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Sample records for accelerated wound closure

  1. Accelerated wound closure of pressure ulcers in aged mice by chitosan scaffolds with and without bFGF.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan J; Clark, Sherrie G; Lichtensteiger, Carol A; Jamison, Russell D; Johnson, Amy J Wagoner

    2009-07-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare concern, especially for elderly populations. Our work served to ameliorate the chronicity of these ulcers by addressing ischemia-reperfusion injury mediated by neutrophils and the concomitant loss of vasculature in these wounds. To this end, chitosan scaffolds loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) contained in gelatin microparticles were developed and tested for clinical relevance in an aged mouse model. Pressure ulcers were induced in aged mice, and efficacy of treatment was assessed. On days 3 and 7, both chitosan and chitosan-bFGF scaffolds significantly accelerated wound closure compared to gauze control. By day 10, all wounds achieved similar closure. Delivery and angiogenic function of bFGF was verified through ELISA and histology. Elevated neutrophil levels were observed in chitosan and chitosan-bFGF groups. Since neutrophil elastase contributes to the proteolytic environments of pressure ulcers, the effect of chitosan on elastase was assessed. In vitro, chitosan inhibited elastase activity. In vivo, elastase protein levels in wounds were reduced with chitosan-bFGF scaffolds by day 10. These results suggest that chitosan is an effective material for growth factor delivery and can help to heal chronic ulcers. Collectively, our data show that chitosan-bFGF scaffolds are effective in accelerating wound closure of pressure ulcers in aged animals.

  2. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A.; Finigan, Jay H.; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:24748602

  3. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed that the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids are possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway. Here, we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues in in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full-thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 days, with adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were significantly lower, while tumor necrosis factor alpha was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical application of brassinosteroids accelerates wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and reepithelialization phases of the wound repair process, in part by enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in the wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing.

  4. Accelerated Wound Closure In Vitro by Fibroblasts from a Subgroup of Cleft Lip/Palate Patients: Role of Transforming Growth Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Beyeler, Joël; Schnyder, Isabelle; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In a fraction of patients surgically treated for cleft lip/palate, excessive scarring disturbs maxillary growth and dento-alveolar development. Since certain genes are involved in craniofacial morphogenesis as well as tissue repair, a primary defect causing cleft lip/palate could lead to altered wound healing. We performed in vitro wound healing assays with primary lip fibroblasts from 16 cleft lip/palate patients. Nine foreskin fibroblast strains were included for comparison. Cells were grown to confluency and scratch wounds were applied; wound closure was monitored morphometrically over time. Wound closure rate showed highly significant differences between fibroblast strains. Statistically, fibroblast strains from the 25 individuals could be divided into three migratory groups, namely “fast”, “intermediate”, and “slow”. Most cleft lip/palate fibroblasts were distributed between the “fast” (5 strains) and the “intermediate” group (10 strains). These phenotypes were stable over different cell passages from the same individual. Expression of genes involved in cleft lip/palate and wound repair was determined by quantitative PCR. Transforming growth factor-α mRNA was significantly up-regulated in the “fast” group. 5 ng/ml transforming growth factor-α added to the culture medium increased the wound closure rate of cleft lip/palate strains from the “intermediate” migratory group to the level of the “fast”, but had no effect on the latter group. Conversely, antibody to transforming growth factor-α or a specific inhibitor of its receptor most effectively reduced the wound closure rate of “fast” cleft lip/palate strains. Thus, fibroblasts from a distinct subgroup of cleft lip/palate patients exhibit an increased migration rate into wounds in vitro, which is linked to higher transforming growth factor-α expression and attenuated by interfering with its signaling. PMID:25360592

  5. Laser-assisted skin closure (LASC) using a 815-nm diode laser system: determination of an optimal dose to accelerate wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capon, Alexandre; Mitchell, Valerie A.; Sumian, Chryslain C.; Gauthier, Beatrice; Mordon, Serge R.

    1999-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a 815 nm diode-laser system to assist wound closure. It was proposed to determine an optimal fluence being able to accelerate and improve heating process without thermal damage after laser irradiation. Male hairless rats with dorsal skin incisions were used for the study. Different fluences were screened (76 to 346 J/cm2) in a first phase with clinical examination at 3, 7, 15 and 21 days after surgery. Best results were obtained for a fluence of 145 J/cm2 and 3 sec time of exposure. A second phase was conducted to valid these parameters with histological study and determination of tensile strength at 3, 7, 15 and 21 days after surgery. LASC was 4 times faster to process than conventional suture. In the laser group with an optimal fluence of 145 J/cm2, healing was accelerated. The resulting scar was more indiscernible than in the control groups. Histological aspect was better with continuous epidermis and dermis at 3 days in most cases. Tensile strength was 30 to 58% greater than in control groups (1141 g/cm2 at 7 days in the laser group versus 856 g/cm2 and 724 g/cm2 in the control groups, p < 0.001).

  6. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John’s wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. Methods We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712–2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712–1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined “wound field”. All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. Results None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712–2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712–1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712–2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712–1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Conclusion Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712–2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis. PMID:22809174

  7. Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS, T.L.

    2003-02-01

    Among the highest priorities for action under the ''Hanford Federal Facility and Agreement and Consent Order'', hereafter referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, is the retrieval, treatment and disposal of Hanford Site tank waste. Tank waste is recognized as one of the primary threats to the Columbia River and one of the most complex technical challenges. Progress has been made in resolving safety issues, characterizing tank waste and past tank leaks, enhancing double-shell tank waste transfer and operations systems, retrieving single-shell tank waste, deploying waste treatment facilities, and planning for the disposal of immobilized waste product. However, limited progress has been made in developing technologies and providing a sound technical basis for tank system closure. To address this limitation the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project was created to develop information through technology demonstrations in support of waste retrieval and closure decisions. To complete its mission the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project has adopted performance objectives that include: protecting human health and the environment; minimizing/eliminating potential waste releases to the soil and groundwater; preventing water infiltration into the tank; maintaining accessibility of surrounding tanks for future closure; maintaining tank structural integrity; complying with applicable waste retrieval, disposal, and closure regulations; and maintaining flexibility for final closure options in the future.

  8. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.; Carl, James

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or in proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds.

  9. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Plan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings, by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds. Using microwave energy to seal wounds has a number of advantages over lasers, which are currently in experimental use in some hospitals. Laser tissue welding is unsuitable for emergency use because its large, bulky

  10. The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner.

  11. HoxD3 accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott L.; Myers, Connie A.; Charboneau, Aubri; Young, David M.; and Boudreau, Nancy

    2003-12-01

    Poorly healing diabetic wounds are characterized by diminished collagen production and impaired angiogenesis. HoxD3, a homeobox transcription factor that promotes angiogenesis and collagen synthesis, is up-regulated during normal wound repair whereas its expression is diminished in poorly healing wounds of the genetically diabetic (db/db) mouse. To determine whether restoring expression of HoxD3 would accelerate diabetic wound healing, we devised a novel method of gene transfer, which incorporates HoxD3 plasmid DNA into a methylcellulose film that is placed on wounds created on db/db mice. The HoxD3 transgene was expressed in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes of the wounds for up to 10 days. More importantly, a single application of HoxD3 to db/db mice resulted in a statistically significant acceleration of wound closure compared to control-treated wounds. Furthermore, we also observed that the HoxD3-mediated improvement in diabetic wound repair was accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the HoxD3 target genes, Col1A1 and beta 3-integrin leading to enhanced angiogenesis and collagen deposition in the wounds. Although HoxD3-treated wounds also show improved re-epithelialization as compared to control db/db wounds, this effect was not due to direct stimulation of keratinocyte migration by HoxD3. Finally, we show that despite the dramatic increase in collagen synthesis and deposition in HoxD3-treated wounds, these wounds showed normal remodeling and we found no evidence of abnormal wound healing. These results indicate that HoxD3 may provide a means to directly improve collagen deposition, angiogenesis and closure in poorly healing diabetic wounds.

  12. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  13. Keratinocyte-Secreted Heat Shock Protein-90alpha: Leading Wound Reepithelialization and Closure

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Delayed and nonhealing wounds pose a health, economic, and social problem worldwide. For decades, the conventional wisdom pointed to growth factors as the driving force of wound healing and granted them a center stage for therapeutic development. To date, few have obtained US FDA approvals or shown clinical effectiveness and safety. Critical Issue: Wound closure is the initial and most critical step during wound healing. Closing chronic wounds to shut down continued infection is the primary and likely the only achievable goal at the clinic in the foreseeable future. The critical question here is to identify the factor(s) in wounded tissues that drives the initial wound closure. Recent Advances: We made an unexpected discovery of the secreted form of heat shock protein-90alpha (Hsp90α) for promoting skin cell motility, reepithelialization, and wound closure. Secreted Hsp90α possesses unique properties to remain functional under the hostile wound environment that compromises conventional growth factors' effectiveness. Through the common lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 cell surface receptor and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, topical application of human recombinant Hsp90α protein greatly accelerates excision, burn, and diabetic skin wound closure in rodent and porcine models. Future Directions: In almost all cells, the 2–3% of their total proteins (∼7,000 per cell) are Hsp90 (α and β), a long unraveled puzzle. Our new finding of Hsp90 secretion in wounded tissues suggests that the stockpile of Hsp90α by all cells is to rapidly supply the need for extracellular Hsp90α to repair damaged tissues. We propose that keratinocytes at the wound edge secrete Hsp90α that leads the reepithelialization process to close the wound. PMID:27076995

  14. A short peptide from frog skin accelerates diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Duan, Zilei; Tang, Jing; Lv, Qiumin; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2014-10-01

    Delayed wound healing will result in the development of chronic wounds in some diseases, such as diabetes. Amphibian skins possess excellent wound-healing ability and represent a resource for prospective wound-healing promoting compounds. A potential wound-healing promoting peptide (CW49; amino acid sequence APFRMGICTTN) was identified from the frog skin of Odorrana grahami. It promotes wound healing in a murine model with a full-thickness dermal wound in both normal and diabetic animals. In addition to its strong angiogenic ability with respect to the upregulation of some angiogenic proteins, CW49 also showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect in diabetic wounds, which was very important for healing chronic wounds. CW49 had little effect on re-epithelialization, resulting in no significant effect on wound closure rate compared to a vehicle control. Altogether, this indicated that CW49 might accelerate diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenesis and preventing any excessive inflammatory response. Considering its favorable traits as a small peptide that significantly promotes angiogenesis, CW49 might be an excellent candidate or template for the development of a drug for use in the treatment of diabetic wounds.

  15. Closure of traumatic wounds without cleaning and suturing

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, D; Sharma, D; Ramdass, M; Naraynsingh, V

    2002-01-01

    Background: In less than ideal situations wounds have to be closed without extensive cleaning using sterile adhesive strips (Steristrips). This prospective analyses the efficiency of this technique and compares it to the more conventional approach. Methods: Altogether 147 lacerations were closed with sterile strips with no wound cleaning. Patients were subsequently followed up for a minimum of three months. Results: The sepsis rate in compliant patients was 1.4% with a total complication rate of 2.7%. Conclusion: This technique, while contradicting the "sacred tenets" of wound closure, is a cheap, quick, and effective alternative to routine closure of traumatic wounds in a casualty department. PMID:12151570

  16. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  17. Modeling closure of circular wounds through coordinated collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing enables tissues to restore their original states, and is achieved through collective cell migration into the wound space, contraction of the wound edge via an actomyosin filament ‘purse-string,’ as well as cell division. Recently, experimental techniques have been developed to create wounds with various regular morphologies in epithelial monolayers, and these experiments of circular closed-contour wounds support coordinated lamellipodial cell crawling as the predominant driver of gap closure. Through utilizing a particle-based mechanical tissue simulation, exhibiting long-range coordination of cell motility, we computationally model these closed-contour experiments with a high level of agreement between experimentally observed and simulated wound closure dynamics and tissue velocity profiles. We also determine the sensitivity of wound closure time in the model to changes in cell motility force and division rate. Our simulation results confirm that circular wounds can close due to collective cell migration without the necessity for a purse-string mechanism or for cell division, and show that the alignment mechanism of cellular motility force with velocity, leading to collective motion in the model, may speed up wound closure.

  18. Functional T lymphocytes infiltrate implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams during surgical wound closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Gouttefangeas, C; Eberle, M; Ruck, P; Stark, M; Müller, J E; Becker, H D; Rammensee, H G; Pinocy, J

    2001-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure involving the implantation of polyvinyl alcohol foam is a technique recently developed for the treatment of patients suffering from either wound infection or chronic wounds. This method has been shown to improve and accelerate wound healing. However, little is known about the cell populations that infiltrate the foam, and their potential role in resolving the infection and promoting granulation tissue formation. Our study demonstrates that wound-implanted foams are mainly infiltrated with granulocytes, but that mononuclear cells, including macrophages and minor populations of T, B and natural killer lymphocytes, are also present. We show that foam-infiltrating T cells, especially CD4(+) T cells, constitute a phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous population influenced by wound-infecting bacteria. Thus, T lymphocytes could play a role in wound cleansing. In addition, our data indicate that implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams might be suitable microenvironments for manipulating T cell-mediated immune responses in patients.

  19. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    DOEpatents

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  20. Liquid covering for superficial skin wounds and its effect on wound closure in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Stenn, K S; Yan, S P

    1985-01-01

    An irrigatable bandage has been developed to hold fluid over a wound. Starting with superficial skin wounds on the back of guinea pigs, the bandage has been used to hold saline or phosphate-buffered saline containing antibiotics over the wound for up to 48 hours. Animals tolerated the bandage well for this period and bacterial contamination and wound maceration were not complications. The extent of reepithelialization with time was measured histologically under three separate conditions: wound exposed to air, wound covered and kept moist, and wound covered with liquid. By 24 hours 2 +/- 1%, 16 +/- 4% and 60 +/- 8% of the wound surface interfollicular areas showed some reepithelialization, respectively. On the average, at the same time these areas showed 15 +/- 2%, 19 +/- 2% and 37 +/- 1% coverage by epithelium. By these measurements, the liquid cover enhanced the rate of wound closure significantly.

  1. Cutaneous Wound Closure Materials: An Overview and Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mubarak, Luluah; Al-Haddab, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: On a daily basis, dermasurgeons are faced with different kinds of wounds that have to be closed. With a plethora of skin closure materials currently available, choosing a solution that combines excellent and rapid cosmetic results with practicality and cost-effectiveness can be difficult, if not tricky. Objectives: We aimed to review the available skin closure materials over the past 20 years and the scientific claims behind their effectiveness in repairing various kinds of wounds. Materials and Methods: The two authors independently searched and scrutinised the literature. The search was performed electronically using Pub Med, the Cochrane Database, Google Scholar and Ovid as search engines to find articles concerning skin closure materials written since 1990. Conclusion: Many factors are involved in the choice of skin closure material, including the type and place of the wound, available materials, physician expertise and preferences, and patient age and health. Evidence-based main uses of different skin closure materials are provided to help surgeons choose the appropriate material for different wounds. PMID:24470712

  2. Ozone mediators effect on "in vitro" scratch wound closure.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Zanardi, Iacopo; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2016-09-01

    The beneficial effect of low doses of ozone on wound healing has been well documented and attributed mainly to its bactericidal and pro-oxidant properties. Because ozone itself does not penetrate the cells but immediately reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids, its effects are the results of oxidative mediators. Among the molecule produces by the interaction of ozone with biological systems, there are HNE and H2O2. At today, the cellular mechanisms accounting for the positive effects of mild ozonization on wound closure are still largely unexplored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different non-toxic doses of ozonated saline ranging from 2 to 300 μM, in an in vitro wound scratch model by the use of human keratinocytes. The results showed that ozonated saline is able to improve in vitro wound healing by stimulating cell proliferation as measured by BrdU assay and PCNA protein levels. In order to better elucidate the molecules that play the main role in the beneficial effect of ozonated saline in wound healing, HNE and H2O2 were used alone or in combination to mimic ozonated saline effect. Surprisingly, keratinocytes treated with different doses of HNE and H2O2 did not significantly improve the wound closure, while the combination of the two compounds was able to improve wound closure. In addition, Nrf2 pathways were also activated as determined by its translocation to the nucleus and the increased HO1 gene expression. The present work suggests that ozonated saline effect on wound closure is the results of the combination of more molecules among which HNE and H2O2 play a key role. PMID:27487012

  3. Cataract surgery and methods of wound closure: a review

    PubMed Central

    Matossian, Cynthia; Makari, Sarah; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Clear corneal incisions are routinely used in cataract surgery, but watertight wound closure may not always be achieved, which can increase the risk for anterior chamber fluid egress or ocular surface fluid ingress. A new US Food and Drug Administration-approved ocular sealant appears to have good efficacy in sealing clear corneal incisions; its use may be indicated when wound integrity is in question. PMID:26045656

  4. Attempts to accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Akira; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    Wound healing is a well-orchestrated process, where numerous factors are activated or inhibited in a sequence of steps. Immediately after the infliction of damage, the repair of wound stars. The initial step is an inflammatory change with activation of innate immunity, which is followed by proliferation phase, including fibroplasia, angiogenesis and re-epithelialization. Pathological impairment of wound healing process may lead to persistent ulceration as seen in diabetic patients. Various signaling pathways are involved in wound healing. TGFβ/Smad pathway is a representative and well known to participate in fibroplasia, however, its comprehensive effect on wound healing is controversial. Experimental and clinical remedies have been being tried to promote wound healing. Advancement of cell engineering allows us to use stem cells and living skin equivalents.

  5. Mobilised bone marrow-derived cells accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Yu; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Ji, Shi-Zhao; Han, Shu; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2013-08-01

    Massive skin defects caused by severe burn and trauma are a clinical challenge to surgeons. Timely and effective wound closure is often hindered by the lack of skin donor site. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to 'differentiate' into multiple tissue cells. In this study we focused on the direct manipulation of endogenous BMDCs, avoiding the immunocompatibility issues and complicated cell isolation, purification, identification and amplification procedures in vitro on wound repair. We found that mobilisation of the BMDCs into the circulation significantly increased the amount of BMDCs at the injury site which in turn accelerated healing of large open wound. We used a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse model to track BMDCs and to investigate their role in full-thickness skin excisional wounds. We have shown that bone marrow mobilisation by granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) exerted multiple beneficial effects on skin repair, both by increasing the engraftment of BMDCs into the skin to differentiate into multiple skin cell types and by upregulating essential cytokine mRNAs critical to wound repair. The potential trophic effects of G-CSF on bone marrow stem cells to accelerate wound healing could have a significant clinical impact.

  6. Consequences of age on ischemic wound healing in rats: altered antioxidant activity and delayed wound closure.

    PubMed

    Moor, Andrea N; Tummel, Evan; Prather, Jamie L; Jung, Michelle; Lopez, Jonathan J; Connors, Sarah; Gould, Lisa J

    2014-04-01

    Advertisements targeted at the elderly population suggest that antioxidant therapy will reduce free radicals and promote wound healing, yet few scientific studies substantiate these claims. To better understand the potential utility of supplemental antioxidant therapy for wound healing, we tested the hypothesis that age and tissue ischemia alter the balance of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Using a bipedicled skin flap model, ischemic and non-ischemic wounds were created on young and aged rats. Wound closure and the balance of the critical antioxidants superoxide dismutase and glutathione in the wound bed were determined. Ischemia delayed wound closure significantly more in aged rats. Lower superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione in non-ischemic wounds of aged rats indicate a basal deficit due to age alone. Ischemic wounds from aged rats had lower superoxide dismutase 2 protein and activity initially, coupled with decreased ratios of reduced/oxidized glutathione and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. De novo glutathione synthesis, to restore redox balance in aged ischemic wounds, was initiated as evidenced by increased glutamate cysteine ligase. Results demonstrate deficiencies in two antioxidant pathways in aged rats that become exaggerated in ischemic tissue, culminating in profoundly impaired wound healing and prolonged inflammation.

  7. Hyaluronidase Modulates Inflammatory Response and Accelerates the Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F.; Leite, Marcel N.; Bitencourt, Claudia S.; Paula-Silva, Francisco W. G.; Andrade, Thiago A. M.; Frade, Marco A. C.; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  8. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  9. Osmotic surveillance mediates rapid wound closure through nucleotide release

    PubMed Central

    Gault, William J.; Enyedi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic cues from the environment mediate rapid detection of epithelial breaches by leukocytes in larval zebrafish tail fins. Using intravital luminescence and fluorescence microscopy, we now show that osmolarity differences between the interstitial fluid and the external environment trigger ATP release at tail fin wounds to initiate rapid wound closure through long-range activation of basal epithelial cell motility. Extracellular nucleotide breakdown, at least in part mediated by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 (Entpd3), restricts the range and duration of osmotically induced cell migration after injury. Thus, in zebrafish larvae, wound repair is driven by an autoregulatory circuit that generates pro-migratory tissue signals as a function of environmental exposure of the inside of the tissue. PMID:25533845

  10. PDGF-BB does not accelerate healing in diabetic mice with splinted skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Ae; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Shah, Nihar M; Teixeira, Leandro; Motta, Monica J; Covert, Jill; Dubielzig, Richard; Schurr, Michael; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; Abbott, Nicholas L; McAnulty, Jonathan; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is considered to accelerate tissue repair of impaired chronic wounds. However, the vast literature is plagued with conflicting reports of its efficacy in animal models and this is often influenced by a wide array of experimental variables making it difficult to compare the results across the studies. To mitigate the confounding variables that influence the efficacy of topically applied PDGF-BB, we used a controlled full thickness splinted excisional wound model in db/db mice (type 2 diabetic mouse model) for our investigations. A carefully-defined silicone-splinted wound model, with reduced wound contraction, controlled splint and bandage maintenance, allowing for healing primarily by reepithelialization was employed. Two splinted 8 mm dorsal full thickness wounds were made in db/db mice. Wounds were topically treated once daily with either 3 µg PDGF-BB in 30 µl of 5% PEG-PBS vehicle or an equal volume of vehicle for 10 days. Body weights, wound contraction, wound closure, reepithelialization, collagen content, and wound bed inflammation were evaluated clinically and histopathologically. The bioactivity of PDGF-BB was confirmed by in vitro proliferation assay. PDGF-BB, although bioactive in vitro, failed to accelerate wound healing in vivo in the db/db mice using the splinted wound model. Considering that the predominant mechanism of wound healing in humans is by re-epithelialization, the most appropriate model for evaluating therapeutics is one that uses splints to prevent excessive wound contraction. Here, we report that PDGF-BB does not promote wound closure by re-epithelialization in a murine splinted wound model. Our results highlight that the effects of cytoactive factors reported in vivo ought to be carefully interpreted with critical consideration of the wound model used.

  11. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2).

  12. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  13. Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, I; Parkinson, L G; Shen, Y; Toro, A; Brown, T; Zhao, H; Bleackley, R C; Granville, D J

    2014-10-09

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. Although once thought to function primarily as a pro-apoptotic serine protease, granzyme B (GzmB) can also accumulate in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during chronic inflammation and cleave ECM proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing through excessive ECM degradation. In the present study, the murine serine protease inhibitor, serpina3n (SA3N), was administered to excisional wounds created on the dorsum of genetically induced type-II diabetic mice. Wound closure was monitored and skin wound samples were collected for analyses. Wound closure, including both re-epithelialization and contraction, were significantly increased in SA3N-treated wounds. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of SA3N-treated wounds revealed a more mature, proliferative granulation tissue phenotype as indicated by increased cell proliferation, vascularization, fibroblast maturation and differentiation, and collagen deposition. Skin homogenates from SA3N-treated wounds also exhibited greater levels of full-length intact fibronectin compared with that of vehicle wounds. In addition, GzmB-induced detachment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts correlated with a rounded and clustered phenotype that was prevented by SA3N. In summary, topical administration of SA3N accelerated wound healing. Our findings suggest that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing through the proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin that is essential for normal wound closure, and that SA3N promotes granulation tissue maturation and collagen deposition.

  14. Skin wound healing is accelerated and scarless in the absence of commensal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Canesso, Maria C C; Vieira, Angélica T; Castro, Tiago B R; Schirmer, Brígida G A; Cisalpino, Daniel; Martins, Flaviano S; Rachid, Milene A; Nicoli, Jacques R; Teixeira, Mauro M; Barcelos, Lucíola S

    2014-11-15

    The commensal microbiota has a high impact on health and disease by modulating the development and homeostasis of host immune system. Immune cells are involved in virtually every aspect of the wound repair process; however, the impact of commensal microbiota on skin wound healing is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the influence of commensal microbiota on tissue repair of excisional skin wounds by using germ-free (GF) Swiss mice. We observed that macroscopic wound closure rate is accelerated in the absence of commensal microbiota. Accordantly, histologically assessed wound epithelization was accelerated in GF in comparison with conventional (CV) Swiss mice. The wounds of GF mice presented a significant decrease in neutrophil accumulation and an increase in mast cell and macrophage infiltration into wounds. Interestingly, alternatively activated healing macrophage-related genes were highly expressed in the wound tissue of GF mice. Moreover, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, the angiogenic growth factor VEGF and angiogenesis were higher in the wound tissue of those mice. Conversely, scarring and levels of the profibrogenic factor TGF-β1 were greatly reduced in GF mice wounded skin when compared with CV mice. Of note, conventionalization of GF mice with CV microbiota restored wound closure rate, neutrophil and macrophage accumulation, cytokine production, and scarring to the same extent as CV mice. Overall, our findings suggest that, in the absence of any contact with microbiota, skin wound healing is accelerated and scarless, partially because of reduced accumulation of neutrophils, increased accumulation of alternatively activated healing macrophages, and better angiogenesis at wound sites.

  15. Low-output carbon dioxide laser for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions: comparative tensile strength studies of the laser to the suture and staple for wound closure

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, J.M.; Robinson, J.K.; Taute, P.M.; Lautenschlager, E.P.; Leibovich, S.J.; Hartz, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The low-output carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser was used for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions. Cutaneous scalpel incisions were placed over the dorsum of three minipigs and were then closed by either the laser, sutures, or staples. At multiple time points after wound closure, up to day 90, the tensile strengths of these wounds were comparatively evaluated. All wounds, including those closed with the laser, clinically appeared to heal similarly with no evidence of wound dehiscence or infection. Tensile strength studies revealed similar sigmoid curves for all wound closure modalities with low initial tensile strengths up to days 14 to 21, which afterwards increased rapidly, with a plateau toward day 90. From our study, it appears that the CO/sub 2/ laser, in the low-output mode, can be used for cutaneous wound closure and that similar clinical healing and tensile strength measurements are obtained relative to the conventional cutaneous wound closure modalities of the suture or staple.

  16. Hydrogel Microencapsulated Insulin-Secreting Cells Increase Keratinocyte Migration, Epidermal Thickness, Collagen Fiber Density, and Wound Closure in a Diabetic Mouse Model of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Faulknor, Renea; Berthiaume, François; Olabisi, Ronke M.

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a hierarchical process of intracellular and intercellular signaling. Insulin is a potent chemoattractant and mitogen for cells involved in wound healing. Insulin's potential to promote keratinocyte growth and stimulate collagen synthesis in fibroblasts is well described. However, there currently lacks an appropriate delivery mechanism capable of consistently supplying a wound environment with insulin; current approaches require repeated applications of insulin, which increase the chances of infecting the wound. In this study, we present a novel cell-based therapy that delivers insulin to the wound area in a constant or glucose-dependent manner by encapsulating insulin-secreting cells in nonimmunogenic poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel microspheres. We evaluated cell viability and insulin secretory characteristics of microencapsulated cells. Glucose stimulation studies verified free diffusion of glucose and insulin through the microspheres, while no statistical difference in insulin secretion was observed between cells in microspheres and cells in monolayers. Scratch assays demonstrated accelerated keratinocyte migration in vitro when treated with microencapsulated cells. In excisional wounds on the dorsa of diabetic mice, microencapsulated RIN-m cells accelerated wound closure by postoperative day 7; a statistically significant increase over AtT-20ins-treated and control groups. Histological results indicated significantly greater epidermal thickness in both microencapsulated RIN-m and AtT-20ins-treated wounds. The results suggest that microencapsulation enables insulin-secreting cells to persist long enough at the wound site for a therapeutic effect and thereby functions as an effective delivery vehicle to accelerate wound healing. PMID:26239745

  17. Potential Activity of 3-(2-Chlorophenyl)-1-phenyl-propenonein Accelerating Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M.; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Salama, Suzy M.; Alwajeeh, Nahla S. I.

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing involves inflammation followed by granular tissue development and scar formation. In this study, synthetic chalcone 3-(2-Chlorophenyl)-1-phenyl-propenone (CPPP) was investigated for a potential role in enhancing wound healing and closure. Twenty-four male rats were divided randomly into 4 groups: carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) (0.2 mL), Intrasite gel, and CPPP (25 or 50 mg/mL). Gross morphology, wounds treatment with the CPPP, and Intrasite gel accelerate the rate of wound healing compared to CMC group. Ten days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Histological assessment revealed that the wounds treated with CPPP showed that wound closure site contained little amount of scar and the granulation tissue contained more collagen and less inflammatory cells than wound treated with CMC. This finding was confirmed with Masson's trichrome staining. The antioxidant defence enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased in the wound homogenates treated with CPPP (P < 0.05) compared to CMC treated group. However, in the CPPP treatment group, lipid peroxidation (MDA) was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), suggesting that the CPPP also has an important role in protection against lipid peroxidation-induced skin injury after ten days of treatment with CPPP, which is similar to the values of cytokines TGF-β and TNF-α in tissue homogenate. Finally the administration of CPPP at a dosage of 25 and 50 mg/kg was suitable for the stimulation of wound healing. PMID:24587992

  18. Diazoxide accelerates wound healing by improving EPC function.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang-Peng; Xin, Ru-Juan; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Guo-Jun; Deng, Ya-Ping; Li, Dong-Jie; Shen, Fu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is the primary cause of microvascular complications in diabetes. Diazoxide enables beta cells to rest by reversibly suppressing glucose-induced insulin secretion by opening ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the beta cells. This study investigated the role of diazoxide in wound healing in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and explored the possible mechanisms of its effect. Compared to the controls, mice with STZ-induced diabetes exhibited significantly impaired wound healing. Diazoxide treatment (30 mg/kg/d, intragastrically) for 28 days accelerated wound closure and stimulated angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) increased significantly in the diazoxide-treated diabetic mice. The adhesion, migration, and tube formation abilities of bone marrow (BM)-EPCs were impaired by diabetes, and these impairments were improved by diazoxide treatment. The expression of both p53 and TSP-1 increased in diabetic mice compared to that in the controls, and these increases were inhibited significantly by diazoxide treatment. In vitro, diazoxide treatment improved the impaired BM-EPC function and diminished the increased expression of p53 and TSP-1 in cultured BM-EPCs caused by high glucose levels. We conclude that diazoxide improved BM-EPC function in mice with STZ-induced diabetes, possibly via a p53- and TSP-1-dependent pathway. PMID:27100489

  19. Par3/Bazooka and phosphoinositides regulate actin protrusion formation during Drosophila dorsal closure and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Karen; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Goberdhan, Deborah; Millard, Tom H

    2013-02-01

    Effective wound closure mechanisms are essential for maintenance of epithelial structure and function. The repair of wounded epithelia is primarily driven by the cells bordering the wound, which become motile after wounding, forming dynamic actin protrusions along the wound edge. The molecular mechanisms that trigger wound edge cells to become motile following tissue damage are not well understood. Using wound healing and dorsal closure in Drosophila, we identify a direct molecular link between changes in cell-cell adhesion at epithelial edges and induction of actin protrusion formation. We find that the scaffolding protein Par3/Bazooka and the lipid phosphatase Pten are specifically lost from cell-cell junctions at epithelial edges. This results in a localized accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), which promotes the formation of actin protrusions along the epithelial edge. Depleting PIP3 results in defective epithelial closure during both dorsal closure and wound healing. These data reveal a novel mechanism that directly couples loss of epithelial integrity to activation of epithelial closure.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  1. Computer simulation of wound closure in epithelial tissues: Cell-basal-lamina adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tatsuzo; Honda, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    The mechanism of wound closure in epithelial tissues, i.e., cell monolayer sheets, is investigated through computer simulations. A wound means an area in which some cells have been removed from the normal tissue. The vertex dynamics cell model [T. Nagai and H. Honda, Philos. Mag. B 81, 699 (2001)], which describes morphogenesis of epithelial tissues using the concepts of statistical physics, is modified and applied to the closure of small wounds without mitosis. It is shown that cell-basal-lamina adhesion governs the wound closure competing with cell-cell adhesion and cell elasticity. The simulation results reproduce the actual wound closure process qualitatively and partly quantitatively. The closing proceeds with the translation of the edges of wound polygons toward the wound center and the intermittent reduction in the number of polygon edges. Over time, the process leads to an exponential decrease in the wound area. A shape factor is introduced to describe the wound shape quantitatively and is used to examine the time variation thereof. A method for determining model parameters by comparison with the experiments is given.

