of 5 weeks in order to equal the best reported internationally. Professional and public awareness was measured by questionnaire surveys. TDI was collected by clinical champions in 18 regional children's cancer centers and the public campaign was coordinated by a national charity, working with a network of community champions. Results The guidelines and campaign raised awareness among pediatricians and were associated with reduction in TDI to a median of 6.7 (mean, 21.3) weeks by May 2013. This change in referral practice was most pronounced in the time from first medical contact to CNS imaging, for which the median was reduced from 3.3 to 1.4 weeks between January 2011 and May 2013 (P = .009). Conclusion This strategy to accelerate brain tumor diagnosis by the NHS using a public and professional awareness campaign is a “world first” in pediatric cancer and is being emulated internationally and acknowledged by a series of NHS and charity awards for excellence. PMID:26523066

  8. Human papillomavirus 16/18 E5 promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and accelerates tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shujie; Deng, Dongrui; Zhang, Weina; Hu, Xiaoji; Wang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Lu, Yunping; Wang, Shixuan; Meng, Li; Ma, Ding

    2013-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are consistently associated with human cervical cancer Additionally, the early oncoproteins of HPVs E5, E6 and E7 are known to contribute to tumor progression. The role of E5 is still nebulous. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanism of E5 action during the human cervical carcinogenesis process. We created four cell models overexpressing HPV16 or HPV18 E5 (HPV16/18 E5) and investigated their ability to proliferate, along with their metastatic characteristics such as migration and invasion. The expression of HPV16/18 E5 protein in various cell lines was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, we compared the levels of phosphorylated paxillin as well as E-cadherin in cell models and controls by western blot analysis. Finally, we assessed the tumor growth rate of human cervical cancer cells overexpressing HPV16/18 E5 in vivo. We discovered that the expression of HPV16/18 E5 consistently increased the malignant potential of various human cervical cancer cells compared with the primary counterparts. We demonstrated the involvement of HPV16/18 E5 in proliferation, migration, invasion and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in human cervical cancer cells. In particular we discovered that HPV16/18 E5 overexpression in human cervical cancer cells correlated with higher levels of paxillin proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and with the downregulation of E-cadherin. Importantly, injection of HPV16/18 E5-overexpressing human cervical cancer cells into mice increased both HPV-and non-HPV-derived tumor growth. Collectively, our data indicate that HPV16/18 E5 influences progression of the human cervical cancer malignant phenotype. This study provides new insights into HPV16/18 E5 as a possible agent that may have an impact on the therapeutic strategies targeting human cervical cancer.

  9. Scaffold-integrated microchips for end-to-end in vitro tumor cell attachment and xenograft formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Kohl, Nathaniel; Shanbhang, Sachin; Parekkadan, Biju

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies have substantially advanced cancer research by enabling the isolation of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The characterization of isolated CTCs has been limited due to the difficulty in recovering and growing isolated cells with high fidelity. Here, we present a strategy that uses a 3D scaffold, integrated into a microfludic device, as a transferable substrate that can be readily isolated after device operation for serial use in vivo as a transplanted tissue bed. Hydrogel scaffolds were incorporated into a PDMS fluidic chamber prior to bonding and were rehydrated in the chamber after fluid contact. The hydrogel matrix completely filled the fluid chamber, significantly increasing the surface area to volume ratio, and could be directly visualized under a microscope. Computational modeling defined different flow and pressure regimes that guided the conditions used to operate the chip. As a proof of concept using a model cell line, we confirmed human prostate tumor cell attachment in the microfluidic scaffold chip, retrieval of the scaffold en masse, and serial implantation of the scaffold to a mouse model with preserved xenograft development. With further improvement in capture efficiency, this approach can offer an end-to-end platform for the continuous study of isolated cancer cells from a biological fluid to a xenograft in mice. PMID:26709385

  10. Scaffold-integrated microchips for end-to-end in vitro tumor cell attachment and xenograft formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Kohl, Nathaniel; Shanbhang, Sachin; Parekkadan, Biju

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic technologies have substantially advanced cancer research by enabling the isolation of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The characterization of isolated CTCs has been limited due to the difficulty in recovering and growing isolated cells with high fidelity. Here, we present a strategy that uses a 3D scaffold, integrated into a microfludic device, as a transferable substrate that can be readily isolated after device operation for serial use in vivo as a transplanted tissue bed. Hydrogel scaffolds were incorporated into a PDMS fluidic chamber prior to bonding and were rehydrated in the chamber after fluid contact. The hydrogel matrix completely filled the fluid chamber, significantly increasing the surface area to volume ratio, and could be directly visualized under a microscope. Computational modeling defined different flow and pressure regimes that guided the conditions used to operate the chip. As a proof of concept using a model cell line, we confirmed human prostate tumor cell attachment in the microfluidic scaffold chip, retrieval of the scaffold en masse, and serial implantation of the scaffold to a mouse model with preserved xenograft development. With further improvement in capture efficiency, this approach can offer an end-to-end platform for the continuous study of isolated cancer cells from a biological fluid to a xenograft in mice.

  11. Differential in vivo mechanism of chemoprevention of tumor formation in azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate mice by PEITC and DBM.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka Lung; Khor, Tin Oo; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2010-05-01

    Previously, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and dibenzoylmethane (DBM) had been shown to inhibit intestinal carcinogenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of PEITC and DBM in the azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-promoted colon cancer mouse model and to compare their potential in vivo mechanisms leading to chemoprevention. The mice were fed with diet supplemented with 0.05% PEITC or 1% DBM before or after AOM initiation. Our results showed that AOM/DSS mice fed with PEITC- or DBM-supplemented diet had lower tumor incidence, lower colon tumor multiplicities and smaller polyps as compared with mice fed with the standard AIN-76A diet. PEITC was effective even after AOM initiation, whereas DBM was not as effective when fed after AOM initiation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that mice fed with PEITC or DBM had attenuated loss of crypt, a marker of inflammation. To examine potential in vivo mechanisms involved in chemoprevention, western blotting was performed and showed that inhibition of growth of adenomas by PEITC was associated with an increase of apoptosis (increased cleaved caspase-3 and-7) and cell cycle arrest (increased p21). In contrast DBM's effect on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis markers was not as substantial as PEITC. Instead, DBM showed increased induction of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) transcription factor and phase II detoxifying enzymes, which appears to correlate with in vitro cell lines results that DBM is a more potent Nrf2 activator than PEITC. In summary, our present study shows that PEITC and DBM are potent natural dietary compounds for chemoprevention of colon cancer induced by AOM/DSS and appears to be associated with different in vivo mechanism of actions. PEITC's chemopreventive effect appears to be due to induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, whereas DBM's effect is due to prevention of AOM initiation via induction of Nrf2 and phase II detoxifying

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) Associates with Huntingtin Protein and Promotes Its Atypical Ubiquitination to Enhance Aggregate Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Marcuzzi, Federica; Codrich, Marta; Agostoni, Elena; Vilotti, Sandra; Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Carnemolla, Alisia; Santoro, Claudio; Gustincich, Stefano; Persichetti, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of polyglutamines in the first exon of huntingtin (HTT), which confers aggregation-promoting properties to amino-terminal fragments of the protein (N-HTT). Mutant N-HTT aggregates are enriched for ubiquitin and contain ubiquitin E3 ligases, thus suggesting a role for ubiquitination in aggregate formation. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) binds to WT and polyQ-expanded N-HTT in vitro as well as to endogenous full-length proteins in mouse and human brain in vivo. Endogenous TRAF6 is recruited to cellular inclusions formed by mutant N-HTT. Transient overexpression of TRAF6 promotes WT and mutant N-HTT atypical ubiquitination with Lys6, Lys27, and Lys29 linkage formation. Both interaction and ubiquitination seem to be independent from polyQ length. In cultured cells, TRAF6 enhances mutant N-HTT aggregate formation, whereas it has no effect on WT N-HTT protein localization. Mutant N-HTT inclusions are enriched for ubiquitin staining only when TRAF6 and Lys6, Lys27, and Lys29 ubiquitin mutants are expressed. Finally, we show that TRAF6 is up-regulated in post-mortem brains from HD patients where it is found in the insoluble fraction. These results suggest that TRAF6 atypical ubiquitination warrants investigation in HD pathogenesis. PMID:21454471

  13. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) associates with huntingtin protein and promotes its atypical ubiquitination to enhance aggregate formation.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Marcuzzi, Federica; Codrich, Marta; Agostoni, Elena; Vilotti, Sandra; Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Carnemolla, Alisia; Santoro, Claudio; Gustincich, Stefano; Persichetti, Francesca

    2011-07-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of polyglutamines in the first exon of huntingtin (HTT), which confers aggregation-promoting properties to amino-terminal fragments of the protein (N-HTT). Mutant N-HTT aggregates are enriched for ubiquitin and contain ubiquitin E3 ligases, thus suggesting a role for ubiquitination in aggregate formation. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) binds to WT and polyQ-expanded N-HTT in vitro as well as to endogenous full-length proteins in mouse and human brain in vivo. Endogenous TRAF6 is recruited to cellular inclusions formed by mutant N-HTT. Transient overexpression of TRAF6 promotes WT and mutant N-HTT atypical ubiquitination with Lys(6), Lys(27), and Lys(29) linkage formation. Both interaction and ubiquitination seem to be independent from polyQ length. In cultured cells, TRAF6 enhances mutant N-HTT aggregate formation, whereas it has no effect on WT N-HTT protein localization. Mutant N-HTT inclusions are enriched for ubiquitin staining only when TRAF6 and Lys(6), Lys(27), and Lys(29) ubiquitin mutants are expressed. Finally, we show that TRAF6 is up-regulated in post-mortem brains from HD patients where it is found in the insoluble fraction. These results suggest that TRAF6 atypical ubiquitination warrants investigation in HD pathogenesis.

  14. A highly invasive subpopulation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells shows accelerated growth, differential chemoresistance, features of apocrine tumors and reduced tumorigenicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mirisola, Valentina; Esposito, Alessia Isabella; Reverberi, Daniele; Matis, Serena; Maffei, Massimo; Giaretti, Walter; Viale, Maurizio; Gangemi, Rosaria; Emionite, Laura; Astigiano, Simonetta; Cilli, Michele; Bachmeier, Beatrice E.; Killian, Peter H.; Albini, Adriana; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of an invasive phenotype is a prerequisite for metastasization, yet it is not clear whether or to which extent the invasive phenotype is linked to other features characteristic of metastatic cells. We selected an invasive subpopulation from the triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, performing repeated cycles of preparative assays of invasion through Matrigel covered membranes. The invasive sub-population of MDA-MB-231 cells exhibits stronger migratory capacity as compared to parental cells confirming the highly invasive potential of the selected cell line. Prolonged cultivation of these cells did not abolish the invasive phenotype. ArrayCGH, DNA index quantification and karyotype analyses confirmed a common genetic origin of the parental and invasive subpopulations and revealed discrete structural differences of the invasive subpopulation including increased ploidy and the absence of a characteristic amplification of chromosome 5p14.1-15.33. Gene expression analyses showed a drastically altered expression profile including features of apocrine breast cancers and of invasion related matrix-metalloproteases and cytokines. The invasive cells showed accelerated proliferation, increased apoptosis, and an altered pattern of chemo-sensitivity with lower IC50 values for drugs affecting the mitotic apparatus. However, the invasive cell population is significantly less tumorigenic in orthotopic mouse xenografts suggesting that the acquisition of the invasive capacity and the achievement of metastatic growth potential are distinct events. PMID:27626697

  15. Novel Role of Merlin Tumor Suppressor in Autophagy and its Implication in Treating NF2-Associated Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    accelerate tumor formation in vivo. This metabolic stress can be suppressed by an autophagy inducer rapamycin . These results suggest that autophagy...induction can be an alternative avenue for treating NF2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Autophagy induction, metabolic stress, Ulk1/Atg1, rapamycin 16... rapamycin (100nM) were used. Autophagy inhibitors used were: 3-methyladenine (10mM) and bafilomycin A1 (50nM). 3b. Initiate 3D cultures MCF10A 3D

  16. Lkb1/Stk11 regulation of mTOR signaling controls the transition of chondrocyte fates and suppresses skeletal tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lick Pui; Lilley, Brendan N; Sanes, Joshua R; McMahon, Andrew P

    2013-11-26

    Liver kinase b1 (Lkb1) protein kinase activity regulates cell growth and cell polarity. Here, we show Lkb1 is essential for maintaining a balance between mitotic and postmitotic cell fates in development of the mammalian skeleton. In this process, Lkb1 activity controls the progression of mitotic chondrocytes to a mature, postmitotic hypertrophic fate. Loss of this Lkb1-dependent switch leads to a dramatic expansion of immature chondrocytes and formation of enchondroma-like tumors. Pathway analysis points to a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-dependent mechanism that can be partially suppressed by rapamycin treatment. These findings highlight a critical requirement for integration of mammalian target of rapamycin activity into developmental decision-making during mammalian skeletogenesis.

  17. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  18. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  19. Comparison of tumor and normal tissue dose for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy eBx source and an Iridium-192 source.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Salahuddin; Johnson, Daniel; Hiatt, Jessica R; Still, D Timothy; Furhang, Eli E; Marsden, David; Kearly, Frank; Bernard, Damian A; Holt, Randall W

    2010-09-14

    The objective of this study has been to compare treatment plans for patients treated with electronic brachytherapy (eBx) using the Axxent System as adjuvant therapy for early stage breast cancer with treatment plans prepared from the same CT image sets using an Ir-192 source. Patients were implanted with an appropriately sized Axxent balloon applicator based on tumor cavity size and shape. A CT image of the implanted balloon was utilized for developing both eBx and Ir-192 brachytherapy treatment plans. The prescription dose was 3.4 Gy per fraction for 10 fractions to be delivered to 1 cm beyond the balloon surface. Iridium plans were provided by the sites on 35 of the 44 patients enrolled in the study. The planning target volume coverage was very similar when comparing sources for each patient as well as between patients. There were no statistical differences in mean %V100. The percent of the planning target volume in the high dose region was increased with eBx as compared with Iridium (p < 0.001). The mean maximum calculated skin and rib doses did not vary greatly between eBx and Iridium. By contrast, the doses to the ipsilateral lung and the heart were significantly lower with eBx as compared with Iridium (p < 0.0001). The total nominal dwell times required for treatment can be predicted by using a combination of the balloon fill volume and planned treatment volume (PTV). This dosimetric comparison of eBx and Iridium sources demonstrates that both forms of balloon-based brachytherapy provide comparable dose to the planning target volume. Electronic brachytherapy is significantly associated with increased dose at the surface of the balloon and decreased dose outside the PTV, resulting in significantly increased tissue sparing in the heart and ipsilateral lung.

  20. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma.

  1. Novel role of immature myeloid cells in formation of new lymphatic vessels associated with inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Ran, Sophia; Wilber, Andrew

    2017-04-13

    Inflammation triggers an immune cell-driven program committed to restoring homeostasis to injured tissue. Central to this process is vasculature restoration, which includes both blood and lymphatic networks. Generation of new vessels or remodeling of existing vessels are also important steps in metastasis-the major cause of death for cancer patients. Although roles of the lymphatic system in regulation of inflammation and cancer metastasis are firmly established, the mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels remain a subject of debate. Until recently, generation of new lymphatics in adults was thought to occur exclusively through sprouting of existing vessels without help from recruited progenitors. However, emerging findings from clinical and experimental studies show that lymphoendothelial progenitors, particularly those derived from immature myeloid cells, play an important role in this process. This review summarizes current evidence for the existence and significant roles of myeloid-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs) in generation of new lymphatics. We describe specific markers of M-LECPs and discuss their biologic behavior in culture and in vivo, as well as currently known molecular mechanisms of myeloid-lymphatic transition (MLT). We also discuss the implications of M-LECPs for promoting adaptive immunity, as well as cancer metastasis. We conclude that improved mechanistic understanding of M-LECP differentiation and its role in adult lymphangiogenesis may lead to new therapeutic approaches for correcting lymphatic insufficiency or excessive formation of lymphatic vessels in human disorders.

  2. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, David; Forster, M.; Bates, D.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, Theodore; Roblin, Yves; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.

    2006-07-01

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  3. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; Bates, D.A.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2006-10-06

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  4. Inhibition of PRL-2·CNNM3 Protein Complex Formation Decreases Breast Cancer Proliferation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kostantin, Elie; Hardy, Serge; Valinsky, William C; Kompatscher, Andreas; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Zolotarov, Yevgen; Landry, Melissa; Uetani, Noriko; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Shrier, Alvin; Tremblay, Michel L

    2016-05-13

    The oncogenic phosphatase of regenerating liver 2 (PRL-2) has been shown to regulate intracellular magnesium levels by forming a complex through an extended amino acid loop present in the Bateman module of the CNNM3 magnesium transporter. Here we identified highly conserved residues located on this amino acid loop critical for the binding with PRL-2. A single point mutation (D426A) of one of those critical amino acids was found to completely disrupt PRL-2·human Cyclin M 3 (CNNM3) complex formation. Whole-cell voltage clamping revealed that expression of CNNM3 influenced the surface current, whereas overexpression of the binding mutant had no effect, indicating that the binding of PRL-2 to CNNM3 is important for the activity of the complex. Interestingly, overexpression of the CNNM3 D426A-binding mutant in cancer cells decreased their ability to proliferate under magnesium-deprived situations and under anchorage-independent growth conditions, demonstrating a PRL-2·CNNM3 complex-dependent oncogenic advantage in a more stringent environment. We further confirmed the importance of this complex in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft breast cancer model. Finally, because molecular modeling showed that the Asp-426 side chain in CNNM3 buries into the catalytic cavity of PRL-2, we showed that a PRL inhibitor could abrogate complex formation, resulting in a decrease in proliferation of human breast cancer cells. In summary, we provide evidence that this fundamental regulatory aspect of PRL-2 in cancer cells could potentially lead to broadly applicable and innovative therapeutic avenues.

  5. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  6. A Novel Carboline Derivative Inhibits Nitric Oxide Formation in Macrophages Independent of Effects on Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Interleukin-1β Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poola, Bhaskar; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Nantz, Michael H.; Lein, Pamela J.; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a maladaptive immune response to peripheral nerve injury that causes a chronic painful condition refractory to most analgesics. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), has been implicated as a key factor in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. β-Carbolines are a large group of natural and synthetic indole alkaloids, some of which block activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a predominant transcriptional regulator of NOS expression. Here, we characterize the inhibitory effects of a novel 6-chloro-8-(glycinyl)-amino-β-carboline (8-Gly carb) on NO formation and NF-κB activation in macrophages. 8-Gly carb was significantly more potent than the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester in inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation in primary rat macrophages. 8-Gly carb interfered with NF-κB–mediated gene expression in differentiated THP1-XBlue cells, a human NF-κB reporter macrophage cell line, but only at concentrations severalfold higher than needed to significantly inhibit NO production. 8-Gly carb also had no effect on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)–induced phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in differentiated THP1 cells, and did not inhibit lipopolysaccharide- or TNFα-stimulated expression of TNFα and interleukin-1β. These data demonstrate that relative to other carbolines and pharmacologic inhibitors of NOS, 8-Gly carb exhibits a unique pharmacological profile by inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation independent of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression. Thus, this novel carboline derivative holds promise as a parent compound, leading to therapeutic agents that prevent the development of neuropathic pain mediated by macrophage-derived NO without interfering with cytokine expression required for neural recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25538105

  7. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  8. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  9. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  10. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  11. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  12. Adsorption behavior of beryllium(II) on copper-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in water: A model for (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water for electromagnets at high-energy accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Kotaro; Kanaya, Naoki; Shimada, Saki; Katsuta, Shoichi; Monjushiro, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Be(II) on CuO nanoparticles dispersed in water was studied as a model for colloid formation of radioactive (7)Be nuclides in the cooling water used for electromagnets at high-energy proton accelerator facilities. An aqueous Be(II) solution and commercially available CuO nanoparticles were mixed, and the adsorption of Be(II) on CuO was quantitatively examined. From a detailed analysis of the adsorption data measured as a function of the pH, it was confirmed that Be(II) is adsorbed on the CuO nanoparticles by complex formation with the hydroxyl groups on the CuO surface (>S-OH) according to the following equation: n > S-OH + Be(2+) ⇔ (>S-O)n Be((2-n)+) + nH(+) (n = 2, 3) S : solid surface. The surface-complexation constants corresponding to the above equilibrium, β(s,2) and β(s,3), were determined for four types of CuO nanoparticles. The β(s,2) value was almost independent of the type of nanoparticle, whereas the β(s,3) values varied with the particle size. These complexation constants successfully explain (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water used for electromagnets at the 12-GeV proton accelerator facility.

  13. Paradoxical role of autophagy in the dysplastic and tumor-forming stages of hepatocarcinoma development in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, K; Guo, X-L; Zhao, Q-d; Jing, Y-y; Kou, X-r; Xie, X-q; Zhou, Y; Cai, N; Gao, L; Zhao, X; Zhang, S-s; Song, J-r; Li, D; Deng, W-j; Li, R; Wu, M-c; Wei, L-x

    2013-02-21

    Many reports have shown that autophagy has a role as both a promoter and inhibitor in tumor development. However, the mechanism of this paradox is unknown. Tumor development is a multistep process. Therefore, we investigated whether the role of autophagy in hepatocarcinoma formation depended on the stage of tumor development. Based on our results, autophagy inhibition by chloroquine had a tumor-promotive effect in the rat model with N-diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in its dysplastic stage (Ds) and a tumor-suppressive effect in its tumor-forming stage (Ts). In the Ds, autophagy inhibition enhanced cell proliferation, DNA damage and inflammatory cytokines expression in liver. These changes were dependent on the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was resulted from autophagy inhibition, and ultimately accelerated the process of hepatocarcinogenesis. However, in the Ts, autophagy inhibition restrained tumor formation by decreasing tumor cell survival and proliferation. In this stage, autophagy inhibition led to excessive ROS accumulation in the tumor, which promoted cell apoptosis, and prominently suppressed tumor cell metabolism. Taken together, our data suggested that autophagy suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ds by protecting normal cell stability and promoted hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ts by supporting tumor cells growth. Autophagy always had a role as a protector throughout the process of hepatocarcinoma development.

  14. Paradoxical role of autophagy in the dysplastic and tumor-forming stages of hepatocarcinoma development in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K; Guo, X-l; Zhao, Q-d; jing, Y-y; Kou, X-r; Xie, X-q; Zhou, Y; Cai, N; Gao, L; Zhao, X; Zhang, S-s; Song, J-r; Li, D; Deng, W-j; Li, R; Wu, M-c; Wei, L-x

    2013-01-01

    Many reports have shown that autophagy has a role as both a promoter and inhibitor in tumor development. However, the mechanism of this paradox is unknown. Tumor development is a multistep process. Therefore, we investigated whether the role of autophagy in hepatocarcinoma formation depended on the stage of tumor development. Based on our results, autophagy inhibition by chloroquine had a tumor-promotive effect in the rat model with N-diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in its dysplastic stage (Ds) and a tumor-suppressive effect in its tumor-forming stage (Ts). In the Ds, autophagy inhibition enhanced cell proliferation, DNA damage and inflammatory cytokines expression in liver. These changes were dependent on the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was resulted from autophagy inhibition, and ultimately accelerated the process of hepatocarcinogenesis. However, in the Ts, autophagy inhibition restrained tumor formation by decreasing tumor cell survival and proliferation. In this stage, autophagy inhibition led to excessive ROS accumulation in the tumor, which promoted cell apoptosis, and prominently suppressed tumor cell metabolism. Taken together, our data suggested that autophagy suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ds by protecting normal cell stability and promoted hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ts by supporting tumor cells growth. Autophagy always had a role as a protector throughout the process of hepatocarcinoma development. PMID:23429287

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  17. Generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxide tumor promoters in isolated mouse keratinocytes. Formation of alkyl and alkoxyl radicals from tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Taffe, B G; Takahashi, N; Kensler, T W; Mason, R P

    1987-09-05

    The organic hydroperoxides tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide are tumor promoters in the skin of SENCAR mice, and this activity is presumed to be mediated through the activation of the hydroperoxides to free radical species. In this study we have assessed the generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxides in the target cell (the murine basal keratinocyte) using electron spin resonance. Incubation of primary isolates of keratinocytes from SENCAR mice in the presence of spin traps (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide or 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane) and either tert-butyl hydroperoxide or cumene hydroperoxide resulted in the generation and detection of radical adducts of these spin traps. tert-Butyl alkoxyl and alkyl radical adducts of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide were detected shortly after addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide, whereas only alkyl radical adducts were observed with cumene hydroperoxide. Spin trapping of the alkyl radicals with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane led to the identification of methyl and ethyl radical adducts following both tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide exposures. Prior heating of the cells to 100 degrees C for 30 min prevented radical formation. The radical generating capacity of subcellular fractions of these epidermal cells was examined using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and this activity was confined to the 105,000 X g supernatant fraction.

  18. Characterization of moderator assembly dimension for accelerator boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors using {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons at proton energy of 2.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension are investigated for the usage of {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.5 MeV protons in boron newtron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors in the present study. The indexes checked are treatable protocol depth (TPD), which is the greatest depth of the region satisfying the dose requirements in BNCT protocol, proton current necessary to complete BNCT by 1 h irradiation, and the heat flux deposited in the Li target which should be removed. Assumed materials are D{sub 2}O for moderator, and mixture of polyethylene and LiF with 50 wt % for collimator. Dose distributions have been computed with MCNP 4B and 4C codes. Consequently, realized TPD does not show a monotonical tendency for the Li target diameter. However, the necessary proton current and heat flux in the Li target decreases as the Li target diameter increases, while this trend reverses at around 10 cm of the Li target diameter for the necessary proton current in the condition of this study. As to the moderator diameter, TPD does not exhibit an apparent dependence. On the other hand, necessary proton current and heat flux decrease as the moderator diameter increases, and this tendency saturates at around 60 cm of the moderator diameter in this study. As to the collimator, increase in inner diameter is suitable from the viewpoint of increasing TPD and decreasing necessary proton current and heat flux, while these indexes do not show apparent difference for collimator inner diameters over 14 cm for the parameters treated here. The practical viewpoint in selecting the parameters of moderator assembly dimension is to increase TPD, within the technically possible condition of accelerated proton current and heat removal from the Li target. In this process, the values for which the resultant characteristics mentioned above saturate or reverse would be important factors.

  19. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  20. Low-temperature (180 °C) formation of large-grained Ge (111) thin film on insulator using accelerated metal-induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Toko, K. Numata, R.; Oya, N.; Suemasu, T.; Fukata, N.; Usami, N.

    2014-01-13

    The Al-induced crystallization (AIC) yields a large-grained (111)-oriented Ge thin film on an insulator at temperatures as low as 180 °C. We accelerated the AIC of an amorphous Ge layer (50-nm thickness) by initially doping Ge in Al and by facilitating Ge diffusion into Al. The electron backscatter diffraction measurement demonstrated the simultaneous achievement of large grains over 10 μm and a high (111) orientation fraction of 90% in the polycrystalline Ge layer formed at 180 °C. This result opens up the possibility for developing Ge-based electronic and optical devices fabricated on inexpensive flexible substrates.