  2. Ultrashort peptide nanofibrous hydrogels for the acceleration of healing of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong-Chiat; Cai, Elijah Z; Ang, Chuan-Han; Raju, Ashvin; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Koh, Alvin G; Zhou, Hui J; Lim, Thiam-Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2014-06-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for wound dressings to treat partial thickness burns that damage the epidermis and dermis. An ideal dressing needs to prevent infection, maintain skin hydration to facilitate debridement of the necrotic tissue, and provide cues to enhance tissue regeneration. We developed a class of 'smart' peptide hydrogels, which fulfill these criteria. Our ultrashort aliphatic peptides have an innate tendency to self-assemble into helical fibers, forming biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds which are non-immunogenic and non-cytotoxic. These nanofibrous hydrogels accelerated wound closure in a rat model for partial thickness burns. Two peptide hydrogel candidates demonstrate earlier onset and completion of autolytic debridement, compared to Mepitel(®), a silicone-coated polyamide net used as standard-of-care. They also promote epithelial and dermal regeneration in the absence of exogenous growth factors, achieving 86.2% and 92.9% wound closure respectively, after 14 days. In comparison, only 62.8% of the burnt area is healed for wounds dressed with Mepitel(®). Since the rate of wound closure is inversely correlated with hypertrophic scar formation and infection risks, our peptide hydrogel technology fills a niche neglected by current treatment options. The regenerative properties can be further enhanced by incorporation of bioactive moieties such as growth factors and cytokines.

  3. Purse-String Versus Linear Conventional Skin Wound Closure of an Ileostomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Gharedaghi, Babak; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infection is one of the most frequent complications that can occur after ileostomy closure. The incidence of wound infection depends on the skin closure technique, but there is no agreement on the perfect closure method for an ileostomy wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of infection, the patient's approval, and the patient's pain between purse-string closure (PSC) and the usual linear closure (LC) of a stoma wound. Methods This randomized clinical trial enrolled 66 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2015 to May 2015 in Sari Emam Khomeini Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the stoma closing method: the PSC group (n = 34) and the LC group (n = 32). The incidences of infection for the 2 groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction and pain with the stoma were determined by using a questionnaire. Results Infection occurred in 1 of 34 PSC patients (2.9%) and in 7 of 32 LC patients (21.8%), and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.021). Patients in the PSC group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar and its cosmetic appearance at one month and three months after surgery (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, PSC was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to LC. However, the healing period for patients who underwent PSC was longer than it was for those who underwent LC. PMID:27626025

  4. Purse-String Versus Linear Conventional Skin Wound Closure of an Ileostomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Gharedaghi, Babak; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infection is one of the most frequent complications that can occur after ileostomy closure. The incidence of wound infection depends on the skin closure technique, but there is no agreement on the perfect closure method for an ileostomy wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of infection, the patient's approval, and the patient's pain between purse-string closure (PSC) and the usual linear closure (LC) of a stoma wound. Methods This randomized clinical trial enrolled 66 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2015 to May 2015 in Sari Emam Khomeini Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the stoma closing method: the PSC group (n = 34) and the LC group (n = 32). The incidences of infection for the 2 groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction and pain with the stoma were determined by using a questionnaire. Results Infection occurred in 1 of 34 PSC patients (2.9%) and in 7 of 32 LC patients (21.8%), and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.021). Patients in the PSC group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar and its cosmetic appearance at one month and three months after surgery (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, PSC was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to LC. However, the healing period for patients who underwent PSC was longer than it was for those who underwent LC.

  5. Inhibition of PAI-1 Via PAI-039 Improves Dermal Wound Closure in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rebalka, Irena A; Raleigh, Matthew J; D'Souza, Donna M; Coleman, Samantha K; Rebalka, Alexandra N; Hawke, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes impairs the ability to heal cutaneous wounds, leading to hospitalization, amputations, and death. Patients with diabetes experience elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), regardless of their glycemic control. It has been demonstrated that PAI-1-deficient mice exhibit improved cutaneous wound healing, and that PAI-1 inhibition improves skeletal muscle repair in mice with type 1 diabetes mellitus, leading us to hypothesize that pharmacologically mediated reductions in PAI-1 using PAI-039 would normalize cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (STZ-diabetic) mice. To simulate the human condition of variations in wound care, wounds were aggravated or minimally handled postinjury. Following cutaneous injury, PAI-039 was orally administered twice daily for 10 days. Compared with nondiabetic mice, wounds in STZ-diabetic mice healed more slowly. Wound site aggravation exacerbated this deficit. PAI-1 inhibition had no effect on dermal collagen levels or wound bed size. PAI-039 treatment failed to improve angiogenesis in the wounds of STZ-diabetic mice and blunted angiogenesis in the wounds of nondiabetic mice. Importantly, PAI-039 treatment significantly improved epidermal cellular migration and wound re-epithelialization compared with vehicle-treated STZ-diabetic mice. These findings support the use of PAI-039 as a novel therapeutic agent to improve diabetic wound closure and demonstrate the primary mechanism of its action to be related to epidermal closure.

  6. Acceleration of skin wound healing with tragacanth (Astragalus) preparation: an experimental pilot study in rats.

    PubMed

    Fayazzadeh, Ehsan; Rahimpour, Sina; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohsen; Farzampour, Shahrokh; Sotoudeh Anvari, Maryam; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Ahmadi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Gum tragacanth is a natural complex mixture of polysaccharides and alkaline minerals extracted from species of Astragalus plant, which is found widely in arid regions of the Middle East. In a pilot experimental study we examined the effects of its topical application on wound healing in ten albino adult male rats. Two similar parasagittal elliptical full-thickness wounds (control vs. test samples) were created on the dorsum of each animal. Test group samples were fully covered by a thin layer of gum tragacanth daily. The extent of wound healing was evaluated by planimetric analysis on multiple occasions during the 10-day study period. On the 7th day of the study, the percent of wound closure was significantly higher in gum tragacanth-treated specimens compared to the control samples (87%±2% vs. 70%±4%, P<0.001). The majority of wounds in the test group were completely closed by the 10th day of the study. The difference in wound healing index measured by histological examination on day 10 of the study was also statistically meaningful between the two groups (0.624±0.097 vs. 0.255±0.063, P<0.05). The results of this study clearly showed the useful effects of topical application of gum tragacanth in acceleration of skin wound contraction and healing. More studies are encouraged to identify the implicating agents and precisely understand the mechanism by which they exert their wound healing effects.

  7. Potential of oncostatin M to accelerate diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo Hye; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine found in a variety of pathologic conditions, which leads to excessive collagen deposition. Current studies demonstrate that OSM is also a mitogen for fibroblasts and has an anti-inflammatory action. It was therefore hypothesised that OSM may play an important role in healing of chronic wounds that usually involve decreased fibroblast function and persist in the inflammatory stage for a long time. In a previous in vitro study, the authors showed that OSM increased wound healing activities of diabetic dermal fibroblasts. However, wound healing in vivo is a complex process involving multiple factors. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of OSM on diabetic wound healing in vivo. Five diabetic mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness round wounds were created on the back of each mouse (total 20 wounds). OSM was applied on the two left-side wounds (n = 10) and phosphate-buffered saline was applied on the two right-side wounds (n = 10). After 10 days, unhealed wound areas of the OSM and control groups were compared using the stereoimage optical topometer system. Also, epithelialisation, wound contraction and reduction in wound volume in each group were compared. The OSM-treated group showed superior results in all of the tested parameters. In particular, the unhealed wound area and the reduction in wound volume demonstrated statistically significant differences (P < 0·05). The results of this study indicate that topical application of OSM may have the potential to accelerate healing of diabetic wounds.

  8. Vacuum-assisted therapy accelerates wound healing in necrotizing soft tissue infections: our experience in two intravenous drug abuse patients.

    PubMed

    Marinis, Athanasios; Voultsos, Mavroudis; Grivas, Paraskevas; Dikeakos, Panagiotis; Liarmakopoulos, Emmanouil; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Rizos, Spyros

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) devices is currently a well established technique for managing complicated wounds. Such wounds occur after aggressive surgical debridement for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). In this report we present our experience in two intravenous drug abusers managed with VAC for NSTIs. The patients were 25 and 34 years old, HCV positive and presented with oedema of the upper femoral compartments and concomitant severe sepsis. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed severe cellulitis, fluid collection and necrosis of the affected fasciae and muscles. After emergent and subsequent aggressive surgical debridement during the first 48h, the VAC device was applied. Both patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a fast recovery from their multiorgan dysfunction. Suture closure of the wounds was achieved at the 25th and 38th postoperative days respectively and patients were discharged without any motor deficit. Negative pressure wound therapy is a modern therapeutic modality for treating complicated infected wounds. Moreover, it accelerates wound healing and primary closure, facilitating patient ambulation and recovery. A dedicated medical and nursing team is an important prerequisite for a successful outcome.

  9. Feasibility and Safety of Absorbable Knotless Wound Closure Device in Laparoscopic Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chying-Chyuan; Lee, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Myomectomy has been performed through laparoscopy. Suturing is known as rate-limiting step in laparoscopic myomectomy. The present study was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of absorbable knotless wound closure device with the results of conventional suturing. Methods. This prospective study included 62 women who underwent laparoscopic myomectomy at Taipei City Hospital, Zhongxiao Branch, from January 2010 through to August 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups according to suturing materials, the knotless group and the 2-0 Vicryl suture group. Patient demographics, overall operative time, and intraoperative blood loss were compared between two groups. Results. Demographic characteristics and laboratory variables before surgery were comparable. Operative time was significantly shorter in knotless group compared with that in 2-0 Vicryl suture group (112 ± 47 versus 147 ± 63 minutes; p < 0.05). The results revealed a significant difference in intraoperative blood loss between two groups (knotless versus 2-0 Vicryl: 112.8 ± 54.2 versus 143.6 ± 64.9). Use of absorbable knotless wound closure device was associated with greater hemostasis compared with that of 2-0 Vicryl. During a 2-year follow-up period, 12 patients (46.2%) from the group with absorbable knotless wound closure device and 14 patients (38.9%) from 2-0 Vicryl suture group became pregnant. Conclusion. Closure of myometrium using absorbable knotless wound closure device after laparoscopic myomectomy resulted in a shorter operative time and less blood loss. PMID:27429977

  10. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4) Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hang-Ning; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wu, Chang-Jer; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4), was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus); TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68). In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing. PMID:25955756

  11. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  12. Methods and apparatus for microwave tissue welding for wound closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane L. (Inventor); Dusl, John R. (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite A. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for joining biological tissue together are provided. In at least one specific embodiment, a method for joining biological tissue together can include applying a biological solder on a wound. A barrier layer can be disposed on the biological solder. An antenna can be located in proximate spatial relationship to the barrier layer. An impedance of the antenna can be matched to an impedance of the wound. Microwaves from a signal generator can be transmitted through the antenna to weld two or more biological tissue pieces of the wound together. A power of the microwaves can be adjusted by a control circuit disposed between the antenna and the signal generator. The heating profile within the tissue may be adjusted and controlled by the placement of metallic microspheres in or around the wound.

  13. Modeling and simulation of material degradation in biodegradable wound closure devices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfei; Chui, Chee-Kong; Teo, Chee-Leong; Lau, David P C

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradable materials have been used as wound closure materials. It is important for these materials to enhance wound healing when the wound is vulnerable, and maintain wound closure until the wound is heal. This article studies the degradation process of bioresorbable magnesium micro-clips for wound closure in voice/laryngeal microsurgery. A novel computational approach is proposed to model degradation of the biodegradable micro-clips. The degradation process that considers both material and geometry of the device as well as its deployment is modeled as an energy minimization problem that is iteratively solved using active contour and incremental finite element methods. Strain energy of the micro-clip during degradation is calculated with the stretching and bending functions in the active contour formulation. The degradation rate is computed from strain energy using a transformation formulation. By relating strain energy to material degradation, the degradation rates and geometries of the micro-clip during degradation can be represented using a simulated degradation map. Computer simulation of the degradation of the micro-clip presented in the study is validated by in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  14. Wound closure in the lamellipodia of single cells: mediation by actin polymerization in the absence of an actomyosin purse string.

    PubMed

    Henson, John H; Nazarian, Ronniel; Schulberg, Katrina L; Trabosh, Valerie A; Kolnik, Sarah E; Burns, Andrew R; McPartland, Kenneth J

    2002-03-01

    The actomyosin purse string is an evolutionarily conserved contractile structure that is involved in cytokinesis, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Recent studies suggested that an actomyosin purse string is crucial for the closure of wounds in single cells. In the present study, morphological and pharmacological methods were used to investigate the role of this structure in the closure of wounds in the peripheral cytoplasm of sea urchin coelomocytes. These discoidal shaped cells underwent a dramatic form of actin-based centripetal/retrograde flow and occasionally opened and closed spontaneous wounds in their lamellipodia. Fluorescent phalloidin staining indicated that a well defined fringe of actin filaments assembles from the margin of these holes, and drug studies with cytochalasin D and latrunculin A indicated that actin polymerization is required for wound closure. Additional evidence that actin polymerization is involved in wound closure was provided by the localization of components of the Arp2/3 complex to the wound margin. Significantly, myosin II immunolocalization demonstrated that it is not associated with wound margins despite being present in the perinuclear region. Pharmacological evidence for the lack of myosin II involvement in wound closure comes from experiments in which a microneedle was used to produce wounds in cells in which actomyosin contraction was inhibited by treatment with kinase inhibitors. Wounds produced in kinase inhibitor-treated cells closed in a manner similar to that seen with control cells. Taken together, our results suggest that an actomyosin purse string mechanism is not responsible for the closure of lamellar wounds in coelomocytes. We hypothesize that the wounds heal by means of a combination of the force produced by actin polymerization alone and centripetal flow. Interestingly, these cells did assemble an actomyosin structure around the margin of phagosome-like membrane invaginations, indicating that myosin is not simply

  15. Formylpeptide receptors mediate rapid neutrophil mobilization to accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Le, Yingying; Gao, Ji-Liang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Ji Ming; Wang, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a multi-phased pathophysiological process requiring chemoattractant receptor-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the lesion. Two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptors Fpr1 and Fpr2 mediate rapid neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice by sensing pathogen-derived chemotactic ligands. These receptors also recognize host-derived chemotactic peptides in inflammation and injury. Here we report the capacity of Fprs to promote the healing of sterile skin wound in mice by initiating neutrophil infiltration. We found that in normal miceneutrophils rapidly infiltrated the dermis in the wound before the production of neutrophil-specific chemokines by the injured tissue. In contrast, rapid neutrophil infiltration was markedly reduced with delayed wound closure in mice deficient in both Fprs. In addition, we detected Fpr ligand activity that chemoattracted neutrophils into the wound tissue. Our study thus demonstrates that Fprs are critical for normal healing of the sterile skin wound by mediating the first wave of neutrophil infiltration.

  16. Vacuum-assisted closure increases ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I expression in wound therapy

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEIYANG; PAN, ZHENYU; HU, XIANG; LI, ZONGHUAN; ZHAO, YONG; YU, AI-XI

    2014-01-01

    Severe traumatic wounds are challenging to manage during surgery. The introduction of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is a breakthrough in wound management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of VAC on cytokines in wounds during the management of severe traumatic wounds following initial debridement. VAC and conventional wound care (CWC) were independently applied to severe traumatic wounds on pigs. The expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, collagen I and human fibroblast collagenase 1 were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. VAC significantly increased the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I compared with that induced by CWC at the protein and mRNA levels. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that VAC therapy is an effective method for treating severe traumatic wounds, as it increases the expression of cytokines in wounds. VAC significantly increases the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I to manage severe traumatic wounds. PMID:24940415

  17. Substance P enhances EPC mobilization for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Um, Jihyun; Jung, Nunggum; Chin, Sukbum; Cho, Younggil; Choi, Sanghyuk; Park, Ki-Sook

    2016-03-01

    Wound healing is essential for the survival and tissue homeostasis of unicellular and multicellular organisms. The current study demonstrated that the neuropeptide substance P (SP) accelerated the wound healing process, particularly in the skin. Subcutaneous treatment of SP accelerated wound closing, increased the population of α-smooth muscle actin positive myofibroblasts, and increased extracellular matrix deposition at the wound site. Moreover, SP treatment enhances angiogenesis without a local increase in the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1. Importantly, SP treatment increased both the population of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in the peripheral blood and in CD31 positive cells in Matrigel plugs. The tube forming potential of endothelial cells was also enhanced by SP treatment. The results suggested that the subcutaneous injection of SP accelerated the wound healing in the skin via better reconstitution of blood vessels, which possibly followed an increase in the systemic mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells and a more effective assembly of endothelial cells into tubes. PMID:26749197

  18. Alginate-hyaluronan composite hydrogels accelerate wound healing process.

    PubMed

    Catanzano, O; D'Esposito, V; Acierno, S; Ambrosio, M R; De Caro, C; Avagliano, C; Russo, P; Russo, R; Miro, A; Ungaro, F; Calignano, A; Formisano, P; Quaglia, F

    2015-10-20

    In this paper we propose polysaccharide hydrogels combining alginate (ALG) and hyaluronan (HA) as biofunctional platform for dermal wound repair. Hydrogels produced by internal gelation were homogeneous and easy to handle. Rheological evaluation of gelation kinetics of ALG/HA mixtures at different ratios allowed understanding the HA effect on ALG cross-linking process. Disk-shaped hydrogels, at different ALG/HA ratio, were characterized for morphology, homogeneity and mechanical properties. Results suggest that, although the presence of HA does significantly slow down gelation kinetics, the concentration of cross-links reached at the end of gelation is scarcely affected. The in vitro activity of ALG/HA dressings was tested on adipose derived multipotent adult stem cells (Ad-MSC) and an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Hydrogels did not interfere with cell viability in both cells lines, but significantly promoted gap closure in a scratch assay at early (1 day) and late (5 days) stages as compared to hydrogels made of ALG alone (p<0.01 and 0.001 for Ad-MSC and HaCaT, respectively). In vivo wound healing studies, conducted on a rat model of excised wound indicated that after 5 days ALG/HA hydrogels significantly promoted wound closure as compared to ALG ones (p<0.001). Overall results demonstrate that the integration of HA in a physically cross-linked ALG hydrogel can be a versatile strategy to promote wound healing that can be easily translated in a clinical setting.

  19. Wound complications in joint arthroplasty: comparing traditional and modern methods of skin closure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak M; Cayo, Max; Patel, Arpan; Albarillo, Marie; Puri, Lalit

    2012-05-01

    Various methods of skin closure exist in joint replacement surgery. Although subcuticular skin closure techniques offer an aesthetic advantage over conventional skin stapling, no measurable differences have been reported. Furthermore, newer barbed sutures, such as the V-Loc absorbable suture (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts), theoretically distribute tension evenly through the wound and help decrease knot-related complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether wound complication rates were (1) lower in V-Loc closure cases as theoretically suggested, (2) lower for subcuticular closure vs staples, and (3) significantly different for knee and hip joint reconstruction.A retrospective chart review was conducted of 278 consecutive cases of primary joint reconstruction performed by a single surgeon (L.P.). The study group comprised 106 men and 161 women. Average patient age at surgery was 63 years (range, 18-92 years), and average body mass index of the cohort was 33.7 kg/m(2) (range, 25-51 kg/m(2)). Skin was closed via staple gun or subcuticular stitch (3-0 Biosyn [Covidien] vs V-Loc). Seven (3.9%) wound complications occurred in 181 cases closed with staples. Four (7.8%) wound complications occurred in 51 cases closed via subcuticular Biosyn suture. Six (13.0%) wound complications occurred in 46 cases closed with V-Loc suture. The staple group had a lower rate of complications when compared with the suture group as a whole (P=.033) and when compared specifically with the V-Loc suture group (P=.017).

  20. LXA{sub 4} actions direct fibroblast function and wound closure

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Bruno S.; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Zarrough, Ahmed; Hasturk, Hatice; Leung, Kai P.; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-09-04

    Timely resolution of inflammation is crucial for normal wound healing. Resolution of inflammation is an active biological process regulated by specialized lipid mediators including the lipoxins and resolvins. Failure of resolution activity has a major negative impact on wound healing in chronic inflammatory diseases that is manifest as excess fibrosis and scarring. Lipoxins, including Lipoxin A{sub 4} (LXA{sub 4}), have known anti-fibrotic and anti-scarring properties. The goal of this study was to elucidate the impact of LXA{sub 4} on fibroblast function. Mouse fibroblasts (3T3 Mus musculus Swiss) were cultured for 72 h in the presence of TGF-β1, to induce fibroblast activation. The impact of exogenous TGF-β1 (1 ng/mL) on LXA{sub 4} receptor expression (ALX/FPR2) was determined by flow cytometry. Fibroblast proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and migration in a “scratch” assay wound model. Expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen types I and III were measured by Western blot. We observed that TGF-β1 up-regulates LXA{sub 4} receptor expression, enhances fibroblast proliferation, migration and scratch wound closure. α-SMA levels and Collagen type I and III deposition were also enhanced. LXA{sub 4} slowed fibroblast migration and scratch wound closure at early time points (24 h), but wound closure was equal to TGF-β1 alone at 48 and 72 h. LXA{sub 4} tended to slow fibroblast proliferation at both concentrations, but had no impact on α-SMA or collagen production by TGF-β1 stimulated fibroblasts. The generalizability of the actions of resolution molecules was examined in experiments repeated with resolvin D2 (RvD2) as the agonist. The activity of RvD2 mimicked the actions of LXA{sub 4} in all assays, through an as yet unidentified receptor. The results suggest that mediators of resolution of inflammation enhance wound healing and limit fibrosis in part by modulating fibroblast function. - Highlights: • TGF

  1. A Dendritic Thioester Hydrogel Based on Thiol-Thioester Exchange as a Dissolvable Sealant System for Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Ghobril, Cynthia; Charoen, Kristie; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Nazarian, Ara; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    A dissolvable dendritic thioester hydrogel based on thiol-thioester exchange for wound closure is reported. The hydrogel sealant adheres strongly to tissues, closes an ex vivo vein puncture, and withstands high pressures placed on a wound. The hydrogel sealant can be completely washed off upon exposure to thiolates based on thiol-thioester exchange and allow gradual wound re-exposure during definitive surgical care. PMID:24282150

  2. Fernald - Developing and Executing an Accelerated Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.A.

    2006-07-01

    In November 2000 the Department of Energy (DOE) and Fluor Fernald entered into a closure contract that incited Fluor Fernald to reduce the cost and schedule of the Fernald site cleanup. The contract established a target schedule and target cost and how Fluor Fernald performs against these targets determines the amount of fee the company earns. In response to these new challenges, Fluor Fernald developed a 13-part strategy to safely accelerate work and more efficiently utilize the available funding. Implementation of this strategy required a dramatic culture change at Fernald - from a 'government job mind set' to an entrepreneurial/commercial model. Fluor Fernald's strategy and culture change has proved to be successful as the company is on track to close the site ahead of the target schedule at a total project cost less than the target cost. The elements of Fluor Fernald's strategy and the lessons learned during implementation provide valuable information that could be utilized by other DOE sites that will be undergoing closure over the next decade. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of Wound Closure Activity of Nigella sativa, Melastoma malabathricum, Pluchea indica, and Piper sarmentosum Extracts on Scratched Monolayer of Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ab Rahman, Mas Rizal; Mohd Bakri, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa, Melastoma malabathricum, Pluchea indica, and Piper sarmentosum are common Asian traditional medicines to treat minor wounds. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro wound healing properties of aqueous extracts of these plants using human gingival fibroblast (HGF) monolayer as study model. DPPH scavenging activity of the extracts was evaluated and effect on HGF proliferation was determined. Their effect on HGF's function to synthesize collagen was indicated by the level of hydroxyproline produced and effect on wound healing activity was assessed using an in vitro scratch assay. The influence of the extracts on expression of bFGF and TGF-β was also determined. Results revealed all four extracts to exhibit low free radical scavenging activity. The extract from N. sativa (NSSE) compared to the others showed favourable enhancement of HGF proliferation with EC50 of 22.67 ± 3.06 µg/mL (P < 0.05) with accelerated wound closure activity despite its nonsignificant effect on collagen synthesis. In addition to the elevated level of bFGF by up to 15% at 100 µg/mL of NSSE, a slightly better effect was observed on the expression of TGF-β. NSSE thus showed that promising wound healing properties and data obtained may contribute towards validation of its traditional use for the healing of oral wounds. PMID:25371695

  4. Staged closure with negative pressure wound therapy for gastroschisis with liver herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael W; Westmoreland, Tamarah; Sawaya, David E; Blewett, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    Liver herniation with gastroschisis is an uncommon occurrence that is associated with a poor prognosis. This report presents a single case of complex gastroschisis complicated by herniation of the left hepatic lobe. In the subject case, the abdominal wall defect was successfully closed by sequential closure with negative pressure wound therapy after the initial application of a preformed silo. As there are no established standards for the management of gastroschisis with liver herniation, there exists an opportunity for multicenter review to define approaches to optimize clinical outcomes with this complex congenital issue. As a result of the complexity and rarity of this congenital abnormality, reports with a positive prognosis carry clinical relevance.

  5. Reduced cell cohesiveness of outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands delays wound closure in elderly skin.

    PubMed

    Rittié, Laure; Farr, Elyssa A; Orringer, Jeffrey S; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2016-10-01

    Human skin heals more slowly in aged vs. young adults, but the mechanism for this delay is unclear. In humans, eccrine sweat glands (ESGs) and hair follicles underlying wounds generate cohesive keratinocyte outgrowths that expand to form the new epidermis. Here, we compared the re-epithelialization of partial-thickness wounds created on the forearm of healthy young (< 40 yo) and aged (> 70 yo) adults. Our results confirm that the outgrowth of cells from ESGs is a major feature of repair in young skin. Strikingly, in aged skin, although ESG density is unaltered, less than 50% of the ESGs generate epithelial outgrowths during repair (vs. 100% in young). Surprisingly, aging does not alter the wound-induced proliferation response in hair follicles or ESGs. Instead, there is an overall reduced cohesiveness of keratinocytes in aged skin. Reduced cell-cell cohesiveness was most obvious in ESG-derived outgrowths that, when present, were surrounded by unconnected cells in the scab overlaying aged wounds. Reduced cell-cell contact persisted during the repair process, with increased intercellular spacing and reduced number of desmosomes. Together, reduced outgrowths of ESG (i) reduce the initial number of cells participating in epidermal repair, (ii) delay wound closure, and (iii) lead to a thinner repaired epidermis in aged vs. young skin. Failure to form cohesive ESG outgrowths may reflect impaired interactions of keratinocytes with the damaged ECM in aged skin. Our findings provide a framework to better understand the mediators of delayed re-epithelialization in aging and further support the importance of ESGs for the repair of human wounds. PMID:27184009

  6. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms.

  7. Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. Ethanol Extract Enhancement of the Efficacy of the Collagen Scaffold in Wound Closure: A Study in a Full-Thickness-Wound Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Somchaichana, Jutamas; Bunaprasert, Tanom; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2012-01-01

    Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. is a Thai herb that is effective in wound healing. We sought to quantitatively determine whether or not the combined application of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. and a collagen scaffold will increase wound closure and angiogenesis. Balb/c mice (body weight: 22–25 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental. The dorsal skin incision measuring 1.5 × 1.5 cm was made and then deepened using scissors to produce a full-thickness incision down to the level of the panniculus carnosus. The size of the wound was approximately 10% of the total body surface area. The collagen sheet was implanted onto the wound. Animals were divided into 4 major groups as follows: wound with normal saline (W-NSS), wound treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. extract (W-AE (0.3 g/kg.bw)), wound implanted with collagen scaffold (W-Coll), and wound implanted with collagen scaffold and treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. (W-Coll-AE combination). On day 14, the W-Coll-AE group showed decreased wound areas and increased capillary vascularity (CV) when compared to the other 3 groups, W-NSS, W-AE0.3, and W-Coll. In the present study, the combination of AE0.3 with collagen showed the best effect on skin angiogenesis and promoted wound closure with less neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23093862

  8. Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. ethanol extract enhancement of the efficacy of the collagen scaffold in wound closure: a study in a full-thickness-wound mouse model.

    PubMed

    Somchaichana, Jutamas; Bunaprasert, Tanom; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2012-01-01

    Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. is a Thai herb that is effective in wound healing. We sought to quantitatively determine whether or not the combined application of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. and a collagen scaffold will increase wound closure and angiogenesis. Balb/c mice (body weight: 22-25 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental. The dorsal skin incision measuring 1.5 × 1.5 cm was made and then deepened using scissors to produce a full-thickness incision down to the level of the panniculus carnosus. The size of the wound was approximately 10% of the total body surface area. The collagen sheet was implanted onto the wound. Animals were divided into 4 major groups as follows: wound with normal saline (W-NSS), wound treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. extract (W-AE (0.3 g/kg.bw)), wound implanted with collagen scaffold (W-Coll), and wound implanted with collagen scaffold and treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. (W-Coll-AE combination). On day 14, the W-Coll-AE group showed decreased wound areas and increased capillary vascularity (CV) when compared to the other 3 groups, W-NSS, W-AE0.3, and W-Coll. In the present study, the combination of AE0.3 with collagen showed the best effect on skin angiogenesis and promoted wound closure with less neutrophil infiltration.

  9. The effect of regional block over pain levels during vacuum-assisted wound closure.

    PubMed

    Findikcioglu, Kemal; Sezgin, Billur; Kaya, Basar; Ozkose, Zerrin; Ayhan, Suhan

    2014-02-01

    Despite being a wound treatment method with a broad spectrum of indications, vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAWC) can be a painful treatment modality which may even result with patient unwillingness for the continuation of treatment. A prospective study was undertaken to determine the effect of regional pain blocks (RPB) for patients who wanted to abandon treatment due to pain after the first application. Patients were asked to score their pain using a visual analogue scale for two different time frames (i) during dressing changes and (ii) while daytime treatment. This evaluation was carried out for conventional wound dressings, VAWC before RPB and finally for VAWC after RPB. The pain experienced with blocks was significantly lesser than conventional and VAWC dressing changes that were applied without pain blocks. Also, the pain was significantly lesser under pain blocks for daytime treatment. For patients with refractory pain where VAWC would prove to be of most benefit, RPB can be discussed with the patient and used. This study has shown that effective pain control can be obtained through regional blocks for patients with excruciating pain undergoing VAWC treatment.

  10. [Comparative description and retrospective analisis of modern methods of surgical wounds closure for intraoperative prophylaxis of development of pathologic cutaneous cicatrices].

    PubMed

    Stavyts'kyĭ, S O; Avetikov, D S; Lokes, K P; Rozkolupa, O O; Boĭko, I V

    2014-05-01

    The experience of application of various methods of closure was presented for the head and neck cutaneous wound surfaces after elective operative interventions. The variant of the postoperative results estimation and optimization of the wounds healing by primary closure was proposed.

  11. Topical treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone accelerates the remodeling phase of full-thickness wound healing in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Jessica A; Zagon, Ian S; Lewis, Gregory S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-10-01

    Wound repair involves a series of overlapping phases that include inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling, with the latter phase requiring months for proper healing. Delays in any of these processes can result in infection, chronic ulceration, and possible amputation. Diabetes is a major risk factor for improper wound repair, and impaired wound healing is a major complication for more than 26 million people in the US diagnosed with diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in moisturizing cream reverses delays in wound closure in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. NTX accelerated DNA synthesis and increased the number of epithelial and mast cells, as well as new blood vessel formation. In this study, remodeling was evaluated in T1D rats up to eight weeks after initial wounding. Twenty days following wounding, diabetic rats treated with vehicle had elevated numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts, suggesting delayed healing processes; birefringence of granulation tissue stained with Sirius red revealed diminished collagen formation and maturation. Wound tissue from NTX-treated T1D rats had comparable numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts to control specimens, as well as accelerated maturation of granulation tissue. The integrity of wounded skin was evaluated by tensile strength measurements. T1D resulted in delayed wound healing, and wounded skin that displayed reduced tensile strength relative to normal rats. Topical NTX applied to wounds in T1D rats resulted in enhanced collagen formation and maturation over a 60-day period of time. Moreover, the force required to tear skin of NTX-treated T1D rats was elevated relative to the force necessary to tear the skin of vehicle-treated T1D rats, and comparable to that for normal rats. These data reveal that complications in wound healing associated with T1D involve the novel OGF-OGFr pathway, and that topical NTX is an effective treatment to enhance wound

  12. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction.

    PubMed

    Lord, A C; Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene(®) mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence. PMID:25519257

  13. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction.

    PubMed

    Lord, A C; Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene(®) mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence.

  14. Comparative analysis of global gene expression profiles between diabetic rat wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure therapy, moist wound healing or gauze under suction.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Kathleen L; Norbury, Kenneth; Kieswetter, Kris; Skaf, Jihad; McNulty, Amy K

    2008-12-01

    How differential gene expression affects wound healing is not well understood. In this study, Zucker diabetic fatty (fa/fa) male inbred rats were used to investigate gene expression during wound healing in an impaired wound-healing model. Whole genome microarray surveys were used to gain insight into the biological pathways and healing processes in acute excisional wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.). Therapy, moist wound healing (MWH) or gauze under suction (GUS). Global gene expression analyses after 2 days of healing indicated major differences with respect to both number of genes showing fold changes and pathway regulation between the three different wound treatments. Statistical analysis of expression profiles indicated that 5072 genes showed a >1.6-fold change with V.A.C. Therapy compared with 3601 genes with MWH and 3952 genes with GUS. Pathways and related genes associated with the early phases of wound healing diverged between treatment groups. For example, pathways involving angiogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation and inflammation were associated with elevated gene expression following V.A.C. Therapy. This study is the first to assess wound healing by whole genome interrogation in a diabetic rat model treated with different healing modalities.

  15. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Adolf; Walker, Audrey; Nissen, Erwin

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers.