  1. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    form an active autocrine loop. fibrosis . Luminal epithelial cells of PIA lesions have elev- A recent study indicated the increase of both IL-6 and...its receptor dothelin-3 (ET-3), and endothelin-4 (ET-4) (Cun- ( CXCR4 ), may play a role as prostate cancer bone meta- ningham et al., 1997). All...members of the endothelin stasis homing signals. The level of CXCR4 increased family contain two essential disulfide bridges and six with the malignancy of

  2. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Anglogenic Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    1164, 1994 442--447,1987 36. Brooks PC, Clark RAF, Cheresh DA: Requirement of vas- 20. Pepper MS: Manipulating angiogensis: from basic science cular...tol 22:1-10. stasis in transgenic mice. Genes Dev 9:945-955. 518 Cunha, G.R. and Chung, L.W. (1981) Stromal-epithelial interac- Corty, EW, Ferguson

  3. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    neuroendocrine factors. They can guide cancer cell perineural invasion and dissemination through the release of soluble and solid matrix factors (see review (32...Ooshima, A. Targeted disruption of TGF-betal/Smad3 signaling protects against renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral

  4. Tracing the Tumor Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Nicholas E.; Hicks, James

    2010-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which tumors progress is critical to our understanding and treatment of cancer. We do not routinely sample patients at multiple time points during the progression of their disease, and thus our research is limited to inferring progression a posteriori from the examination of a single tumor sample. Despite this limitation, inferring progression is possible because the tumor genome contains a natural history of the mutations that occur during the formation of the tumor mass. There are two approaches to reconstructing a lineage of progression: (1) inter-tumor comparisons, and (2) intra-tumor comparisons. The inter-tumor approach consists of taking single samples from large collections of tumors and comparing the complexity of the genomes to identify early and late mutations. The intra-tumor approach involves taking multiple samples from individual heterogeneous tumors to compare divergent clones and reconstruct a phylogenetic lineage. Here we discuss how these approaches can be used to interpret the current models for tumor progression. We also compare data from primary and metastatic copy number profiles to shed light on the final steps of breast cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how recent technical advances in single cell genomics will herald a new era in understanding the fundamental basis of tumor heterogeneity and progression. PMID:20537601

  5. Graphene-assisted room-temperature synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid electrode materials: dramatic acceleration of the formation rate of 2D metal oxide nanoplates induced by reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Sung, Da-Young; Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Lee, Yu Ri; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2013-05-27

    A new prompt room temperature synthetic route to 2D nanostructured metal oxide-graphene-hybrid electrode materials can be developed by the application of colloidal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets as an efficient reaction accelerator for the synthesis of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. Whereas the synthesis of the 2D nanostructured δ-MnO2 at room temperature requires treating divalent manganese compounds with persulfate ions for at least 24 h, the addition of RGO nanosheet causes a dramatic shortening of synthesis time to 1 h, underscoring its effectiveness for the promotion of the formation of 2D nanostructured metal oxide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the accelerated synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid material induced by the RGO nanosheets. The observed acceleration of nanoplate formation upon the addition of RGO nanosheets is attributable to the enhancement of the oxidizing power of persulfate ions, the increase of the solubility of precursor MnCO3, and the promoted crystal growth of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. The resulting hybridization between RGO nanosheets and δ-MnO2 nanoplates is quite powerful not only in increasing the surface area of manganese oxide nanoplate but also in enhancing its electrochemical activity. Of prime importance is that the present δ-MnO2 -RGO nanocomposites show much superior electrode performance over most of 2D nanostructured manganate systems including a similar porous assembly of RGO and layered MnO2 nanosheets. This result underscores that the present RGO-assisted solution-based synthesis can provide a prompt and scalable method to produce nanostructured hybrid electrode materials.

  6. Compact pulsed accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, M.J.; Schneider, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of fast pulses from a current charged transmission line and opening switch is described. By employing a plasma focus as an opening switch and diode in the prototype device, a proton beam of peak energy 250 keV is produced. The time integrated energy spectrum of the beam is constructed from a Thomson spectrograph. Applications of this device as an inexpensive and portable charged particle accelerator are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  8. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  9. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  10. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  11. Paradoxical dependencies of tumor dormancy and progression on basic cell kinetics.

    PubMed

    Enderling, Heiko; Anderson, Alexander R A; Chaplain, Mark A J; Beheshti, Afshin; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2009-11-15

    Even after a tumor is established, it can early on enter a state of dormancy marked by balanced cell proliferation and cell death. Disturbances to this equilibrium may affect cancer risk, as they may cause the eventual lifetime clinical presentation of a tumor that might otherwise have remained asymptomatic. Previously, we showed that cell death, proliferation, and migration can play a role in shifting this dynamic, making the understanding of their combined influence on tumor development essential. We developed an individual cell-based computer model of the interaction of cancer stem cells and their nonstem progeny to study early tumor dynamics. Simulations of tumor growth show that three basic components of tumor growth--cell proliferation, migration, and death--combine in unexpected ways to control tumor progression and, thus, clinical cancer risk. We show that increased proliferation capacity in nonstem tumor cells and limited cell migration overall lead to space constraints that inhibit proliferation and tumor growth. By contrast, increasing the rate of cell death produces the expected tumor size reduction in the short term, but results ultimately in paradoxical accelerated long-term growth owing to the liberation of cancer stem cells and formation of self-metastases.

  12. Formation of a major DNA adduct of the mitomycin metabolite 2,7-diaminomitosene in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells treated with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Kumar, G S; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with [3H]mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major DNA adducts, as described earlier using an HPLC assay of 3H-labeled products of enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA isolated from MC-treated cells. Four of these adducts were identified as monofunctional and bifunctional guanine-N2 adducts in the minor groove of DNA. In order to establish relationships between individual types of MC-DNA adducts and biological responses it is necessary to identify all of the adducts formed in cells. To this end we have now identified a predominant, previously unknown adduct formed in MC-treated EMT6 cells as a derivative not of MC, but of 2,7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), the major bioreductive metabolite of MC. Rigorous proof demonstrates that it is a DNA major groove, guanine-N7 adduct of 2,7-DAM, linked at C-10 to DNA. The adduct is relatively stable at ambient temperature, but is readily depurinated upon heating. Its isolation from MC-treated cells indicates that MC is reductively metabolized to 2,7-DAM, which then undergoes further reductive activation to alkylate DNA, along with the parent MC. Low MC:DNA ratios were identified as a critical factor promoting 2,7-DAM adduct formation in an in vitro model calf thymus DNA/ MC/reductase model system, as well as in MC-treated EMT6 cells. The 2,7-DAM-guanine-N7 DNA adduct appears to be relatively noncytotoxic, as indicated by the dramatically lower cytotoxicity of 2,7-DAM in comparison with MC in EMT6 cells. Like MC, 2,7-DAM exhibited slightly greater cytotoxicity to cells treated under hypoxic as compared to aerobic conditions. However, 2,7-DAM was markedly less cytotoxic than MC under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Thus, metabolic reduction of MC to 2,7-DAM represents a detoxification process. The differential effects of MC-DNA and 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts support the concept that specific structural features of the DNA damage may play a critical role in the cytotoxic response to a DNA

  13. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  14. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  15. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  16. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  17. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  18. Evaluation of a combined respiratory-gating system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Kawamura, Shinji; Uehara, Takuya; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Koike, Masahiro; Sera, Tatsuhiro; Emoto, Yuki; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time, tumor-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed in our institution. The goals of this study were to assess the capability of SyncTraX in measuring the position of a fiducial marker using color fluoroscopic images, and to evaluate the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using this combined system for the simple geometry. For the fundamental evaluation of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using SyncTraX, the following were performed: 1) determination of dosimetric and positional characteristics of sinusoidal patterns using a motor-driven base for several gating windows; 2) measurement of time delay using an oscilloscope; 3) positional verification of sinusoidal patterns and the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient; 4) measurement of the half-value layer (HVL in mm AL), effective kVp, and air kerma, using a solid-state detector for each fluoroscopic condition, to determine the patient dose. The dose profile in a moving phantom with gated radiotherapy having a gating window ≤4 mm was in good agreement with that under static conditions for each photon beam. The total time delay between TrueBeam and SyncTraX was <227 ms for each photon beam. The mean of the positional tracking error was <0.4 mm for sinusoidal patterns and for the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient. The air-kerma rates from one fluoroscopy direction were 1.93±0.01, 2.86±0.01, 3.92±0.04, 5.28±0.03, and 6.60±0.05 mGy/min for 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV X-ray beams at 80 mA, respectively. The combined system comprising TrueBeam and SyncTraX could track the motion of the fiducial marker and control radiation delivery with reasonable accuracy; therefore, this system provides significant dosimetric improvement. However, patient exposure dose from fluoroscopy was not clinically negligible. PACS number(s): 87.53.Bn, 87.55.km, 87.55.Qr.

  19. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  20. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  1. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S.; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. PMID:25117977

  2. Study of beam optics and beam halo by integrated modeling of negative ion beams from plasma meniscus formation to beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2013-01-14

    To understand the physical mechanism of the beam halo formation in negative ion beams, a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code for simulating the trajectories of negative ions created via surface production has been developed. The simulation code reproduces a beam halo observed in an actual negative ion beam. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the plasma meniscus (an electro-static lens in a source plasma) are over-focused in the extractor due to large curvature of the meniscus.

  3. Ear Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis Tumors of the ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis NOTE: This is ...

  4. Impact accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  5. Porous microspheres as promising vehicles for the topical delivery of poorly soluble asiaticoside accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation in vitro &in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Niu, Jie; Chong, Yee-Song; Huang, Yan-Fen; Chu, Yang; Xie, Sheng-Yang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Peng, Li-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Asiaticoside is a natural compound possessing diverse pharmacological effects with great potential for clinical use. However, the low solubility and oil-water partition coefficient of asiaticoside lead to reduced effect and limited application. This study aims to construct a porous microsphere for the sustained release of asiaticoside to improve its absorption and enhance the therapeutic effects. Parameters of the formulations, including the drug to polymer ratio, solvent amounts of the inner and external phases, the stirring speed for preparation, and the drug entrapment efficiency were investigated and optimized. Particle size, morphology, pores structure, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the microsphere were characterized. The release kinetics and cellular uptake profiles of the asiaticoside-microspheres were examined. The therapeutic effects of asiaticoside-microspheres on wound healing and skin appendages regeneration were investigated in vitro & in vivo. Results showed that the optimized asiaticoside-microspheres possess spherical spongy structure with cylindrical holes. Asiaticoside can be loaded in the microsphere with high efficiency and released with sustained manner. The cellular uptake of asiaticoside from the microspheres was increased with 9.1 folds higher than that of free solution. Asiaticoside-microspheres expressed the strong promotion in the proliferation, migration of keratinocytes and wound scratching healing in vitro. More importantly, they significantly accelerated the re-epithelization, collagen synthesis and pro-angiogenesis in the rat full-skin wound healing. Porous microsphere was shown a novel carrier for the sustained delivery of poorly soluble asiaticoside, with absorption and therapeutic effects improved. Asiaticoside-microsphere is a promising topical preparation with excellent regenerative effects for the wound therapy.

  6. Reductive off-odors in wines: Formation and release of H₂S and methanethiol during the accelerated anoxic storage of wines.

    PubMed

    Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Ferreira, Vicente

    2016-05-15

    In order to better understand the processes involved in the development of H2S and methanethiol (MeSH) along anoxic storage of wines, 24 wines were stored in strict anoxia at 50°C for 3weeks. Free and total forms of H2S and MeSH were measured at different times. Results showed that: (1) all wines contain relevant proportions of bonded forms of H2S and MeSH (93% and 47% on average); (2) such % decreases with age; (3) levels of total forms are related to wine metal composition; (4) anoxic storage brings about an increase of free forms, a strong decrease in the percentage of bonded forms, and except for H2S in red wines, an increase in total forms. Both de novo formation and release contribute to reductive off-odors. Release is predominant for reds and H2S, while at 50°C, de novo formation dominates for whites and rosés and MeSH.

  7. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-07

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  8. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Tools & Publications Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors World Health Organization (WHO) Updates Official Classification of Tumors ... Central Nervous System On May 9, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published an official reclassification of ...

  9. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-04-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ~21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ~21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01439e

  10. Dietary vitamin D inadequacy accelerates calcification and osteoblast-like cell formation in the vascular system of LDL receptor knockout and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nadine; Brandsch, Corinna; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Hirche, Frank; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is highly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We have demonstrated enhanced vascular calcification in LDL receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice fed a diet low in vitamin D. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a diet low in vitamin D on vascular calcification in wild-type (WT) mice lacking atherosclerotic plaques and the effects of a persistent and discontinuous vitamin D insufficiency on atherosclerotic plaque composition in LDLR(-/-) mice. The study was performed with 4-wk-old male WT and LDLR(-/-) mice that were fed a normal calcium/phosphate Western diet (210 g/kg fat, 1.5 g/kg cholesterol) containing either adequate (+D; 1000 IU/kg) or low (-D; 50 IU/kg) amounts of vitamin D-3 for 16 wk. Four groups of LDLR(-/-) mice received 1 of the 2 diets for additional 16 wk (total 32 wk) and were compared with mice fed the diets for only 16 wk. WT and LDLR(-/-) mice that were fed the -D diet for 16 wk tended to develop more calcified spots in the aortic valve than mice fed the +D diet (+50% and +56%, respectively; P < 0.10). In LDLR(-/-) mice, the extent of calcification increased from week 16 to week 32 and was higher in the -D than in the +D group (P < 0.05). The calcification, owing to the -D diet, was accompanied by highly expressed osteoblast differentiation factors, indicating a transdifferentiation of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. Feeding the +D diet subsequent to the -D diet reduced the vascular calcification (P < 0.05). LDLR(-/-) mice fed the -D diet for 32 wk had higher plaque lipid depositions (+48%, P < 0.05) and a higher expression of cluster of differentiation 68 (+31%, P < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor α (+134%, P < 0.001) than the +D group. Collectively, the findings imply low vitamin D status as a causal factor for vascular calcification and atherosclerosis.

  11. Acceleration of bone formation during fracture healing by poly(pro-hyp-gly)10 and basic fibroblast growth factor containing polycystic kidney disease and collagen-binding domains from Clostridium histolyticum collagenase.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kentaro; Inoue, Gen; Matsushita, Osamu; Saito, Wataru; Aikawa, Jun; Tanaka, Keisuke; Fujimaki, Hisako; Miyagi, Masayuki; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Growth factor delivered in combination with animal-derived collagen materials has been used to accelerate bone fracture healing in human patients. However, the introduction of bovine proteins into humans carries the risk of zoonotic and immunologic complications. Here, we developed a collagen-like polypeptide-based bone formation system consisting of poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 , which mimics the triple helical conformation of collagen, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domain and collagen-binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. Circular dichroism spectral analysis showed that when pepsin-soluble bovine type I collagen was treated at 50°C, a positive signal corresponding to the collagen triple helix at 220 nm was not detected. In contrast, poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 retained the 220-nm positive peak, even when treated at 80°C. The combination of the collagen binding-bFGF fusion protein (bFGF-PKD-CBD) with poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 induced greater bone formation compared to bFGF alone in mice bone fracture models. Taken together, these properties suggest that the bFGF-PKD-CBD/poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 composite is a promising material for bone repair in the clinical setting. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1372-1378, 2016.

  12. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  13. Protein kinase Cα suppresses Kras-mediated lung tumor formation through activation of a p38 MAPK-TGFβ signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, KS; Erdogan, E; Khoor, A; Walsh, MP; Leitges, M; Murray, NR; Fields, AP

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) can activate both pro- and anti-tumorigenic signaling depending upon cellular context. Here, we investigated the role of PKCα in lung tumorigenesis in vivo. Gene expression data sets revealed that primary human non-small lung cancers (NSCLC) express significantly decreased PKCα levels, indicating that loss of PKCα expression is a recurrent event in NSCLC. We evaluated the functional relevance of PKCα loss during lung tumorigenesis in three murine lung adenocarcinoma models (LSL-Kras, LA2-Kras and urethane exposure). Genetic deletion of PKCα resulted in a significant increase in lung tumor number, size, burden and grade, bypass of oncogene-induced senescence, progression from adenoma to carcinoma and a significant decrease in survival in vivo. The tumor promoting effect of PKCα loss was reflected in enhanced Kras-mediated expansion of bronchio-alveolar stem cells (BASCs), putative tumor-initiating cells, both in vitro and in vivo. LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− mice exhibited a decrease in phospho-p38 MAPK in BASCs in vitro and in tumors in vivo, and treatment of LSL-Kras BASCs with a p38 inhibitor resulted in increased colony size indistinguishable from that observed in LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− BASCs. In addition, LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− BASCs exhibited a modest but reproducible increase in TGFβ1 mRNA, and addition of exogenous TGFβ1 to LSL-Kras BASCs results in enhanced growth similar to untreated BASCs from LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− mice. Conversely, a TGFβR1 inhibitor reversed the effects of PKCα loss in LSL-Kras/Prkca−/−BASCs. Finally, we identified the inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) Id1–3 and the Wilm’s Tumor 1 as potential downstream targets of PKCα-dependent tumor suppressor activity in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that PKCα suppresses tumor initiation and progression, at least in part, through a PKCα-p38MAPK-TGFβ signaling axis that regulates tumor cell proliferation and Kras-induced senescence. Our results provide the

  14. Differential oxidative modification of proteins in MRL+/+ and MRL/lpr mice: Increased formation of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehyde-protein adducts may contribute to accelerated onset of autoimmune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Li, Hui; Firoze Khan, M

    2012-12-01

    Even though reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in SLE pathogenesis, the contributory role of ROS, especially the consequences of oxidative modification of proteins by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in eliciting an autoimmune response and disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. MRL/lpr mice, a widely used model for SLE, spontaneously develop a condition similar to human SLE, whereas MRL+/+ mice with the same MRL background, show much slower onset of SLE. To assess if the differences in the onset of SLE in the two substrains could partly be due to differential expression of LPDAs and to provide evidence for the role of LPDA-modified proteins in SLE pathogenesis, we determined the serum levels of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts, anti-MDA-/HNE-protein adduct antibodies, MDA-/HNE-protein adduct specific immune complexes, and various autoantibodies in 6-, 12- and 18-week old mice of both substrains. The results show age-related increases in the formation of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts, their corresponding antibodies and MDA-/HNE-specific immune complexes, but MRL/lpr mice showed greater and more accelerated response. Interestingly, a highly positive correlation between increased anti-MDA-/HNE-protein adduct antibodies and autoantibodies was observed. More importantly, we further observed that HNE-MSA caused significant inhibition in antinuclear antibodies (ANA) binding to nuclear antigens. These findings suggest that LPDA-modified proteins could be important sources of autoantibodies and CICs in these mice, and thus contribute to autoimmune disease pathogenesis. The observed differential responses to LPDAs in MRL/lpr and MRL+/+ mice may, in part, be responsible for accelerated and delayed onset of the disease, respectively.

  15. High average power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, J.C.

    1985-10-01

    The induction accelerator is discussed with respect to general background and concept, beam transport, scaling, pulse power technology, and the electron beam injector. A discussion of the factors which affect the scaling of the intensity of the beam is given. Limiting factors include collective forces in the beam, virtual cathode formation, surroundings, and beam breakup instability. 24 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)

  16. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  17. Activation of the FGFR-STAT3 pathway in breast cancer cells induces a hyaluronan-rich microenvironment that licenses tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Laura R; Chuntova, Pavlina; Bade, Lindsey K; Beadnell, Thomas C; Leon, Ronald P; Brady, Nicholas J; Ryu, Yungil; Goldberg, Jodi E; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; McCarthy, James B; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) contributes to breast cancer growth, progression, and therapeutic resistance. Because of the complex nature of the FGF/FGFR axis, and the numerous effects of FGFR activation on tumor cells and the surrounding microenvironment, the specific mechanisms through which aberrant FGFR activity contributes to breast cancer are not completely understood. We show here that FGFR activation induces accumulation of hyaluronan within the extracellular matrix and that blocking hyaluronan synthesis decreases proliferation, migration, and therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, FGFR-mediated hyaluronan accumulation requires activation of the STAT3 pathway, which regulates expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) and subsequent hyaluronan synthesis. Using a novel in vivo model of FGFR-dependent tumor growth, we demonstrate that STAT3 inhibition decreases both FGFR-driven tumor growth and hyaluronan levels within the tumor. Finally, our results suggest that combinatorial therapies inhibiting both FGFR activity and hyaluronan synthesis is more effective than targeting either pathway alone and may be a relevant therapeutic approach for breast cancers associated with high levels of FGFR activity. In conclusion, these studies indicate a novel targetable mechanism through which FGFR activation in breast cancer cells induces a protumorigenic microenvironment.

  18. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  19. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  20. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  1. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  2. Design and synthesis of fluorescence-labeled closo-dodecaborate lipid: its liposome formation and in vivo imaging targeting of tumors for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Noriko; Ban, Hyun Seung; Ueno, Manabu; Tachikawa, Shoji

    2012-02-21

    The fluorescence-labeled closo-dodecaborane lipid (FL-SBL) was synthesized from (S)-(+)-1,2-isopropylideneglycerol as a chiral starting material. FL-SBL was readily accumulated into the PEGylated DSPC liposomes prepared from DSPC, CH, and DSPE-PEG-OMe by the post insertion protocol. The boron concentrations and the fluorescent intensities of the FL-SBL-labeled DSPC liposomes increased with the increase of the additive FL-SBL, and the maximum emission wavelength of the liposomes appeared at 531 nm. A preliminary in vivo imaging study of tumor-bearing mice revealed that the FL-SBL-labeled DSPC liposomes were delivered to the tumor tissue but not distributed to hypoxic regions.

  3. 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) inhibits mammary epithelial differentiation and induces fibroadenoma formation in female Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wright, Laura E; Frye, Jennifer B; Lukefahr, Ashley L; Marion, Samuel L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Besselsen, David G; Funk, Janet L

    2011-07-01

    4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), an occupational chemical that targets ovarian follicles and accelerates ovarian failure in rodents, was used to test the effect of early-onset reproductive senescence on mammary fibroadenoma formation. One-month female Sprague Dawley rats were dosed with VCD (80 mg/kg or 160 mg/kg) and monitored for 22 months for persistent estrus and tumor development. Only high-dose VCD treatment accelerated the onset of persistent estrus relative to controls. However, both doses of VCD accelerated mammary tumor onset by 5 months, increasing incidence to 84% (vs. 38% in controls). Tumor development was independent of time in persistent estrus, 17 β-estradiol, androstenedione and prolactin. Delay in VCD administration until after completion of mammary epithelial differentiation (3 months) did not alter tumor formation despite acceleration of ovarian senescence. VCD administration to 1-month rats acutely decreased mammary alveolar bud number and expression of β-casein, suggesting that VCD's tumorigenic effect requires exposure during mammary epithelial differentiation.

  4. Can secondary degeneration accelerate the formation of neurofibrillary tangles? A case of hemispheric infarction showing asymmetric degeneration of the substantia nigra, red nuclei, inferior olivary nuclei and dentate nuclei with concomitant changes of progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Oda, M; Arai, N; Shin, T; Hayashi, M

    1999-02-01

    A case of hemispheric infarction involving the territory of the right middle cerebral artery and the thalamus showed conspicuous asymmetric degeneration in the substantia nigra, red nuclei, inferior olivary nuclei and dentate nuclei with concomitant changes of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The right substantia nigra and red nucleus showed loss of neurons and proliferation of astrocytes. The right olivary nucleus was hypertrophic, while the neuronal loss and astrocytosis in the dentate nucleus were predominant on the contralateral side. Modified Gallyas-Braak staining revealed the extensive distribution of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), threads and intraglial argyrophilic structures in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nuclei, cerebral cortex and dentate nuclei, as well as in the affected brain stem nuclei, with a distinct predominance on the affected side. In this case, the one-sided predominance of the extended degeneration in these brain stem and cerebellar areas is considered, in addition to the PSP changes, to be due to secondary retrograde degeneration via the nigrostriatal and dentato-rubro-thalamic pathways following the hemispheric infarction, and to also be the result of disruption of the dentato-olivary fiber connections. In addition, because of the predominant distribution of NFTs on the more degenerated side, it is surmised that the formation of NFTs may be accelerated by secondary degeneration.

  5. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  6. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wilms Tumor KidsHealth > For Parents > Wilms Tumor Print A A A What's in this article? ... their child has cancer. Fortunately, most kids with Wilms tumor, a rare kidney cancer, survive and go on ...

  8. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Hirbe, Angela C; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M; Clapp, D Wade; Gutmann, David H

    2016-02-16

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ~60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1(flox/flox) mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ~70% of Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1(flox/null) mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/- stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy.

  9. New Trends in Induction Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-12-05

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  10. Tracheobronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Branislava

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of trachea and bronchi are uncommon and can occur in the form of benign or low- and high-grade malignant tumors. Although tracheobronchial tumors (TBTs) represent only 0.6% of all pulmonary tumors, they are clinically significant. Delays in diagnosis of these tumors commonly occur because the signs and symptoms caused by these tumors are nonspecific and chest radiographs are often considered unremarkable. Therefore, novel radiological techniques and better access to flexible bronchoscopy enable detection of larger number of TBT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of tracheal and bronchial tumors and discuss significant aspects of the different TBT with focus on clinical manifestations and diagnostic procedures. PMID:28066620

  11. Computational assessment of deep-seated tumor treatment capability of the 9Be(d,n)10B reaction for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT).

    PubMed

    Capoulat, M E; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-03-01

    The 9Be(d,n)10B reaction was studied as an epithermal neutron source for brain tumor treatment through Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In BNCT, neutrons are classified according to their energies as thermal (<0.5 eV), epithermal (from 0.5 eV to 10 keV) or fast (>10 keV). For deep-seated tumors epithermal neutrons are needed. Since a fraction of the neutrons produced by this reaction are quite fast (up to 5-6 MeV, even for low-bombarding energies), an efficient beam shaping design is required. This task was carried out (1) by selecting the combinations of bombarding energy and target thickness that minimize the highest-energy neutron production; and (2) by the appropriate choice of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) geometry, for each of the combinations found in (1). The BSA geometry was determined as the configuration that maximized the dose deliverable to the tumor in a 1 h treatment, within the constraints imposed by the healthy tissue dose adopted tolerance. Doses were calculated through the MCNP code. The highest dose deliverable to the tumor was found for an 8 μm target and a deuteron beam of 1.45 MeV. Tumor weighted doses ≥40 Gy can be delivered up to about 5 cm in depth, with a maximum value of 51 Gy at a depth of about 2 cm. This dose performance can be improved by relaxing the treatment time constraint and splitting the treatment into two 1-h sessions. These good treatment capabilities strengthen the prospects for a potential use of this reaction in BNCT.

  12. Id1 Deficiency Protects against Tumor Formation in Apc(Min/+) Mice but Not in a Mouse Model of Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Chin, Yvette; Benezra, Robert; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Different mechanisms contribute to the development of sporadic, hereditary and colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id) proteins act as dominant-negative antagonists of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Id1 is a promising target for cancer therapy, but little is known about its role in the development of colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry to demonstrate that Id1 is overexpressed in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, whether sporadic or syndromic. Furthermore, elevated Id1 levels were found in dysplasia and colon cancer arising in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Because levels of PGE2 are also elevated in both colitis and colorectal neoplasia, we determined whether PGE2 could induce Id1. PGE2 via EP4 stimulated protein kinase A activity resulting in enhanced pCREB-mediated Id1 transcription in human colonocytes. To determine the role of Id1 in carcinogenesis, two mouse models were used. Consistent with the findings in humans, Id1 was overexpressed in tumors arising in both Apc(Min) (/+) mice, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis, and in experimental colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia. Id1 deficiency led to significant decrease in the number of intestinal tumors in Apc(Min) (/+) mice and prolonged survival. In contrast, Id1 deficiency did not affect the number or size of tumors in the model of colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia, likely due to exacerbation of colitis associated with Id1 loss. Collectively, these results suggest that Id1 plays a role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Our findings also highlight the need for different strategies to reduce the risk of colitis-associated colorectal cancer compared with sporadic or hereditary colorectal cancer.

  13. A nuclear localization signal and the C-terminal omega sequence in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirD2 endonuclease are important for tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Shurvinton, C E; Hodges, L; Ream, W

    1992-12-15

    The T-DNA portion of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid integrates into plant nuclear DNA. Direct repeats define the T-DNA ends; transfer begins when the VirD2 endonuclease produces a site-specific nick in the right-hand border repeat and attaches to the 5' end of the nicked strand. Subsequent events generate linear single-stranded VirD2-bound DNA molecules that include the entire T-DNA (T-strands). VirD2 protein contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) near the C terminus and may direct bound T-strands to plant nuclei. We constructed mutations in virD2 and showed that the NLS was important for tumorigenesis, although T-strand production occurred normally in its absence. A tobacco etch virus NLS, substituted for the VirD2 NLS, restored tumor-inducing activity. Amino acids (the omega sequence) at the C terminus of VirD2, outside the NLS and the endonuclease domain, contributed significantly to tumorigenesis, suggesting that VirD2 may serve a third important function in T-DNA transfer.