  16. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  17. Accelerated wound repair in old deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Cohen, B J; Cutler, R G; Roth, G S

    1987-05-01

    The closure of bilateral full thickness cutaneous wounds, made over the back with a sharp paper punch, was measured and assessed histologically in outbred deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). In contrast to inbred C57BL/6J laboratory mice (Mus musculus), in which the rate of wound repair was more rapid in young than in mature or aged mice (Cohen et al., 1987), wound repair in Peromyscus was most rapid in aged animals. Aged Peromyscus (45 to 70 months) achieved 50% closure of cutaneous wounds within 3 to 4 days, whereas mature (23 or 24 months) and young Peromyscus required 5 to 7.7 days to reach the 50% closure level. Histologic indices were compatible with the more rapid rate of closure of the cutaneous wounds in aged Peromyscus. The reasons for the unexpected increase in the rate of wound repair with increasing age in Peromyscus are not clear but stress-related hormonal and cellular factors may play an important role.

  18. A Randomized Study Comparing Skin Staples with Subcuticular Sutures for Wound Closure at Caesarean Section in Black-Skinned Women

    PubMed Central

    Abdus-Salam, Rukiyat Adeola; Bello, Folasade Adenike; Olayemi, Oladapo

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare patients' satisfaction and outcome of caesarean section wound closure by skin staples and subcuticular suture at discharge and 6 weeks of postoperation. It was a randomized controlled trial of pregnant women scheduled for caesarean section at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, allocating them to wound closure by skin staples or subcuticular suture. Pain was assessed using the box numeric pain scale. Scar assessments were by patient, research nurse, and independent observers using the visual analogue scale, modified patient observer scar assessment scale, and patient satisfaction scale. Operation time (minutes) was significantly shorter in the staple group, 40.26 (±16.53) compared to 47.55 (±14.55) in the suture group (P = 0.025). Skin closure time (seconds) was significantly less in the staple group, 118.62 (±69.68) versus 388.70 (±170.40) in the suture group (P ≤ 0.001). There was no difference in pain experienced, wound assessment by the participants, and patients' satisfaction. Participants in the staple group scored higher on both scar assessment scales by the nurse (P = 0.044). Cost comparison analysis showed that staple use costs significantly more than suture use (P < 0.001). The perceived benefit of subcuticular suture over skin staples was not observed and participants were satisfied with both wound closure techniques. PMID:27437457

  19. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) Promotes Perfusion and Vascularization and Accelerates Wound Healing in Non-Diabetic and Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbo; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Syeda, Mahrukh M; Schuster, Victor L; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral ischemia, resulting from diminished arterial flow and defective local vascularization, is one of the main causes of impaired wound healing in diabetes. Vasodilatory prostaglandins (PGs), including PGE2 and PGI2, regulate blood flow in peripheral tissues. PGs also stimulate angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor. However, PG levels are reduced in diabetes mainly due to enhanced degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) (SLCO2A1), which mediates the degradation of PGs, would increase blood flow and stimulate vascularization, thereby mitigating peripheral ischemia and accelerating wound healing in diabetes. Here we report that inhibiting PGT with intravenously injected PGT inhibitor, T26A, increased blood flow in ischemic hind limbs created in non-diabetic rats and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Systemic, or combined with topical, T26A accelerated closure of cutaneous wounds. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that inhibition of PGT enhanced vascularization (marked by larger numbers of vessels formed by CD34+ cells), and accelerated re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. In cultured primary human bone marrow CD34+ cells and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) either inhibiting or silencing PGT increased migration in both cell lines. Thus PGT directly regulates mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and HEKs, which could contribute to PGT-mediated vascularization and re-epithelialization. At the molecular level, systemic inhibition of PGT raised circulating PGE2. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PGT modulates arterial blood flow, mobilization of EPCs and HEKs, and vascularization and epithelialization in wound healing by regulating vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic PGs.

  20. An innovative bi-layered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kanokpanont, Sorada; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2012-10-15

    In this study, the novel silk fibroin-based bi-layered wound dressing was developed. Wax-coated silk fibroin woven fabric was introduced as a non-adhesive layer while the sponge made of sericin and glutaraldehyde-crosslinked silk fibroin/gelatin was fabricated as a bioactive layer. Wax-coated silk fibroin fabrics showed improved mechanical properties compared with the non-coated fabrics, but less adhesive than the commercial wound dressing mesh. This confirmed by results of peel test on both the partial- and full-thickness wounds. The sericin-silk fibroin/gelatin spongy bioactive layers showed homogeneous porous structure and controllable biodegradation depending on the degree of crosslinking. The bi-layered wound dressings supported the attachment and proliferation of L929 mouse fibroblasts, particularly for the silk fibroin/gelatin ratio of 20/80 and 0.02% GA crosslinked. Furthermore, we proved that the bi-layered wound dressings promoted wound healing in full-thickness wounds, comparing with the clinically used wound dressing. The wounds treated with the bi-layered wound dressings showed the greater extent of wound size reduction, epithelialization, and collagen formation. The superior properties of the silk fibroin-based bi-layered wound dressings compared with those of the clinically used wound dressings were less adhesive and had improved biological functions to promote cell activities and wound healing. This novel bi-layered wound dressing should be a good candidate for the healing of full-thickness wounds.

  1. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity accelerates skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Ogiso, Hideyuki; Arioka, Yuko; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex process involving several stages that include inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. In the inflammatory phase, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are induced at the wound site and, they contribute to the development of wound healing. These cytokines also induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) activity; this is the rate-limiting and first enzyme in the l-tryptophan (TRP)-l-kynurenine (KYN) pathway. This study examined the effect of IDO1 on the process of skin wound healing. The expression of the Ido1 mRNA was enhanced after creating a wound in wild-type (WT) mice. TRP concentration was simultaneously reduced at the wound site. The rate of wound healing in IDO1 knockout (IDO-KO) mice was significantly higher than that in WT mice. 1-Methyl-dl-tryptophan (1-MT), a potent inhibitor of IDO1, increased the rate of wound healing in WT mice. The administration of TRP accelerated wound healing in vivo and in an in vitro experimental model, whereas the rate of wound healing was not affected by the administration of KYN. The present study identifies the role of IDO1 in skin wound healing, and indicates that the local administration of 1-MT or TRP may provide an effective strategy for accelerating wound healing.

  2. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease–anti-protease combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T.; Suckow, Mark A.; Wolter, William R.; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body’s response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9–knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds. PMID:26598687

  3. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease-anti-protease combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T; Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-12-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body's response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9-knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds.

  4. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    PubMed Central

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification. PMID:26347154

  5. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification. PMID:26347154

  6. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  7. Effects of different transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) isomers on wound closure of bone cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Denyer, Morgan C T; Youseffi, Mansour

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed at determining the role of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) isomers and their combinations in bone cell behaviour using MG63 cells. The work examined how TGF-β1, 2 and 3 and their solvent and carrier (HCl and BSA, respectively) effected cell morphology, cell proliferation and integrin expression. This study also aimed at examining how the TGF-βs and their solvent and carrier influenced wound closure in an in vitro wound closure model and how TGF-βs influence extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion and integrin expression. The wound healing response in terms of healing rate to the TGF-βs and their solvent/carrier was investigated in 300 μm ± 10-30 μm SD wide model wounds induced in fully confluent monolayers of MG63 bone cells. The effect of different TGF-β isomers and their combinations on proliferation rate and cell length of human bone cells were also assessed. Immunostaining was used to determine if TGF-βs modifies integrin expression and ECM secretion by the bone cells. Imaging with WSPR allowed observation of the focal contacts without the need for immunostaining. The wound healing results indicated that TGF-β3 has a significant effect on the wound healing process and its healing rate was found to be higher than the control (p < 0.001), TGF-β1 (p < 0.001), TGF-β2 (p < 0.001), BSA/HCl (p < 0.001) and HCl (p < 0.001) in ascending order. It was also found that TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 treatment significantly improved wound closure rate in comparison to the controls (p < 0.001). All TGF-β combinations induced a faster healing rate than the control (p < 0.001). It was expected that the healing rate following treatment with TGF-β combinations would be greater than those healing rates following treatments with TGF-β isomers alone, but this was not the case. The results also suggest that cell morphological changes were observed significantly more in cells treated with TGF-β(2 + 3) and TGF-β(1 + 3) (p < 0.001). Any cell treated

  8. Prospective comparative study of single-layer versus double-layer closure of leg wounds after long saphenous vein harvest in coronary artery bypass graft operations

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Salman; Al Sabti, Hilal; Mukaddirov, Mirdavron; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wound infection is one of the major complication post CABG that leads to prolonged length of stay and cost post surgery. Coronary artery bypass grafting is one of the most commonly performed operations in the world. The long saphenous vein harvested by traditional techniques is still widely used and caries a risk of wound infection. Objective The purpose of this study is to ascertain if a single-layer closure result in better wound healing and functional outcome as compared with the traditional two-layer closure after harvest of saphenous vein. Methods Sixty-seven consecutive patients undergoing CABG were prospectively randomized to have their leg wound closed by either a single-layer technique with a suction drain or double layers without suction drain. All wounds were assessed for the presence of serous discharge, inflammation, edema, purulent exudates, infection of the deep tissues, and pain postoperatively and two weeks after discharge. Results There were trends towards increased rates of wound related outcomes in patients in double layer group when compared with single layer group. Out of 77 patients in our study, 52 patients underwent single layer closure (males, n = 37; females, n= 15) and 25 patients underwent double layer closure (males, n = 21; females, n = 04). There was significant statistical difference between the treatment groups with single layer group having lower average scores (4.038) compared to double layer group (9.467), P- value 0.001. Patients whose legs were closed with the single layer technique had less post operative edema (23.07% vs 53.30) and pain (44.2 vs 73.33) compared with the double layer group. Conclusions Single-layer leg wound closure over a suction drain has shown a better wound outcome compared to traditional double-layer closure. A possible mechanism of better wound healing in the former technique might be through decreased tissue handling and a reduction in leg edema. PMID:22263084

  9. The use of negative-pressure therapy in the closure of complex head and neck wounds.

    PubMed

    Strub, Graham Michael; Moe, Kristen S

    2013-02-01

    The evolution of wound care has seen much technological advancement over many decades. Most recently, negative-pressure therapy, by which a vacuum pressure is applied through a wound bed, has dramatically improved the surgical outcomes of complex wounds. Although initial studies focused on wounds to the abdomen, torso, and extremities, more publications are appearing that demonstrate the efficacy of negative-pressure wound therapy in the head and neck. This article reviews the history and evolution of negative-pressure therapy, highlights the current opinions on its mechanism of action, and summarizes its use in complex head and neck wounds.

  10. Loss of Epithelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase 2 Accelerates Skin Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Ettinger, Andreas; Franke, Kristin; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Singh, Rashim Pal; Farhat, Katja; Muschter, Antje; Olbrich, Susanne; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Huttner, Wieland; Weidemann, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing in mammals is a complex, multicellular process that depends on the precise supply of oxygen. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) serves as a crucial oxygen sensor and may therefore play an important role during reepithelialization. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the role of PHD2 in cutaneous wound healing using different lines of conditionally deficient mice specifically lacking PHD2 in inflammatory, vascular, or epidermal cells. Interestingly, PHD2 deficiency only in keratinocytes and not in myeloid or endothelial cells was found to lead to faster wound closure, which involved enhanced migration of the hyperproliferating epithelium. We demonstrate that this effect relies on the unique expression of β3-integrin in the keratinocytes around the tip of the migrating tongue in an HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show enhanced proliferation of these cells in the stratum basale, which is directly related to their attenuated transforming growth factor β signaling. Thus, loss of the central oxygen sensor PHD2 in keratinocytes stimulates wound closure by prompting skin epithelial cells to migrate and proliferate. Inhibition of PHD2 could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities for the local treatment of cutaneous wounds. PMID:23798557

  11. Acellular Dermal Matrix Combined with Autologous Skin Grafts for Closure of Chronic Wounds after Reconstruction of Skull Defects with Titanium Mesh.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu; Lin, Cai; Wang, Xinling; Lin, Xiangwei; He, Sunyue; Liu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Ruijin; Zhu, Xinguo

    2016-07-01

    Objective The closure of chronic wounds after skull defect reconstruction with titanium mesh is one of the most challenging problems for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Current approaches are disappointing. Methods In 10 patients, we explored the role of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in combination with autologous skin grafts (ASGs) for closure of chronic wounds after skull reconstruction with titanium. Results ADM and ASG survived in all patients. Grade A healing (healing well without defect) was achieved. The average operating time was 30 to 45 minutes, and the average blood loss 30 to 50 mL. After 3 months, the wound was still closed in all patients. Conclusion The combination of ADM plus ASG obtained a high wound closure rate. ADM plus ASG allows avoiding other procedures such as rotational flaps and free flaps that require more operating time, special equipment, and adequate training. PMID:27088591

  12. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione incorporated into a collagen matrix as a base for the design of drugs accelerating skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, Anatoly B; Rudenko, Tatyana G; Istranov, Leonid P; Guller, Anna E; Borodulin, Rostislav R; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2015-10-12

    Composites of a collagen matrix and dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (DNIC-GS) (in a dose of 4.0 μmoles per item) in the form of spongy sheets (DNIC-Col) were prepared and then topically applied in rat excisional full-thickness skin wound model. The effects of DNIC-Col were studied in comparison with spontaneously healing wounds (SpWH) and wounds treated with collagen sponges (Col) without DNIC-GS. The composites induced statistically and clinically significant acceleration of complete wound closure (21±1 day versus 23±1 day and 26±1 day for DNIC-Col, Col and SpWH, respectively). Histological examination of wound tissues on days 4, 14, 18 and 21 after surgery demonstrated that this improvement was supported by enhanced growth, maturation and fibrous transformation of granulation tissue and earlier epithelization of the injured area in rats treated with DNIC-Col composites benchmarked against Col and SpWH. It is suggested that the positive effect of the new pharmaceutical material on wound healing is based on the release of NO from decomposing DNIC. This effect is believed to be potentiated by the synergy of DNIC and collagen.

  13. Polysaccharides-Rich Extract of Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst Accelerates Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Poh-Guat; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst is a popular medicinal mushroom. Scientific reports had shown that the wound healing effects of G. lucidum were partly attributed to its rich polysaccharides. However, little attention has been paid to its potential effects on wounds associated with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the wound healing activity of the hot aqueous extract of G. lucidum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The extract of G. lucidum was standardised based on chemical contents (w/w) of total polysaccharides (25.1%), ganoderic acid A (0.45%), and adenosine (0.069%). Six groups of six rats were experimentally wounded in the posterior neck region. Intrasite gel was used as a positive control and aqueous cream as the placebo. Topical application with 10% (w/w) of mushroom extract-incorporated aqueous cream was more effective than that with Intrasite gel in terms of wound closure. The antioxidant activity in serum of rats treated with aqueous extract of G. lucidum was significantly higher; whereas the oxidative protein products and lipid damage were lower when compared to those of the controls. These findings strongly support the beneficial effects of standardised aqueous extract of G. lucidum in accelerating wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. PMID:24348715

  14. Coacervate delivery of HB-EGF accelerates healing of type 2 diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers pose a significant challenge as a number of underlying deficiencies prevent natural healing. In pursuit of a regenerative wound therapy, we developed a heparin-based coacervate delivery system that provides controlled release of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor (HB-EGF) within the wound bed. In this study, we used a polygenic type 2 diabetic mouse model to evaluate the capacity of HB-EGF coacervate to overcome the deficiencies of diabetic wound healing. In full-thickness excisional wounds on NONcNZO10 diabetic mice, HB-EGF coacervate enhanced the proliferation and migration of epidermal keratinocytes, leading to accelerated epithelialization. Furthermore, increased collagen deposition within the wound bed led to faster wound contraction and greater wound vascularization. Additionally, in vitro assays demonstrated that HB-EGF released from the coacervate successfully increased migration of diabetic human keratinocytes. The multifunctional role of HB-EGF in the healing process and its enhanced efficacy when delivered by the coacervate make it a promising therapy for diabetic wounds.

  15. Surgical amputation of a digit and vacuum-assisted-closure (V.A.C.) management in a case of osteomyelitis and wound care in an eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Stanley, Bryden J; Sikarskie, James G; Bohart, George; Ames, N Kent; Tomlian, Janice; Marquardt, Mark; Marcum, Annabel; Kiupel, Matti; Sledge, Dodd; Agnew, Dalen

    2011-06-01

    A 14-yr-old female eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) presented with progressive suppurative osteomyelitis in her left hind lateral toe. beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus sp. was isolated. The animal was treated with multiple systemic antibiotics, and topical wound cleansing. Repeated debridements and nail trimmings were performed for 5 mo prior to electing amputation. The toe was surgically amputated under general anesthesia between the first and second phalanges. Analgesia was diffused into the wound topically via a catheter and elastomeric pump. The open amputation site was covered with adherent drapes and a negative-pressure wound therapy device provided vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) for 72 hr. Three months later this animal developed a deep dermal ulcer on the lateral aspect of the right hind limb, at the level of the stifle. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The wound was managed by initial daily lavage, followed by 1 mo of V.A.C. therapy, with 72 hr between dressing changes. Clinically, this therapy expedited the formation of healthy granulation tissue and overall healing was accelerated. The animal tolerated the machine and bandage changes well via operant conditioning. The use of negative-pressure wound therapy appeared to shorten time to resolution of slow-healing wounds in black rhinoceros. PMID:22946413

  16. Ultrasound accelerates healing of normal wounds but not of ischemic ones.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Mariane; Nascimento, Adriana P; Romana-Souza, Bruna; Amadeu, Thaís P; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2009-01-01

    To examine the influence of therapeutic ultrasound (US) on repair of standard and ischemic cutaneous lesions, full-thickness excisional wounds were made in rats and treated with a US 3 MHz, 0.5 W/cm(2) pulsed duty cycle. We used five experimental groups: control (received US powered off on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), control US (received US on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), ischemic (received US powered off on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day), ischemic US 3X (received US on the day of surgery, and on the second and fourth day) and ischemic US 5X (received US in the day of surgery, first, second, third and fourth day). The control US group showed acceleration in wound contraction 7 days after wounding, an increase in collagen density, and only focal inflammatory areas. Neo-epidermis formation was more advanced in the control US group than in the control one. Wound contraction was delayed in the ischemic group when compared with the control group as well as the ischemic US 3X group, was but slightly accelerated in the ischemic US 5X group when compared with the ischemic group 7 days after wounding. Reepithelialization was delayed in both ischemic US groups when compared with the ischemic group. The number of inflammatory cells was higher in both US ischemic groups. We conclude that US therapy accelerates wound healing in normal wounds and delays wound healing in ischemic wounds.

  17. Use of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Support Topical Skin Adhesive for Wound Closure: A Preliminary Report from Animal In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Grzanka, Dariusz; Skopinska-Wisniewska, Joanna; Scibior, Kinga; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Grzanka, Alina; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the local and systemic effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as a component of topical skin adhesive in an animal artificial wound closure model. In presented study the cosmetic effects, histological analysis, mechanical properties, and cell migration have been assessed to evaluate the usefulness of ADSCs as supporting factor for octyl blend cyanoacrylate adhesive. The total of 40 rats were used and divided into six groups. In the Study Group, ADSCs were administered by multipoint injection of the six surrounding intrawound areas with additional freely leaving procedure of the cells between the skin flaps just before applying adhesive to close the wound. Five control groups without using ADSCs, utilizing different types of standard wound closure, were created in order to check efficiency of experimental stem cell therapy. In our study, we proved that ADSCs could be used effectively also as a supportive tool in topical skin adhesive for wound closure. However we did not achieve any spectacular differences related to such aspects as better mechanical properties or special biological breakthroughs in wound healing properties. The use of stem cells, especially ADSCs for wound closure can provide an inspiring development in plastic and dermatologic surgery. PMID:27803921

  18. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro. Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo. These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  19. Sodium humate accelerates cutaneous wound healing by activating TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Aijun; Chen, Xiaobin; Che, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Sodium humate (HA-Na) has been topically used as a wound healing and anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. In the present study, HA-Na was investigated for cutaneous wound healing in Sprague–Dawley rats. HA-Na solution (1.0%, w/v) was topically administered to rats undergoing excision wound models. Healing was assessed with a recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor for external use as positive control. Wound healing rates were calculated on Day 3, 6, 9, 14 and 21 after injury, and tissues were also harvested after the same intervals for histological analysis. In addition, tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured. Furthermore, mRNA levels and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β1, 2, 3 (TGF-β1, 2, 3) were determined by RT-PCR and western blot. Protein expression levels of Smad-2, -3, -4 and -7 were also detected by western blot. Our study demonstrates that HA-Na has the capacity to promote wound healing in rats via accelerated wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content. More importantly, these wound healing effects of HA-Na might be mediated through the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. HA-Na may be an effective agent for enhanced wound healing. PMID:27006897

  20. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong-Hua; Qi, Shao-Hai; Shu, Bin; Ruan, Shu-Bin; Lin, Ze-Peng; Lin, Yan; Shen, Rui; Zhang, Feng-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Ju-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Recently, various cell therapies have been reported for promotion of diabetic wound healing. Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are considered a powerful tool for tissue therapy. However, the effect and the mechanism of the therapeutic properties of ESCs in the diabetic wound healing are unclear. Herein, to determine the ability of ESCs to diabetic wound healing, a dorsal skin defect in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) mouse model was used. ESCs were isolated from mouse skin. We found that both the mRNA and protein levels of a Notch ligand Jagged1 (Jag1), Notch1 and Notch target gene Hairy Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) were significantly increased at the wound margins. In addition, we observed that Jag1 was high expressed in ESCs. Overexpression of Jag1 promotes ESCs migration, whereas knockdown Jag1 resulted in a significant reduction in ESCs migration in vitro Importantly, Jag1 overexpression improves diabetic wound healing in vivo These results provide evidence that ESCs accelerate diabetic wound healing via the Notch signalling pathway, and provide a promising potential for activation of the Notch pathway for the treatment of diabetic wound. PMID:27129289

  1. Accelerated healing of excisional skin wounds by PL 14736 in alloxan-hyperglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Seveljević-Jaran, D; Cuzić, S; Dominis-Kramarić, M; Glojnarić, I; Ivetić, V; Radosević, S; Parnham, M J

    2006-01-01

    PL 14736 is a synthetic peptide, originally isolated from human gastric juice, that has anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective actions in experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. To investigate its possible benefit in poorly healing skin wounds, the effects of the topical application of PL 14736 in a gel formulation have been studied on full-thickness excisional wounds in rats, either healthy or made hyperglycemic by alloxan (175 mg/kg s.c.) 5 days previously. The effects of becaplermin gel (platelet-derived growth factor, PDGF-BB, Regranex, a standard therapy for diabetic foot ulcers, were investigated for comparison. Healing was evaluated for up to 7 days after wounding, using digital planimetry analysis, macroscopic scoring and histology. While healing was too rapid in healthy rats to observe enhancement by either treatment, in the hyperglycemic rats which exhibited delayed healing, PL 14736 (10-1,000 microg/wound) produced a dose-dependent acceleration of wound healing (determined by macroscopic scoring) equivalent at the highest doses to that observed with becaplermin. The beneficial effect on healing was associated with increased deposition of organized granulation tissue by day 7 for both PL 14736 and becaplermin, as determined histologically. PL 14736 tended to have a greater effect than becaplermin on the formation of granulation tissue containing mature collagen. Wound contraction, as measured by planimetry, was not significantly affected. In conclusion, topical PL 14736 produces a dose-dependent acceleration of deficient skin wound healing in hyperglycemic rats by facilitating granulation tissue formation, similar to the response seen with topical becaplermin, the standard therapy for diabetic skin wounds. PL 14736 may represent an alternative therapy for delayed wound healing, such as that seen with diabetic foot ulcers, without the proliferative concerns or immunogenicity associated with growth factors. PMID:16785777

  2. Vacuum-assisted wound closure for cheaper and more comfortable healing of pressure sores: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Marcus B; Schwarzl, Franz; Strub, Beni; Zaech, Guido A; Pierer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Pressure sores are a common complication of patients with spinal injuries. The vacuum-assisted closure technique is widely used to induce and promote wound healing. We tested our clinical impression that pressure sores healed faster with vacuum-assisted closure, and compared it with the traditional wet-to-dry/wet-to-wet technique with gauze soaked in Ringer's solution changed three times a day. Consecutive patients with pressure sores were entered into the study. Two randomised groups of 11 patients each with pressure sores of the pelvic region were included. We found no difference in time to reach 50% of the initial wound volume between the two methods. The vacuum-assisted group took a mean (SD) of 27 (10) days and the traditional group 28 (7) days. The two methods were equally effective in forming granulation tissue, so one can profit from the other advantages of the vacuum-assisted treatment (reduced costs and improved comfort) knowing that the effect on the formation of granulation tissue is as good as with the traditional treatment. PMID:12625392

  3. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Smout, Michael J; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Giacomin, Paul R; Moran, Corey S; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  4. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N.; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Moran, Corey S.; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  5. Biofunctionalized electrospun silk mats as a topical bioactive dressing for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A; Wang, X Y; Kaplan, D L; Garlick, J A; Egles, C

    2009-09-01

    Materials able to deliver topically bioactive molecules represent a new generation of biomaterials. In this article, we describe the use of silk mats, made of electrospun nanoscale silk fibers containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), for the promotion of wound healing processes. In our experiments, we demonstrated that EGF is incorporated into the silk mats and slowly released in a time-dependent manner (25% EGF release in 170h). We tested these materials using a new model of wounded human skin-equivalents displaying the same structure as human skin and able to heal using the same molecular and cellular mechanisms found in vivo. This human three-dimensional model allows us to demonstrate that the biofunctionalized silk mats, when placed on the wounds as a dressing, aid the healing by increasing the time of wound closure by the epidermal tongue by 90%. The preservation of the structure of the mats during the healing period as demonstrated by electronic microscopy, the biological action of the dressing, as well as the biocompatibility of the silk demonstrate that this biomaterial is a new and very promising material for medical applications, especially for patients suffering from chronic wounds.

  6. Reduced FOXO1 Expression Accelerates Skin Wound Healing and Attenuates Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Katsuya; de Kerckhove, Maiko; Okamoto, Momoko; Kashiyama, Kazuya; Tanaka, Katsumi; Kim, Sangeun; Kawata, Takuya; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Martin, Paul; Shimokawa, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) family has been extensively investigated in aging and metabolism, but its role in tissue-repair processes remains largely unknown. Herein, we clarify the molecular aspect of the FOXO family in skin wound healing. We demonstrated that Foxo1 and Foxo3a were both up-regulated during murine skin wound healing. Partial knockout of Foxo1 in Foxo1+/− mice throughout the body led to accelerated skin wound healing with enhanced keratinocyte migration, reduced granulation tissue formation, and decreased collagen density, accompanied by an attenuated inflammatory response, but we observed no wound phenotype in Foxo3a−/− mice. Fibroblast growth factor 2, adiponectin, and notch1 genes were significantly increased at wound sites in Foxo1+/− mice, along with markedly altered extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Similarly, transient knockdown of Foxo1 at the wound site by local delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides enhanced skin wound healing. The link between FOXO1 and scarring extends to patients, in particular keloid scars, where we see FOXO1 expression markedly increased in fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the otherwise normal dermis. This occurs in the immediate vicinity of the keloid by comparison to the center of the mature keloid, indicating that FOXO1 is associated with the overgrowth of this fibrotic response into adjacent normal skin. Overall, our data indicate that molecular targeting of FOXO1 may improve the quality of healing and reduce pathological scarring. PMID:25010393

  7. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  8. Risk-Based Decision Process for Accelerated Closure of a Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Norland, R. L.; DiSalvo, R.; Anderson, M.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Site) resulted in contamination of soil and underground systems and structures with hazardous substances, including plutonium, uranium and hazardous waste constituents. The Site was placed on the National Priority List in 1989. There are more than 370 Individual Hazardous Substance Sites (IHSSs) at RFETS. Accelerated cleanup and closure of RFETS is being achieved through implementation and refinement of a regulatory framework that fosters programmatic and technical innovations: (1) extensive use of ''accelerated actions'' to remediate IHSSs, (2) development of a risk-based screening process that triggers and helps define the scope of accelerated actions consistent with the final remedial action objectives for the Site, (3) use of field instrumentation for real time data collection, (4) a data management system that renders near real time field data assessment, and (5) a regulatory agency consultative process to facilitate timely decisions. This paper presents the process and interim results for these aspects of the accelerated closure program applied to Environmental Restoration activities at the Site.

  9. [Wound closure after irrigation with Octenisept® without possibility for drainage].

    PubMed

    Högele, A M; Neu, J

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old patient suffered a stab wound of the right thenar prominence after an accident with a screwdriver. In the first hospital the deep wound was irrigated with octenidine dihydrochloride/2-phenoxyethanol and closed by suture. During the further course pressure pain and numbness of the right thenar and swelling of the right hand occurred. Three weeks after the accident an operative revision of the wound in a second hospital was performed. The intraoperative findings showed inflammation and necrosis of the right m. abductor pollicis brevis, but no infection with pus.The patient accused the first hospital of irrigating the tissue of his right hand with Octenisept®. The expert option of the Arbitration Board identified improper care in the first hospital with insufficient excision of the wound and incorrect use of the Octenisept® solution. Against the explicit advice of the manufacturing company the wound had been sutured without the possibility of drainage for the Octenisept® solution. PMID:21229225

  10. [Wound closure after irrigation with Octenisept® without possibility for drainage].

    PubMed

    Högele, A M; Neu, J

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old patient suffered a stab wound of the right thenar prominence after an accident with a screwdriver. In the first hospital the deep wound was irrigated with octenidine dihydrochloride/2-phenoxyethanol and closed by suture. During the further course pressure pain and numbness of the right thenar and swelling of the right hand occurred. Three weeks after the accident an operative revision of the wound in a second hospital was performed. The intraoperative findings showed inflammation and necrosis of the right m. abductor pollicis brevis, but no infection with pus.The patient accused the first hospital of irrigating the tissue of his right hand with Octenisept®. The expert option of the Arbitration Board identified improper care in the first hospital with insufficient excision of the wound and incorrect use of the Octenisept® solution. Against the explicit advice of the manufacturing company the wound had been sutured without the possibility of drainage for the Octenisept® solution.

  11. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R; Berns, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation. PMID:25562608

  12. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation. PMID:25562608

  13. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation.

  14. Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Combined With a Collagenfibrin Double-layered Membrane Accelerates Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Liu, Rui; Chen, Hongli; Xu, Zhihao; Chen, Jiannan; Wang, Manman; Yuan, Zhiqing

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in combination with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane on wound healing in mice. A collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane was prepared, and the surface properties of the support material were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. Twenty-four mice were prepared for use as full-thickness skin wound models and randomly divided into 3 groups: group A, a control group in which the wounds were bound using a conventional method; group B, a group treated with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen membrane; and group C, a group treated with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane. The postoperative concrescence of the wounds was observed daily to evaluate the effects of the different treatments. Scanning electron microscope observation showed the collagen-fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure, and wound healing in the double-layered membrane group was better than in groups A or B. Treatment with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane accelerated wound healing.

  15. Nano-porous nitrocellulose liquid bandage modulates cell and cytokine response and accelerates cutaneous wound healing in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaofeng; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Caizhen; Chen, Xiufang; Cheng, Zhiyun; Bai, Ruyu; Wu, Xunxun; Yu, Qian; Wu, Chunlin; Diao, Yong

    2016-01-20

    Nitrocellulose liquid bandage (L-Bandage) is extensively used in hard-to-cover cuts and wounds management, owing to its flexibility, softness, transparency, and conformability. However, evidence supporting their mechanisms of action as wound dressing is scanty. This study introduces a novel nano-porous L-Bandage, and provides results from a mouse full-thickness wound model investigating its mechanism of action on wound healing. Different characteristics, such as porosity, mechanical properties and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) were determined. The L-Bandage formed film had a porous network structure with mean diameter of 18 nm that could effectively prevent the bacterial invasion, and favorable properties of tensile strength, elongation, and WVTR. The L-Bandage treated wound exhibited accelerated healing, with reduced inflammations, enhanced wound re-epithelialization, contraction, granulation tissue formation, and rapid angiogenesis. Our data suggested that L-Bandage could serve as a promising wound dressing, because of its desirable properties for wound healing.

  16. Use of external fixation and primary wound closure in an open comminuted first metatarsal fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jason C; Shever, Sepideh

    2008-01-01

    Management of open, comminuted fractures presents a challenge for the foot and ankle surgeon. Reconstructive surgery for such injuries has a high potential for the development of serious complications, and factors such as the extent of soft tissue injury, neurovascular status to the foot, and fracture stability must be taken into consideration before determining a surgical plan. This article describes the case of a patient who presented with an open, comminuted first metatarsal fracture as a result of a chainsaw injury. The patient was treated with a uniplanar mini-external fixator, demineralized bone matrix, primary wound closure, and external bone growth stimulation. At 1-year follow-up, the interview and examination revealed the patient to be pain free with a functional first ray. ACFAS Level of Clinical Evidence: 4.

  17. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  18. Stomal mucocutaneous dehiscence as a complication of a dynamic wound closure system following laparostomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Raber, Menno Hendrikus; Steenvoorde, Pascal; de Wit, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic retention suture techniques that allow gradual reapproximation of abdominal midline muscles and fascia as well as sufficient freedom of movement for breathing and patient care commonly are used to prevent lateral retraction of the abdominal fascia in patients whose abdominal wound closure must be delayed. A 58-year-old otherwise healthy man was admitted with severe abdominal sepsis and following surgery, which included the creation of a stoma, a dynamic wound closure system was applied. Mucocutaneous stomal dehiscence was observed a few days after starting the treatment. The complication was believed to have occurred as a result of traction on the proximal end of the stoma (the bowel inside the abdomen) due to tension on the sutures of the small part of the bowel outside the abdomen. Definite, primary closure of the abdominal fascia was achieved after 16 days, at which point the stoma was reinserted with good results. Since using a modified procedure that involves cutting a groove in the protective drape and carefully placing two flaps around the stoma, this complication has not been observed with similar patients in the authors' facility. This complication is not unique to this wound closure system; it also has been reported with other treatment modalities such as negative pressure wound therapy. The relatively small number of patients requiring delayed closure of the abdomen, coupled with the uniqueness of each case due to a wide variety of indications and comorbidities, hampers the development of evidence-based guidelines of care for these patients. A worldwide data exchange that includes patient experiences and descriptions of successful and failed attempts to address problems and complications in these patients is necessary. In the meantime, experiences with these types of wounds need to be shared in the literature.

  19. Lifting incise drapes off the skin during wound closure can cause contamination.

    PubMed

    Makki, D; Probert, N; Gedela, V; Kustos, I; Thonse, R; Banim, R

    2015-05-01

    Incise drapes adhere well to skin and reduce bacterial migration into the wound. We took skin swabs before and after the application of incise drapes during 49 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Contamination was detected under incise drapes in four cases (8.1%) and consisted mainly of skin flora. We conclude that it is important to clean the skin again with antiseptics if the incise drape is removed by the surgeon. PMID:26292465

  20. Platelet lysate promotes in vitro wound scratch closure of human dermal fibroblasts: different roles of cell calcium, P38, ERK and PI3K/AKT.

    PubMed

    Ranzato, Elia; Mazzucco, Laura; Patrone, Mauro; Burlando, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    There is a growing interest for the clinical use of platelet derivates in wound dressing. Platelet beneficial effect is attributed to the release of growth factors and other bioactive substances, though mechanisms are mostly unknown. We studied wound-healing processes of human primary fibroblasts, by exposing cells to a platelet lysate (PL) obtained from blood samples. Crystal violet and tetrazolium salt (MTS) assays showed dose-response increase of cell proliferation and metabolism. In scratch wound and transwell assays, a dose of 20% PL induced a significant increase of wound closure rate at 6 and 24 hrs, and had a strong chemotactic effect. BAPTA-AM, SB203580 and PD98059 caused 100% inhibition of PL effects, whereas wortmannin reduced to about one third the effect of PL on wound healing and abolished the chemotactic response. Confocal imaging showed the induction by PL of serial Ca2(+) oscillations in fibroblasts. Data indicate that cell Ca2(+) plays a fundamental role in wound healing even without PL, p38 and ERK1/2 are essential for PL effects but are also activated by wounding per se, PI3K is essential for PL effects and its downstream effector Akt is activated only in the presence of PL. In conclusion, PL stimulates fibroblast wound healing through the activation of cell proliferation and motility with different patterns of involvement of different signalling pathways.

  1. Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.

    PubMed

    Vits, Sabine; Dissemond, Joachim; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kriegler, Lisa; Körber, Andreas; Schedlowski, Manfred; Cesko, Elvir

    2015-12-01

    Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects' expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n = 11; control group, n = 11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative 'wound gel' was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a 'non-active gel' was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers. PMID:24373522

  2. Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.

    PubMed

    Vits, Sabine; Dissemond, Joachim; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kriegler, Lisa; Körber, Andreas; Schedlowski, Manfred; Cesko, Elvir

    2015-12-01

    Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects' expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n = 11; control group, n = 11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative 'wound gel' was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a 'non-active gel' was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers.

  3. Astragulus polysaccharide-loaded fibrous mats promote the restoration of microcirculation in/around skin wounds to accelerate wound healing in a diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Wang, Fei; Yin, Dengke; Fang, Zhaohui; Huang, Lu

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds (TES) can carry numerous biomacromolecules and cells, and they have been widely used in diabetic skin wound healing with positive effects. However, the bioactive retention of biomacromolecules and cells during fabrication and storage is still a factor restricting their use. Moreover, impaired blood supply in/around poorly healing diabetic skin wounds has not been considered. In the present study, a bioactive natural substance of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS), which has stable and confirmed effects on endothelial protection, was embedded into fibrous TES by electrospinning. The administration of APS-loaded TES on the skin wound in a diabetic rat model led to a dose-dependent promotion in skin blood flow around wounds and an increase in endoglin expression and microvessel density in regenerated skin tissues. Furthermore, the higher loading of APS in TES led to faster collagen synthesis, appendage and epidermal differentiation, and wound closure. In summary, the combination of APS with TES is a potentially novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic skin wound healing, as it not only mimics the ultrastructure of extracellular matrixes but also restores skin microcirculation.

  4. A beveled, conventional cutting edge surgical needle: a new innovation in wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kaulbach, H C; Towler, M A; McClelland, W A; Povinelli, K M; Becker, D G; Cantrell, R W; Edlich, R F

    1990-01-01

    A new beveled, conventional cutting edge needle has been developed with superior performance characteristics over those of other conventional cutting edge needles. It is composed of a unique stainless steel, ASTM 45500, that has been heat-treated after the curving process to enhance its resistance to bending. The angle of presentation of its cutting edges has been decreased to enhance needle sharpness. On the basis of the results of experimental and clinical investigations, this new needle is recommended for closure of lacerations. PMID:2197321

  5. Young coconut juice can accelerate the healing process of cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Estrogen has been reported to accelerate cutaneous wound healing. This research studies the effect of young coconut juice (YCJ), presumably containing estrogen-like substances, on cutaneous wound healing in ovairectomized rats. Methods Four groups of female rats (6 in each group) were included in this study. These included sham-operated, ovariectomized (ovx), ovx receiving estradiol benzoate (EB) injections intraperitoneally, and ovx receiving YCJ orally. Two equidistant 1-cm full-thickness skin incisional wounds were made two weeks after ovariectomy. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the third and the fourth week of the study, and their serum estradiol (E2) level was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay. The skin was excised and examined in histological sections stained with H&E, and immunostained using anti-estrogen receptor (ER-α an ER-β) antibodies. Results Wound healing was accelerated in ovx rats receiving YCJ, as compared to controls. This was associated with significantly higher density of immunostaining for ER-α an ER-β in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, white blood cells, fat cells, sebaceous gland, skeletal muscles, and hair shafts and follicles. This was also associated with thicker epidermis and dermis, but with thinner hypodermis. In addition, the number and size of immunoreactive hair follicles for both ER-α and ER-β were the highest in the ovx+YCJ group, as compared to the ovx+EB group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that YCJ has estrogen-like characteristics, which in turn seem to have beneficial effects on cutaneous wound healing. PMID:23234369

  6. Pretreatment of photoaged forearm skin with topical tretinoin accelerates healing of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Popp, C; Kligman, A M; Stoudemayer, T J

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of skin with all-trans retinoic acid (tretinoin) has been shown to enhance wound healing. Previous studies have mainly used animal models to demonstrate this effect. We wanted to determine whether pretreatment could promote wound healing in severely photoaged dorsal forearm skin. Four elderly men with severely actinically damaged forearms were treated daily for 16 weeks. One arm was treated with 0.05-0.1% tretinoin cream (Retin A, Ortho), and the other with Purpose cream (Ortho) as a vehicle control. Four-millimetre punch biopsies were taken from both dorsal forearms prior to treatment. After 16 weeks, full-thickness 2-mm punch biopsies were taken from both sides. Serial photographs were taken, and healing of the wounds quantitatively assessed by image analysis. On the 11th day, the wounds were excised using a 4-mm biopsy punch. Biopsies were processed for light microscopy. After 16 weeks, the tretinoin-treated forearms showed moderate erythema and scaling. Polarized light photographs revealed multiple, red, vascularized foci and/or a diffuse network of small vessels. The histological effects were typical for tretinoin, i.e. compaction of the stratum corneum, epidermal acanthosis with correction of atypia, an increase in small vessels, and increased cellularity in the upper dermis. Purpose cream had no effect, either clinically or histologically. On the tretinoin-treated side, the wound areas were 35-37% smaller on days 1 and 4, and 47-50% smaller on days 6, 8, 11, compared with the controls. Clinically and histologically, reepithelialization occurred more rapidly. Thus tretinoin dramatically accelerated wound healing in photodamaged skin.

  7. Application of coenzyme Q10 for accelerating soft tissue wound healing after tooth extraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Kataoka, Kota; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-10

    Accelerating wound healing after tooth extraction is beneficial in dental treatment. Application of antioxidants, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (rCoQ10), may promote wound healing after tooth extraction. In this study, we examined the effects of topical application of rCoQ10 on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. After maxillary first molars were extracted, male Fischer 344 rats (8 weeks old) (n = 27) received topical application of ointment containing 5% rCoQ10 (experimental group) or control ointment (control group) to the sockets for 3 or 8 days (n = 6-7/group). At 3 days after extraction, the experimental group showed higher collagen density and lower numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the upper part of socket, as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB were also lower in the experimental group than in the control group (p < 0.05). At 8 days after tooth extraction, there were no significant differences in collagen density, number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bone fill between the groups. Our results suggest that topical application of rCoQ10 promotes wound healing in the soft tissue of the alveolar socket, but that rCoQ10 has a limited effect on bone remodeling in rats.

  8. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication. PMID:27037778

  9. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  10. Combined nitric oxide-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) film/F127 hydrogel for accelerating wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Raggio Santos, Karen Slis; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; de Oliveira, Marcelo G

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing biomaterials represent a potential strategy for use as active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. Topical NO-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films and Pluronic F127 hydrogels (F127) have already exhibited effective skin vasodilation and wound healing actions. In this study, we functionalized PVA films with SNO groups via esterification with a mixture of mercaptosucinic acid (MSA) and thiolactic acid (TLA) followed by S-nitrosation of the SH moieties. These films were combined with an underlying layer of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide), i.e., PEO-PPO-PEO (Pluronic F127) hydrogel and used for the topical treatment of skin lesions in an animal model. The mixed esterification of PVA with MSA and TLA led to chemically crosslinked PVA-SNO films with a high swelling capacity capable of spontaneously releasing NO. Real time NO-release measurements revealed that the hydrogel layer reduces the initial NO burst from the PVA-SNO films. We demonstrate that the combination of PVA-SNO films with F127 hydrogel accelerates wound contraction, decreases wound gap and cellular density and accelerates the inflammatory phase of the lesion. These results were reflected in an increase in myofibroblastic differentiation and collagen type III expression in the cicatricial tissue. Therefore, PVA-SNO films combined with F127 hydrogel may represent a new approach for active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. PMID:25907598

  11. Clippers or the knife? The reform of surgical practice and the difficulty of early wound closure.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Borg, Keith

    2009-09-01

    Salt, vinegar and wine sounds more like a recipe from the Saturday kitchen, but in 1667 it was all a surgeon could use to close wounds, along with silk and linen strips. In providing this service, barbers and surgeons found themselves confused and intertwined, struggling for professional recognition that was about to experience reform. Allegations of neglect in the aftermath of a major seafaring battle on the very shores of our capital city required the court of King Charles II to search for a solution of supreme magnitude to accommodate the hundreds of maimed sailors who were littering the streets of London. A campaign to conceal the horrors of warfare began which lead to the implementation of the Greenwich charter and the construction of a hospital which the architect Christopher Wren helped to design.

  12. Prophylactic plastic surgery closure of neurosurgical scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications in previously-operated patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®) and radiation.

    PubMed

    Golas, Alyssa Reiffel; Boyko, Tatiana; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip E; Boockvar, John A; Spector, Jason A

    2014-09-01

    Neurosurgical craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal interventions are performed for a variety of indications, including the resection of benign or malignant tumors, hematoma evacuation, and for the management of intractable seizure disorders. Despite an overall low complication rate of intervention, wound healing complications such as dehiscence, surgical site infection, and cerebrospinal fluid leak are not uncommon. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent scalp incision closure at a single institution by a single plastic surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Sixty patients (83 procedures) were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (95.0 %) underwent previous craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal procedure. Of the total 60 patients, 35 patients received preoperative radiation. Sixteen patients received bevacizumab prior to their index case, while 12 received bevacizumab postoperatively. Ten patients (16.7 %) required additional plastic surgical intervention for wound complications after their index plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically in 34 patients (38 procedures). When plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically, 4 patients (11.8 %) required further wound revision. None of the 14 patients who underwent prophylactic plastic surgery closure for previous scalp incision, preoperative bevacizumab, and XRT administration required re-intervention. Plastic surgery closure of complex scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications among patients who underwent previous neurosurgical intervention, XRT administration, and preoperative bevacizumab administration. This is particularly true when plastic surgery closure is performed "prophylactically." Further collaboration between the neurosurgical and plastic surgery teams is therefore warranted, particularly in the setting of these high-risk cases.

  13. Accelerating skin wound healing by M-CSF through generating SSEA-1 and -3 stem cells in the injured sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunyuan; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complicated process requiring the collaborative efforts of different cell lineages. Our recent studies have found that one subset of hematopoietic cells can be induced to dedifferentiate into multipotent stem cells by means of a proliferating fibroblast releasable factor, M-CSF. Understanding the importance of stem cells on skin wound healing, here we evaluate the biological significance of M-CSF on skin wound healing. In an in vivo mouse skin excisional wound model, we found that SSEA-positive stem cells were present in wounded but not normal skin. After isolating skin cells from either normal or wounded skin by collagenase digestion, and analyzing the SSEA-1 positive cells by flow cytometry, we found a significant increase in the number of SSEA-1 positive cells in wounded skin. Topical application of M-CSF in skin wounds accelerated healing remarkably, while application of M-CSF-neutralizing antibody slowed wound healing. Furthermore, injection of EGFP-labeled hematopoietic cell-derived stem cells generated from M-CSF treated splenocytes resulted in EGFP-labeled cells being enriched in the skin wound site and further differentiated into functional organ-specific cells. Together, these data demonstrated that M-CSF makes a significant contribution to the healing process by inducing hematopoietic cell dedifferentiation into stem cells. PMID:27363517

  14. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. Furthermore, saliva contains a variety of proteins that play a role in the various stages of the intraoral wound healing. Tissue factor, present in salivary exosomes, accelerates the clotting of blood dramatically. The subsequent proliferation of epithelial cells is promoted by growth factors in saliva, especially epidermal growth factor. The importance of secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor is demonstrated by the observation that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Members of the salivary histatin family promote wound closure in vitro by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration. Cell proliferation is not enhanced by histatin. Cyclization of histatin increased its biological activity approximately 1,000-fold compared to linear histatin. These studies suggest that histatins could potentially be used for the development of new wound healing medications.

  15. Clinical and Histologic Evaluation of Platelet-Rich Fibrin Accelerated Epithelization of Gingival Wound

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Mansi; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Gupta, Geeti; Vij, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    The foremost indication for gingival depigmentation is patient demand for improved aesthetics. In most cases after the removal of pigmented layer, the area is covered with periodontal packs. These dressings have no curative properties. They only minimise the likelihood of surface trauma during mastication. However, platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) accelerates wound healing by effective neovascularisation and promoting fast cicatricial tissue remodelling. In the present split mouth study, PRF membrane was applied in the first quadrant and non-eugenol dressing (Coe-Pack) in the second quadrant after depigmentation. Clinical evaluation of epithelization with toluidine blue revealed that PRF treated sites stained substantially less indicating better wound healing as compared to Coe-Pack sites, which appeared more erythematous after 5 days. The histologic evaluation also revealed greater inflammatory cell infiltrate on Coe-Pack sites as compared to PRF. Thus, PRF membrane as a periodontal dressing is a successful approach to protect the raw wound area of the depigmented site to reduce healing time and patient discomfort. PMID:27761092

  16. Acceleration of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles interacting with the natural anti-Gal antibody.

    PubMed

    Galili, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Application of α-gal nanoparticles to wounds and burns induces accelerated healing by harnessing the natural anti-Gal antibody which constitutes ~1% of human immunoglobulins. α-gal nanoparticles present multiple α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R), the carbohydrate ligand of anti-Gal. Studied α-gal nanoparticles were comprised of glycolipids with α-gal epitopes, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Binding of anti-Gal to α-gal nanoparticles in wounds activates the complement cascade, resulting in formation of chemotactic complement cleavage peptides that induce rapid recruitment of many macrophages. The Fc/Fcγ receptors interaction between anti-Gal coating α-gal nanoparticles and the recruited macrophages activates macrophages to produce cytokines/growth factors that promote wound healing and recruit stem cells. Studies of wound healing by α-gal nanoparticles were feasible in α1,3galactosyltransferase knockout mice and pigs. In contrast to other nonprimate mammals, these mice and pigs lack the α-gal epitope, and thus they are not immunotolerant to it and produce anti-Gal. Treatment of skin wounds and burns with α-gal nanoparticles resulted in 40-60% decrease in healing time in comparison with control wounds treated with saline. This accelerated healing is associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and extensive angiogenesis in wounds, faster regrowth of epidermis, and regeneration of the dermis. The accelerated healing further decreases and may completely eliminate fibrosis and scar formation in wounds. Since healing of internal injuries is mediated by mechanisms similar to those in external wound healing, it is suggested that α-gal nanoparticles treatment may also improve regeneration and restoration of biological function following internal injuries such as surgical incisions, myocardial ischemia following infarction, and nerve injuries.

  17. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  18. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  19. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery. PMID:24525612

  20. Remediation of the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Lab: An Accelerated Closure Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J.; Skinner, R.; Adams, V.

    2008-07-01

    The Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses approximately 430 hectares (1062 acres). Historic operations at ORNL produced a diverse legacy of contaminated facilities and waste disposal areas in the valley. In addition, from 1955 to 1963, ORNL served as a major disposal site for wastes from over 50 off-site government-sponsored installations, research institutions, and other isotope users. Contaminated areas in the watershed included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pits/trenches, hydro-fracture wells, leak and spill sites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediment. Remediation of the watershed in accordance with the requirements specified in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Actions in Melton Valley, which estimated that remedial actions specified in the ROD would occur over a period of 14 years, with completion by FY 2014. Under the terms of the Accelerated Closure Contract between DOE and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, the work was subdivided into 14 separate sub-projects which were completed between August 2001 and September 2006, 8 years ahead of the original schedule. (authors)

  1. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  2. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  3. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF ISSUES TO BE CONSIDERED FOR PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) ACCELERATED CLOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2005-02-23

    This paper describes some of the basic issues identified to date related to the proposed closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) site. It is to be used as a preliminary planning supplement to enable application of the many guidance documents that are now available to describe the statutory and DOE requirements for closure of a Hanford site contaminated with low levels of plutonium. The major issues identified herein include: (1) Closure barrier performance, life expectancy and design criteria; (2) Public and interest group acceptability of closure approach; (3) Quantity of plutonium that will remain; (4) Void backfilling prior to barrier placement; (5) Identification of closure zone boundary; and (6) Impact of 241Z and 241Z-361 waste unit closure plans on the PFP surface barrier design.

  5. Mitochondrial signal transduction in accelerated wound and retinal healing by near-infrared light therapy.

    PubMed

    Eells, Janis T; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T; VerHoeve, James; Henry, Michele; Buchman, Ellen V; Kane, Mary P; Gould, Lisa J; Das, Rina; Jett, Marti; Hodgson, Brian D; Margolis, David; Whelan, Harry T

    2004-09-01

    Photobiomodulation by light in the red to near infrared range (630-1000 nm) using low energy lasers or light-emitting diode (LED) arrays has been shown to accelerate wound healing, improve recovery from ischemic injury in the heart and attenuate degeneration in the injured optic nerve. Recent evidence indicates that the therapeutic effects of red to near infrared light result, in part, from intracellular signaling mechanisms triggered by the interaction of NIR light with the mitochondrial photoacceptor molecule cytochrome c oxidase. We have demonstrated that NIR-LED photo-irradiation increases the production of cytochrome oxidase in cultured primary neurons and reverses the reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity produced by metabolic inhibitors. We have also shown that NIR-LED treatment prevents the development of oral mucositis in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients. Photobiomodulation improves wound healing in genetically diabetic mice by upregulating genes important in the promotion of wound healing. More recent studies have provided evidence for the therapeutic benefit of NIR-LED treatment in the survival and functional recovery of the retina and optic nerve in vivo after acute injury by the mitochondrial toxin, formic acid generated in the course of methanol intoxication. Gene discovery studies conducted using microarray technology documented a significant upregulation of gene expression in pathways involved in mitochondrial energy production and antioxidant cellular protection. These findings provide a link between the actions of red to near infrared light on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in vitro and cell injury in vivo. Based on these findings and the strong evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases processes, we propose that NIR-LED photobiomodulation represents an innovative and non-invasive therapeutic approach for the treatment of tissue injury and disease processes in which mitochondrial

  6. Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome accelerates rat excisional wound healing: involvement of Hsp70/Bax proteins, antioxidant defense, and angiogenesis activity

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Elham; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Zahedifard, Maryam; Tayeby, Faezeh; Awang, Khalijah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curcuma purpurascens BI. is a member of Zingiberaceae family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the wound healing properties of hexane extract of C. purpurascens rhizome (HECP) against excisional wound healing in rats. Materials and methods Twenty four rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: A) negative control (blank placebo, acacia gum), B) low dose of HECP, C) high dose of HECP, and D) positive control, with 6 rats in each group. Full-thickness incisions (approximately 2.00 cm) were made on the neck area of each rat. Groups 1–4 were treated two-times a day for 20 days with blank placebo, HECP (100 mg/kg), HECP (200 mg/kg), and intrasite gel as a positive control, respectively. After 20 days, hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome stainings were employed to investigate the histopathological alterations. Protein expressions of Bax and Hsp70 were examined in the wound tissues using immunohistochemistry analysis. In addition, levels of enzymatic antioxidants and malondialdehyde representing lipid peroxidation were measured in wound tissue homogenates. Results Macroscopic evaluation of wounds showed conspicuous elevation in wound contraction after topical administration of HECP at both doses. Moreover, histopathological analysis revealed noteworthy reduction in the scar width correlated with the enhanced collagen content and fibroblast cells, accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory cells in the granulation tissues. At the molecular level, HECP facilitates wound-healing process by downregulating Bax and upregulating Hsp70 protein at the wound site. The formation of new blood vessel was observed in Masson’s trichrome staining of wounds treated with HECP (100 and 200 mg/kg). In addition, HECP administration caused a significant surge in enzymatic antioxidant activities and a decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion These findings suggested that HECP accelerated wound-healing process in rats via antioxidant activity, angiogenesis

  7. Topical Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) Extract Does Not Accelerate the Oral Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Fernanda Hack; Salvadori, Gabriela; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki; Magnusson, Alessandra; Danilevicz, Chris Krebs; Meurer, Luise; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-07-01

    The effect of topical application of Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) extract was assessed on the healing of rat oral wounds in an in vivo model using 72 male Wistar rats divided into three groups (n = 24): control, placebo and Aloe Vera (0.5% extract hydroalcoholic). Traumatic ulcers were caused in the dorsum of the tongue using a 3-mm punch tool. The Aloe Vera and placebo group received two daily applications. The animals were sacrificed after 1, 5, 10 and 14 days. Clinical analysis (ulcer area and percentage of repair) and histopathological analysis (degree of re-epithelialization and inflammation) were performed. The comparison of the differences between scores based on group and experimental period, both in quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses, was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance level was 5%. On day 1, all groups showed predominantly acute inflammatory infiltrate. On day 5, there was partial epithelialization and chronic inflammatory infiltrate. On the days 10 and 14 total repair of ulcers was observed. There was no significant difference between groups in the repair of mouth ulcers. It is concluded that treatment using Aloe Vera as an herbal formulation did not accelerate oral wound healing in rats.

  8. The effect of B vitamin supplementation on wound healing in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Saeka; Takano, Mayuko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ohtsu, Mariko; Tsunoda, Kou; Koshi, Ryosuke; Yoshinuma, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of B-group vitamin supplements on wound healing in diabetic mice. The mice in the experimental group were treated daily with 1 g/L B6, 1.25 mg/L B12, and 62.5 mg/L folic acid in their drinking water. Full-thickness excision wounds were created with 6-mm skin biopsy punches. Each wound closure was digitally photographed. Beginning on day 3 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 42.8 ± 11.3%, p<0.05). On day 9 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was also statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 13.2 ± 16.8%, p<0.05). In addition, the high glucose level in the diabetic animals decreased significantly in response to B vitamin treatment. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that B vitamin supplementation may improve wound healing in diabetic mice. PMID:26798199

  9. Comparison of laser and diode sources for acceleration of in vitro wound healing by low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Ryan; Berns, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Low-level light therapy has been shown to improve in vitro wound healing. However, well-defined parameters of different light sources for this therapy are lacking. The goal of this study was (1) to determine if the wavelengths tested are effective for in vitro wound healing and (2) to compare a laser and a light-emitting diode (LED) source at similar wavelengths. We show four wavelengths, delivered by either a laser or LED array, improved in vitro wound healing in A549, U2OS, and PtK2 cells. Improved wound healing occurred through increased cell migration demonstrated through scratch wound and transwell assays. Cell proliferation was tested by the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-car-boxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) (MTS) assay and was found generally not to be involved in the wound healing process. The laser and LED sources were found to be comparable when equal doses of light were applied. The biological response measured was similar in most cases. We conclude that the laser at 652 (5.57  mW/cm2, 10.02  J/cm2) and 806 nm (1.30  mW/cm2, 2.334  J/cm2) (full bandwidth 5 nm), and LED at 637 (5.57  mW/cm2, 10.02  J/cm2) and 901 nm (1.30  mW/cm2, 2.334  J/cm2) (full bandwidth 17 and 69 nm respectively) induce comparable levels of cell migration and wound closure.

  10. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY... approximated skin edges of wounds from surgical incisions, including punctures from minimally invasive...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY... approximated skin edges of wounds from surgical incisions, including punctures from minimally invasive...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY... approximated skin edges of wounds from surgical incisions, including punctures from minimally invasive...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY... approximated skin edges of wounds from surgical incisions, including punctures from minimally invasive...

  14. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Logeswaran, Selvarasoo; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2012-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05), improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties. PMID:22312255

  15. Wound healing activity of Elaeis guineensis leaf extract ointment.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Logeswaran, Selvarasoo; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2012-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05), improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  16. Allogeneic Transplantation of an Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Sheet Combined With Artificial Skin Accelerates Wound Healing in a Rat Wound Model of Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Morikawa, Shunichi; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes is diabetic foot ulcer. Diabetic ulcers do not heal easily due to diabetic neuropathy and reduced blood flow, and nonhealing ulcers may progress to gangrene, which necessitates amputation of the patient's foot. This study attempted to develop a new cell-based therapy for nonhealing diabetic ulcers using a full-thickness skin defect in a rat model of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were harvested from the inguinal fat of normal rats, and ASC sheets were created using cell sheet technology and transplanted into full-thickness skin defects in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. The results indicate that the transplantation of ASC sheets combined with artificial skin accelerated wound healing and vascularization, with significant differences observed 2 weeks after treatment. The ASC sheets secreted large amounts of several angiogenic growth factors in vitro, and transplanted ASCs were observed in perivascular regions and incorporated into the newly constructed vessel structures in vivo. These results suggest that ASC sheets accelerate wound healing both directly and indirectly in this diabetic wound-healing model. In conclusion, allogeneic ASC sheets exhibit potential as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diabetic ulcers.

  17. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  18. Green light emitting diodes accelerate wound healing: characterization of the effect and its molecular basis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Tomohiro; Inui, Shigeki; Nakajima, Takeshi; Ogasawara, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Ko; Itami, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Because light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are low-coherent, quasimonochromatic, and nonthermal, they are an alternative for low level laser therapy, and have photobiostimulative effects on tissue repair. However, the molecular mechanism(s) are unclear, and potential effects of blue and/or green LEDs on wound healing are still unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of red (638 nm), blue (456 nm), and green (518 nm) LEDs on wound healing. In an in vivo study, wound sizes in the skin of ob/ob mice were significantly decreased on day 7 following exposure to green LEDs, and complete reepithelialization was accelerated by red and green LEDs compared with the control mice. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we investigated the effects of LEDs on human fibroblasts in vitro by measuring mRNA and protein levels of cytokines secreted by fibroblasts during the process of wound healing and on the migration of HaCat keratinocytes. The results suggest that some cytokines are significantly increased by exposure to LEDs, especially leptin, IL-8, and VEGF, but only by green LEDs. The migration of HaCat keratinocytes was significantly promoted by red or green LEDs. In conclusion, we demonstrate that green LEDs promote wound healing by inducing migratory and proliferative mediators, which suggests that not only red LEDs but also green LEDs can be a new powerful therapeutic strategy for wound healing.

  19. Wound closure and gradual involution of an infantile hemangioma using a noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Serena, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Facial hemangiomas are benign vascular neoplasms of infancy and childhood. Although most hemangiomas do not result in significant complications, some result in pain, ulceration, infection, and structural abnormalities and can interfere with respiration, vision, and hearing. A 5-month-old infant presented to the author's wound center with a necrotic wound within a large, segmental hemangioma of mixed superficial and deep morphology; her vision was obstructed. The patient's discomfort was indicated by poor feeding and irritability. The hemangioma had been treated with oral corticosteroids and laser therapy. The wound within had been treated with povidone-iodine, moist healing, and topical growth factors. Debridement of necrotic tissue was indicated at presentation; however, bleeding and discomfort were risks. Daily noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (used for painless debridement of chronic wounds) was initiated to remove necrotic tissue and prepare the wound for grafting. By day 8 of this treatment, the wound bed was covered with healthy-appearing granulation tissue and epithelialization had begun. Additionally, the hemangioma began to involute. Laser treatments were discontinued and the patient was weaned from oral steroids. By week 7, the wound was completely closed and did not require skin grafting. The hemangioma continued to involute. Additional studies are warranted to elucidate the role of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound in the management of ulcerated hemangioma.

  20. Sugar-coating wound repair: a review of FGF-10 and dermatan sulfate in wound healing and their potential application in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Radek, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of patients suffer from burn injuries each year, yet few therapies have been developed to accelerate the wound healing process. Most fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have been extensively evaluated but only a few have been found to participate in the wound healing process. In particular, FGF-10 is robustly increased in the wound microenvironment after injury and has demonstrated some ability to promote wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Glycosaminoglycans are linear carbohydrates that participate in wound repair by influencing cytokine/growth factor localization and interaction with cognate receptors. Dermatan sulfate (DS) is the most abundant glycosaminoglycan in human wound fluid and has been postulated to be directly involved in the healing process. Recently, the combination of FGF-10 and DS demonstrated the potential to accelerate wound healing via increased keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Based on these preliminary studies, DS may serve as a cofactor for FGF-10, and together they are likely to expedite the healing process by stimulating keratinocyte activity. As a specific subtype of wounds, the overall healing process of burn injuries does not significantly differ from other types of wounds, where optimal repair results in matrix regeneration and complete reepithelialization. At present, standard burn treatment primarily involves topical application of antimicrobial agents, while no routine therapies target acceleration of reepithelialization, the key to wound closure. Thus, this novel therapeutic combination could be used in conjunction with some of the current therapies, but it would have the unique ability to initiate wound healing by stimulating keratinocyte epithelialization.

  1. Development of ethyl alcohol-precipitated silk sericin/polyvinyl alcohol scaffolds for accelerated healing of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Siritienthong, Tippawan; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2012-12-15

    Silk sericin has been recently reported for its advantageous biological properties to promote wound healing. In this study, we established that the ethyl alcohol (EtOH) could be used to precipitate sericin and form the stable sericin/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds without the crosslinking. The sericin/PVA scaffolds were fabricated via freeze-drying and subsequently precipitating in various concentrations of EtOH. The EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds showed denser structure, higher compressive modulus, but lower water swelling ability than the non-precipitated scaffolds. Sericin could be released from the EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds in a sustained manner. After cultured with L929 mouse fibroblasts, the 70 vol% EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds showed the highest potential to promote cell proliferation. After applied to the full-thickness wounds of rats, the 70 vol% EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds showed significantly higher percentage of wound size reduction and higher extent of type III collagen formation and epithelialization, compared with the control scaffolds without sericin. The accelerated wound healing by the 70 vol% EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds was possibly due to (1) the bioactivity of sericin itself to promote wound healing, (2) the sustained release of precipitated sericin from the scaffolds, and (3) the activation and recruitment of wound healing-macrophages by sericin to the wounds. This finding suggested that the EtOH-precipitated sericin/PVA scaffolds were more effective for the wound healing, comparing with the EtOH-precipitated PVA scaffolds without sericin.

  2. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-09-12

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair.

  3. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  4. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  5. ACCELERATING CLOSURE AT DOE SITES WITH EM'S SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.; Toussaint, Craig R., Ph.D.; Gardner, E.J.

    2003-02-27

    Technical support is important for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities facing difficult technical issues, aggressive remediation schedules, and tight budgets. It is especially vital for closure sites, which typically are smaller and have fewer resources available to apply to remediation activities. In many cases, closure sites and other small sites no longer have staff with the expertise required to overcome technical barriers on their own. As closure deadlines approach, special technical expertise is needed to identify, evaluate, and implement new and innovative approaches that will result in significant cost and schedule improvement for the waste disposition pathway. Site ''problem holders'' must have access to world-class scientific and engineering expertise from DOE national laboratories and research facilities, private industry, and universities to address immediate critical problems. In order to have confidence in the feasibility and results of innovative approaches, site contractors need to have the benefit of the valuable experiences of technicians who have faced similar problems and found solutions. The DOE Environmental Management (EM) Science and Technology (S&T) program recognizes the need of the closure sites to solve problems aggressively and is highly responsive to this need. Technical support from the S&T program can take many forms, such as providing expertise, reviewing the baseline, addressing a specific technical problem, evaluating commercially available technologies, or co-funding a high-risk alternative. This paper describes the approach by which closure sites are quickly and easily able to obtain technical support from the S&T program and provides examples of successfully completed and ongoing technical solutions activities.