  14. ZBRK1, a novel tumor suppressor, activates VHL gene transcription through formation of a complex with VHL and p300 in renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Yu, Gan; Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Yao, Weimin; Gao, Lu; Chen, Shuliang; Hao, Jun; Wang, Ji; Huang, Qihong; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhangqun

    2015-03-30

    Inactivation or mutation of the VHL gene causes various tumors, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In the present study, we identified ZBRK1 as a novel VHL interacting protein by yeast two-hybrid screening, and found a single ZBRK1-binding site located in the VHL promoter region. Ectopic expression of ZBRK1 increases transcriptional activity of the VHL, whereas the depletion of endogenous ZBRK1 by shRNA leads to reduction of VHL expression. We also demonstrate that the inhibition of VEGF transcription by ZBRK1 overexpression is dependent on VHL/HIF pathway. Moreover, VHL is confirmed to serve as a bridge component for the association of ZBRK1 and p300, which leads to an increase in ZBRK1 transcriptional activity in the VHL promoter. We further provide striking evidences that ZBRK1 acts as a tumor suppressor in renal carcinoma by a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays, and ZBRK1 may represent a molecular marker to distinguish patients with ccRCC at high risk from those with a better survival prognosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZBRK1 suppresses renal cancer progression perhaps by regulating VHL expression.

  15. ZBRK1, a novel tumor suppressor, activates VHL gene transcription through formation of a complex with VHL and p300 in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Yao, Weimin; Gao, Lu; Chen, Shuliang; Hao, Jun; Wang, Ji; Huang, Qihong; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhangqun

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation or mutation of the VHL gene causes various tumors, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In the present study, we identified ZBRK1 as a novel VHL interacting protein by yeast two-hybrid screening, and found a single ZBRK1-binding site located in the VHL promoter region. Ectopic expression of ZBRK1 increases transcriptional activity of the VHL, whereas the depletion of endogenous ZBRK1 by shRNA leads to reduction of VHL expression. We also demonstrate that the inhibition of VEGF transcription by ZBRK1 overexpression is dependent on VHL/HIF pathway. Moreover, VHL is confirmed to serve as a bridge component for the association of ZBRK1 and p300, which leads to an increase in ZBRK1 transcriptional activity in the VHL promoter. We further provide striking evidences that ZBRK1 acts as a tumor suppressor in renal carcinoma by a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays, and ZBRK1 may represent a molecular marker to distinguish patients with ccRCC at high risk from those with a better survival prognosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZBRK1 suppresses renal cancer progression perhaps by regulating VHL expression. PMID:25749518

  16. Dietary clofibrate stimulates the formation and size of estradiol-induced breast tumors in female August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats.

    PubMed

    Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Sanchez, Rosa I; Roberts, Kathleen G; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Conney, Allan H; Kauffman, Frederick C

    2008-04-03

    Administration of 0.4% clofibrate in the diet stimulated estradiol (E(2))-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rat without having an effect on serum levels of E(2). This treatment stimulated by several-fold the NAD(P)H-dependent oxidative metabolism of E(2) and oleyl-CoA-dependent esterification of E(2) to 17beta-oleyl-estradiol by liver microsomes. Glucuronidation of E(2) by microsomal glucuronosyltransferase was increased moderately. In contrast, the activity of NAD(P)H quinone reductase 1 (NQO1), a representative monofunctional phase 2 enzyme, was significantly decreased in liver cytosol of rats fed clofibrate. Decreases in hepatic NQO1 in livers of animals fed clofibrate were noted before the appearance of mammary tumors. E(2) was delivered in cholesterol pellets implanted in 7-8-week-old female ACI rats. The animals received AIN-76A diet containing 0.4% clofibrate for 6, 12 or 28 weeks. Control animals received AIN-76A diet. Dietary clofibrate increased the number and size of palpable mammary tumors but did not alter the histopathology of the E(2)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas. Collectively, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of clofibrate on hepatic esterification of E(2) with fatty acids coupled with the inhibition of protective phase 2 enzymes, may in part, enhance E(2)-dependent mammary carcinogenesis in the ACI rat model.

  17. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  18. ACCELERATION AND THE GIFTED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIBSON, ARTHUR R.; STEPHANS, THOMAS M.

    ACCELERATION OF PUPILS AND SUBJECTS IS CONSIDERED A MEANS OF EDUCATING THE ACADEMICALLY GIFTED STUDENT. FIVE INTRODUCTORY ARTICLES PROVIDE A FRAMEWORK FOR THINKING ABOUT ACCELERATION. FIVE PROJECT REPORTS OF ACCELERATED PROGRAMS IN OHIO ARE INCLUDED. ACCELERATION IS NOW BEING REGARDED MORE FAVORABLY THAN FORMERLY, BECAUSE METHODS HAVE BEEN…

  19. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  20. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  1. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  2. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  3. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  4. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  5. Lung tumorigenesis induced by human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF)-A165 overexpression in transgenic mice and amelioration of tumor formation by miR-16.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Huang, Pin-Wu; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lai, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Ho, Heng-Chien; Yen, Chih-Ching; Tu, Chih-Yen; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Wang, Jiun-Long; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-04-30

    Many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), especially the human VEGF-A165 (hVEGF-A165) isoform, is a key proangiogenic factor that is overexpressed in lung cancer. We generated transgenic mice that overexpresses hVEGF-A165 in lung-specific Clara cells to investigate the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this study, three transgenic mouse strains were produced by pronuclear microinjection, and Southern blot analysis indicated similar patterns of the foreign gene within the genomes of the transgenic founder mice and their offspring. Accordingly, hVegf-A165 mRNA was expressed specifically in the lung tissue of the transgenic mice. Histopathological examination of the lung tissues of the transgenic mice showed that hVEGF-A165 overexpression induced bronchial inflammation, fibrosis, cysts, and adenoma. Pathological section and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses demonstrated a positive correlation between the development of pulmonary cancer and hVEGF expression levels, which were determined by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and western blot analyses. Gene expression profiling by cDNA microarray revealed a set of up-regulated genes (hvegf-A165, cyclin b1, cdc2, egfr, mmp9, nrp-1, and kdr) in VEGF tumors compared with wild-type lung tissues. In addition, overexpressing hVEGF-A165 in Clara cells increases CD105, fibrogenic genes (collagen α1, α-SMA, TGF-β1, and TIMP1), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α) in the lungs of hVEGF-A165-overexpressing transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. We further demonstrated that the intranasal administration of microRNA-16 (miR-16) inhibited lung tumor growth by suppressing VEGF expression via the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. In conclusion, hVEGF-A165 transgenic mice exhibited complex alterations in gene expression and tumorigenesis and may be a relevant model for studying VEGF-targeted therapies in lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Regulates the Proliferation, Self-Renewal Capacity, Tumor Formation and Migration of the Cancer Stem-Like Cell (CSC) Subpopulation Enriched from Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; An, Ning; Wang, Xiaoshan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the malignant behavior of cancer. HOTAIR, a well-studied lncRNA, contributes to breast cancer development, and overexpression of HOTAIR predicts a poor prognosis. However, the regulatory role of HOTAIR in the cancer stem-like cell (CSC) subpopulation remains largely unknown. Our goal was to determine the regulatory functions of HOTAIR in the processes of self-renewal capacity, tumor formation and proliferation of CSCs derived from breast cancer. Methods We first enriched and incubated the CSC population derived from breast cancer cell line MCF7 (CSC-MCF7) or MDA-MB-231 (MB231, CSC-MB231). Self-renewal capacity and tumor formation were assessed in vitro and in vivo to determine the stemness of CSCs. We assessed the impact on ectopically upregulated or downregulated expression of HOTAIR in CSCs by soft agar, self-renewal capacity and CCK-8 assays. The functional domain of HOTAIR was determined by truncation. RT-qPCR and semiquantitative Western blotting were performed to detect the expression levels of genes of interest. Chromatin IP (ChIP) was employed to detect the transcriptional regulatory activity of p53 on its target gene. Results After the identification of CSC properties, RT-qPCR analysis revealed that HOTAIR, but not other cancer-associated lncRNAs, is highly upregulated in both CSC-MCF7 and CSC-MB231 populations compared with MCF7 and MB231 populations. By modulating the level of HOTAIR expression, we showed that HOTAIR tightly regulates the proliferation, colony formation, migration and self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Moreover, full-length HOTAIR transcriptionally inhibits miR-34a specifically, leading to upregulation of Sox2, which is targeted by miR-34a. Ectopic introduction of miR-34a mimics reverses the effects of HOTAIR on the physiological processes of CSCs, indicating that HOTAIR affects these processes, including self-renewal capacity; these effects are dependent on the regulation of Sox

  7. Gender-related effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol and B-hexachlorocyclohexane on liver tumor formation in medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    When medaka were acutely exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN), greater incidence of hepatocarcinoma was seen in female versus male fish. This is possibly related to elevated female endogenous estrogens, which increase liver weight and production of vitellogenin. To examine roles of estrogens in tumor modulation, 21-day old medaka were exposed to DEN (200 ppm for 24 hr.), then fed purified diets containing the estrogenic compound {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane ({beta}-HCH) or 17-{beta}estradiol (E2) for 6 months. Incidences of basophilic preneoplastic foci of cellular alteration in females receiving DEN and 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 ppm E2 were three times the incidences in similarly-treated males. Also, incidences of basophilic foci in DEN + 0.1 ppm E2 males were significantly increased over DEN-only males and were equal to incidences in DEN-only females. Liver weights and hepatosomatic indices of males given 0.1 ppm E2 were not significantly different than females fed control diet. Females fed 0.01-10.0 ppm {beta}-HCH after DEN had 4--5 times greater incidences of basophilic foci as males. Gender-related effects on kinetics of growth rates and volumes of foci are being examined.

  8. Formation and stabilization of the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex and inhibition of telomerase by novel benzothioxanthene derivatives with anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Min; Ling Wu, Yan; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Juan Ji, Yan; Lin Zhang, Su; He Wei, Chuan; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    G-quadruplexes formed in telomeric DNA sequences at human chromosome ends can be a novel target for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cancer patients. Herein, we examined the ability of six novel benzothioxanthene derivatives S1-S6 to induce the formation of and stabilize an antiparallel G-quadruplex by EMSA, UV-melting and CD techniques and the influence of S1-S6 on A549 and SGC7901 cells through real-time cell analysis, wound healing, trap assay methods. Results show that six compounds could differentially induce 26 nt G-rich oligonucleotides to form the G-quadruplex with high selectivity vs C-rich DNA, mutated DNA and double-stranded DNA, stabilize it with high affinity, promote apoptosis and inhibit mobility and telomerase activity of A549 cells and SGC7901 cells. Especially, S1, S3, S4 displayed stronger abilities, of which S3 was the most optimal with the maximum ΔTm value being up to 29.8 °C for G-quadruplex, the minimum IC50 value being 0.53 μM and the maximum cell inhibitory rate being up to 97.2%. This study suggests that this type of compounds that induce the formation of and stabilize the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex, and consequently inhibit telomerase activity, leading to cell apoptosis, can be screened for the discovery of novel antitumor therapeutics.

  9. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction.

  10. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  11. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  12. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  13. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  14. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  15. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  16. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils.

  17. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  18. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  19. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  20. Accelerated test design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an accelerated life test program for electric batteries is discussed. A number of observations and suggestions on the procedures and objectives for conducting an accelerated life test program are presented. Equations based on nonlinear regression analysis for predicting the accelerated life test parameters are discussed.

  1. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  2. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  3. Wilms' Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  4. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  5. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 49. Read More Brain tumor - children Hodgkin lymphoma Metastasis Spinal cord trauma Review Date 8/15/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review ...

  6. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of kidney cancer that occurs in children. Causes WT is the most common form of childhood kidney cancer. The exact cause of this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye ( ...

  7. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  8. Regulatory roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-mediated pulmonary granuloma formation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Flory, C. M.; Jones, M. L.; Miller, B. F.; Warren, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of particulate yeast cell wall glucan into rats results in the synchronous development of angiocentric pulmonary granulomas that are composed almost entirely of monocytes and macrophages. Previous studies indicate that locally produced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is required for full granuloma development. Because tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce MCP-1 production in a variety of cell types, we sought to determine their potential regulatory roles in this model. A single infusion of anti-TNF-alpha antibody at the time of glucan infusion (time 0) markedly reduced MCP-1 mRNA levels at 1 and 6 hours but not at later time points; there was no effect on granuloma size or number measured at 48 hours. When multiple infusions of anti-TNF-alpha antibody were administered over a 23-hour period (0 to 23 hours), MCP-1 mRNA was reduced through 24 hours, there was a significant reduction in peak bronchoalveolar lavage fluid MCP-1 activity at 48 hours, and there were marked reductions in granuloma size and number at 48 hours. Similar results were observed in animals that received infusions of anti-IL-1 beta. Infusion of anti-IL-1 beta at time 0 resulted in moderate reductions in MCP-1 mRNA at 1 and 6 hours and had no effect on granuloma size or number measured at 48 hours. When multiple infusions of anti-IL-1 beta were administered over a 23-hour period (0 to 23 hours), MCP-1 mRNA was reduced through 24 hours, there was a moderate reduction in peak bronchoalveolar lavage fluid MCP-1 activity at 48 hours, and there were marked reductions in granuloma size and number at 48 hours. A single infusion of anti-TNF-alpha and anti-IL-1 beta together at time 0 resulted in marked reductions in whole lung MCP-1 and mRNA at 1 and 6 hours, but not at 24 hours. Multiple combined infusions of anti-TNF-alpha and anti-IL-1 beta over a 23-hour period resulted in additive reductions in MCP-1 mRNA through 24 hours

  9. Collisionless shocks and particle acceleration in laser-driven laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2012-10-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in space and astrophysical plasmas, from the Earth's bow shock to Gamma Ray Bursters; however, the microphysics underlying shock formation and particle acceleration in these distant sites is not yet fully understood. Mimicking these extreme conditions in laboratory is a grand challenge that would allow for a better understanding of the physical processes involved. Using ab initio multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, shock formation and particle acceleration are investigated for realistic laboratory conditions associated with the interaction of intense lasers with high-energy-density plasmas. Weibel-instability-mediated shocks are shown to be driven by the interaction of an ultraintense laser with overcritical plasmas. In this piston regime, the laser generates a relativistic flow that is Weibel unstable. The strong Weibel magnetic fields deflect the incoming flow, compressing it, and forming a shock. The resulting shock structure is consistent with previous simulations of relativistic astrophysical shocks, demonstrating for the first time the possibility of recreating these structures in laboratory. As the laser intensity is decreased and near-critical density plasmas are used, electron heating dominates over radiation pressure and electrostatic shocks can be formed. The electric field associated with the shock front can reflect ions from the background accelerating them to high energies. It is shown that high quality 200 MeV proton beams, required for tumor therapy, can be generated by using an exponentially decaying plasma profile to control competing accelerating fields. These results pave the way for the experimental exploration of space and astrophysical relevant shocks and particle acceleration with current laser systems.