  6. Surgical resection of invasive adenoid cystic carcinoma of the lacrimal gland and wound closure using a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap.

    PubMed

    Andrade, João Paulo; Figueiredo, Sergio; Matias, Julio; Almeida, Ana Catarina

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of recurrent conjunctivitis. He was evaluated by an ophthalmologist and submitted to a CT scan that revealed an intraconic mass with invasion of the lateral orbital wall. He was operated, the mass was completely removed (with preservation of the intraorbital structures) and the lateral orbital wall rebuilt. The histopathological analysis revealed an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the lacrimal gland. 4 months later a painful recurrence of the lesion was diagnosed with invasion of the orbital roof and eyelids. After a multidisciplinary discussion and request from the patient, an exenteration of the orbit and removal of the lateral and superior orbital wall and dura mater was performed with the objective of a total resection. The wound and orbit were closed with a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap to ensure closure. PMID:27646316

  7. A novel technique for the treatment of infected metalwork in orthopaedic patients using skin closure over irrigated negative pressure wound therapy dressings

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, AWP; Krikler, S; Krkovic, M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There has been recent interest in the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NWPT) as an adjunct to parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of infection in orthopaedic patients with metalwork in situ. To address some of the limitations of standard NPWT in this situation, the senior author has developed a modified method of treatment for infected metalwork (excluding arthroplasty) in orthopaedic patients that includes irrigation and skin closure over the standard NPWT dressing. Methods This retrospective study examined the outcome of a case series of 16 trauma and orthopaedic patients with deep infection involving metalwork in whom this modified form of NPWT was used. In conjunction with standard parenteral antibiotic therapy and a multidisciplinary approach, this modified technique included serial debridements in theatre, irrigation and negative pressure dressings over a white polyvinyl alcohol foam (KCI, Kidlington, UK) as well as closure of the skin over the foam. Results Among the 16 patients, there was a variety of upper and lower limb as well as spinal trauma and elective cases. In all 16 patients, there was successful resolution of the infection with no early or unplanned removal of any metalwork required. Conclusions Patients with infected metalwork are a heterogeneous group, and often suffer high morbidity and mortality. The modified NPWT technique shows potential as an adjunct in the treatment of complex orthopaedic patients with infected metalwork. PMID:23484994

  8. Application of Antrodia camphorata Promotes Rat's Wound Healing In Vivo and Facilitates Fibroblast Cell Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Zahra A.; Ali, Hapipah M.; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Darvish, Pouya H.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2015-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a parasitic fungus from Taiwan, it has been documented to possess a variety of pharmacological and biological activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Antrodia camphorata ethanol extract to accelerate the rate of wound healing closure and histology of wound area in experimental rats. The safety of Antrodia camphorata was determined in vivo by the acute toxicity test and in vitro by fibroblast cell proliferation assay. The scratch assay was used to evaluate the in vitro wound healing in fibroblast cells and the excision model of wound healing was tested in vivo using four groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Our results showed that wound treated with Antrodia camphorata extract and intrasite gel significantly accelerates the rate of wound healing closure than those treated with the vehicle. Wounds dressed with Antrodia camphorata extract showed remarkably less scar width at wound closure and granulation tissue contained less inflammatory cell and more fibroblast compared to wounds treated with the vehicle. Masson's trichrom stain showed granulation tissue containing more collagen and less inflammatory cell in Antrodia camphorata treated wounds. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata extract significantly enhanced the rate of the wound enclosure in rats and promotes the in vitro healing through fibroblast cell proliferation. PMID:26557855

  9. A fast loop-closure algorithm to accelerate residue matching in computational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Min; Zhu, Yushan

    2016-02-01

    Constructing an active site on an inert scaffold is still a challenge in chemical biology. Herein, we describe the incorporation of a Newton-direction-based fast loop-closure algorithm for catalytic residue matching into our enzyme design program ProdaMatch. This was developed to determine the sites and geometries of the catalytic residues as well as the position of the transition state with high accuracy in order to satisfy the geometric constraints on the interactions between catalytic residues and the transition state. Loop-closure results for 64,827 initial loops derived from 21 loops in the test set showed that 99.51% of the initial loops closed to within 0.05 Å in fewer than 400 iteration steps, while the large majority of the initial loops closed within 100 iteration steps. The revised version of ProdaMatch containing the novel loop-closure algorithm identified all native matches for ten scaffolds in the native active-site recapitulation test. Its high speed and accuracy when matching catalytic residues with a scaffold make this version of ProdaMatch potentially useful for scaffold selection through the incorporation of more complex theoretical enzyme models which may yield higher initial activities in de novo enzyme design.

  10. Transparent crosslinked ultrashort peptide hydrogel dressing with high shape-fidelity accelerates healing of full-thickness excision wounds.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Yang; Salgado, Giorgiana; Lane, E Birgitte; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-09-07

    Wound healing is a major burden of healthcare systems worldwide and hydrogel dressings offer a moist environment conducive to healing. We describe cysteine-containing ultrashort peptides that self-assemble spontaneously into hydrogels. After disulfide crosslinking, the optically-transparent hydrogels became significantly stiffer and exhibited high shape fidelity. The peptide sequence (LIVAGKC or LK6C) was then chosen for evaluation on mice with full-thickness excision wounds. Crosslinked LK6C hydrogels are handled easily with forceps during surgical procedures and offer an improvement over our earlier study of a non-crosslinked peptide hydrogel for burn wounds. LK6C showed low allergenic potential and failed to provoke any sensitivity when administered to guinea pigs in the Magnusson-Kligman maximization test. When applied topically as a dressing, the medium-infused LK6C hydrogel accelerated re-epithelialization compared to controls. The peptide hydrogel is thus safe for topical application and promotes a superior rate and quality of wound healing.

  11. Novel anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 accelerates wound healing via the PI3 kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Hideki; Nakagami, Hironori; Tenma, Akiko; Saito, Yoshimi; Kaga, Toshihiro; Kanamori, Toshihide; Tamura, Nao; Tomono, Kazunori; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel cationic antimicrobial peptide, AG30/5C, which demonstrates angiogenic properties similar to those of LL-37 or PR39. However, improvement of its stability and cost efficacy are required for clinical application. Therefore, we examined the metabolites of AG30/5C, which provided the further optimized compound, SR-0379. SR-0379 enhanced the proliferation of human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDFs) via the PI3 kinase-Akt-mTOR pathway through integrin-mediated interactions. Furthermore SR-0379 promoted the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in co-culture with NHDFs. This compound also displays antimicrobial activities against a number of bacteria, including drug-resistant microbes and fungi. We evaluated the effect of SR-0379 in two different would-healing models in rats, the full-thickness defects under a diabetic condition and an acutely infected wound with full-thickness defects and inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment with SR-0379 significantly accelerated wound healing when compared to fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). The beneficial effects of SR-0379 on wound healing can be explained by enhanced angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, proliferation of endothelial cells and fibroblasts and antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that SR-0379 may have the potential for drug development in wound repair, even under especially critical colonization conditions. PMID:24675668

  12. Transparent crosslinked ultrashort peptide hydrogel dressing with high shape-fidelity accelerates healing of full-thickness excision wounds.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Yang; Salgado, Giorgiana; Lane, E Birgitte; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a major burden of healthcare systems worldwide and hydrogel dressings offer a moist environment conducive to healing. We describe cysteine-containing ultrashort peptides that self-assemble spontaneously into hydrogels. After disulfide crosslinking, the optically-transparent hydrogels became significantly stiffer and exhibited high shape fidelity. The peptide sequence (LIVAGKC or LK6C) was then chosen for evaluation on mice with full-thickness excision wounds. Crosslinked LK6C hydrogels are handled easily with forceps during surgical procedures and offer an improvement over our earlier study of a non-crosslinked peptide hydrogel for burn wounds. LK6C showed low allergenic potential and failed to provoke any sensitivity when administered to guinea pigs in the Magnusson-Kligman maximization test. When applied topically as a dressing, the medium-infused LK6C hydrogel accelerated re-epithelialization compared to controls. The peptide hydrogel is thus safe for topical application and promotes a superior rate and quality of wound healing. PMID:27600999

  13. Transparent crosslinked ultrashort peptide hydrogel dressing with high shape-fidelity accelerates healing of full-thickness excision wounds

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Yang; Salgado, Giorgiana; Lane, E. Birgitte; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a major burden of healthcare systems worldwide and hydrogel dressings offer a moist environment conducive to healing. We describe cysteine-containing ultrashort peptides that self-assemble spontaneously into hydrogels. After disulfide crosslinking, the optically-transparent hydrogels became significantly stiffer and exhibited high shape fidelity. The peptide sequence (LIVAGKC or LK6C) was then chosen for evaluation on mice with full-thickness excision wounds. Crosslinked LK6C hydrogels are handled easily with forceps during surgical procedures and offer an improvement over our earlier study of a non-crosslinked peptide hydrogel for burn wounds. LK6C showed low allergenic potential and failed to provoke any sensitivity when administered to guinea pigs in the Magnusson-Kligman maximization test. When applied topically as a dressing, the medium-infused LK6C hydrogel accelerated re-epithelialization compared to controls. The peptide hydrogel is thus safe for topical application and promotes a superior rate and quality of wound healing. PMID:27600999

  14. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 receptor CXCR4-overexpressing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells accelerate wound healing by migrating into skin injury areas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazhi; Sun, Shijin; Wang, Zhengguo; Zhu, Peifang; Yang, Zailiang; Zhang, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its membrane receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) are involved in the homing and migration of multiple stem cell types, neovascularization, and cell proliferation. This study investigated the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) accelerate skin wound healing in the mouse model by overexpression of CXCR4 in BMSCs. We compared SDF-1 expression and skin wound healing times of BALB/c mice, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, and immune system-deficient nude mice after (60)Co radiation-induced injury of their bone marrow. The occurrence of transplanted adenovirus-transfected CXCR4-overexpressing male BMSCs in the wound area was compared with the occurrence of untransfected male BALB/c BMSCs in (60)Co-irradiated female mice skin wound healing areas by Y chromosome marker analyses. The wound healing time of BALB/c mice was 14.00±1.41 days, whereas for the nude and SCID mice it was 17.16±1.17 days and 19.83±0.76 days, respectively. Male BMSCs could be detected in the surrounding areas of (60)Co-irradiated female BALB/c mice wounds, and CXCR4-overexpressing BMSCs accelerated the wound healing time. CXCR4-overexpressing BMSCs migrate in an enhanced manner to skin wounds in a SDF-1-expression-dependent manner, thereby reducing the skin wound healing time.

  15. Chitosan-based copper nanocomposite accelerates healing in excision wound model in rats.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Anu; Kant, Vinay; Gopalakrishnan, Anu; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-05-15

    Copper possesses efficacy in wound healing which is a complex phenomenon involving various cells, cytokines and growth factors. Copper nanoparticles modulate cells, cytokines and growth factors involved in wound healing in a better way than copper ions. Chitosan has been shown to be beneficial in healing because of its antibacterial, antifungal, biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric nature. In the present study, chitosan-based copper nanocomposite (CCNC) was prepared by mixing chitosan and copper nanoparticles. CCNC was applied topically to evaluate its wound healing potential and to study its effects on some important components of healing process in open excision wound model in adult Wistar rats. Significant increase in wound contraction was observed in the CCNC-treated rats. The up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-beta1(TGF-β1) by CCNC-treatment revealed its role in facilitating angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in CCNC-treated rats. Histological evaluation showed more fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition and intact re-epithelialization in CCNC-treated rats. Immunohistochemistry of CD31 revealed marked increase in angiogenesis. Thus, we concluded that chitosan-based copper nanocomposite efficiently enhanced cutaneous wound healing by modulation of various cells, cytokines and growth factors during different phases of healing process. PMID:24632085

  16. A poly-herbal formulation accelerates normal and impaired diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Upadhyay, Nitin K; Sawhney, R C; Kumar, Ratan

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a poly-herbal formulation (PHF) was prepared by combining the aqueous lyophilized leaf extracts of Hippophae rhamnoides L. and Aloe vera L. and the ethanol rhizome extract of Curcuma longa L., in an optimized ratio (1 : 7 : 1). The efficacy of PHF treatment was studied in normal and impaired diabetic rats using a full-thickness cutaneous wound model. Topical PHF treatment increased cellular proliferation and collagen synthesis at the wound site in normal rats, as evidenced by the significant increase in DNA, total protein, hydroxyproline, and hexosamine contents in comparison with a positive control treated with a povidone-iodine ointment. The histological examinations and matrix metalloproteinases expression also correlated well with the biochemical findings, confirming the efficacy of PHF in normal wounds. In the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, PHF treatment increased hydroxyproline and hexosamine content. A faster wound contraction was also observed in PHF-treated normal and diabetic rats. The PHF also promoted angiogenesis as evidenced by an in vitro chick chorioallantoic membrane model and in vivo up-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. The results suggest that PHF possesses significant wound healing potential in both normal as well as chronic diabetic wounds. PMID:19128249

  17. Honey: an immunomodulator in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Honey is a popular natural product that is used in the treatment of burns and a broad spectrum of injuries, in particular chronic wounds. The antibacterial potential of honey has been considered the exclusive criterion for its wound healing properties. The antibacterial activity of honey has recently been fully characterized in medical-grade honeys. Recently, the multifunctional immunomodulatory properties of honey have attracted much attention. The aim of this review is to provide closer insight into the potential immunomodulatory effects of honey in wound healing. Honey and its components are able to either stimulate or inhibit the release of certain cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6) from human monocytes and macrophages, depending on wound condition. Similarly, honey seems to either reduce or activate the production of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils, also depending on the wound microenvironment. The honey-induced activation of both types of immune cells could promote debridement of a wound and speed up the repair process. Similarly, human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cell responses (e.g., cell migration and proliferation, collagen matrix production, chemotaxis) are positively affected in the presence of honey; thus, honey may accelerate reepithelization and wound closure. The immunomodulatory activity of honey is highly complex because of the involvement of multiple quantitatively variable compounds among honeys of different origins. The identification of these individual compounds and their contributions to wound healing is crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind honey-mediated healing of chronic wounds.

  18. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  19. Keratin dressings speed epithelialization of deep partial-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Pechter, Patricia M; Gil, Joel; Valdes, Jose; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Kirsner, Robert S; Davis, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Keratin gene expression is regarded as a hallmark of epidermal biology. It demarcates the three keratinocyte phenotypes: basal (expressing KRT5 and KRT14), differentiating (expressing KRT1 and KRT10), and activated (wound healing), which is characterized by expression of KRT6, KRT16, and KRT17. Activated keratinocytes are among the first signals of epidermal wound healing. In addition, they are found deregulated in nonhealing chronic wounds. To examine keratins as a potential modality for wound-healing disorders, we evaluated two different keratin dressings, liquid or solid, and assessed their effects of epithelialization and closure using porcine partial-thickness wound-healing model in vivo. We found that both forms of keratin dressings accelerated closure and epithelialization, achieving statistically significant differences on day 5. Evidence suggesting early onset of epithelialization was corroborated further by gene expression analyses revealing induction of KRT6A, KRT16, and KRT17 by day 2 postwounding. The data suggest that keratin dressings may stimulate epithelialization by enhancing the activation of keratinocytes. We conclude that keratin-containing dressings can accelerate wound healing and closure. Further studies are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms of this activation.

  20. Injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired tissue bioadhesives with high wet strength for sutureless wound closure.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammadreza; Weng, Hong; Gyawali, Dipendra; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2012-11-01

    The existing surgical adhesives are not ideal for wet tissue adhesion required in many surgeries such as those for internal organs. Developing surgical adhesives with strong wet tissue adhesion, controlled degradability and mechanical properties, and excellent biocompatibility has been a significant challenge. Herein, learning from nature, we report a one-step synthesis of a family of injectable citrate-based mussel-inspired bioadhesives (iCMBAs) for surgical use. Within the formulations investigated, iCMBAs showed 2.5-8.0 folds stronger wet tissue adhesion strength over the clinically used fibrin glue, demonstrated controlled degradability and tissue-like elastomeric mechanical properties, and exhibited excellent cyto/tissue-compatibility both in vitro and in vivo. iCMBAs were able to stop bleeding instantly and suturelessly, and close wounds (2 cm long×0.5 cm deep) created on the back of Sprague-Dawley rats, which is impossible when using existing gold standard, fibrin glue, due to its weak wet tissue adhesion strength. Equally important, the new bioadhesives facilitate wound healing, and are completely degraded and absorbed without eliciting significant inflammatory response. Our results support that iCMBA technology is highly translational and could have broad impact on surgeries where surgical tissue adhesives, sealants, and hemostatic agents are used.

  1. Leaching of antioxidants and vulcanization accelerators from rubber closures into drug preparations.

    PubMed

    Airaudo, C B; Gayte-Sorbier, A; Momburg, R; Laurent, P

    1990-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatographic method was used to highlight the leaching into drug preparations of several constituents of elastomeric closures. Among the 150 preparations analysed, the twenty-eight local anaesthetics presented in single-dose delivery syringe-cartridges, one Epinephrine injection in prefilled syringes, eight insulin preparations and two Prednisolone acetate suspensions in the form of small volume flasks (less than or equal to 20 ml) were contaminated by one or more of the following: 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), 2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulphide and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI). Prednisolone acetate suspensions also contained 2,2'-methylene-bis(4-methyl-6-alpha-methylcyclohexylphenol). No contamination was found in drug preparations presented in large volume flasks (250-1000 ml). 2-(2-Hydroxyethylthio)-benzothiazole was not present, which indicated that the rubbers had not been sterilized with ethylene oxide. Elastomeric parts of drug closures analysed in the same way contained the same compounds as those found in drugs, one case excepted, which confirms the origin of the contamination. The lowest and the highest concentrations were found in syringe-cartridges; they ranged from 8.3 to 13.8 micrograms ml-1 for MBT, from 2.9 to 9.3 micrograms ml-1 for MBTS and from 2.8 to 11.1 micrograms ml-1 for MBI. Variable results were obtained, for a same preparation, depending upon the batches analysed, which indicates that rubber formulations and/or vulcanization conditions differed. The allergenic, toxic, embryotoxic and mutagenic properties of the compounds leached are discussed.

  2. Accelerated wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects of physically cross linked polyvinyl alcohol-chitosan hydrogel containing honey bee venom in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mohamed A; Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes is one of the leading causes of impaired wound healing. The objective of this study was to develop a bee venom-loaded wound dressing with an enhanced healing and anti-inflammatory effects to be examined in diabetic rats. Different preparations of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), chitosan (Chit) hydrogel matrix-based wound dressing containing bee venom (BV) were developed using freeze-thawing method. The mechanical properties such as gel fraction, swelling ratio, tensile strength, percentage of elongation and surface pH were determined. The pharmacological activities including wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects in addition to primary skin irritation and microbial penetration tests were evaluated. Moreover, hydroxyproline, glutathione and IL-6 levels were measured in the wound tissues of diabetic rats. The bee venom-loaded wound dressing composed of 10 % PVA, 0.6 % Chit and 4 % BV was more swellable, flexible and elastic than other formulations. Pharmacologically, the bee venom-loaded wound dressing that has the same previous composition showed accelerated healing of wounds made in diabetic rats compared to the control. Moreover, this bee venom-loaded wound dressing exhibited anti-inflammatory effect that is comparable to that of diclofenac gel, the standard anti-inflammatory drug. Simultaneously, wound tissues covered with this preparation displayed higher hydroxyproline and glutathione levels and lower IL-6 levels compared to control. Thus, the bee venom-loaded hydrogel composed of 10 % PVA, 0.6 % Chit and 4 % BV is a promising wound dressing with excellent forming and enhanced wound healing as well as anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24293065

  3. A unique combination of infrared and microwave radiation accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schramm, J Mark; Warner, Dave; Hardesty, Robert A; Oberg, Kerby C

    2003-01-01

    Light or electromagnetic radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing. The use of selected spectra, including infrared and microwave, has been described; however, no studies to date have examined the potential benefit of combining these spectra. In this study, a device that emits electromagnetic radiation across both the infrared and microwave ranges was used. To test the effects of this unique electromagnetic radiation spectrum on wound healing, two clinically relevant wound-healing models (i.e., tensile strength of simple incisions and survival of McFarlane flaps) were selected. After the creation of a simple full-thickness incision (n = 35 rats) or a caudally based McFarlane flap (n = 33 rats), animals were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: untreated control, infrared, or combined electromagnetic radiation. Treatment was administered for 30 minutes, twice daily for 18 days in animals with simple incisions, and 15 days in animals with McFarlane flaps. The wound area or flap was harvested and analyzed, blinded to the treatment regimens. A p value of less than 0.05 obtained by analysis of variance was considered to be statistically significant. Animals receiving combined electromagnetic radiation demonstrated increased tensile strength (2.62 N/mm2) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (2.36 N/mm2) or untreated controls (1.73 N/mm2, p < 0.001). Animals with McFarlane flaps receiving combined electromagnetic radiation had increased flap survival (78.0 percent) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (69.7 percent) and untreated controls (63.1 percent, p < 0.01). Thus, combined electromagnetic radiation provided a distinct advantage in wound healing that might augment current treatment regimens.

  4. Peroxide-based oxygen generating topical wound dressing for enhancing healing of dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Prafulla K; Ross, Christina L; Smith, Leona C; Jeong, Seon S; Kim, Jaehyun; Yoo, James J; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen generating biomaterials represent a new trend in regenerative medicine that aims to generate and supply oxygen at the site of requirement, to support tissue healing and regeneration. To enhance the healing of dermal wounds, we have developed a highly portable, in situ oxygen generating wound dressings that uses sodium percarbonate (SPO) and calcium peroxide (CPO) as chemical oxygen sources. The dressing continuously generated oxygen for more than 3 days, after which it was replaced. In the in vivo testing on porcine full-thickness porcine wound model, the SPO/CPO dressing showed enhanced wound healing during the 8 week study period. Quantitative measurements of wound healing related parameters, such as wound closure, reepithelialization, epidermal thickness and collagen content of dermis showed that supplying oxygen topically using the SPO/CPO dressing significantly accelerated the wound healing. An increase in neovascularization, as determined using Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31 staining, was also observed in the presence of SPO/CPO dressing. This novel design for a wound dressing that contains oxygen generating biomaterials (SPO/CPO) for supplying topical oxygen, may find utility in treating various types of acute to chronic wounds.

  5. Thiolated Carboxymethyl-Hyaluronic-Acid-Based Biomaterials Enhance Wound Healing in Rats, Dogs, and Horses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghui; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Mann, Brenda K.

    2011-01-01

    The progression of wound healing is a complicated but well-known process involving many factors, yet there are few products on the market that enhance and accelerate wound healing. This is particularly problematic in veterinary medicine where multiple species must be treated and large animals heal slower, oftentimes with complicating factors such as the development of exuberant granulation tissue. In this study a crosslinked-hyaluronic-acid (HA-) based biomaterial was used to treat wounds on multiple species: rats, dogs, and horses. The base molecule, thiolated carboxymethyl HA, was first found to increase keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. Crosslinked gels and films were then both found to enhance the rate of wound healing in rats and resulted in thicker epidermis than untreated controls. Crosslinked films were used to treat wounds on forelimbs of dogs and horses. Although wounds healed slower compared to rats, the films again enhanced wound healing compared to untreated controls, both in terms of wound closure and quality of tissue. This study indicates that these crosslinked HA-based biomaterials enhance wound healing across multiple species and therefore may prove particularly useful in veterinary medicine. Reduced wound closure times and better quality of healed tissue would decrease risk of infection and pain associated with open wounds. PMID:23738117

  6. Electroporative transfection with KGF-1 DNA improves wound healing in a diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Marti, G; Ferguson, M; Wang, J; Byrnes, C; Dieb, R; Qaiser, R; Bonde, P; Duncan, M D; Harmon, J W

    2004-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that electroporation enhances transfection in a mouse wound-healing model. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is an inducer of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation and has been shown to be under expressed in the wounds of diabetic individuals. We hypothesized that KGF delivered into an excisional wound via naked DNA injection with subsequent electroporation would be a novel and potentially effective method to enhance wound closure in a diabetic mouse model. ELISA assays confirmed production of KGF protein in cultured mouse cells and RT-PCR assays confirmed KGF mRNA in skin samples taken from mice. In all, 32 genetically diabetic mice were given two identical excisional wounds of their dorsum and split into two groups with one group receiving KGF DNA injection and electroporation with the other group receiving no treatment. Over 90% of wounds healed in the presence of KGF and electroporation versus 40% in the untreated group by day 12. Histological analysis of the wounds demonstrated that untreated wounds contained microulcers with thin or incomplete epithelium with unresolved inflammation as compared to treated wounds where intact and mature epithelium was observed. Taken together these findings suggest that a single injection of KGF DNA encoded on a plasmid coupled with electroporation improves and accelerates wound closure in a delayed wound-healing model.

  7. Knockout of Angiotensin AT2 receptors accelerates healing but impairs quality

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mahya; Hosseini, Sayed M.; Smith, Barbara; Ansari, Amir Mehdi.; Lay, Frank; Ahmed, Ali Karim; Inagami, Tedashi; Marti, Guy P.; Harmon, John W.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Abadir, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Wounds are among the most common, painful, debilitating and costly conditions in older adults. Disruption of the angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1R), has been associated with impaired wound healing, suggesting a critical role for AT1R in this repair process. Biological functions of angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT2R) are less studied. We investigated effects of genetically disrupting AT2R on rate and quality of wound healing. Our results suggest that AT2R effects on rate of wound closure depends on the phase of wound healing. We observed delayed healing during early phase of wound healing (inflammation). An accelerated healing rate was seen during later stages (proliferation and remodeling). By day 12, fifty percent of AT2R−/− mice had complete wound closure as compared to none in either C57/BL6 or AT1R−/− mice. There was a significant increase in AT1R, TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 expression during the proliferative and remodeling phases in AT2R−/− mice. Despite the accelerated closure rate, AT2R−/− mice had more fragile healed skin. Our results suggest that in the absence of AT2R, wound healing rate is accelerated, but yielded worse skin quality. Elucidating the contribution of both of the angiotensin receptors may help fine tune future intervention aimed at wound repair in older individuals. PMID:26727887

  8. Cutaneous Wound Healing After Treatment with Plant-Derived Human Recombinant Collagen Flowable Gel

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sigal; Amzel, Tal; Harel-Adar, Tamar; Tamir, Eran; Grynspan, Frida; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds, particularly diabetic ulcers, represent a main public health concern with significant costs. Ulcers often harbor an additional obstacle in the form of tunneled or undermined wounds, requiring treatments that can reach the entire wound tunnel, because bioengineered grafts are typically available only in a sheet form. While collagen is considered a suitable biodegradable scaffold material, it is usually extracted from animal and human cadaveric sources, and accompanied by potential allergic and infectious risks. The purpose of this study was to test the performance of a flowable gel made of human recombinant type I collagen (rhCollagen) produced in transgenic tobacco plants, indicated for the treatment of acute, chronic, and tunneled wounds. The performance of the rhCollagen flowable gel was tested in an acute full-thickness cutaneous wound-healing rat model and compared to saline treatment and two commercial flowable gel control products made of bovine collagen and cadaver human skin collagen. When compared to the three control groups, the rhCollagen-based gel accelerated wound closure and triggered a significant jumpstart to the healing process, accompanied by enhanced re-epithelialization. In a cutaneous full-thickness wound pig model, the rhCollagen-based flowable gel induced accelerated wound healing compared to a commercial product made of bovine tendon collagen. By day 21 post-treatment, 95% wound closure was observed with the rhCollagen product compared to 68% closure in wounds treated with the reference product. Moreover, rhCollagen treatment induced an early angiogenic response and induced a significantly lower inflammatory response than in the control group. In summary, rhCollagen flowable gel proved to be efficacious in animal wound models and is expected to be capable of reducing the healing time of human wounds. PMID:23259631

  9. Bee Venom Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice by Suppressing Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3) and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS)-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Recruiting Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Hozzein, Wael N; Badr, Badr M; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Saad Eldien, Heba M; Garraud, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing including impaired neovascularization and deficient endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment. Bee venom (BV) has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of several diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of BV on the healing of diabetic wounds has not been studied. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the impact of BV on diabetic wound closure in a type I diabetic mouse model. Three experimental groups were used: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated with BV. We found that the diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in collagen production and prolonged elevation of inflammatory cytokines levels in wounded tissue compared to control non-diabetic mice. Additionally, wounded tissue in diabetic mice revealed aberrantly up-regulated expression of ATF-3 and iNOS followed by a marked elevation in free radical levels. Impaired diabetic wound healing was also characterized by a significant elevation in caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity and a marked reduction in the expression of TGF-β and VEGF, which led to decreased neovascularization and angiogenesis of the injured tissue by impairing EPC mobilization. Interestingly, BV treatment significantly enhanced wound closure in diabetic mice by increasing collagen production and restoring the levels of inflammatory cytokines, free radical, TGF-β, and VEGF. Most importantly, BV-treated diabetic mice exhibited mobilized long-lived EPCs by inhibiting caspase activity in the wounded tissue. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying improved diabetic wound healing and closure following BV treatment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2159-2171, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825453

  10. PEDF promotes self-renewal of limbal stem cell and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Wu, Ju-Yun; Ho, Mei-Ying; Chen, Lee-Jen; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Cheng, Huey-Chuan; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2013-09-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) transplantation is a prevalent therapeutic method for patients with LSC deficiency. The maintenance of stem cell characteristics in the process of culture expansion is critical for the success of ocular surface reconstruction. Pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) increased the numbers of holoclone in LSC monolayer culture and preserved the stemness of LSC in suspension culture by evidence of ΔNp63α, Bmi-1, and ABCG2 expression. BrdU pulse-labeling assay also demonstrated that PEDF stimulated LSCs proliferation. In air-lift culture of limbal equivalent, PEDF was capable of increasing the numbers of ΔNp63α-positive cells. The mitogenic effect of PEDF was found to be mediated by the phosphorylations of p38 MAPK and STAT3 in LSCs. Synthetic 44-mer PEDF (residues 78-121) was as effective as the full length PEDF in LSC expansion in suspension culture and limbal equivalent formation, as well as the activation of p38 MAPK and STAT3. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of cornea epithelium, 44-mer PEDF facilitated corneal wound healing. Microscopically, 44-mer PEDF advanced the early proliferative response in limbus, increased the proliferation of ΔNp63α-positive cells both in limbus and in epithelial healing front, and assisted the repopulation of limbus in the late phase of wound healing. In conclusion, the capability of expanding LSC in cell culture and in animal indicates the potential of PEDF and its fragment (e.g., 44-mer PEDF) in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency; and their uses as therapeutics for treating corneal wound.

  11. Loss of CAR promotes migration and proliferation of HaCaT cells, and accelerates wound healing in rats via Src-p38 MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Linlin; Fu, Lanqing; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xue; Li, Yan; Bai, Xiaozhi; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule mostly localized to cell-cell contacts in epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR is known to regulate tumor progression, however, its physiological role in keratinocyte migration and proliferation, two essential steps in re-epithelialization during wound healing, has less been investigated. Here we showed that CAR was predominantly expressed in the epidermis of human skin, CAR knockdown by RNAi significantly accelerated HaCaT cell migration and proliferation. In addition, knockdown of CAR in vitro increased p-Src, p-p38, and p-JNK protein levels; however, Src inhibitor PP2 prevented the increase of p-Src and p-p38 induced by CAR RNAi, but not p-JNK, and decelerated cell migration and proliferation. More intriguingly, in vivo CAR RNAi on the skin area surrounding the wounds on rat back visually accelerated wound healing and re-epithelialization process, while treatment with PP2 or p38 inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited these effects. By contrast, overexpressing CAR in HaCaT cells significantly decelerated cell migration and proliferation. Above results demonstrate that suppression of CAR could accelerate HaCaT cell migration and proliferation, and promote wound healing in rat skin, probably via Src-p38 MAPK pathway. CAR thus might serve as a novel therapeutic target for facilitating wound healing. PMID:26804208

  12. Low-intensity vibration improves angiogenesis and wound healing in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Judex, Stefan; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant health problem, especially in diabetic patients. In the current study, we investigated a novel therapeutic approach to wound healing--whole body low-intensity vibration (LIV). LIV is anabolic for bone, by stimulating the release of growth factors, and modulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We hypothesized that LIV improves the delayed wound healing in diabetic mice by promoting a pro-healing wound environment. Diabetic db/db mice received excisional cutaneous wounds and were subjected to LIV (0.4 g at 45 Hz) for 30 min/d or a non-vibrated sham treatment (controls). Wound tissue was collected at 7 and 15 d post-wounding and wound healing, angiogenesis, growth factor levels and wound cell phenotypes were assessed. LIV increased angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation at day 7, and accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization over days 7 and 15. LIV also reduced neutrophil accumulation and increased macrophage accumulation. In addition, LIV increased expression of pro-healing growth factors and chemokines (insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) in wounds. Despite no evidence of a change in the phenotype of CD11b+ macrophages in wounds, LIV resulted in trends towards a less inflammatory phenotype in the CD11b- cells. Our findings indicate that LIV may exert beneficial effects on wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation, and these changes are associated with increases in pro-angiogenic growth factors.