  10. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a “field effect” predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger “accelerated geroncogenesis” in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes “permissive” with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the “install phase” that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the “geroncogenic risk” of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited “one-hit” metabolic “field effect” might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  11. Impaired lymphatic function accelerates cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinskog, Eli Sihn Samdal; Sagstad, Solfrid Johanne; Wagner, Marek; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Yang, Ning; Markhus, Carl Erik; Yndestad, Synnøve; Wiig, Helge; Eikesdal, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    Increased lymphangiogenesis is a common feature of cancer development and progression, yet the influence of impaired lymphangiogenesis on tumor growth is elusive. C3HBA breast cancer and KHT-1 sarcoma cell lines were implanted orthotopically in Chy mice, harboring a heterozygous inactivating mutation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, resulting in impaired dermal lymphangiogenesis. Accelerated tumor growth was observed in both cancer models in Chy mice, coinciding with reduced peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. An impaired lymphatic washout was observed from the peritumoral area in Chy mice with C3HBA tumors, and the number of macrophages was significantly reduced. While fewer macrophages were detected, the fraction of CD163+ M2 macrophages remained constant, causing a shift towards a higher M2/M1 ratio in Chy mice. No difference in adaptive immune cells was observed between wt and Chy mice. Interestingly, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage-associated cytokines were reduced in C3HBA tumors, pointing to an impaired innate immune response. However, IL-6 was profoundly elevated in the C3HBA tumor interstitial fluid, and treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab inhibited breast cancer growth. Collectively, our data indicate that impaired lymphangiogenesis weakens anti-tumor immunity and favors tumor growth at an early stage of cancer development. PMID:27329584

  12. PDGF activation in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells induces meningioma formation in mice promoting tumor progression in combination with Nf2 and Cdkn2ab loss.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Matthieu; Salaud, Céline; Clermont-Taranchon, Estelle; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Goutagny, Stephane; Mawrin, Christian; Giovannini, Marco; Kalamarides, Michel

    2015-10-20

    The role of PDGF-B and its receptor in meningeal tumorigenesis is not clear. We investigated the role of PDGF-B in mouse meningioma development by generating autocrine stimulation of the arachnoid through the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) using the RCAStv-a system. To specifically target arachnoid cells, the cells of origin of meningioma, we generated the PGDStv-a mouse (Prostaglandin D synthase). Forced expression of PDGF-B in arachnoid cells in vivo induced the formation of Grade I meningiomas in 27% of mice by 8 months of age. In vitro, PDGF-B overexpression in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells lead to increased proliferation.We found a correlation of PDGFR-B expression and NF2 inactivation in a cohort of human meningiomas, and we showed that, in mice, Nf2 loss and PDGF over-expression in arachnoid cells induced meningioma malignant transformation, with 40% of Grade II meningiomas. In these mice, additional loss of Cdkn2ab resulted in a higher incidence of malignant meningiomas with 60% of Grade II and 30% of Grade III meningiomas. These data suggest that chronic autocrine PDGF signaling can promote proliferation of arachnoid cells and is potentially sufficient to induce meningiomagenesis. Loss of Nf2 and Cdkn2ab have synergistic effects with PDGF-B overexpression promoting meningioma malignant transformation.

  13. [Reductive effect of the sesquiterpenic lactone "Helenalin " and its metallic derivatives in the formation of the estradiol receptor complex in breast tumor tissue].

    PubMed

    Salazar Esquivel, E L; Tellez, M C; Calzada, L

    1995-01-01

    Chemotherapy for systemic therapy in breast cancer has been widely used, and has been supported by many varied compounds with different origins and different compositions. Nevertheless, all of them produce several side adverse effects which must be taken into account. For this reason we must study new possibilities in which the administered drug acts selectively on the tumour cell without injuring healthy tissue. For studying its effect, a gamma lactone called "Helenaline" and its metalic derivates He-Co, He-Hg and He-Cu were studied, which chemical composition allows them to react with -SH residues present in the tumour cell receptors, which when interspaced by a previous reaction, could modify its structural composition and finally its affinity by the hormone. The inhibition effect for formation of estradiol-receptor complex in breast tumour tissue using Helenaline 12 n M and 126 n M was studied, obtaining 14% and 56% inhibition effect respectively. When He-Co, He-Hg and He-Cu effect was studied, this effect was raised obtaining 11%, 10.5% and 60% with 12 nM and 44.5%, 74.4% and 86% with 126 nM respectively.

  14. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  15. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  16. Tumor regulation of the tissue environment in the liver.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Tobias; Greten, Tim F

    2017-02-04

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) in the liver plays an important role in primary and metastatic liver tumor formation and tumor growth promotion. Cellular and non-cellular components of the TME significantly influence tumor development, growth, metastatic spread, anti-tumor immunity and response to tumor therapy. The cellular components of the TME in the liver not only consist of infiltrating immune cells, but also of liver-resident cells such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which promote tumor growth by negatively regulating tumor-associated immune responses. In this review, we characterize cells of the TME with pro- and anti-tumor function in primary and metastatic liver tumors. Furthermore, we summarize mechanisms that permit growth of hepatic tumors despite the occurrence of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses and how novel therapeutic approaches targeting the TME could unleash tumor-specific immune responses to improve survival of liver cancer patients.

  17. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  18. Naked singularities as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by naked singularities to arbitrarily high center of mass energies. Recently it has been suggested that black holes could be used as particle accelerators to probe the Planck scale physics. We show that the naked singularities serve the same purpose and probably would do better than their black hole counterparts. We focus on the scenario of a self-similar gravitational collapse starting from a regular initial data, leading to the formation of a globally naked singularity. It is seen that when particles moving along timelike geodesics interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center of mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to Planck scale physics.

  19. Apc, but not obesity, synergizes with PTEN to drive intestinal stem cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Tahmineh; Wang, Donghai; Guan, Fangxia; Hu, Zunju; Beck, Amanda; Delahaye, Fabien; Huffman, Derek M

    2017-03-28

    Obesity is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and can accelerate Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell (ISC)-derived tumorigenesis following inactivation of Apc. However, whether non-canonical pathways involving PI3K-Akt signaling in ISCs can lead to tumor formation, and if this can be further exacerbated by obesity is unknown. Despite the synergy between Pten and Apc inactivation in epithelial cells on intestinal tumor formation, their combined role in Lgr5+-ISCs, which are the most rapidly dividing ISC population in the intestine, is unknown. Lgr5+-GFP mice were provided low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 mo and the transcriptome was evaluated in Lgr5+-ISCs. For tumor studies, Lgr5+-GFP and Lgr5+-GFP Ptenflox/flox mice were tamoxifen treated to inactivate Pten in ISCs and provided LFD or HFD until 14-15 mo of age. Finally, various combinations of Lgr5+-ISC specific, Apc and Pten-deleted mice were generated, and evaluated for histopathology and survival. HFD did not overtly alter Akt signaling in ISCs, but did increase other metabolic pathways. Pten deficiency, but not HFD, increased BrdU positive cells in the small intestine (P<0.05). However, combining Pten and Apc deficiency synergistically increased proliferative markers, tumor pathology and mortality, in a dose-dependent fashion (P<0.05). In summary, we show that HFD alone fails to drive Akt signaling in ISCs and that Pten deficiency, is dispensable as a tumor suppressor in Lgr5+-ISCs. However, combining Pten and Apc deficiency in ISCs synergistically increases proliferation, tumor formation, and mortality. Thus, aberrant Wnt/β-catenin, rather than PI3K-Akt signaling, is requisite for obesity to drive Lgr5+ISC-derived tumorigenesis.

  20. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  1. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor What Is Wilms Tumor? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... live normal, healthy lives with just one kidney. Wilms tumors Wilms tumors are the most common cancers in ...

  2. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27695323

  3. An introduction to acceleration mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper discusses the acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic fields, i.e., by fields that are produced by the motion of other charged particles driven by some power source. The mechanisms that are discussed include: Ponderamotive Forces, Acceleration, Plasma Beat Wave Acceleration, Inverse Free Electron Laser Acceleration, Inverse Cerenkov Acceleration, Gravity Acceleration, 2D Linac Acceleration and Conventional Iris Loaded Linac Structure Acceleration. (LSP)

  4. Schooling in Times of Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddeberg, Magdalena; Hornberg, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies are characterised by forms of acceleration, which influence social processes. Sociologist Hartmut Rosa has systematised temporal structures by focusing on three categories of social acceleration: technical acceleration, acceleration of social change, and acceleration of the pace of life. All three processes of acceleration are…

  5. Uniformly accelerated black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    2001-09-01

    The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

  6. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  7. On the separation mechanics of accelerating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, John N.; Marzanek, Mathew; Bond, Clinton; Rival, David E.

    2017-03-01

    The instantaneous drag forces and wake mechanics of an accelerating sphere have been investigated experimentally. Drag forces are first compared to the circular flat plate, which is characterized by stable and Reynolds-number independent vortex-ring formation during accelerations from rest. For the sphere, vortex-ring formation is shown to be greatly suppressed by the time-dependent movement of the separation line during start-up towards the steady-state position, which induces strong vortex-body interactions. Next, inviscid theory is used to predict the state of the pressure-gradient field around a sphere during accelerations from a non-zero initial velocity. The azimuthal point of separation extracted from experimental data for the subcritical cases is found to be strongly correlated with the start of the adverse pressure gradient predicted by theory. For the supercritical cases, the point of separation is unaffected by the imposed accelerations and remains at the steady-state position. The results suggest that accelerations can only be exploited to delay flow separation at Reynolds numbers with steady separation points near the apex, where the tangential accelerations are the largest.

  8. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  9. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  10. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  11. The foxhole accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Claus, J.

    1992-07-17

    This report examines some properties of a new type of open accelerating structure. It consists of a series of rectangular cavities, which we call foxholes, joined by a beam channel. The power for accelerating the particles comes from an external radiation source and enters the cavities through their open upper surfaces. Analytic and computer calculations are presented showing that the foxhole is a suitable structure for accelerating relativistic electrons.

  12. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene-6 (TSG-6) Is Constitutively Expressed in Adult Central Nervous System (CNS) and Associated with Astrocyte-mediated Glial Scar Formation following Spinal Cord Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Lauer, Mark E.; Soleman, Sara; Zhao, Chao; Hascall, Vincent C.; Day, Anthony J.; Fawcett, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) binds to hyaluronan and can reorganize/stabilize its structure, also enhancing the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to its cell surface receptor, CD44. TSG-6 is rapidly up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines protecting tissues from the damaging effects of inflammation. Despite TSG-6 treatment having been shown to improve outcomes in an experimental model of traumatic brain injury, TSG-6 expression has not been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). We hereby analyzed the expression profile of TSG-6 in the developing CNS and following injury. We show that TSG-6 is expressed in the rat CNS by GFAP+ and CD44+ astrocytes, solely in the mature brain and spinal cord, and is not present during the development of the CNS. TSG-6−/− mice present a reduced number of GFAP+ astrocytes when compared with the littermate TSG-6+/− mice. TSG-6 expression is drastically up-regulated after injury, and the TSG-6 protein is present within the glial scar, potentially coordinating and stabilizing the formation of this hyaluronan-rich matrix. This study shows that TSG-6 is expressed in the CNS, suggesting a role for TSG-6 in astrocyte activation and tissue repair. We hypothesize that within this context TSG-6 could participate in the formation of the glial scar and confer anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of targeting TSG-6 after CNS injury to promote its protective effects while reducing the inhibitory properties of the glial scar in axon regeneration. PMID:27435674

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor-stimulated Gene-6 (TSG-6) Is Constitutively Expressed in Adult Central Nervous System (CNS) and Associated with Astrocyte-mediated Glial Scar Formation following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Lauer, Mark E; Soleman, Sara; Zhao, Chao; Hascall, Vincent C; Day, Anthony J; Fawcett, James W

    2016-09-16

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) binds to hyaluronan and can reorganize/stabilize its structure, also enhancing the binding of this glycosaminoglycan to its cell surface receptor, CD44. TSG-6 is rapidly up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines protecting tissues from the damaging effects of inflammation. Despite TSG-6 treatment having been shown to improve outcomes in an experimental model of traumatic brain injury, TSG-6 expression has not been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). We hereby analyzed the expression profile of TSG-6 in the developing CNS and following injury. We show that TSG-6 is expressed in the rat CNS by GFAP(+) and CD44(+) astrocytes, solely in the mature brain and spinal cord, and is not present during the development of the CNS. TSG-6(-/-) mice present a reduced number of GFAP(+) astrocytes when compared with the littermate TSG-6(+/-) mice. TSG-6 expression is drastically up-regulated after injury, and the TSG-6 protein is present within the glial scar, potentially coordinating and stabilizing the formation of this hyaluronan-rich matrix. This study shows that TSG-6 is expressed in the CNS, suggesting a role for TSG-6 in astrocyte activation and tissue repair. We hypothesize that within this context TSG-6 could participate in the formation of the glial scar and confer anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies are required to elucidate the therapeutic potential of targeting TSG-6 after CNS injury to promote its protective effects while reducing the inhibitory properties of the glial scar in axon regeneration.

  15. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  16. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  17. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  18. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  19. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  20. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  1. FFAGS for rapid acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Carol J. Johnstone and Shane Koscielniak

    2002-09-30

    When large transverse and longitudinal emittances are to be transported through a circular machine, extremely rapid acceleration holds the advantage that the beam becomes immune to nonlinear resonances because there is insufficient time for amplitudes to build up. Uncooled muon beams exhibit large emittances and require fast acceleration to avoid decay losses and would benefit from this style of acceleration. The approach here employs a fixed-field alternating gradient or FFAG magnet structure and a fixed frequency acceleration system. Acceptance is enhanced by the use only of linear lattice elements, and fixed-frequency rf enables the use of cavities with large shunt resistance and quality factor.

  2. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  3. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost always benign (not cancerous), but can cause hormonal imbalances and interfere with the normal function of the pituitary gland. Because the pituitary affects so many functions of the body, ... the tumor mass or hormonal changes (either too much or too little hormone). ...

  4. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  5. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  6. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  7. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  8. Accelerator Science: Why RF?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-12-21

    Particle accelerators can fire beams of subatomic particles at near the speed of light. The accelerating force is generated using radio frequency technology and a whole lot of interesting features. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it all works.

  9. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  10. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  11. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  12. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  13. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  14. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  15. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  16. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  17. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  18. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    antigens expressed on breast tumors. Towards this end we are developing peptide mimotopes of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens as they are T cell...dependent antigens. In our progress to date we have shown the 1) immunization with peptide mimotope activates a specific cellular response to a model murine...tumor cell line; 2) vaccination of mice with peptide eradicates established tumor; 3) Immunization with DNA format of the peptide suppresses tumor

  19. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  20. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  1. Embryonal brain tumors and developmental control genes

    SciTech Connect

    Aguzzi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Cell proliferation in embryogenesis and neoplastic transformation is thought to be controlled by similar sets of regulatory genes. This is certainly true for tumors of embryonic origin, such as Ewing sarcoma, Wilms` tumor and retinoblastoma, in which developmental control genes are either activated as oncogenes to promote proliferation, or are inactivated to eliminate their growth suppressing function. However, to date little is known about the genetic events underlying the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor in children, which still carries an unfavourable prognosis. None of the common genetic alterations identified in other neuroectodermal tumors, such as mutation of the p53 gene or amplification of tyrosine kinase receptor genes, could be uncovered as key events in the formation of medulloblastoma. The identification of regulatory genes which are expressed in this pediatric brain tumor may provide an alternative approach to gain insight into the molecular aspects of tumor formation.

  2. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  3. KLF10, transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Duk-Jung; Lee, Jong Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Lee, Woon Kyu

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. -- Abstract: Krueppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription.

  4. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  5. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  6. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  7. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  8. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  9. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  10. Robo-Enabled Tumor Cell Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Helena E; Portela, Marta

    2016-12-19

    How aberrant cells are removed from a tissue to prevent tumor formation is a key question in cancer biology. Reporting in this issue of Developmental Cell, Vaughen and Igaki (2016) show that a pathway with an important role in neural guidance also directs extrusion of tumor cells from epithelial tissues.

  11. The FRC Acceleration Space Thruster (FAST) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard; Houts, Mike; Slough, John; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the FRC (Field Reversed Configuration) Acceleration Space Thruster (FAST) Experiment is to investigate the use of a repetitive FRC source as a thruster, specifically for an NEP (nuclear electric propulsion) system. The Field Reversed Configuration is a plasmoid with a closed poloidal field line structure, and has been extensively studied as a fusion reactor core. An FRC thruster works by repetitively producing FRCs and accelerating them to high velocity. An FRC thruster should be capable of I(sub sp)'s in the range of 5,000 - 25,000 seconds and efficiencies in the range of 60 - 80 %. In addition, they can have thrust densities as high as 10(exp 6) N/m2, and as they are inductively formed, they do not suffer from electrode erosion. The jet-power should be scalable from the low to the high power regime. The FAST experiment consists of a theta-pinch formation chamber, followed by an acceleration stage. Initially, we will produce and accelerate single FRCs. The initial focus of the experiment will be on the ionization, formation and acceleration of a single plasmoid, so as to determine the likely efficiency and I(sub sp). Subsequently, we will modify the device for repetitive burst-mode operation (5-10 shots). A variety of diagnostics are or will be available for this work, including a HeNe interferometer, high-speed cameras, and a Thomson-scattering system. The status of the experiment will be described.

  12. Production, Characterization, and Acceleration of Optical Microbunches

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Christopher M.S.

    2008-06-20

    Optical microbunches with a spacing of 800 nm have been produced for laser acceleration research. The microbunches are produced using a inverse Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) followed by a dispersive chicane. The microbunched electron beam is characterized by coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) with good agreement to the analytic theory for bunch formation. In a second experiment the bunches are accelerated in a second stage to achieve for the first time direct net acceleration of electrons traveling in a vacuum with visible light. This dissertation presents the theory of microbunch formation and characterization of the microbunches. It also presents the design of the experimental hardware from magnetostatic and particle tracking simulations, to fabrication and measurement of the undulator and chicane magnets. Finally, the dissertation discusses three experiments aimed at demonstrating the IFEL interaction, microbunch production, and the net acceleration of the microbunched beam. At the close of the dissertation, a separate but related research effort on the tight focusing of electrons for coupling into optical scale, Photonic Bandgap, structures is presented. This includes the design and fabrication of a strong focusing permanent magnet quadrupole triplet and an outline of an initial experiment using the triplet to observe wakefields generated by an electron beam passing through an optical scale accelerator.

  13. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  14. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  15. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  16. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  17. Accelerated cleanup risk reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1998-02-01

    period in which the well was `capped`. Our results show the formation of an inclined gas phase during injection and a fast collapse of the steam zone within an hour of terminating steam injection. The majority of destruction occurs during the collapse phase, when contaminant laden water is drawn back towards the well. Little to no noncondensible gasses are created in this process, removing any possibility of sparging processes interfering with contaminant destruction. Our models suggest that the thermal region should be as hot and as large as possible. To have HPO accepted, we need to demonstrate the in situ destruction of contaminants. This requires the ability to inexpensively sample at depth and under high temperatures. We proved the ability to implies monitoring points at depths exceeding 150 feet in highly heterogeneous soils by use of cone penetrometry. In addition, an extractive system has been developed for sampling fluids and measuring their chemistry under the range of extreme conditions expected. We conducted a collaborative field test of HPO at a Superfund site in southern California where the contaminant is mainly creosote and pentachlorophenol. Field results confirm the destruction of contaminants by HPO, validate our field design from simulations, demonstrate that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells (and minimal capital cost) and yield reliable cost estimates for future commercial application. We also tested the in situ microbial filter technology as a means to intercept and destroy the accelerated flow of contaminants caused by the injection of steam. A series of laboratory and field tests revealed that the selected bacterial species effectively degrades trichloroethene in LLNL Groundwater and under LLNL site conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that the bacteria effectively attach to the LLNL subsurface media. An in-well treatability study indicated that the bacteria

  18. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  19. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  20. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  1. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  3. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  4. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  5. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  6. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  7. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  8. Clinical Requirements and Accelerator Concepts for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    1997-05-01

    Accelerator-driven epithermal neutron sources are an attractive alternative to nuclear reactors for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In BNCT the goal of delivering a sufficient dose to the tumor without exceeding the dose limits of the surrounding normal tissues is achieved by administering a ^10B-containing compound which is selectively taken up in the tumor cells. Subsequent irradiation with epithermal neutrons leads to the release of short ranged (< 10 μm) ionizing particles via the ^10B(n,α)^7Li neutron-capture reaction. By carefully shaping the neutron spectrum the background dose, partially due to recoil protons and external gamma radiation, can be minimized and the depth dose distribution optimized. Excellent epithermal neutron beams for BNCT can be produced by bombarding a Li-target with a high current proton beam at energies ranging from the (p,n) reaction threshold to 2.5 MeV and subsequent moderation and filtering of the primary neutrons. In comparison the use of Be-targets and higher proton or deuteron energies, up to 20 MeV, leads to higher neutron yields but also to higher primary neutron energies requiring more moderation and resulting in less desirable neutron spectra. Accelerator options for possible neutron sources include dc-accelerators, RFQs, LINACs and cyclotrons. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator has been chosen to provide a 2.5 MeV proton beam for the BNCT facility currently being designed at LBNL. An ESQ-accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents which are desired for producing high quality neutron beams for BNCT treatments. A novel power supply based on the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the accelerator to deliver proton beam currents up to about 50 mA. A Li-target has been designed which can handle beam power in excess of 50 kW establishing the practicability of this approach. Monte Carlo simulation studies have shown that at a proton beam current of 20 mA high

  9. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  10. Designing reliability into accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, A.

    1992-07-01

    Future accelerators will have to provide a high degree of reliability. Quality must be designed in right from the beginning and must remain a central theme throughout the project. The problem is similar to the problems facing US industry today, and examples of the successful application of quality engineering will be given. Different aspects of an accelerator project will be addressed: Concept, Design, Motivation, Management Techniques, and Fault Diagnosis. The importance of creating and maintaining a coherent team will be stressed.

  11. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  12. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G. A.; Poelker, M.; Reece, C.; Tiefenback, M.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  13. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  14. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  15. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  16. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  17. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  18. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  19. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  20. The CCK(2) receptor antagonist, YF476, inhibits Mastomys ECL cell hyperplasia and gastric carcinoid tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Siddique, Z-L; Drozdov, I; Gustafsson, B I; Camp, R L; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Modlin, I M

    2010-06-08

    YF476 is a potent and highly selective cholecystokin 2 (CCK(2)) receptor antagonist of the benzodiazepine class. It inhibits gastric neuroendocrine enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell secretion, proliferation and spontaneous formation of gastric neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) in cotton rats. The Mastomys rodent species exhibits a genetic predisposition to gastric ECL neuroendocrine tumor formation which can be accelerated by acid suppression and induction of hypergastrinemia. In this respect, it mimics the human condition of atrophic gastritis, hypergastrinemia and gastric carcinoid development. We investigated whether YF476 could inhibit acid suppression-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia in this model. In addition, we examined whether YF476 could reverse established ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia. Targeting the CCK(2) receptor during Loxtidine-induced hypergastrinemia resulted in a reduction in ECL cell secretion (plasma and mucosal histamine, and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) transcripts, p<0.05) and proliferation (numbers of HDC-positive cells, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 transcription). This was associated with a decrease in ECL cell hyperplasia and a 60% reduction in gastric ECL cell microcarcinoid (tumors <0.3mm in size) formation. YF476 inhibited ECL cell neoplasia (gastric carcinoid) in animals with hyperplasia, inhibited the formation of ECL cell tumors when co-administered with Loxtidine and reversed the growth and developement of gastric ECL cell carcinoids in long-term acid suppressed Mastomys. Variable importance analysis using a logistic multinomial regression model indicated the effects of YF476 were specific to the ECL cell and alterations in ECL cell function reflected inhibition of transcripts for HDC, Chromogranin A (CgA), CCK(2) and the autocrine growth factor, CTGF. We conclude that specifically targeting the CCK(2) receptor inhibits gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and ECL cell proliferation and tumor

  1. Loss of Mig6 accelerates initiation and progression of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor-driven lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Tapan K.; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Linnoila, Ilona; Cultraro, Constance M.; Giannakou, Andreas; Nemati, Roxanne; Zhang, Xu; Webster, Joshua D.; Ritt, Daniel; Ghosal, Sarani; Hoschuetzky, Heinz; Simpson, R. Mark; Biswas, Romi; Politi, Katerina; Morrison, Deborah K.; Varmus, Harold E.; Guha, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain drive lung adenocarcinoma. We have previously identified MIG6, an inhibitor of ERBB signaling and a potential tumor suppressor, as a target for phosphorylation by mutant EGFRs. Here we demonstrate that Mig6 is a tumor suppressor for the initiation and progression of mutant EGFR-driven lung adenocarcinoma in mouse models. Mutant EGFR-induced lung tumor formation was accelerated in Mig6-deficient mice, even with Mig6 haploinsufficiency. We demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of MIG6 at Y394/395 in EGFR-mutant human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines is associated with an increased interaction of MIG6 with mutant EGFR, which may stabilize EGFR protein. MIG6 also fails to promote mutant EGFR degradation. We propose a model whereby increased tyrosine phosphorylation of MIG6 decreases its capacity to inhibit mutant EGFR. Nonetheless, the residual inhibition is sufficient for Mig6 to delay mutant EGFR-driven tumor initiation and progression in mouse models. PMID:25735773

  2. Rb deficiency accelerates progression of carcinoma of the urinary bladder in vivo and in vitro through inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Jiang-Ping; Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Urinary bladder cancer is known as a common cancer diagnosed across the world and results in significant mortality and morbidity rates among patients. The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, as a main tumor suppressor, controls cellular responses to potentially oncogenic stimulation. Rb phosphorylation could disrupt E2F complex formation, resulting in diverse transcription factor dysfunction. In our study, we investigated how Rb is involved in controlling urinary bladder cancer progression. The results indicate that Rb expression is reduced in mice with urinary bladder tumor, and its suppression leads to urinary bladder cancer progression in vivo and in vitro. Rb mutation directly results in tumor size with lower survival rate in vivo. Rb knockdown in vitro promoted bladder tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Interestingly, Rb knockout and knockdown result in autophagy and apoptosis inhibition via suppressing p53 and caspase-3 signaling pathways, enhancing bladder cancer development in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal that Rb deficiency accelerated urinary bladder cancer progression, exposing an important role of Rb in suppressing urinary bladder cancer for treatment in the future.

  3. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  4. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chanmee, Theerawut; Ontong, Pawared; Konno, Kenjiro; Itano, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy. PMID:25125485

  5. Laser Ion Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    An intense femtosecond pulsed laser is employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, the ion particle energy control, etc. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. Partly supported by JSPS, MEXT, CORE, Japan/US Cooperation program, ASHULA and ILE/Osaka University.