  13. Acceleration of wound healing in gastric ulcers by local injection of neutralising antibody to transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, H; Konturek, P; Hahn, E G; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, S J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Application of neutralising antibodies (NAs) to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) improves wound healing in experimental glomerulonephritis and dermal incision wounds. TGF beta 1 has been detected in the stomach, but despite the fact that this cytokine plays a central part in wound healing no information is available to determine if modulation of the TGF beta 1 profile influences the healing of gastric ulcers. This study examines gastric ulcer healing in the rat after local injection of NAs to TGF beta 1. METHOD: Chronic gastric ulcers were induced in Wistar rats by the application of 100% acetic acid to the serosal surface of the stomach. Immediately after ulcer induction and on day 2, NAs to TGF beta 1 (50 micrograms), TGF beta 1 (50 ng), saline or control antibodies (IgG; 50 micrograms) were locally injected into the subserosa. Controls received no subserosal injections. Animals were killed on day 5 or 11, the ulcer area was measured planimetrically, sections were embedded in paraffin wax, and stained with trichrome or haematoxylin and eosin. Depth of residual ulcer was assessed on day 11 by a scale of 0-3, the percentage of connective tissue was determined by a semiquantitative matrix score and granulocytes and macrophages in the ulcer bed were also assessed. RESULTS: The application of NAs to TGF beta 1 led to a significant acceleration of gastric ulcer healing on day 11 (0.6 (SD 0.8) v 3.7 (SD 2.6) mm2), a reduction in macrophages (23.7 (SD 22.6) v 38 (26) per 40 x power field) and granulocytes (8.5 (SD 5.6) v 20 (10) per 40 x power field), fewer histological residual ulcers (mean 1 (SD 0.9) v 2 (1.1)), a reduced matrix score, and a regenerative healing pattern. Excessive scarring was seen in the TGF beta 1 treated group. CONCLUSION: Further treatment of gastric ulcers may induce a new treatment modality by local injection of NA to TGF beta 1 in an attempt to accelerate and improve ulcer healing. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8991853

  14. Management of laparotomy wound dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Daniel E; Dumanian, Gregory A; Halverson, Amy L

    2007-12-01

    Many studies identify risk factors for dehiscence, but a paucity of data exist suggesting an optimal treatment strategy. This study examines repair of abdominal wound dehiscence, comparing closure and interposition of mesh. We conducted a retrospective review of 37 individuals who suffered a wound dehiscence after laparotomy. Outcomes of repairs with either primary closure or polyglactin mesh interposition were examined. Twenty-seven individuals underwent repair with primary closure. Twelve of these individuals suffered repeat wound dehiscence; 10 were treated with repeat fascial closure, 2 with polyglactin mesh interposition. Seven individuals initially underwent successful repair with polyglactin mesh interposition; all subsequently had their hernias repaired. Three patients had minor fascial separation managed nonoperatively. Primary closure is associated with a relatively high rate of recurrent wound dehiscence. Closure with polyglactin mesh interposition has a higher initial success rate, but necessitates additional surgeries for repair of the abdominal wall defect.

  15. Commercially available topical platelet-derived growth factor as a novel agent to accelerate burn-related wound healing.

    PubMed

    Travis, Taryn E; Mauskar, Neil A; Mino, Matthew J; Prindeze, Nick; Moffatt, Lauren T; Fidler, Philip E; Jordan, Marion H; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated whether the application of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to donor site wounds would speed healing in a porcine model. In a red duroc pig model, three wounds that were 3 inches × 3 inches were created with a dermatome (0.06-inch depth) on one side of two different animals. These wounds were digitally and laser Doppler (LDI) imaged and biopsied immediately pre- and postwound creation and every 2 days for 2 weeks. A set of identical wounds were subsequently created on the opposite side of the same animals and treated with topical PDGF (becaplermin gel 0.01%, 4 g/wound) immediately on wounding. PDGF-treated wounds were imaged and biopsied as above. Digital images of wounds were assessed for epithelialization by clinicians using an ordinal scale. Perfusion units (PU) were evaluated by LDI. Wound healing was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin histological visualization of an epithelium and intact basement membrane. First evidence of partial epithelialization was seen in control and PDGF-treated wounds within 7.7 ± 1.4 and 6.4 ± 1.1 days postwounding, respectively (P=.03). Completely epithelialized biopsies were seen in control and PDGF-treated wounds at 11.7 ± 2.6 and 9.6 ± 1.5 days, respectively (P=.02). Clinician evaluation of digital images showed that on day 9, control wounds were, on average, 48.3 ± 18.5% epithelialized vs 57.2 ± 20.2% epithelialized for PDGF-treated wounds. At day 16, control wounds showed an average of 72.9 ± 14.6% epithelialization and PDGF-treated wounds showed an average of 90 ± 11.8%epithelialization. Overall, PDGF-treated wounds had statistically significantly higher scores across all timepoints (P=.02). Average perfusion units as measured by LDI were similar for control and PDGF-treated wounds at time of excision (225 ± 81and 257 ± 100, respectively). On day 2 postwounding, average PU for control wounds were 803 and were 764 for PDGF-treated wounds. Control wounds maintained higher PU values

  16. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  17. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  18. TSG-6 released from intradermally injected mesenchymal stem cells accelerates wound healing and reduces tissue fibrosis in murine full-thickness skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yu; Jiang, Dongsheng; Sindrilaru, Anca; Stegemann, Agatha; Schatz, Susanne; Treiber, Nicolai; Rojewski, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Böhm, Markus; Seitz, Andreas; Scholz, Natalie; Dürselen, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Ignatius, Anita; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2014-02-01

    Proper activation of macrophages (Mφ) in the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing is essential for physiological tissue repair. However, there is a strong indication that robust Mφ inflammatory responses may be causal for the fibrotic response always accompanying adult wound healing. Using a complementary approach of in vitro and in vivo studies, we here addressed the question of whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-due to their anti-inflammatory properties-would control Mφ activation and tissue fibrosis in a murine model of full-thickness skin wounds. We have shown that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated protein 6 (TSG-6) released from MSCs in co-culture with activated Mφ or following injection into wound margins suppressed the release of TNF-α from activated Mφ and concomitantly induced a switch from a high to an anti-fibrotic low transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/TGF-β3 ratio. This study provides insight into what we believe to be a previously undescribed multifaceted role of MSC-released TSG-6 in wound healing. MSC-released TSG-6 was identified to improve wound healing by limiting Mφ activation, inflammation, and fibrosis. TSG-6 and MSC-based therapies may thus qualify as promising strategies to enhance tissue repair and to prevent excessive tissue fibrosis.

  19. Improved repair of dermal wounds in mice lacking microRNA-155

    PubMed Central

    van Solingen, Coen; Araldi, Elisa; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Suárez, Yajaira

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a well-regulated but complex process that involves haemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Recent reports suggest that microRNAs (miRs) play important roles in dermal wound healing. In fact, miR deregulation has been linked with impaired wound repair. miR-155 has been shown to be induced by inflammatory mediators and plays a central regulatory role in immune responses. We have investigated the potential role of miR-155 in wound healing. By creating punch wounds in the skin of mice, we found an increased expression of miR-155 in wound tissue when compared with healthy skin. Interestingly, analysis of wounds of mice lacking the expression of miR-155 (miR-155−/−) revealed an increased wound closure when compared with wild-type animals. Also, the accelerated wound closing correlated with elevated numbers of macrophages in wounded tissue. Gene expression analysis of wounds tissue and macrophages isolated from miR-155−/− mice that were treated with interleukin-4 demonstrated an increased expression of miR-155 targets (BCL6, RhoA and SHIP1) as well as, the finding in inflammatory zone-1 (FIZZ1) gene, when compared with WT mice. Moreover, the up-regulated levels of FIZZ1 in the wound tissue of miR-155−/− mice correlated with an increased deposition of type-1 collagens, a phenomenon known to be beneficial in wound closure. Our data indicate that the absence of miR-155 has beneficial effects in the wound healing process. PMID:24636235

  20. The use of collagen-based matrices in the treatment of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wiebke; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Werner, Jan-Ole; Schiefer, Jennifer; Rothenberger, Jens; Hübner, Gunnar; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Held, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Chronic and complex full-thickness wounds have become increasingly prevalent. Besides autologous skin transplantation, innovative wound dressing products have gained interest, as the functional and esthetic outcome is still limited. In this respect, the effect of a novel modifiable collagen-gelatin fleece on the healing of deep dermal wounds was examined and compared with untreated controls and Matriderm(®). A total of 48 full-thickness skin defects were generated on six minipigs and treated with the novel collagen-gelatin fleece of different thicknesses in single or multiple application (n=36) or treated with Matriderm(®) in a single application (n=6), or the wounds were left untreated (n=6). Wound healing was analyzed planimetrically by wound closure per time and histologically with regard to epidermal thickness and cell density. Compared to untreated wounds, wound closure per time and histological skin quality with regard to the mean epidermal thickness and epidermal cell amount were enhanced in both treatment groups. Overall, the best results for the novel collagen-gelatin fleece were achieved for multiple applications with a thickness of 150g/m(2). The novel biomaterial shows accelerated and improved dermal wound repair in a minipig model. As the manufacturing process of the scaffold allows the integration of bioactive substances such as antibiotics and growth factors, we intend to design a composite biomaterial using this scaffold as a carrier matrix. PMID:27297940

  1. Enhanced healing of full-thickness burn wounds using di-rhamnolipid

    PubMed Central

    Stipcevic, Tamara; Piljac, Ante; Piljac, Goran

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of di-rhamnolipid [α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1–2)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-3-hydroxydecanoyl-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, also referred to as di-rhamnolipid BAC-3] relating to the process of cutaneous wound healing. Di-rhamnolipid was prepared in a eucerin ointment and applied topically on full-thickness burn wounds in normal Sprague–Dawley rats covering 5% of the total body surface area. The rate of wound closure was measured over the period of 45 days. The collagen content was evaluated microscopically, by performing densitometric analysis on Verhoeff’s stained histopathological slides of wound biopsies taken at the end of 45th day of di-rhamnolipid treatment. Di-rhamnolipid toxicity was assessed with the subcutaneous multi-dose study in Swiss–Webster mice. The treatment of full-thickness-burn wounds with topical 0.1% di-rhamnolipid accelerated the closure of wounds on day 21 of the treatment by 32% compared to the control ( p < 0.05). On day 35, the wounds closed in all animals-treated with 0.1% di-rhamnolipid ointment while some rats in the control group had open wounds on days 35 and even 45. Histologic comparisons have shown that di-rhamnolipid significantly decreased collagen content in burn wounds (47.5%, p < 0.05) as compared to the vehicle-treated (control) wounds. Di-rhamnolipid was well-tolerated. The results of this study raise the possibility of potential efficacy of di-rhamnolipid in accelerating normal wound healing and perhaps in overcoming defects associated with healing failure in chronic wounds. PMID:16380213

  2. Wound healing: translating theory into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cuzzell, J

    1995-04-01

    Skin care clinicians must accurately assess progress towards wound healing and identify appropriate therapies to hasten wound closure. Perhaps the most practical method for facilitating assessment and guiding intervention is the red, yellow, black (RYB) classification system.

  3. Multiple actions of Lucilia sericata larvae in hard-to-heal wounds: larval secretions contain molecules that accelerate wound healing, reduce chronic inflammation and inhibit bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pritchard, David I; Nigam, Yamni; Jung, Willi; Nibbering, Peter H

    2013-12-01

    In Europe ≈15,000 patients receive larval therapy for wound treatment annually. Over the past few years, clinical studies have demonstrated the success of larvae of Lucilia sericata as debridement agents. This is based on a combination of physical and biochemical actions. Laboratory investigations have advanced our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of larval secretions, including removal of dead tissue, reduction of the bacterial burden, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the microbiological, immunological, and wound healing actions of larval therapy, and the molecules involved in these beneficial effects. Future studies will focus on the isolation, identification, and (pre)clinical testing of the effective molecules of L. sericata larvae. These molecules may be candidates for the development of new agents for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory diseases, including chronic wounds.

  4. Electrospun emodin polyvinylpyrrolidone blended nanofibrous membrane: a novel medicated biomaterial for drug delivery and accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xin-Yi; Nie, Wei; Wang, Yong-Chun; Shen, Yi; Li, Yan; Gan, Shu-Jie

    2012-11-01

    In this work, blended nanofibrous membranes were prepared by an electrospinning technique with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K90 as the filament-forming polymer, and emodin, an extract of polygonum cuspidate known as a medicinal plant, as the treatment drug. Detailed analysis of the blended nanofibrous membrane by scanning electron microscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction revealed that emodin was well distributed in the ultrafine fibers in the form of amorphous nanosolid dispersions. Results from attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that the main interactions between PVP and emodin might be mediated through hydrogen bonding. In vitro dissolution tests proved that the blended nanofibrous membrane produced more desired release kinetics of the entrapped drug (emodin) as compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, wound healing test and histological evaluation revealed that the emodin loaded nanofibrous membrane to be more effective as a healing accelerator thereby proving potential strategies to develop composite drug delivery system as well as promising materials for future therapeutic biomedical applications.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance wound healing through differentiation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaojiong; Chen, Liwen; Scott, Paul G; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-10-01

    Although chronic wounds are common, treatment for these disabling conditions remains limited and largely ineffective. In this study, we examined the benefit of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in wound healing. Using an excisional wound splinting model, we showed that injection around the wound and application to the wound bed of green fluorescence protein (GFP)(+) allogeneic BM-MSCs significantly enhanced wound healing in normal and diabetic mice compared with that of allogeneic neonatal dermal fibroblasts or vehicle control medium. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cells derived from the wound for GFP-expressing BM-MSCs indicated engraftments of 27% at 7 days, 7.6% at 14 days, and 2.5% at 28 days of total BM-MSCs administered. BM-MSC-treated wounds exhibited significantly accelerated wound closure, with increased re-epithelialization, cellularity, and angiogenesis. Notably, BM-MSCs, but not CD34(+) bone marrow cells in the wound, expressed the keratinocyte-specific protein keratin and formed glandular structures, suggesting a direct contribution of BM-MSCs to cutaneous regeneration. Moreover, BM-MSC-conditioned medium promoted endothelial cell tube formation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis revealed high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-1 in BM-MSCs and significantly greater amounts of the proteins in BM-MSC-treated wounds. Thus, our data suggest that BM-MSCs promote wound healing through differentiation and release of proangiogenic factors. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:17615264

  6. Secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhances wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SEC(PBMC)). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on the backs of C57BL/6J-mice and SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion or controls were applied daily for three days. Morphology and neo-angiogenesis were analyzed by H&E-staining and CD31 immuno-staining, respectively. In vitro effects on diverse skin cells were investigated by migration assays, cell cycle analysis, and tube formation assay. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Application of SEC(PBMC) on 6 mm punch biopsy wounds significantly enhanced wound closure. H&E staining of the wounds after 6 days revealed that wound healing was more advanced after application of SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion. Furthermore, there was a massive increase in CD31 positive cells, indicating enhanced neo-angiogenesis. In primary human fibroblasts (FB) and keratinocytes (KC) migration but not proliferation was induced. In endothelial cells (EC) SEC(PBMC) induced proliferation and tube-formation in a matrigel-assay. In addition, SEC(PBMC) treatment of skin cells led to the induction of multiple signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and survival. In summary, we could show that emulsions containing the secretome of PBMC derived from healthy individuals accelerates wound healing in a mouse model and induce wound healing associated mechanisms in human primary skin cells. The formulation and use of such emulsions might therefore represent a possible novel option for the treatment of non-healing skin ulcers.

  7. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

    PubMed Central

    Henshaw, F. R.; Boughton, P.; Lo, L.; McLennan, S. V.; Twigg, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. Results. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P < 0.001). Conclusions/Interpretation. These data collectively increasingly substantiate a functional role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:25789327

  8. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with host defense peptide LL37 promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Her, Charles-Henry; Comune, Michela; Moia, Claudia; Lopes, Alessandra; Porporato, Paolo E; Vanacker, Julie; Lam, Martin C; Steinstraesser, Lars; Sonveaux, Pierre; Zhu, Huijun; Ferreira, Lino S; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique

    2014-11-28

    Wound treatment remains one of the most prevalent and economically burdensome healthcare issues in the world. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) supplies lactate that accelerates neovascularization and promotes wound healing. LL37 is an endogenous human host defense peptide that modulates wound healing and angiogenesis and fights infection. Hence, we hypothesized that the administration of LL37 encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles (PLGA-LL37 NP) promotes wound closure due to the sustained release of both LL37 and lactate. In full thickness excisional wounds, the treatment with PLGA-LL37 NP significantly accelerated wound healing compared to PLGA or LL37 administration alone. PLGA-LL37 NP-treated wounds displayed advanced granulation tissue formation by significant higher collagen deposition, re-epithelialized and neovascularized composition. PLGA-LL37 NP improved angiogenesis, significantly up-regulated IL-6 and VEGFa expression, and modulated the inflammatory wound response. In vitro, PLGA-LL37 NP induced enhanced cell migration but had no effect on the metabolism and proliferation of keratinocytes. It displayed antimicrobial activity on Escherichia coli. In conclusion, we developed a biodegradable drug delivery system that accelerated healing processes due to the combined effects of lactate and LL37 released from the nanoparticles.

  9. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin accelerated the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kant, Vinay; Gopal, Anu; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Pawan; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    Prolonged inflammation and increased oxidative stress impairs healing in diabetics and application of curcumin, a well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, could be an important strategy in improving impaired healing in diabetics. So, the present study was conducted to evaluate the cutaneous wound healing potential of topically applied curcumin in diabetic rats. Open excision skin wound was created in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and wounded rats were divided into three groups; i) control, ii) gel-treated and iii) curcumin-treated. Pluronic F-127 gel (25%) and curcumin (0.3%) in pluronic gel were topically applied in the gel- and curcumin-treated groups, respectively, once daily for 19 days. Curcumin application increased the wound contraction and decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines/enzymes i.e. tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Curcumin also increased the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine i.e. IL-10 and antioxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Histopathologically, the curcumin-treated wounds showed better granulation tissue dominated by marked fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, and wounds were covered by thick regenerated epithelial layer. These findings reveal that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential of curcumin caused faster and better wound healing in diabetic rats and curcumin could be an additional novel therapeutic agent in the management of impaired wound healing in diabetics.

  10. Burn-wound healing effect of gelatin/polyurethane nanofiber scaffold containing silver-sulfadiazine.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Yang, Dae Hyeok; Lee, Jung Bok; Bae, Min Soo; Kim, Jung Ho; Moon, Seong Hwan; Chun, Heoung Jae; Kim, Chun Ho; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that advances of burn treatment have led to reduction in the morbidity caused by burns, burn infection is still a serious problem. In this study, we designed blended synthetic and natural polymers nanofiber scaffolds using polyurethane (PU) and gelatin, which were prepared by an electrospinning method. Silver-sulfadiazine (SSD) was co-mixed to the blended polymer solution for being incorporated into the nanofibers after the electrospinning, followed by examination of burn-wound healing effect. The nanofiber scaffolds containing SSD should not only serve as a substrate for skin regeneration, but may also deliver suitable drugs, within a controlled manner during healing. The SSD release was able to prevent the growth of a wide array of bacteria and accelerate the wound healing by preventing infection. Therefore it could accelerate the burn-wound closure rate. We confirmed that PU/gelatin nanofiber scaffolds containing SSD lead to enhanced regeneration of burn-wounds.

  11. Economic evaluation of noncontact normothermic wound therapy for treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alex

    2002-06-01

    New adjunctive treatments for pressure ulcers have become available to complement standard care. The economic benefits of new advanced wound care treatments like noncontact normothermic wound therapy are related to: the costs of adequately providing standard care treatment, the baseline probability of healing a pressure ulcer to closure with standard care, the relative improvement in healing rates with the advanced wound care treatment and the acquisition cost of the advanced treatment. Healing data from preliminary clinical trials suggest that pressure ulcer healing in long-term care patients is accelerated two-fold with noncontact normothermic wound therapy. At this healing rate, noncontact normothermic wound therapy for stage III and IV pressure ulcer is an economically attractive intervention. Additional well-controlled clinical trials are necessary.

  12. “Sugar-coating wound repair: A review of FGF-10 and dermatan sulfate in wound healing and their potential application in burn wounds”

    PubMed Central

    Plichta, Jennifer K.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of patients suffer from burn injuries each year, yet few therapies have been developed to accelerate the wound healing process. Most fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have been extensively evaluated, but only a few have been found to participate in wound healing. In particular, FGF-10 is robustly increased in the wound microenvironment following injury and has demonstrated some ability to promote wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear carbohydrates that participate in wound repair by influencing cytokine/growth factor localization and interaction with cognate receptors. Dermatan sulfate (DS) is the most abundant GAG in human wound fluid and has been postulated to be directly involved in the healing process. Recently, the combination of FGF-10 and DS demonstrated the potential to accelerate wound healing via increased keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Based on these preliminary studies, DS may serve as a cofactor for FGF-10, and together, they are likely to expedite the healing process by stimulating keratinocyte activity. As a specific subtype of wounds, the overall healing process of burn injuries does not significantly differ from other types of wounds, where optimal repair results in matrix regeneration and complete re-epithelialization. At present, standard burn treatment primarily involves topical application of anti-microbial agents, while no routine therapies target acceleration of re-epithelialization, the key to wound closure. Thus, this novel therapeutic combination could be used in conjunction with some of the current therapies, but it would have the unique ability to initiate wound healing by stimulating keratinocyte epithelialization. PMID:22561305

  13. Hierarchically micro-patterned nanofibrous scaffolds with a nanosized bio-glass surface for accelerating wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He; Lv, Fang; Zhang, Yali; Yi, Zhengfang; Ke, Qinfei; Wu, Chengtie; Liu, Mingyao; Chang, Jiang

    2015-11-01

    A composite scaffold with a controlled micro-pattern, nano-sized fiber matrix and surface-modified nanobioglass component was successfully prepared for skin wound healing by combining the patterning electrospinning with pulsed laser deposition strategies, and the hierarchical micro/nano structures and nano-sized bioglass in the scaffolds could synergistically improve the efficiency and re-epithelialization of wound healing.A composite scaffold with a controlled micro-pattern, nano-sized fiber matrix and surface-modified nanobioglass component was successfully prepared for skin wound healing by combining the patterning electrospinning with pulsed laser deposition strategies, and the hierarchical micro/nano structures and nano-sized bioglass in the scaffolds could synergistically improve the efficiency and re-epithelialization of wound healing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04802h

  14. β-Cyclodextrin-Linked Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Facilitate Gene Transfer and Enhance the Angiogenic Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Wound Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Hua; Wei, Wei; Shan, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Wu, Jia-He; Yu, Lian; Lin, Jun; Liang, Wen-Quan; Khang, Gilson; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Repair of deep wounds by cell transplantation strongly depends on angiogenesis and on the regeneration of skin and appendages. In this study, plasmid DNA encoding vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF-165) was transduced into bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using a nonviral vector, β-cyclodextrin-linked polyethylenimine, to enhance angiogenic capacity. The effects of MSCs administered by intradermal injection or transplantation on wound closure were compared in a full-thickness excision wound model. The results showed that the MSC-seeded sponge had significantly stronger acceleration in wound closure than the MSC injection. The effects on wound repair and regeneration of transplanted MSCs and pDNA-VEGF1 65-transfected MSCs (TMSCs) with gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate scaffold were also investigated. Compared with MSC transplantation, TMSC transplantation showed higher efficacy in stimulating wound closure, promoting dermal collagen synthesis and regulating the deposition of newly formed collagen. In addition, the angiogenic capacity of the TMSCs was higher than that of the MSCs. The results indicate that the nonviral genetic engineering of the MSCs is a promising strategy to enhance the angiogenic capacity of MSCs for wound repair and angiogenesis. Functional gene-activated MSCs may be used as cost-effective and accessible seed cells for skin tissue engineering and as novel carriers for wound gene therapy. PMID:26310074

  15. Local release of pioglitazone (a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist) accelerates proliferation and remodeling phases of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shigeki; Sato, Keisuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily known for its anti-inflammatory and macrophage differentiation effects, as well as its ability to promote fat cell differentiation and reduce insulin resistance. Pioglitazone (Pio) is a PPARγ agonist used clinically as an anti-diabetic agent for improving insulin sensitivity in patients with diabetes. The objective of this study was to develop a drug delivery system (DDS) for the local release of Pio to promote wound healing. Pio of low aqueous solubility was water-solubilized by micelles formed from gelatin grafted with L-lactic acid oligomers, and incorporated into a biodegradable gelatin hydrogel. An 8-mm punch biopsy tool was used to prepare two skin wounds on either side of the midline of 8-week-old mice. Wounds were treated by the hydrogels with (Pio-hydrogel group) or without (control group) Pio, and the wound area were observed 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after treatment. In addition, a protein assay and immunohistological stain were performed to determine the effects of the Pio-hydrogel on inflammation and macrophage differentiation. The Pio-hydrogels promote wound healing. Moreover, Western blotting analysis demonstrated that treatment with Pio-hydrogels resulted in decreased levels of the cytokines MIP-2 and TGF-β, and increased levels of glucose-regulating adiponectin. It is concluded that Pio-incorporated hydrogels promote the proliferation and remodeling phases of wound healing, and may prove to be effective as wound dressings. PMID:26710090

  16. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  17. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy.

  18. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells form Vascular Tubes when Placed in Fibrin Sealant and Accelerate Wound Healing in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Julio J.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Shao, Zhen; Osuji, Chinedum; Steinbacher, Derek M.; Leffell, David J.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Non-healing, chronic wounds are a growing public health problem and may stem from insufficient angiogenesis in affected sites. Here, we have developed a fibrin formulation that allows adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) to form tubular structures in vitro. The tubular structures express markers of endothelium, including CD31 and VE-Cadherin, as well as the pericyte marker NG2. The ability for the MSCs to form tubular structures within the fibrin gels was directly dependent on the stoichiometric ratios of thrombin and fibrinogen and the resulting gel concentration, as well as on the presence of bFGF. Fibrin gel formulations that varied in stiffness were tested. ADSCs that are embedded in a stiff fibrin formulation express VE-cadherin and CD31 as shown by PCR, FACS and immunostaining. Confocal imaging analysis demonstrated that tubular structures formed, containing visible lumens, in the stiff fibrin gels in vitro. There was also a difference in the amounts of bFGF secreted by ADSCs grown in the stiffer gels as compared to softer gels. Additionally, hAT-MSCs gave rise to perfusable vessels that were VE-cadherin positive after subcutaneous injection into mice, whereas the softer fibrin formulation containing ADSCs did not. The application of ADSCs delivered in the stiff fibrin gels allowed for the wounds to heal more quickly, as assessed by wound size, amount of granulation tissue and collagen content. Interestingly, following 5 days of healing, the ADSCs remained within the fibrin gel and did not integrate into the granulation tissue of healing wounds in vivo. These data show that ADSCs are able to form tubular structures within fibrin gels, and may also contribute to faster wound healing, as compared with no treatment or to wounds treated with fibrin gels devoid of ADSCs. PMID:25433608

  19. Nanoparticles Encapsulated with LL37 and Serpin A1 Promotes Wound Healing and Synergistically Enhances Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Fumakia, Miral; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2016-07-01

    Wound care is a serious healthcare concern, often complicated by prolonged inflammation and bacterial infection, which contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity. Agents commonly used to treat chronic wound infections are limited due to toxicity of the therapy, multifactorial etiology of chronic wounds, deep skin infections, lack of sustained controlled delivery of drugs, and development of drug resistance. LL37 is an endogenous host defense peptide possessing antimicrobial activity and is involved in the modulation of wound healing. Serpin A1 (A1) is an elastase inhibitor and has been shown to demonstrate wound-healing properties. Hence, our goal was to develop a topical combination nanomedicine for the controlled sustained delivery of LL37 and A1 at precise synergistic ratio combinations that will significantly promote wound closure, reduce bacterial contamination, and enhance anti-inflammatory activity. We have successfully developed the first solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) formulation that can simultaneously deliver LL37 and A1 at specific ratios resulting in accelerated wound healing by promoting wound closure in BJ fibroblast cells and keratinocytes as well as synergistically enhancing antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli in comparison to LL37 or A1 alone. PMID:27182713

  20. Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Wound Healing in Diabetic NOD/SCID Mice through High Angiogenic and Engraftment Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Whan; Zhang, Hong-Zhe; Guo, Longzhe; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Although human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs) have been recognised as a promising stem cell resource, their therapeutic potential for wound healing has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of AMMs using a diabetic mouse wound model. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA results revealed that the angiogenic factors, IGF-1, EGF and IL-8 were markedly upregulated in AMMs when compared with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMs) and dermal fibroblasts. In vitro scratch wound assays also showed that AMM-derived conditioned media (CM) significantly accelerated wound closure. Diabetic mice were generated using streptozotocin and wounds were created by skin excision, followed by AMM transplantation. AMM transplantation significantly promoted wound healing and increased re-epithelialization and cellularity. Notably, transplanted AMMs exhibited high engraftment rates and expressed keratinocyte-specific proteins and cytokeratin in the wound area, indicating a direct contribution to cutaneous closure. Taken together, these data suggest that AMMs possess considerable therapeutic potential for chronic wounds through the secretion of angiogenic factors and enhanced engraftment/differentiation capabilities. PMID:22815931

  1. Contribution of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we determined the contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to the skin wound healing process. In iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) mice lacking iNKT cells, wound closure was significantly delayed compared with wild-type mice. Collagen deposition, expression of α-smooth muscle actin and CD31, and wound breaking strength were significantly attenuated in Jα18KO mice. The adoptive transfer of liver mononuclear cells from wild-type but not from Jα18KO or interferon (IFN)-γ gene-disrupted (IFN-γKO) mice resulted in the reversal of this impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. IFN-γ expression was induced in the wounded tissues, which was significantly decreased at 6, 12, and 24 hours, but increased on day 3 after wounding in Jα18KO mice. The main source of the late-phase IFN-γ production in Jα18KO mice were neutrophils rather than NK cells and T cells. Administration of α-galactosylceramide, an activator of iNKT cells, resulted in the acceleration of wound healing on day 3 in wild-type mice. This effect was not observed in IFN-γKO mice. These results indicate that iNKT cells play important roles in wound healing. The iNKT cell-induced IFN-γ production may regulate the wound healing process in the early phase.

  2. Contribution of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we determined the contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to the skin wound healing process. In iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) mice lacking iNKT cells, wound closure was significantly delayed compared with wild-type mice. Collagen deposition, expression of α-smooth muscle actin and CD31, and wound breaking strength were significantly attenuated in Jα18KO mice. The adoptive transfer of liver mononuclear cells from wild-type but not from Jα18KO or interferon (IFN)-γ gene-disrupted (IFN-γKO) mice resulted in the reversal of this impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. IFN-γ expression was induced in the wounded tissues, which was significantly decreased at 6, 12, and 24 hours, but increased on day 3 after wounding in Jα18KO mice. The main source of the late-phase IFN-γ production in Jα18KO mice were neutrophils rather than NK cells and T cells. Administration of α-galactosylceramide, an activator of iNKT cells, resulted in the acceleration of wound healing on day 3 in wild-type mice. This effect was not observed in IFN-γKO mice. These results indicate that iNKT cells play important roles in wound healing. The iNKT cell-induced IFN-γ production may regulate the wound healing process in the early phase. PMID:26468976

  3. Wet wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Jan J; Slama, Jaromir; Preuss, Stefan; Perez, Norvin; Svensjö, Tor; Visovatti, Scott; Breuing, Karl; Bartlett, Richard; Pribaz, Julian; Weiss, Denton; Eriksson, Elof

    2002-12-01

    Wound treatment in a flexible transparent chamber attached to the perimeter of the wound and containing a liquid has been extensively tested in preclinical experiments in pigs and found to offer several advantages. It protects the wound; the liquid medium or saline in the chamber provides in vivo tissue culture-like conditions; and antibiotics, analgesics, and various molecules can be delivered to the wound through the chamber. The wound chamber causes no injury to the wound itself or to the surrounding intact skin. Topical delivery of, for instance, antibiotics can provide very high concentrations at the wound site and with a favorable direction of the concentration gradient. A series of 28 wounds in 20 patients were treated with a wound chamber containing saline and antibiotics. Most patients had significant comorbidity and had not responded to conservative or surgical management with débridement and delayed primary closure or skin grafts. Six wounds had foreign bodies present; four of these were joint prostheses. Seven patients were on corticosteroids for rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and four patients had diabetes. Most patients were treated with the wound chamber in preparation for a delayed skin graft or flap procedure, but one was treated with a wound chamber until the wound healed. Twenty-five of the wounds (89 percent) healed, and five wounds (18 percent) required additional conservative management after the initial chamber treatment and grafting procedure. Of the three wounds that did not heal, one healed after additional chamber treatment, one had a skin graft that did not take, and one required reamputation at a higher level. Antibiotic delivery was less than one intravenous dose daily, which avoided the potential for systemic absorption to toxic levels. Antibiotics such as vancomycin and gentamicin could be used in concentrations of up to 10,000 times the minimal inhibitory concentration. Forty-eight hours

  4. Postoperative washing of sutured wounds.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Conrad; Wade, Cian; Gore, Sinclair

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The three part question addressed was: [In patients undergoing closure of surgical wounds with sutures] does [keeping the wound dry for the first 48 h after closure] [reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs)]? 4 relevant papers were culled from the literature and appraised. The authors, date, country, population, study type, main outcomes, key results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Current NICE guidelines recommend cleaning surgical wounds with sterile saline only for the first 48 h following skin closure. We found no evidence that washing wounds with tap water during this period increases the incidence of SSIs compared to keeping them dry. Further randomised controlled trials will enable the construction of conclusive systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27668079

  5. Current achievements with topical negative pressure to improve wound healing in dehiscent ischemic stumps of diabetic patients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Charalampidis, Dimitris; Kakagia, Despoina; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2013-06-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has been increasingly used either as a primary or as an adjunctive therapeutic measure to treat a variety of recalcitrant wounds during the past years. It is thought to act by creating a local environment that promotes cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and granulation tissue formation, leading to accelerated wound healing to the point of spontaneous closure or reducing the wound size to facilitate significantly further surgical reconstruction. This case series presents our preliminary experience with the use of a Topical Negative Pressure system in the treatment of challenging ischemic wounds of diabetic patients. It aims to underscore its beneficial effects and explore its potential role in the management of ischemic amputated stumps to avoid ipsilateral re-amputation at a higher level. PMID:23667104

  6. Development of fibroblast culture in three-dimensional activated carbon fiber-based scaffold for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ying; Yeh, Chia-Lin; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Jai-Sing; Ko, Tse-Hao; Lin, Yu-Hsin

    2012-06-01

    This work developed a novel bi-layer wound dressing composed of 3D activated carbon fibers that allows facilitates fibroblast cell growth and migration to a wound site for tissue reconstruction, and the gentamicin is incorporated into a poly(γ-glutamic acid)/gelatin membrane to prevent bacterial infection. In an in vitro, field emission scanning electron microscopy shows that rat skin fibroblasts appeared and spread on the surface of activated carbon fibers, and penetrated the interior and exterior of the 3D activated carbon fiber construct to a depth of roughly 200 μm. An in vivo analysis shows that fibroblast cells containing the proposed 3D scaffold had the potential of a biologically functionalized dressing to accelerate wound closure. Additionally, fibroblasts migrated to the wound site in a bi-layer wound dressing containing fibroblasts, enhancing fibronectin and type I collagen expression, resulting in faster skin regeneration than that achieved with a Tegaderm™ hydrocolloid dressing or gauze.

  7. Endogenous N-acyl taurines regulate skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Pontis, Silvia; Armirotti, Andrea; Cardinali, Giorgia; Kovacs, Daniela; Migliore, Marco; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Picardo, Mauro; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-07-26

    The intracellular serine amidase, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), degrades a heterogeneous family of lipid-derived bioactive molecules that include amides of long-chain fatty acids with taurine [N-acyl-taurines (NATs)]. The physiological functions of the NATs are unknown. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological disruption of FAAH activity accelerates skin wound healing in mice and stimulates motogenesis of human keratinocytes and differentiation of human fibroblasts in primary cultures. Using untargeted and targeted lipidomics strategies, we identify two long-chain saturated NATs-N-tetracosanoyl-taurine [NAT(24:0)] and N-eicosanoyl-taurine [NAT(20:0)]-as primary substrates for FAAH in mouse skin, and show that the levels of these substances sharply decrease at the margins of a freshly inflicted wound to increase again as healing begins. Additionally, we demonstrate that local administration of synthetic NATs accelerates wound closure in mice and stimulates repair-associated responses in primary cultures of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and an increase in intracellular calcium levels, under the permissive control of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptors. The results point to FAAH-regulated NAT signaling as an unprecedented lipid-based mechanism of wound-healing control in mammalian skin, which might be targeted for chronic wound therapy. PMID:27412859

  8. A Modified Collagen Gel Enhances Healing Outcome in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model of Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; DasGhatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action in a wound setting in vivo is scanty. This work providesfirst results from a pre-clinical swine model of excisional wounds elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days post-wounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophages recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced MCP-1 expression in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG treated wound tissue displayed elevated VEGF expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson’s Trichrome and Picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a pre-clinical experimental setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms as compared to standard of care i.e., Tegadem treated wounds. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other modified or unmodified collagen based products used in clinical setting. PMID:23607796

  9. Early controlled release of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ agonist GW501516 improves diabetic wound healing through redox modulation of wound microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Sng, Ming Keat; Foo, Selin; Chong, Han Chung; Lee, Wei Li; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Ng, Kee Woei; Luo, Baiwen; Choong, Cleo; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong; Tong, Benny Meng Kiat; Chiba, Shunsuke; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Zhu, Pengcheng; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2015-01-10

    Diabetic wounds are imbued with an early excessive and protracted reactive oxygen species production. Despite the studies supporting PPARβ/δ as a valuable pharmacologic wound-healing target, the therapeutic potential of PPARβ/δ agonist GW501516 (GW) as a wound healing drug was never investigated. Using topical application of polymer-encapsulated GW, we revealed that different drug release profiles can significantly influence the therapeutic efficacy of GW and consequently diabetic wound closure. We showed that double-layer encapsulated GW microparticles (PLLA:PLGA:GW) provided an earlier and sustained dose of GW to the wound and reduced the oxidative wound microenvironment to accelerate healing, in contrast to single-layered PLLA:GW microparticles. The underlying mechanism involved an early GW-mediated activation of PPARβ/δ that stimulated GPx1 and catalase expression in fibroblasts. GPx1 and catalase scavenged excessive H2O2 accumulation in diabetic wound beds, prevented H2O2-induced ECM modification and facilitated keratinocyte migration. The microparticles with early and sustained rate of GW release had better therapeutic wound healing activity. The present study underscores the importance of drug release kinetics on the therapeutic efficacy of the drug and warrants investigations to better appreciate the full potential of controlled drug release. PMID:25449811

  10. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer incorporated ointment for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yeong Mi; Im, Sooseok; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-12-28

    This work demonstrates the development of nitric oxide-releasing ointment and its potential on efficient wound healing. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer was successfully synthesized, which is composed of biocompatible Pluronic F127, branched polyethylenimine and 1-substituted diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolates. The synthesized nitric oxide-releasing polymer was incorporated into the PEG-based ointment which not only facilitated nitric oxide release in a slow manner, but also served as a moisturizer to enhance the wound healing. As compared to control groups, the nitric oxide-releasing ointment showed the accelerated wound closure with enhanced re-epithelialization, collagen deposition, and blood vessel formation in vivo. Therefore, this nitric oxide-based ointment presents the promising potential for the efficient strategy to heal the cutaneous wound.

  11. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  12. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing by a cryopreserved living dermal substitute created by micronized amnion seeded with fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongjun; Ji, Shizhao; Wu, Haibin; Tian, Song; Wang, Xingtong; Luo, Pengfei; Fang, He; Wang, Zhihong; Wang, Junjie; Wang, Zhongshan; Xiao, Shichu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2015-01-01

    Bioengineered dermal substitutes have been used for the treatment of diabetic ulcers in clinics and achieved satisfactory results. However, constructing traditional tissue engineered dermal substitutes with two-step method is high-cost, time-consuming and greatly decreases fibroblast proliferative activity because of repeated trypsinization. Inthisstudy, we created a 3D micronized amniotic membrane (mAM) and used it as a natural microcarrier for ex vivo culture and amplification of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) combined with the rotary cell culture system (RCCS). This one-step mAM-RCCS method couldamplify HDF quickly and construct a dermal substitute HDF-mAM simultaneously. To facilitate the clinical application of mAM-RCCS, anoptimized storage method was used.Post-thawing HDF-mAM retained high cell viability, intact cell morphology and active peptide secretion. When transplanted to the wounds of db/db mice, cryopreserved HDF-mAM promoted vascularization and diabetic wound healing significantly. These results demonstrate the potential application of cryopreserved HDF-mAM as a living dermal substitutefor treating diabetic ulcers and other chronic wounds in clinics. PMID:26885266

  13. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients.

  14. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  15. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  16. Regeneration of the ear after wounding in different mouse strains is dependent on the severity of wound trauma.

    PubMed

    Rajnoch, Charissa; Ferguson, Sharon; Metcalfe, Anthony D; Herrick, Sarah E; Willis, Hayley S; Ferguson, Mark W J

    2003-02-01

    The replacement and restoration of tissue mass after organ damage or injury in adult higher vertebrates is critical to the architecture and function of the organ. If replacement occurs with scar tissue, this often results in adverse effects on function and growth as well as an undesirable cosmetic appearance. However, certain mammals, such as the MRL/MpJ mouse, have shown a restricted capacity for regeneration, rather than scar tissue formation, after an excisional ear punch wound. To investigate the changes in tissue architecture leading to ear wound closure, initial ear wounding studies with a 2-mm clinical biopsy punch were performed on MRL/MpJ mice, by using C57BL/6 mice as a nonregenerative control strain. In contrast to previously reported studies on mouse ear regeneration, we observed that C57BL/6 mice in fact showed a limited regenerative capacity. One explanation for this difference could be attributed to the method of wounding used; both previous studies on mouse ear regeneration used a thumb punch, whereas our approach was to use a clinical biopsy punch. This approach led us to further investigate whether the severity of trauma applied influenced the rate of wound healing. We, therefore, compared the effects of the sharp clinical biopsy punch with that of a cruder thumb punch, and introduced a third strain of mouse, Balb/c, known to be a slow-healing strain. A new method to quantify ear punch hole closure was developed and a histologic investigation conducted up to 4 months after wounding. Image analysis data showed a reduction in original ear wound area of 85% in MRL/MpJ mice at 4 weeks and of 91.7% over 4 months by using a biopsy punch. In contrast, the crude thumb punch methodology resulted in an increase in wound area of up to 58% in Balb/c ears; thought to be due to increased necrosis of the wound site. All biopsy-punched wound areas plateaued in healing between days 28 and 112. Only 5 of 80 MRL/MpJ mouse ears showed no residual holes

  17. Hyperglycemia-Suppressed Expression of Serpine1 Contributes to Delayed Epithelial Wound Healing in Diabetic Mouse Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haijing; Mi, Xiaofan; Gao, Nan; Yan, Chenxi; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at an increased risk for developing corneal complications, including delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize the expression and the function of Serpine1 and other components of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)–proteolytic system in delayed epithelial wound healing in diabetic mouse corneas. Methods. Mice of the strain C57BL/6 were induced to develop diabetes by streptozotocin, and wound-healing assays were performed 10 weeks afterward. Gene expression and/or distribution were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and/or immunohistochemistry. The role of Serpine1 in mediating epithelial wound closure was determined by subconjunctival injections of neutralizing antibodies in either normal or recombinant protein in diabetic corneas. Enzyme assay for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 was also performed. Results. The expressions of Serpine1 (PAI-1), Plau (uPA), and Plaur (uPA receptor) were upregulated in response to wounding, and these upregulations were significantly suppressed by hyperglycemia. In healing epithelia, Plau and Serpine1 were abundantly expressed at the leading edge of the healing epithelia of normal and, to a lesser extent, diabetic corneas. Inhibition of Serpine1 delayed epithelial wound closure in normal corneas, whereas recombinant Serpine1 accelerated it in diabetic corneas. The Plau and MMP-3 mRNA levels and MMP-3 enzymatic activities were correlated to Serpine1 levels and/or the rates of epithelial wound closure. Conclusions. Serpine1 plays a role in mediating epithelial wound healing and its impaired expression may contribute to delayed wound healing in DM corneas. Hence, modulating uPA proteolytic pathway may represent a new approach for treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:26024123

  18. Wound modulation after filtration surgery.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; Sherwood, Mark B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2012-11-01

    Filtration surgery is the standard invasive procedure for the management of intraocular pressure in advanced glaucoma. The key to a successful outcome is to modulate the normal wound healing cascade that leads to closure of the newly created aqueous outflow pathway. Antifibrotic agents such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil have been increasingly used to modulate the wound healing process and increase surgical success. Although these agents have proven efficacy, they also increase the risk of complications. Efforts have centered on the identification of novel agents and techniques that can influence wound modulation without these complications. We detail new agents and methods under investigation to control wound healing after filtration surgery. PMID:23068975

  19. Oral Administration of Linoleic Acid Induces New Vessel Formation and Improves Skin Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Hosana G.; Vinolo, Marco A. R.; Sato, Fabio T.; Magdalon, Juliana; Kuhl, Carolina M. C.; Yamagata, Ana S.; Pessoa, Ana Flávia M.; Malheiros, Gabriella; dos Santos, Marinilce F.; Lima, Camila; Farsky, Sandra H.; Camara, Niels O. S.; Williner, Maria R.; Bernal, Claudio A.; Calder, Philip C.; Curi, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Impaired wound healing has been widely reported in diabetes. Linoleic acid (LA) accelerates the skin wound healing process in non-diabetic rats. However, LA has not been tested in diabetic animals. Objectives We investigated whether oral administration of pure LA improves wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods Dorsal wounds were induced in streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats treated or not with LA (0.22 g/kg b.w.) for 10 days. Wound closure was daily assessed for two weeks. Wound tissues were collected at specific time-points and used to measure fatty acid composition, and contents of cytokines, growth factors and eicosanoids. Histological and qPCR analyses were employed to examine the dynamics of cell migration during the healing process. Results LA reduced the wound area 14 days after wound induction. LA also increased the concentrations of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (CINC-2αβ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and reduced the expression of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1). These results together with the histological analysis, which showed accumulation of leukocytes in the wound early in the healing process, indicate that LA brought forward the inflammatory phase and improved wound healing in diabetic rats. Angiogenesis was induced by LA through elevation in tissue content of key mediators of this process: vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT-2). Conclusions Oral administration of LA hastened wound closure in diabetic rats by improving the inflammatory phase and angiogenesis. PMID:27764229

  20. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  1. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    . (5) identification of complications; early identification of certain complications can prevent the delays in healing. These include infection, remembering infrequently cultured organisms such as yeast, malnourishment with protein and mineral deficiency, and the knowledge that adhesive-backed wound dressings can cause rewounding of otherwise normally healing wounds. (6) predicting the cosmetic result; wounds healed by secondary intention may provide a cosmetic result superior to surgical repair. Wounds in concave areas usually heal with a better result than wounds managed by flaps or grafts although wounds on convex surfaces usually look best if a skillful primary closure can be performed without distortion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3079257

  2. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    . (5) identification of complications; early identification of certain complications can prevent the delays in healing. These include infection, remembering infrequently cultured organisms such as yeast, malnourishment with protein and mineral deficiency, and the knowledge that adhesive-backed wound dressings can cause rewounding of otherwise normally healing wounds. (6) predicting the cosmetic result; wounds healed by secondary intention may provide a cosmetic result superior to surgical repair. Wounds in concave areas usually heal with a better result than wounds managed by flaps or grafts although wounds on convex surfaces usually look best if a skillful primary closure can be performed without distortion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  3. [Saliva and wound healing].

    PubMed

    Veerman, E C I; Oudhoff, M J; Brand, H S

    2011-05-01

    The oral mucosa is frequently exposed to mechanical forces, which may result in tissue damage. Saliva contributes to the repair of the oral mucosa in several ways. In the first place, it creates a humid environment to improve the function of inflammatory cells. During the last few years, it has been shown that saliva also contains a large number of proteins with a role in wound healing. Saliva contains growth factors, especially Epidermal Growth FACTOR, which promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Trefoil factor 3 and histatin promote the process of wound closure. The importance of Secretory Leucocyte Protease Inhibitor is demonstrated by the fact that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Understanding these salivary proteins opens the way for the development of new wound healing medications.

  4. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds. PMID:27679749

  5. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds.

  6. Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Wound Management Strategies for Dirty Abdominal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Stephen M.; Giannotti, Giovanni; Ong, Adrian W.; Esteban Varela, J.; Shatz, David V.; McKenney, Mark G.; Sleeman, Danny; Ginzburg, Enrique; Augenstein, Jeffrey S.; Byers, Patricia M.; Sands, Laurence R.; Hellinger, Michael D.; Namias, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal method of wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds. Summary Background Data The rate of wound infection for dirty abdominal wounds is approximately 40%, but the optimal method of wound closure remains controversial. Three randomized studies comparing delayed primary closure (DPC) with primary closure (PC) have not conclusively shown any advantage of one method over the other in terms of wound infection. Methods Fifty-one patients with dirty abdominal wounds related to perforated appendicitis, other perforated viscus, traumatic injuries more than 4 hours old, or intraabdominal abscesses were enrolled. Patients were stratified by cause (appendicitis vs. all other causes) and prospectively randomized to one of two wound management strategies: E/DPC (wound packed with saline-soaked gauze, evaluated 3 days after surgery for closure the next day if appropriate) or PC. In the E/DPC group, wounds that were not pristine when examined on postoperative day 3 were not closed and daily dressing changes were instituted. Wounds were considered infected if purulence discharged from the wound, or possibly infected if signs of inflammation or a serous discharge developed. Results Two patients were withdrawn because they died less than 72 hours after surgery. The wound infection rate was greater in the PC group than in the E/DPC group. Lengths of hospital stay and hospital charges were similar between the two groups. Conclusion A strategy of DPC for appropriate dirty abdominal wounds 4 days after surgery produced a decreased wound infection rate compared with PC without increasing the length of stay or cost. PMID:11224630

  7. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. PMID:25972413

  8. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth.

  9. C. elegans epidermal wounding induces a mitochondrial ROS burst that promotes wound repair.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suhong; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2014-10-13

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide are generated at wound sites and act as long-range signals in wound healing. The roles of other ROS in wound repair are little explored. Here, we reveal a cytoprotective role for mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) in Caenorhabditis elegans skin wound healing. We show that skin wounding causes local production of mtROS superoxide at the wound site. Inhibition of mtROS levels by mitochondrial superoxide-specific antioxidants blocks actin-based wound closure, whereas elevation of mtROS promotes wound closure and enhances survival of mutant animals defective in wound healing. mtROS act downstream of wound-triggered Ca(2+) influx. We find that the mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU-1 is essential for rapid mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and mtROS production after wounding. mtROS can promote wound closure by local inhibition of Rho GTPase activity via a redox-sensitive motif. These findings delineate a pathway acting via mtROS that promotes cytoskeletal responses in wound healing. PMID:25313960

  10. Silicone-coated non-woven polyester dressing enhances reepithelialisation in a sheep model of dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Costa, Manolo; Sanguinetti, Elena; Soldani, Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) also known as V.A.C. (Vacuum-assisted closure), is widely used to manage various type of wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane (PU) foam or medical gauze. In this study an experimental setup of sheep wound model was used to evaluate, under NPWT conditions, the performance of a silicone-coated non-woven polyester (N-WPE) compared with PU foam and cotton hydrophilic gauze, used as reference materials. Animals were anesthetized with spontaneous breathing to create three 3 × 3 cm skin defects bilaterally; each animal received three different samples on each side (n = 6 in each experimental group) and was subjected to negative and continuous 125 mmHg pressure up to 16 days. Wound conditions after 1, 8 and 16 days of treatment with the wound dressings were evaluated based on gross and histological appearances. Skin defects treated with the silicone-coated N-WPE showed a significant decrease in wound size, an increase of re-epithelialization, collagen deposition and wound neovascularisation, and a minimal stickiness to the wound tissue, in comparison with gauze and PU foam. Taken all together these findings indicate that the silicone-coated N-WPE dressing enhances wound healing since stimulates higher granulation tissue formation and causes minor tissue trauma during dressing changes.

  11. Office management of minor wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta improves healing of radiation-impaired wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.F.; Harisiadis, L.; Salomon, G.; Norton, J.; Sollberg, S.; Uitto, J.; Glatstein, E.; Glass, J.; Talbot, T.; Russo, A. )

    1991-09-01

    Exogenously applied TGF-{beta} 1 has been shown to increase wound strength in incisional wounds early in the healing process. An impaired wound healing model was first established in guinea pigs by isolating flaps of skin and irradiating the flaps to 15 Gray in one fraction using a 4-MeV linear accelerator. Incisions made 2 d after irradiation were excised 7 d later, and showed decreased linear wound bursting strength (WBS) as compared to non-irradiated control wounds on the contralateral side of each animal (p = 0.001). The effect of TGF-{beta}on healing of radiation-impaired wounds was studied using this model. Skin on both left and right sides of guinea pigs was irradiated as above. A linear incision was made in each side. Collagen with either 1, 5, or 20 micrograms of TGF-{beta} was applied to one side prior to closure with staples, whereas the contralateral side received saline in collagen. Wounds given either 1 or 5 micrograms of TGF-{beta} were found to be stronger than controls at 7 d (p less than 0.05), whereas those receiving the higher 20-micrograms dose were weaker than controls (p less than 0.05). Thus, TGF-{beta} in lower doses improved healing at 7 d but very large amounts of the growth factor actually impaired healing. In situ hybridization done on wound samples showed increased type I collagen gene expression by fibroblasts in wounds treated with 1 micrograms TGF-{beta} over control wounds. These results indicate that TGF-{beta} improved wound healing as demonstrated by increased WBS. This improvement is accompanied by an up-regulation of collagen gene expression by resident fibroblasts.

  13. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  14. Wound bed preparation: TIME for an update.

    PubMed

    Harries, Rhiannon L; Bosanquet, David C; Harding, Keith G

    2016-09-01

    While the overwhelming majority of wounds heal rapidly, a significant proportion fail to progress through the wound-healing process. These resultant chronic wounds cause considerable morbidity and are costly to treat. Wound bed preparation, summarised by the TIME (Tissue, Inflammation/infection, Moisture imbalance, Epithelial edge advancement) concept, is a systematic approach for assessing chronic wounds. Each of these components needs to be addressed and optimised to improve the chances of successful wound closure. We present an up-to-date literature review of the most important recent aspects of wound bed preparation. While there are many novel therapies that are available to the treating clinician, often, there are limited data on which to assess their clinical value, and a lack of appreciation for adequate wound bed preparation needed before expensive therapy is used to heal a wound. PMID:27547958

  15. A new porous polyetherurethane wound covering.

    PubMed

    Bruin, P; Jonkman, M F; Meijer, H J; Pennings, A J

    1990-02-01

    A polyetherurethane (PEU) wound covering with non-interconnected micropores up to approximately 5 microns has been prepared by means of a phase inversion process. This highly elastic, very thin (15-20 microns), pliable wound covering showed good, immediate adherence to wet wound surfaces and high water vapor permeability, but was impermeable to bacteria. In guinea pigs epidermal wound healing of partial-thickness wounds under PEU wound coverings was accelerated compared with uncovered controls and an occlusive wound covering, OpSite. Water in liquid form or wound exudate could not leak through the PEU covering, but its high water vapor permeability induced concentration of the wound exudate into a jellylike clot layer, which apparently accelerated reepithelialization. The main conclusion from a clinical study on 20 donor sites was that the use of the PEU covering reduced pain, besides prevention of fluid retention. No differences in epithelialization were seen in comparison to tulle gras-treated wounds.

  16. The evolution of negative pressure wound therapy: negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    PubMed

    Wolvos, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Complex wounds pose a considerable burden to patients and the health-care system. The development of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionised the treatment of these wounds. NPWT helps create a favourable wound healing environment by removing infectious material, decreasing oedema and promoting perfusion and granulation tissue formation. Additionally, NPWT has been reported to help reduce time to wound closure and length of hospital stay. Modifications of this foundation of wound care have added intermittent instillation with a dwell time to NPWT (NPWTi-d). This new system offers more comprehensive wound care through automated wound irrigation, allowing more control over the wound environment and the opportunity to deliver topical wound solutions directly to the affected tissues. A comparison between the two therapies, NPWT and NPWTi-d, is described, and two real-world applications of NPWTi-d are presented.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells and cutaneous wound healing: novel methods to increase cell delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dylan E; Ayoub, Nagi; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-03-09

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (also known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) possess the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and their ability to enhance cutaneous wound healing has been well characterized. Acting via paracrine interactions, MSCs accelerate wound closure, increase angiogenesis, promote resolution of wound inflammation, favorably regulate extracellular matrix remodeling, and encourage regeneration of skin with normal architecture and function. A number of studies have employed novel methods to amplify the delivery and efficacy of MSCs. Non-traditional sources of MSCs, including Wharton's jelly and medical waste material, have shown efficacy comparable to that of traditional sources, such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. The potential of alternative methods to both introduce MSCs into wounds and increase migration of MSCs into wound areas has also been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the associations between MSCs with M2 macrophages and microRNA, methods to enhance the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs have shown success. New measures to enhance angiogenic capabilities have also exhibited effectiveness, often demonstrated by increased levels of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, hypoxia has been shown to have strong wound-healing potential in terms of increasing MSC efficacy. We have critically reviewed the results of the novel studies that show promise for the continued development of MSC-based wound-healing therapies and provide direction for continued research in this field.

  18. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  19. Advances in wound debridement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Dead and devitalised tissue interferes with the process of wound healing. Debridement is a natural process that occurs in all wounds and is crucial to healing; it reduces the bacterial burden in a wound and promotes effective inflammatory responses that encourage the formation of healthy granulation tissue (Wolcott et al, 2009). Wound care should be part of holistic patient care. Recent advances in debridement techniques include: biosurgery, hydrosurgery, mechanical debridement, and ultrasound. Biosurgery and mechanical debridement can be practiced by nonspecialist nurses and can be provided in a patient's home, thus increasing the patient's access to debridement therapy and accelerating wound healing.

  20. Noninvasive and High-Resolution Optical Monitoring of Healing of Diabetic Dermal Excisional Wounds Implanted with Biodegradable In Situ Gelable Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhijia; Zakhaleva, Julia; Ren, Hugang; Liu, Jingxuan; Chen, Weiliam

    2010-01-01

    Closure of diabetic dermal chronic wounds remains a clinical challenge. Implant-assisted healing is emerging as a potential class of therapy for dermal wound closure; this advancement has not been paralleled by the development in complementary diagnostic techniques to objectively monitor the wound-healing process in conjunction with assessing/monitoring of implant efficacy. Biopsies provide the most objective morphological assessments of wound healing; however, they not only perpetuate the wound presence but also increase the risk of infection. A noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique is highly desirable to provide objective longitudinal diagnosis of implant-assisted wound healing. We investigated the feasibility of deploying optical coherence tomography (OCT) for noninvasive monitoring of the healing of full-thickness excisional dermal wounds implanted with a novel in situ gelable hydrogel composed of N-carboxyethyl chitosan, oxidized dextran, and hyaluronan, in both normal and db/db mice. The results showed that OCT was able to differentiate the morphological differences (e.g., thickness of dermis) between normal and diabetic mice as validated by their corresponding histological evaluations (p < 0.05). OCT could detect essential morphological changes during wound healing, including re-epithelization, inflammatory response, and granulation tissue formation as well as impaired wound repair in diabetic mice. Importantly, by tracking specific morphological changes in hydrogel-assisted wound healing (e.g., implants' degradation and resorption, cell-mediated hydrogel degradation, and accelerated re-epithelization), OCT could also be deployed to monitor and evaluate the transformation of implanted biomaterials, thus holding the promise for noninvasive and objective monitoring of wound healing longitudinally and for objective efficacy assessment of implantable therapeutics in tissue engineering. PMID:19496703

  1. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  2. E2F1 Hinders Skin Wound Healing by Repressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression, Neovascularization, and Macrophage Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ning; Wang, Haiping; Deng, Pei; Xu, Yi; Feng, Youping; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Hongxia; Hou, Kai; Wang, Andrew; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Goyal, Samaksh; Qin, Gangjian; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory surface of wound and dermal chronic ulcer are largely attributed to poor neovascularization. We have previously shown that E2F1 suppresses VEGF expression in the ischemic heart, and that genetic deletion of E2F1 leads to better cardiac recovery. However, whether E2F1 has a role in dermal wound healing is currently not known. Methods and Results Skin wounds were surgically induced in E2F1-null (E2F1–/–) mice and WT littermates. E2F1–/– displayed an accelerated wound healing including wound closure, dermal thickening and collagen deposition, which was associated with an increased endothelial cell proliferation and greater vessel density in the border zone of the wound. Furthermore, more macrophages were recruited to the skin lesions and the level of VEGF expression was markedly higher in E2F1–/– than in WT mice. Conclusions E2F1 hinders skin wound healing by suppressing VEGF expression, neovascularization, and macrophage recruitment. Strategies that target E2F1 may enhance wound healing. PMID:27490344

  3. Proteomic Changes of Tissue-Tolerable Plasma Treated Airway Epithelial Cells and Their Relation to Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lendeckel, Derik; Eymann, Christine; Emicke, Philipp; Daeschlein, Georg; Darm, Katrin; O'Neil, Serena; Beule, Achim G.; von Woedtke, Thomas; Völker, Uwe; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Jünger, Michael; Hosemann, Werner; Scharf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background. The worldwide increasing number of patients suffering from nonhealing wounds requires the development of new safe strategies for wound repair. Recent studies suggest the possibility of nonthermal (cold) plasma application for the acceleration of wound closure. Methods. An in vitro wound healing model with upper airway S9 epithelial cells was established to determine the macroscopically optimal dosage of tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP) for wound regeneration, while a 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach was used to quantify the proteomic changes in a hypothesis-free manner and to evaluate the balance of beneficial and adverse effects due to TTP application. Results. Plasma doses from 30 s up to 360 s were tested in relation to wound closure after 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h, and 120 h, in which lower doses (30, 60, and 120 s) resulted in dose-dependent improved wound healing rate compared to untreated cells. Thereby, the 120 s dose caused significantly the best wound healing properties after 96 and 120 h. The proteome analysis combined with IPA revealed that a lot of affected stress adaptation responses are linked to oxidative stress response emphasizing oxidative stress as a possible key event in the regeneration process of epithelial cells as well as in the adaptation to plasma exposure. Further cellular and molecular functions like proliferation and apoptosis were significantly up- or downregulated by all TTP treatments but mostly by the 120 s dose. Conclusions. For the first time, we were able to show plasma effects on cellular adaptation of upper airway epithelial S9 cells improving wound healing. This is of particular interest for plasma application, for example, in the surgery field of otorhinolaryngology or internal medicine. PMID:26539504

  4. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  5. Effect of aged garlic extract on wound healing: a new frontier in wound management.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Sohail; Chekarova, Irina; Cho, Jae Woo; Lee, Seung Yeon; Ashraf, Shoaib; Lim, Chae Woong

    2009-01-01

    Successful wound healing depends upon angiogenesis, and impaired angiogenesis is a hallmark of the chronic wounds encountered with diabetes and venous or arterial insufficiency. To intervene and improve wound closure, it is essential to investigate the effects of different natural remedies in wound healing. The chicken dorsum skin excisional wound assay was used to investigate the influence of different concentrations of aged garlic solution (AGS) on wound healing. Gross, histopathology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and computer-based three-dimensional (3D) image-probing techniques were utilized to determine the effects of AGS on wound closure, re-epithelialization, dermal matrix regeneration, and angiogenesis. Ninety chicks, aged 1 week and divided in 6 groups, were topically exposed to different concentrations of AGS for 6 days: control (group A), 1% (group B), 5% (group C), 10% (group D), 15% (group E), and skin lotion (group F). Different patterns, ranging from incomplete to almost complete wound closure, were observed among different groups with highly significant results (P < 0.001) in group E. Histological investigations revealed a positive augment in the re-epithelialization of all AGS exposed wounds. An increase in the number of new loosely packed collagen and maturation of collagen bundles was observed in all treated wounds at days 4 and 6 post-wounding, respectively. Similar results were achieved through SEM of treated wounds. Histological investigations revealed the profuse dose-dependent neovascularization among AGS-treated wounds. Abbott curve, angular spectrum, and different parameters of 3D surface roughness of wounds were also measured for the precise quantification of angiogenesis. A very highly significant (P < 0.001) increase in angiogenesis was observed among all treated groups. No significant change was observed among control and skin lotion-treated groups. These observations substantiate the beneficial use of AGS in the treatment of

  6. Emblica officinalis exerts wound healing action through up-regulation of collagen and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2).

    PubMed

    Sumitra, Miriyala; Manikandan, Panchatcharam; Gayathri, Vinaya Subramani; Mahendran, Panchatcharam; Suguna, Lonchin

    2009-01-01

    During wound healing, the wound site is rich in oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, mostly contributed by neutrophils and macrophages. Ascorbic acid and tannins of low molecular weight, namely emblicanin A (2,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-2-keto-glucono-delta-lactone) and emblicanin B (2,3,4,6-bis-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-2-keto-glucono-delta-lactone) present in Emblica officinalis (emblica), have been shown to exhibit a very strong antioxidant action. We proposed that addition of these antioxidants to the wound microenvironment would support the repair process. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the efficacy of emblica on dermal wound healing in vivo. Full-thickness excision wounds were made on the back of the rat and topical application of emblica accelerated wound contraction and closure. Emblica increased cellular proliferation and cross-linking of collagen at the wound site, as evidenced by an increase in the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, along with an increase in DNA, type III collagen, acid-soluble collagen, aldehyde content, shrinkage temperature and tensile strength. Higher levels of tissue ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase support the fact that emblica application promotes antioxidant activity at the wound site. In summary, this study provides firm evidence to support that topical application of emblica represents a feasible and productive approach to support dermal wound healing. PMID:19152656

  7. Retained wound vacuum foam in non-healing wounds: a real possibility.

    PubMed

    Mazoch, M; Montgomery, C

    2015-06-01

    Negative pressure wound therpay (NPWT) has revolutionised the management of chronic wounds, particularly pressure ulcers (PU). Frequently, PUs are too large to close primarily, so NPWT is used to assist in management on an outpatient basis. If not closely monitored, NPWT closure foam can be accidentally left in patients. Here we describe two cases where NPWT closure foam was left in patients resulting in persistent infections. Additionally, some suggestions of how to help avoid these should be 'never' events are provided.