  6. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  7. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  8. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  9. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  10. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  11. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  12. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  13. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed? Wilms tumors are usually found when a ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  14. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  15. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  16. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  17. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  18. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  19. "Light sail" acceleration reexamined.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for "optimal" values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple "light sail" model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  20. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  1. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  2. Combined deletion of Pten and p53 in mammary epithelium accelerates triple-negative breast cancer with dependency on eEF2K

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeff C; Voisin, Veronique; Wang, Sharon; Wang, Dong-Yu; Jones, Robert A; Datti, Alessandro; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Egan, Sean E; Bader, Gary D; Tsao, Ming; Mak, Tak W; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressors Pten and p53 are frequently lost in breast cancer, yet the consequences of their combined inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we show that mammary-specific deletion of Pten via WAP-Cre, which targets alveolar progenitors, induced tumors with shortened latency compared to those induced by MMTV-Cre, which targets basal/luminal progenitors. Combined Pten-p53 mutations accelerated formation of claudin-low, triple-negative-like breast cancer (TNBC) that exhibited hyper-activated AKT signaling and more mesenchymal features relative to Pten or p53 single-mutant tumors. Twenty-four genes that were significantly and differentially expressed between WAP-Cre:Pten/p53 and MMTV-Cre:Pten/p53 tumors predicted poor survival for claudin-low patients. Kinome screens identified eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF2K) inhibitors as more potent than PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors on both mouse and human Pten/p53-deficient TNBC cells. Sensitivity to eEF2K inhibition correlated with AKT pathway activity. eEF2K monotherapy suppressed growth of Pten/p53-deficient TNBC xenografts in vivo and cooperated with doxorubicin to efficiently kill tumor cells in vitro. Our results identify a prognostic signature for claudin-low patients and provide a rationale for using eEF2K inhibitors for treatment of TNBC with elevated AKT signaling. PMID:25330770

  3. Combined deletion of Pten and p53 in mammary epithelium accelerates triple-negative breast cancer with dependency on eEF2K.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jeff C; Voisin, Veronique; Wang, Sharon; Wang, Dong-Yu; Jones, Robert A; Datti, Alessandro; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Egan, Sean E; Bader, Gary D; Tsao, Ming; Mak, Tak W; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2014-12-01

    The tumor suppressors Pten and p53 are frequently lost in breast cancer, yet the consequences of their combined inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we show that mammary-specific deletion of Pten via WAP-Cre, which targets alveolar progenitors, induced tumors with shortened latency compared to those induced by MMTV-Cre, which targets basal/luminal progenitors. Combined Pten-p53 mutations accelerated formation of claudin-low, triple-negative-like breast cancer (TNBC) that exhibited hyper-activated AKT signaling and more mesenchymal features relative to Pten or p53 single-mutant tumors. Twenty-four genes that were significantly and differentially expressed between WAP-Cre:Pten/p53 and MMTV-Cre:Pten/p53 tumors predicted poor survival for claudin-low patients. Kinome screens identified eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF2K) inhibitors as more potent than PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors on both mouse and human Pten/p53-deficient TNBC cells. Sensitivity to eEF2K inhibition correlated with AKT pathway activity. eEF2K monotherapy suppressed growth of Pten/p53-deficient TNBC xenografts in vivo and cooperated with doxorubicin to efficiently kill tumor cells in vitro. Our results identify a prognostic signature for claudin-low patients and provide a rationale for using eEF2K inhibitors for treatment of TNBC with elevated AKT signaling.

  4. The Student Course Experience among Online, Accelerated, and Traditional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielitz, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The demand by the public for a wider variety of course formats has led to complexity in determining a course's optimal delivery format as many faculty members still believe that online and accelerated courses do not offer students an equivalent experience to traditional face to face instruction. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study…

  5. Formation of 1-octen-3-ol from Aspergillus flavus conidia is accelerated after disruption of cells independently of Ppo oxygenases, and is not a main cause of inhibition of germination.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kana; Murakami, Tomoko; Kakumyan, Pattana; Keller, Nancy P; Matsui, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Eight-carbon (C8) volatiles, such as 1-octen-3-ol, are ubiquitous among fungi. They are the volatiles critical for aroma and flavor of fungi, and assumed to be signals controlling germination of several fungi. In this study, we found that intact Aspergillus flavus conidia scarcely synthesized C8 volatiles but repeated freeze-thaw treatment that made the cell membrane permeable promoted (R)-1-octen-3-ol formation. Loss or down regulation of any one of five fatty acid oxygenases (PpoA, PpoB, PpoC, PpoD or lipoxygenase) hypothesized contribute to 1-octen-3-ol formation had little impact on production of this volatile. This suggested that none of the oxygenases were directly involved in the formation of 1-octen-3-ol or that compensatory pathways exist in the fungus. Germination of the conidia was markedly inhibited at high density (1.0 × 10(9)spores mL(-1)). It has been postulated that 1-octen-3-ol is an autoinhibitor suppressing conidia germination at high density. 1-Octen-3-ol at concentration of no less than 10 mM was needed to suppress the germination while the concentration of 1-octen-3-ol in the suspension at 1.0 × 10(9) mL(-1) was under the detection limit (<1 µM). Thus, 1-octen-3-ol was not the principal component responsible for inhibition of germination. Instead, it was evident that the other heat-labile factor(s) suppressed conidial germination.

  6. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  7. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  8. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  9. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  10. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  11. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  12. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  13. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  14. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors A A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  15. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  16. Tumor Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.

    2000-04-18

    Veterinary oncology has seen tremendous growth since the first textbook devoted to the subject in the late 1970s. Cancer is usually at the top of the list when owners ask about health concerns for their pets (and it remains the leading cause of death among dogs and cats). The volume, Veterinary Oncology Secrets, joins others in the series by presenting in question and answer format the type of information so important to veterinary students, interns and residents, general practitioners, and specialists in a number of clinical fields.

  17. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rory A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6− /− mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6− /− mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6−/− animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6−/− mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6−/− mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6−/− but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors. PMID:23598467

  18. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; O'Malley, Yunxia; Askeland, Ryan W; Sugg, Sonia L; Fisher, Rory A

    2013-08-01

    Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6(-/-) mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6(-/-) animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6(-/-) mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6(-/-) mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6(-/-) but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors.

  19. Interleukin-27 signaling promotes immunity against endogenously arising murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Karlo D T; Junankar, Simon R; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent.

  20. Interleukin-27 Signaling Promotes Immunity against Endogenously Arising Murine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Natividad, Karlo D. T.; Junankar, Simon R.; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C.; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent. PMID:23554861

  1. Radioisotope Dating with Accelerators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Explains a new method of detecting radioactive isotopes by counting their accelerated ions rather than the atoms that decay during the counting period. This method increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and allows one to find the ages of much older and smaller samples. (GA)

  2. Accelerated Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Kenn

    1974-01-01

    Western Electric's accelerated management development program for hand picked college graduate students consists of a high risk training project in which the management candidate accomplishes his task or is terminated. The success of such projects puts candidates in third level management in seven years or half the normal time. (DS)

  3. FPGA Verification Accelerator (FVAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Jane; Burke, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Is Verification Acceleration Possible? - Increasing the visibility of the internal nodes of the FPGA results in much faster debug time - Forcing internal signals directly allows a problem condition to be setup very quickly center dot Is this all? - No, this is part of a comprehensive effort to improve the JPL FPGA design and V&V process.

  4. Combined generating-accelerating buncher for compact linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, E. A.; Matsievskiy, S. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Sokolov, I. D.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Described in the previous article [1] method of the power extraction from the modulated electron beam has been applied to the compact standing wave electron linear accelerator feeding system, which doesnt require any connection waveguides between the power source and the accelerator itself [2]. Generating and accelerating bunches meet in the hybrid accelerating cell operating at TM020 mode, thus the accelerating module is placed on the axis of the generating module, which consists from the pulsed high voltage electron sources and electrons dumps. This combination makes the accelerator very compact in size which is very valuable for the modern applications such as portable inspection sources. Simulations and geometry cold tests are presented.

  5. Colon and pancreas tumors enhance coagulation: role of hemeoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Nfonsam, Valentine N; Matika, Ryan W; Ong, Evan S; Jie, Tun; Warneke, James A; Steinbrenner, Evangelina B

    2014-07-01

    Colon and pancreatic cancer are associated with significant thrombophilia. Colon and pancreas tumor cells have an increase in hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) activity, the endogenous enzyme responsible for carbon monoxide production. Given that carbon monoxide enhances plasmatic coagulation, we determined if patients undergoing resection of colon and pancreatic tumors had an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide and plasmatic hypercoagulability. Patients with colon (n = 17) and pancreatic (n = 10) tumors were studied. Carbon monoxide was determined by the measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). A thrombelastographic method to assess plasma coagulation kinetics and formation of carboxyhemefibrinogen (COHF) was utilized. Nonsmoking patients with colon and pancreatic tumors had abnormally increased COHb concentrations of 1.4 ± 0.9 and 1.9 ± 0.7%, respectively, indicative of HO-1 upregulation. Coagulation analyses comparing both tumor groups demonstrated no significant differences in any parameter; thus the data were combined for the tumor groups for comparison with 95% confidence interval values obtained from normal individuals (n = 30) plasma. Seventy percent of tumor patients had a velocity of clot formation greater than the 95% confidence interval value of normal individuals, with 53% of this hypercoagulable group also having COHF formation. Further, 67% of tumor patients had clot strength that exceeded the normal 95% confidence interval value, and 56% of this subgroup had COHF formation. Finally, 63% of all tumor patients had COHF formation. Future investigation of HO-1-derived carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of colon and pancreatic tumor-related thrombophilia is warranted.

  6. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  7. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  8. Present status of Accelerator-Based BNCT

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Andres Juan; Bergueiro, Javier; Cartelli, Daniel; Baldo, Matias; Castell, Walter; Asoia, Javier Gomez; Padulo, Javier; Suárez Sandín, Juan Carlos; Igarzabal, Marcelo; Erhardt, Julian; Mercuri, Daniel; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Debray, Mario E.; Somacal, Hector R.; Capoulat, María Eugenia; Herrera, María S.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Gagetti, Leonardo; Anzorena, Manuel Suarez; Canepa, Nicolas; Real, Nicolas; Gun, Marcelo; Tacca, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Aim This work aims at giving an updated report of the worldwide status of Accelerator-Based BNCT (AB-BNCT). Background There is a generalized perception that the availability of accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of BNCT. Accordingly, in recent years a significant effort has started to develop such machines. Materials and methods A variety of possible charged-particle induced nuclear reactions and the characteristics of the resulting neutron spectra are discussed along with the worldwide activity in suitable accelerator development. Results Endothermic 7Li(p,n)7Be and 9Be(p,n)9B and exothermic 9Be(d,n)10B are compared. In addition to having much better thermo-mechanical properties than Li, Be as a target leads to stable products. This is a significant advantage for a hospital-based facility. 9Be(p,n)9B needs at least 4–5 MeV bombarding energy to have a sufficient yield, while 9Be(d,n)10B can be utilized at about 1.4 MeV, implying the smallest possible accelerator. This reaction operating with a thin target can produce a sufficiently soft spectrum to be viable for AB-BNCT. The machines considered are electrostatic single ended or tandem accelerators or radiofrequency quadrupoles plus drift tube Linacs. Conclusions 7Li(p,n)7Be provides one of the best solutions for the production of epithermal neutron beams for deep-seated tumors. However, a Li-based target poses significant technological challenges. Hence, Be has been considered as an alternative target, both in combination with (p,n) and (d,n) reactions. 9Be(d,n)10B at 1.4 MeV, with a thin target has been shown to be a realistic option for the treatment of deep-seated lesions. PMID:26933390

  9. The altered glucose metabolism in tumor and a tumor acidic microenvironment associated with extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xiaozhou; Dai, Dong; Song, Xiuyu; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, also knowns as cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) or basigin, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that is involved in numerous physiological and pathological functions, especially in tumor invasion and metastasis. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) catalyze the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates such as L-lactate across the plasma membrane to preserve the intracellular pH and maintain cell homeostasis. As a chaperone to some MCT isoforms, CD147 overexpression significantly contributes to the metabolic transformation of tumor. This overexpression is characterized by accelerated aerobic glycolysis and lactate efflux, and it eventually provides the tumor cells with a metabolic advantage and an invasive phenotype in the acidic tumor microenvironment. This review highlights the roles of CD147 and MCTs in tumor cell metabolism and the associated molecular mechanisms. The regulation of CD147 and MCTs may prove to be with a therapeutic potential for tumors through the metabolic modification of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27009812

  10. The effect of stochastic re-acceleration on the energy spectrum of shock-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami; Kocharov, Leon

    2014-07-20

    The energy spectra of particles in gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events do not always have a power-law form attributed to the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In particular, the observed spectra in major SEP events can take the form of a broken (double) power law. In this paper, we study the effect of a process that can modify the power-law spectral form produced by the diffusive shock acceleration: the stochastic re-acceleration of energetic protons by enhanced Alfvénic turbulence in the downstream region of a shock wave. There are arguments suggesting that this process can be important when the shock propagates in the corona. We consider a coronal magnetic loop traversed by a shock and perform Monte Carlo simulations of interactions of shock-accelerated protons with Alfvén waves in the loop. The wave-particle interactions are treated self-consistently, so the finiteness of the available turbulent energy is taken into account. The initial energy spectrum of particles is taken to be a power law. The simulations reveal that the stochastic re-acceleration leads either to the formation of a spectrum that is described in a wide energy range by a power law (although the resulting power-law index is different from the initial one) or to a broken power-law spectrum. The resulting spectral form is determined by the ratio of the energy density of shock-accelerated protons to the wave energy density in the shock's downstream region.

  11. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  12. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  13. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  14. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks. I. Acceleration efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2014-03-10

    We use two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations to investigate particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification at non-relativistic astrophysical shocks. We show that diffusive shock acceleration operates for quasi-parallel configurations (i.e., when the background magnetic field is almost aligned with the shock normal) and, for large sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers, produces universal power-law spectra ∝p {sup –4}, where p is the particle momentum. The maximum energy of accelerated ions increases with time, and it is only limited by finite box size and run time. Acceleration is mainly efficient for parallel and quasi-parallel strong shocks, where 10%-20% of the bulk kinetic energy can be converted to energetic particles and becomes ineffective for quasi-perpendicular shocks. Also, the generation of magnetic turbulence correlates with efficient ion acceleration and vanishes for quasi-perpendicular configurations. At very oblique shocks, ions can be accelerated via shock drift acceleration, but they only gain a factor of a few in momentum and their maximum energy does not increase with time. These findings are consistent with the degree of polarization and the morphology of the radio and X-ray synchrotron emission observed, for instance, in the remnant of SN 1006. We also discuss the transition from thermal to non-thermal particles in the ion spectrum (supra-thermal region) and we identify two dynamical signatures peculiar of efficient particle acceleration, namely, the formation of an upstream precursor and the alteration of standard shock jump conditions.

  15. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  16. Review of ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1990-06-01

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

  17. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  18. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.; Saadatmand, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth`s magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth`s atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  19. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V. ); Connolly, R.; Weiss, R. (Gr

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth's magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth's atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  20. Auroral ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalimov, S. L.

    From the altitude of 500 km to 15 R sub E everywhere conic like distributions of H+, O+, He+ ions are moving upwards from the ionosphere along the geomagnetic field lines in the auroral zone. The distributed ions suggest the existence of ion transverse acceleration mechanisms (ITAM) acting below the observation point. The more plausible mechanisms are connected with the resonance of the type wave particle between ions and the observed EIC and LH waves and are also due to the existence of the local transverse electric fields in the ionoshere and the magnetosphere. The known ion transverse acceleration mechanisms were complemented by new results. The conical distributions of ionospheric ions at different altitudes in the auroral zone are pointed out.