  8. Endocytosis-dependent coordination of multiple actin regulators is required for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Coulson-Gilmer, Camilla; Millard, Tom H

    2015-08-01

    The ability to heal wounds efficiently is essential for life. After wounding of an epithelium, the cells bordering the wound form dynamic actin protrusions and/or a contractile actomyosin cable, and these actin structures drive wound closure. Despite their importance in wound healing, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the assembly of these actin structures at wound edges are not well understood. In this paper, using Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we demonstrate that Diaphanous, SCAR, and WASp play distinct but overlapping roles in regulating actin assembly during wound healing. Moreover, we show that endocytosis is essential for wound edge actin assembly and wound closure. We identify adherens junctions (AJs) as a key target of endocytosis during wound healing and propose that endocytic remodeling of AJs is required to form "signaling centers" along the wound edge that control actin assembly. We conclude that coordination of actin assembly, AJ remodeling, and membrane traffic is required for the construction of a motile leading edge during wound healing.

  9. Desmoglein 3-Dependent Signaling Regulates Keratinocyte Migration and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Vera; Hartlieb, Eva; Winkler, Julia; Walter, Elias; Schlipp, Angela; Sardy, Miklós; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The desmosomal transmembrane adhesion molecules desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmocollin 3 (Dsc3) are required for strong keratinocyte cohesion. Recently, we have shown that Dsg3 associates with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and suppresses its activity. Here, we further investigated the role of Dsg3-dependent control of p38MAPK function. Dsg3-deficient mice display recurrent spontaneously healing skin erosions. In lesional and perilesional biopsies, p38MAPK activation was detectable compared with control animals. This led us to speculate that Dsg3 regulates wound repair in a p38MAPK-dependent manner. Indeed, scratch-wounded keratinocyte monolayers exhibited p38MAPK activation and loss of Dsg3 in cells lining the wound edge. Human keratinocytes after silencing of Dsg3 as well as primary cells isolated from Dsg3 knockout animals exhibited accelerated migration, which was further corroborated in an ex vivo skin outgrowth assay. Importantly, migration was efficiently blocked by inhibition of p38MAPK, indicating that p38MAPK mediates the effects observed upon loss of Dsg3. In line with this, we show that levels of active p38MAPK associated with Dsc3 are increased in Dsg3-deficient cells. These data indicate that Dsg3 controls a switch from an adhesive to a migratory keratinocyte phenotype via p38MAPK inhibition. Thus, loss of Dsg3 adhesion may foster wound closure by allowing p38MAPK-dependent migration. PMID:26763450

  10. High-voltage pulsed current stimulation enhances wound healing in diabetic rats by restoring the expression of collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Cho, Hwi-Young; Lee, Suk Min

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and a major morbidity that leads to pain and severely diminished quality of life. Diabetic wounds are commonly associated with defective immune cell responses or abnormality of extracellular matrix. Various types of electrical stimulation interventions have been used to promote tissue healing. However, it is unclear whether high-voltage pulsed current stimulation (HVPCS) enhances diabetic wound healing. In this study, the effects of HVPCS on wound healing were investigated in diabetic rats. Three groups of rats (10 per group) were used: non-diabetic control, diabetic control, and diabetic rats that were administered HVPCS for 40 minutes daily for 1 week. Rats from control groups were administered sham interventions. Dorsal incision wounds were generated in all animals, and wound-healing rate was determined during one-week intervention. After interventions, we measured the relative expression levels of collagen type I (collagen-I), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNAs in the wounded skin. Wound closure was delayed in diabetic control rats compared to the non-diabetic control rats, and the diabetic control rats showed the reduced expression levels of collagen-I, α-SMA and TGF-β1 mRNAs. Importantly, compared to diabetic control rats, rats with HVPCS showed accelerated wound closure and healing (p < 0.01) and restored expression levels of collagen-I (p = 0.02), α-SMA (p = 0.04), and TGF-β1 (p = 0.01) mRNAs. In conclusion, HVPCS may be beneficial for enhancing the healing of diabetic wounds by restoring the expression levels of TGF-β1, collagen-I, and α-SMA. PMID:25169252

  11. Proresolution therapy for the treatment of delayed healing of diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunan; Zhang, Michael J; Hellmann, Jason; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are emerging global epidemics associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation. A characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes is delayed wound healing, which increases the risk of recurrent infections, tissue necrosis, and limb amputation. In health, inflammation is actively resolved by endogenous mediators, such as the resolvins. D-series resolvins are generated from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and promote macrophage-mediated clearance of microbes and apoptotic cells. However, it is not clear how type 2 diabetes affects the resolution of inflammation. Here, we report that resolution of acute peritonitis is delayed in obese diabetic (db/db) mice. Altered resolution was associated with decreased apoptotic cell and Fc receptor-mediated macrophage clearance. Treatment with resolvin D1 (RvD1) enhanced resolution of peritonitis, decreased accumulation of apoptotic thymocytes in diabetic mice, and stimulated diabetic macrophage phagocytosis. Conversion of DHA to monohydroxydocosanoids, markers of resolvin biosynthesis, was attenuated in diabetic wounds, and local application of RvD1 accelerated wound closure and decreased accumulation of apoptotic cells and macrophages in the wounds. These findings support the notion that diabetes impairs resolution of wound healing and demonstrate that stimulating resolution with proresolving lipid mediators could be a novel approach to treating chronic, nonhealing wounds in patients with diabetes.

  12. The Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Chitosan Gel on Full Thickness Skin Wound Healing in Albino Rats: Histological, Immunohistochemical and Fluorescent Study

    PubMed Central

    El Sadik, Abir O.; El Ghamrawy, Tarek A.; Abd El-Galil, Tarek I.

    2015-01-01

    follicles and sebaceous glands in the dermis of the healed areas more than in other groups. Conclusion MSCs enhanced the healing process of wound closure more than chitosan gel treatment. Furthermore, MSCs injected intradermally, were more efficient in accelerating wound healing than any other mode of treatment. PMID:26402454

  13. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  14. Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 Enhances the Healing Process and Improves the Esthetic Outcome of the Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Marí, Yssel; Fernández Mayola, Maday; Aguilera Barreto, Ana; García Ojalvo, Ariana; Bermúdez Alvarez, Yilian; Mir Benítez, Ana Janet; Berlanga Acosta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its cytoprotective effects, growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) proved to reduce liver fibrotic induration. CD36 as one of the GHRP-6 receptors appears abundantly represented in cutaneous wounds granulation tissue. The healing response in a scenario of CD36 agonistic stimulation had not been previously investigated. Excisional full-thickness wounds (6 mmØ) were created in the dorsum of Wistar rats and topically treated twice a day for 5 days. The universal model of rabbit's ears hypertrophic scars was implemented and the animals were treated daily for 30 days. Treatments for both species were based on a CMC jelly composition containing GHRP-6 400 μg/mL. Wounds response characterization included closure dynamic, RT-PCR transcriptional profile, histology, and histomorphometric procedures. The rats experiment indicated that GHRP-6 pharmacodynamics involves attenuation of immunoinflammatory mediators, their effector cells, and the reduction of the expression of fibrotic cytokines. Importantly, in the hypertrophic scars rabbit's model, GHRP-6 intervention dramatically reduced the onset of exuberant scars by activating PPARγ and reducing the expression of fibrogenic cytokines. GHRP-6 showed no effect on the reversion of consolidated lesions. This evidence supports the notion that CD36 is an active and pharmacologically approachable receptor to attenuate wound inflammation and accelerate its closure so as to improve wound esthetic. PMID:27200188

  15. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  16. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity.

  17. Effect of Powdered Shells of the Snail Megalobulimus lopesi on Secondary-Intention Wound Healing in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Paulo Henrique Muleta; Schmidt Rondon, Eric; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Rodrigues Macedo, Maria Lígia; Viana, Luiz Henrique; Schiaveto de Souza, Albert; Turatti Oliveira, Carolina; Cepa Matos, Maria de Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Topical administration of powdered shells of the land snail Megalobulimus lopesi was evaluated in Wistar rats for their healing activity in an excision wound model. The animals were distributed into three groups—G1 (control): no therapeutic intervention; G2 (vehicle controls): Lanette cream once daily; G3 (experimental animals): treated with powdered shells. Variables investigated were: wound area contraction, angiogenic activity, morphometric data, leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate, and total leukocyte count in peripheral blood. Thermogravimetric analysis and quantification and characterization of powdered shell proteins were also performed. Wound area on days 3, 7, and 14 was smaller in G3, besides presenting wound closure on day 21 for all these animals. Topical administration of the powdered shells also led to an increased number of vessels at the wound site, higher leukocyte counts in peripheral blood, and increased leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate. The results lend support to the southern Brazilian folk use of M. lopesi powdered shells, as shown by the enhanced secondary-intention healing achieved with their topical administration to wounds in rats. Topical administration caused inflammatory response modulation, crucial to accelerating the healing process, the chronification of which increases the risks of wound contamination by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:25821475

  18. Visual Closure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groffman, Sidney

    An experimental test of visual closure based on an information-theory concept of perception was devised to test the ability to discriminate visual stimuli with reduced cues. The test is to be administered in a timed individual situation in which the subject is presented with sets of incomplete drawings of simple objects that he is required to name…

  19. Gingival Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M.; Martínez, C.; Oyarzún, A.; Martínez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications. PMID:25527254

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Severe Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jiake; Duan, Hongjie; Chu, Wanli; Zhang, Haijun; Hu, Quan; Du, Jundong

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe burns are a common and highly lethal trauma. The key step for severe burn therapy is to promote the wound healing as early as possible, and reports indicate that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy contributes to facilitate wound healing. In this study, we investigated effect of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUC-MSCs) could on wound healing in a rat model of severe burn and its potential mechanism. Methods Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, burn, and burn transplanted hUC-MSCs. GFP labeled hUC-MSCs or PBS was intravenous injected into respective groups. The rate of wound closure was evaluated by Image Pro Plus. GFP-labeled hUC-MSCs were tracked by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and human-specific DNA expression in wounds was detected by PCR. Inflammatory cells, neutrophils, macrophages, capillaries and collagen types I/III in wounds were evaluated by histochemical staining. Wound blood flow was evaluated by laser Doppler blood flow meter. The levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors, VEGF, collagen types I/III in wounds were analyzed using an ELISA. Results We found that wound healing was significantly accelerated in the hUC-MSC therapy group. The hUC-MSCs migrated into wound and remarkably decreased the quantity of infiltrated inflammatory cells and levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and increased levels of IL-10 and TSG-6 in wounds. Additionally, the neovascularization and levels of VEGF in wounds in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than those in other control groups. The ratio of collagen types I and III in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than that in the burn group at indicated time after transplantation. Conclusion The study suggests that hUC-MSCs transplantation can effectively improve wound healing in severe burned rat model. Moreover, these data might provide the theoretical foundation for the further clinical application of hUC-MSC in burn areas. PMID:24586314

  1. Organic light emitting diode improves diabetic cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingjia; Alberico, Stephanie; Saidu, Edward; Rahman Khan, Sazzadur; Zheng, Shijun; Romero, Rebecca; Sik Chae, Hyun; Li, Sheng; Mochizuki, Amane; Anders, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    A major complication for diabetic patients is chronic wounds due to impaired wound healing. It is well documented that visible red wavelengths can accelerate wound healing in diabetic animal models and patients. In vitro and in vivo diabetic models were used to investigate the effects of organic light emitting diode (OLED) irradiation on cellular function and cutaneous wound healing. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured in hyperglycemic medium (glucose concentration 180 mM) and irradiated with an OLED (623 nm wavelength peak, range from 560 to 770 nm, power density 7 or 10 mW/cm2 at 0.2, 1, or 5 J/cm2). The OLED significantly increased total adenosine triphosphate concentration, metabolic activity, and cell proliferation compared with untreated controls in most parameters tested. For the in vivo experiment, OLED and laser (635 ± 5 nm wavelength) treatments (10 mW/cm2 , 5 J/cm2 daily for a total of seven consecutive days) for cutaneous wound healing were compared using a genetic, diabetic rat model. Both treatments had significantly higher percentage of wound closure on day 6 postinjury and higher total histological scores on day 13 postinjury compared with control. No statistical difference was found between the two treatments. OLED irradiation significantly increased fibroblast growth factor-2 expression at 36-hour postinjury and enhanced macrophage activation during initial stages of wound healing. In conclusion, the OLED and laser had comparative effects on enhancing diabetic wound healing.

  2. Targeted delivery of adipose-derived stem cells via acellular dermal matrix enhances wound repair in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chunlei; Zhang, Guoyou; Yang, Daping; Liu, Tong; Liu, Dan; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Jiewu

    2015-03-01

    Cell-based therapeutic intervention has emerged as a new approach to accelerate wound closure. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), as a fascinating cell source, have received much attention in tissue repair and regeneration. In this study we evaluated the potential of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) scaffold serving as a carrier for the delivery of ASCs and investigated its therapeutic effects on wound healing. First, ASCs were isolated and characterized for multidifferentiation potential. ASCs-ADM grafts were then prepared, and ADM scaffold was shown to support the in vitro growth and proliferation of ASCs. Next, we analysed paracrine factors in conditioned medium and found that ASCs-ADM grafts secreted various cytokines, including VEGF, HGF, TGFβ and bFGF. Moreover, ASCs-ADM conditioned medium notably stimulated the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. In vivo, we established an excisional wound model in diabetic rats which received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), ADM or ASCs-ADM grafts, respectively. Our results demonstrated that implantation of ASCs-ADM significantly enhanced tissue regeneration and increased epithelialization, resulting in accelerated wound closure. Immunofluorescence analysis further indicated that capillary density was evidently increased in the ASCs-ADM group compared with the control or ADM group. In addition, western blot analysis showed that ASCs-ADM significantly increased the expression of angiogenic factors, which was consistent with in vitro data. Taken together, our results suggest that targeted delivery of ASCs via ADM scaffold accelerate diabetic wound healing through a paracrine mechanism, with enhanced granulation tissue formation and increased re-epithelialization and neovascularization.

  3. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  4. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  5. Acellular Hydrogels for Regenerative Burn Wound Healing: Translation from a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-I; Song, Hyun-Ho G; Papa, Arianne E; Burke, Jacqueline A; Volk, Susan W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Currently available skin grafts and skin substitutes for healing following third-degree burn injuries are fraught with complications, often resulting in long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Synthetic treatment that can promote wound healing in a regenerative manner would provide an off-the-shelf, non-immunogenic strategy to improve clinical care of severe burn wounds. Here, we demonstrate the vulnerary efficacy and accelerated healing mechanism of a dextran-based hydrogel in a third-degree porcine burn model. The model was optimized to allow examination of the hydrogel treatment for clinical translation and its regenerative response mechanisms. Hydrogel treatment accelerated third-degree burn wound healing by rapid wound closure, improved re-epithelialization, enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling, and greater nerve reinnervation, compared with the dressing-treated group. These effects appear to be mediated through the ability of the hydrogel to facilitate a rapid but brief initial inflammatory response that coherently stimulates neovascularization within the granulation tissue during the first week of treatment, followed by an efficient vascular regression to promote a regenerative healing process. Our results suggest that the dextran-based hydrogels may substantially improve healing quality and reduce skin grafting incidents and thus pave the way for clinical studies to improve the care of severe burn injury patients. PMID:26358387

  6. Acellular Hydrogels for Regenerative Burn Wound Healing: Translation from a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-I; Song, Hyun-Ho G; Papa, Arianne E; Burke, Jacqueline A; Volk, Susan W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Currently available skin grafts and skin substitutes for healing following third-degree burn injuries are fraught with complications, often resulting in long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Synthetic treatment that can promote wound healing in a regenerative manner would provide an off-the-shelf, non-immunogenic strategy to improve clinical care of severe burn wounds. Here, we demonstrate the vulnerary efficacy and accelerated healing mechanism of a dextran-based hydrogel in a third-degree porcine burn model. The model was optimized to allow examination of the hydrogel treatment for clinical translation and its regenerative response mechanisms. Hydrogel treatment accelerated third-degree burn wound healing by rapid wound closure, improved re-epithelialization, enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling, and greater nerve reinnervation, compared with the dressing-treated group. These effects appear to be mediated through the ability of the hydrogel to facilitate a rapid but brief initial inflammatory response that coherently stimulates neovascularization within the granulation tissue during the first week of treatment, followed by an efficient vascular regression to promote a regenerative healing process. Our results suggest that the dextran-based hydrogels may substantially improve healing quality and reduce skin grafting incidents and thus pave the way for clinical studies to improve the care of severe burn injury patients.

  7. Moderate treadmill running exercise prior to tendon injury enhances wound healing in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Yuan, Ting; Wang, James H-C.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of exercise on wound healing in aging tendon was tested using a rat moderate treadmill running (MTR) model. The rats were divided into an MTR group that ran on a treadmill for 4 weeks and a control group that remained in cages. After MTR, a window defect was created in the patellar tendons of all rats and wound healing was analyzed. We found that MTR accelerated wound healing by promoting quicker closure of wounds, improving the organization of collagen fibers, and decreasing senescent cells in the wounded tendons when compared to the cage control. MTR also lowered vascularization, increased the numbers of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs) and TSC proliferation than the control. Besides, MTR significantly increased the expression of stem cell markers, OCT-4 and Nanog, and tenocyte genes, Collagen I, Collagen III and tenomodulin, and down-regulated PPAR-γ, Collagen II and Runx-2 (non-tenocyte genes). These findings indicated that moderate exercise enhances healing of injuries in aging tendons through TSC based mechanisms, through which exercise regulates beneficial effects in tendons. This study reveals that appropriate exercise may be used in clinics to enhance tendon healing in aging patients. PMID:26885754

  8. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Experience in 45 Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kathryn A.; Stanley, Bryden J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report experience with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in 45 consecutive dogs admitted with extensive cutaneous wounds and to determine if NPWT is feasible in veterinary hospital practice. Study Design Prospective descriptive study Animals Dogs (n = 45) Methods Collected data were organized into 6 categories: patient data, wound data, NPWT data, adjunctive treatments, complications, and final outcome Results Wounds (53 in 45 dogs) were largely traumatic in origin, and distributed fairly evenly to the trunk, proximal and distal aspects of the limbs. Most wounds (34 dogs, 76%) had no granulation tissue and were treated a mean of 4.2 days after wounding, whereas 11 dogs had granulating wounds that were initially treated a mean of 87 days after wounding. Median NPWT use was 3 days with a mean hospitalization of 7.8 days. Most wounds (33; 62%) were closed surgically after NPWT and were healed by 14 days. The other 18 wounds healed (mean, 21 days) by second intention after hospital discharge. Overall, 96% of the wounds healed; 2 dogs died before definitive closure could be attempted. Conclusion NPWT is applicable to a wide variety of canine wounds is well tolerated, allows for several days between dressing changes, and can used to optimize the wound bed for surgical closure or second intention healing. PMID:24512302

  9. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  10. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing.

  11. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  12. Electrospun Tropoelastin for Delivery of Therapeutic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Full-Thickness Dermal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Machula, Hans; Ensley, Burt; Kellar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the physiological effects of electrospun tropoelastin scaffolds as therapeutic adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) delivery vehicles for the treatment of full-thickness dermal wounds. Approach: Using the process of electrospinning, several prototype microfiber scaffolds were created with tropoelastin. Initial testing of scaffold biocompatibility was performed in vitro through ADSC culture, followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for assessment of ADSC attachment, morphology, and new extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. The wound healing effects of ADSC-seeded scaffolds were then evaluated in a murine dermal excisional wound model. Results: For the in vitro study, SEM revealed exceptional biocompatibility of electrospun tropoelastin for ADSCs. In the wound-healing study, ADSC-treated groups demonstrated significantly enhanced wound closure and epithelial thickness compared to controls. Innovation: This is the first report on the use of tropoelastin-based biomaterials as delivery vehicles for therapeutic ADSCs. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that tropoelastin-based ADSC delivery vehicles significantly accelerate wound healing compared to controls that represent the current clinical standard of care. Furthermore, the unique mechanical and biochemical characteristics of tropoelastin may favor its use over other biological or synthetic scaffolds for the treatment of certain pathologies due to its unique intrinsic mechanical properties. PMID:24804156

  13. The Electrical Response to Injury: Molecular Mechanisms and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Natural, endogenous electric fields (EFs) and currents arise spontaneously after wounding of many tissues, especially epithelia, and are necessary for normal healing. This wound electrical activity is a long-lasting and regulated response. Enhancing or inhibiting this electrical activity increases or decreases wound healing, respectively. Cells that are responsible for wound closure such as corneal epithelial cells or skin keratinocytes migrate directionally in EFs of physiological magnitude. However, the mechanisms of how the wound electrical response is initiated and regulated remain unclear. Recent Advances: Wound EFs and currents appear to arise by ion channel up-regulation and redistribution, which are perhaps triggered by an intracellular calcium wave or cell depolarization. We discuss the possibility of stimulation of wound healing via pharmacological enhancement of the wound electric signal by stimulation of ion pumping. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are a major problem in the elderly and diabetic patient. Any strategy to stimulate wound healing in these patients is desirable. Applying electrical stimulation directly is problematic, but pharmacological enhancement of the wound signal may be a promising strategy. Future Directions: Understanding the molecular regulation of wound electric signals may reveal some fundamental mechanisms in wound healing. Manipulating fluxes of ions and electric currents at wounds might offer new approaches to achieve better wound healing and to heal chronic wounds. PMID:24761358

  14. Thiol-ene Michael-type formation of gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices for three-dimensional mesenchymal stromal/stem cell administration to cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kedi; Cantu, David Antonio; Fu, Yao; Kim, Jaehyup; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hematti, Peiman; Kao, W. John

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are considered promising cellular therapeutics in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. MSCs secrete high concentrations of immunomodulatory cytokines and growth factors, which exert paracrine effects on infiltrating immune and resident cells of the wound microenvironment that could favorably promote healing after acute injury. However, better spatial delivery and improved retention at the site of injury are two factors that could improve the clinical application of MSCs. In this study, we utilized thiol-ene Michael-type addition for rapid encapsulation of MSCs within a gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix; this biomatrix was also applied as a provisional dressing to full-thickness wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. The three-way interaction of MSCs, gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices, and host immune cells and adjacent resident cells of the wound microenvironment favorably modulated wound progression and host response. In this model we observed attenuated immune cell infiltration, lack of foreign giant cell (FBGC) formation, accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization, as well as enhanced neovascularization and granulation tissue formation by 7 days. The MSC-entrapped gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix localized the presentation of MSCs adjacent to the wound microenvironment and thus, mediated early resolution of inflammatory events and facilitated proliferative phases in wound healing. PMID:23811217

  15. Thiol-ene Michael-type formation of gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices for three-dimensional mesenchymal stromal/stem cell administration to cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kedi; Cantu, David Antonio; Fu, Yao; Kim, Jaehyup; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hematti, Peiman; Kao, W John

    2013-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are considered promising cellular therapeutics in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. MSCs secrete high concentrations of immunomodulatory cytokines and growth factors, which exert paracrine effects on infiltrating immune and resident cells in the wound microenvironment that could favorably promote healing after acute injury. However, better spatial delivery and improved retention at the site of injury are two factors that could improve the clinical application of MSCs. In this study, we utilized thiol-ene Michael-type addition for rapid encapsulation of MSCs within a gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix. This biomatrix was also applied as a provisional dressing to full thickness wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. The three-way interaction of MSCs, gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices, and host immune cells and adjacent resident cells in the wound microenvironment favorably modulated wound progression and host response. In this model we observed attenuated immune cell infiltration, lack of foreign giant cell (FBGC) formation, accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization, as well as enhanced neovascularization and granulation tissue formation by 7 days. The MSC entrapped in the gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix localized cell presentation adjacent to the wound microenvironment and thus mediated the early resolution of inflammatory events and facilitated the proliferative phases in wound healing. PMID:23811217

  16. [Wound bed preparation of chronic wounds with ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Fitz, G; Goos, M

    2003-06-01

    The use of different low dose ultrasound systems is an innovative and effective alternative strategy of treatment in wound bed preparation of different chronic wounds. The handling of the ultrasonic systems is easy to learn, their use is safe and little additional equipment is required. Induction of the so called cavitation phenomenon seems to be a major effect which permits selective debridement and reduction of microorganism colonisation. While the suggestion is that granulation tissue is promoted and wound healing accelerated, there are few well documented evidence-based data. Additional randomized controlled trials are needed before the therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound in this clinical setting can be evaluated.

  17. The prevalence, management and outcome for acute wounds identified in a wound care survey within one English health care district.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports the characteristics and local management of 826 acute wounds identified during an audit across all health care providers serving the population of Bradford, UK. Of the wounds encountered 303 were traumatic wounds and 237 primary closures with smaller numbers of other acute wound types. Of the 303 traumatic wounds 174 occurred in women (57.4%). Men predominated in the under 45s (65M:26F), this being largely accounted for by hand and finger trauma (n = 62) particularly in patients of working age (M32:F12). Women predominated in the over 65s (50M:130F), this being largely accounted for by lower limb traumatic wounds (M24:F91), the majority of these being in patients 65 and over (M14:F82). In this sub-group of 96 patients 25 had wounds of 6 weeks or longer duration, only 3 had undergone Doppler assessment and only 2 received compression bandaging. Typically these wounds were of recent origin and small in size (under 1 week and less than 5 cm2 in surface area) however exceptions occurred where 10 people had wounds over 25 cm2 in area while 3 wounds had been present for over 5 years. 101 (12.2%) of the encountered wounds were considered to be infected although the practice of wound swabbing in the presence of presumed infection seemed inadequate with 37.6% of all infected acute wounds not being swabbed while 97 non-infected wounds were swabbed. Where wounds were swabbed 4.5% were found to be MRSA positive. Across all acute wound types (with the sole exception of primary closures) antimicrobial wound dressings were the most prevalent form of dressing and covered 56 (55.4%) of all infected wounds.

  18. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  19. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) promote early wound healing and myofibroblast proliferation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lin; Kwan, Rachel Lai-Chu; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2014-04-01

    Reduced collagen deposition possibly leads to slow recovery of tensile strength in the healing process of diabetic cutaneous wounds. Myofibroblasts are transiently present during wound healing and play a key role in wound closure and collagen synthesis. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to enhance the tensile strength of diabetic wounds. In this study, we examined the effect of PEMF on wound closure and the presence of myofibroblasts in Sprague-Dawley rats after diabetic induction using streptozotocin. A full-thickness square-shaped dermal wound (2 cm × 2 cm) was excised aseptically on the shaved dorsum. The rats were randomly divided into PEMF-treated (5 mT, 25 Hz, 1 h daily) and control groups. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups in blood glucose level and body weight. However, PEMF treatment significantly enhanced wound closure (days 10 and 14 post-wounding) and re-epithelialization (day 10 post-wounding), although these improvements were no longer observed at later stages of the wound healing process. Using immunohistochemistry against α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), we demonstrated that significantly more myofibroblasts were detected on days 7 and 10 post-wounding in the PEMF group when compared to the control group. We hypothesized that PEMF would increase the myofibroblast population, contributing to wound closure during diabetic wound healing.

  20. Capillary Force Seeding of Hydrogels for Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Delivery in Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravi K.; Rennert, Robert C.; Duscher, Dominik; Sorkin, Michael; Kosaraju, Revanth; Auerbach, Lauren J.; Lennon, James; Chung, Michael T.; Paik, Kevin; Nimpf, Johannes; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Longaker, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Effective skin regeneration therapies require a successful interface between progenitor cells and biocompatible delivery systems. We previously demonstrated the efficiency of a biomimetic pullulan-collagen hydrogel scaffold for improving bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell survival within ischemic skin wounds by creating a “stem cell niche” that enhances regenerative cytokine secretion. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) represent an even more appealing source of stem cells because of their abundance and accessibility, and in this study we explored the utility of ASCs for hydrogel-based therapies. To optimize hydrogel cell seeding, a rapid, capillary force-based approach was developed and compared with previously established cell seeding methods. ASC viability and functionality following capillary hydrogel seeding were then analyzed in vitro and in vivo. In these experiments, ASCs were seeded more efficiently by capillary force than by traditional methods and remained viable and functional in this niche for up to 14 days. Additionally, hydrogel seeding of ASCs resulted in the enhanced expression of multiple stemness and angiogenesis-related genes, including Oct4, Vegf, Mcp-1, and Sdf-1. Moving in vivo, hydrogel delivery improved ASC survival, and application of both murine and human ASC-seeded hydrogels to splinted murine wounds resulted in accelerated wound closure and increased vascularity when compared with control wounds treated with unseeded hydrogels. In conclusion, capillary seeding of ASCs within a pullulan-collagen hydrogel bioscaffold provides a convenient and simple way to deliver therapeutic cells to wound environments. Moreover, ASC-seeded constructs display a significant potential to accelerate wound healing that can be easily translated to a clinical setting. PMID:25038246

  1. Integration of silver nanoparticle-impregnated polyelectrolyte multilayers into murine-splinted cutaneous wound beds.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Kathleen M; Agarwal, Ankit; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Dubielzig, Richard R; Abbott, Nicholas L; Murphy, Christopher J; Singh, Harpreet; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Schurr, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Silver is a commonly used topical antimicrobial. However, technologies to immobilize silver at the wound surface are lacking, while currently available silver-containing wound dressings release excess silver that can be cytotoxic and impair wound healing. We have shown that precise concentrations of silver at lower levels can be immobilized into a wound bed using a polyelectrolyte multilayer attachment technology. These silver nanoparticle-impregnated polyelectrolyte multilayers are noncytotoxic yet bactericidal in vitro, but their effect on wound healing in vivo was previously unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect on wound healing of integrating silver nanoparticle/polyelectrolyte multilayers into the wound bed. A full-thickness, splinted, excisional murine wound healing model was employed in both phenotypically normal mice and spontaneously diabetic mice (healing impaired model). Gross image measurements showed an initial small lag in healing in the silver-treated wounds in diabetic mice, but no difference in time to complete wound closure in either normal or diabetic mice. Histological analysis showed modest differences between silver-treated and control groups on day 9, but no difference between groups at the time of wound closure. We conclude that silver nanoparticle/polyelectrolyte multilayers can be safely integrated into the wound beds of both normal and diabetic mice without delaying wound closure, and with transient histological effects. The results of this study suggest the feasibility of this technology for use as a platform to affect nanoscale wound engineering approaches to microbial prophylaxis or to augment wound healing. PMID:23511285

  2. In Vivo Wound Healing Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing has emerged as a major treatment issue which has provoked the development of drugs that can improve the healing process. Studies using plant drugs have revealed many interesting results about existing commercial drugs. Effective wound healing leads to the restoration of tissue integrity and occurs through a highly organized multistage. Use of plant-derived medicines against excision, incision, and dead space models accelerates the wound healing process, which is briefly discussed in a manner to be followed easily during experimental sessions.

  3. In Vivo Wound Healing Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing has emerged as a major treatment issue which has provoked the development of drugs that can improve the healing process. Studies using plant drugs have revealed many interesting results about existing commercial drugs. Effective wound healing leads to the restoration of tissue integrity and occurs through a highly organized multistage. Use of plant-derived medicines against excision, incision, and dead space models accelerates the wound healing process, which is briefly discussed in a manner to be followed easily during experimental sessions. PMID:26939282

  4. Nutrition in Wound Care Management: A Comprehensive Overview.

    PubMed

    Quain, Angela M; Khardori, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Wound care is a multidisciplinary specialty requiring many physiologic and immunologic processes as well as physical, social, and societal factors to achieve successful wound closure. Most wounds are treated with combinations of antimicrobials, protective barriers, and topical growth agents, including skin and biologic grafts.The role of nutrition in wound healing may be overlooked in the wound care patient. Like the specialty, it is often multifaceted, with many nutritional components playing a variety of roles in the wound healing process. Suboptimal nutrition can alter immune function, collagen synthesis, and wound tensile strength, all of which are essential in the wound healing process. It is also important to remember that not all wounds are equal: a burn is different from a diabetic foot ulcer, which is different from a pressure ulcer. Nonetheless, nutrition is a common denominator for all wound patients, and what is studied in 1 wound population is often relevant in another. Due to the complexities of monitoring and measuring both wound healing and dietary intake, randomized, controlled trials of wound care patients are difficult to conduct, and much of the data concerning nutrition in wound care relies on combined supplements. In summary, it appears that some nutrients are necessary only if deficient, whereas others may become conditionally essential and serve a therapeutic role. All of the nutrients discussed should be viewed as a component of a broader, complete diet. This article is a summary of wound healing and the roles of a variety of macronutrients and micronutrients in the process. PMID:27447105

  5. [Innovative wound therapy and skin substitutes for burns].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M; Kolokythas, P; Niederbichler, A; Knobloch, K; Reimers, K; Choi, C Y

    2007-04-01

    The success of modern burn therapy is based mainly on special burn intensive care, topical treatment, early eschar excision, and wound closure by immediate skin grafting or skin substitutes. This paper describes the current state of wound care and skin substitutes in burn therapy.

  6. Wound healing activity of flower extract of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Korengath C; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of oral and topical application of Calendula officinalis flower extract on excision wounds made in rats were checked. The parameters assessed were the days needed for re-epithelization and percentage of wound closure. The hydroxy proline and hexosamine content in the granuloma tissue of the wound was also measured. The percentage of wound closure was 90.0% in the extract-treated group, whereas the control group showed only 51.1% on the eighth day of wounding (p < .01). The days needed for re-epithelization were 17.7 for the control animals; extract treatment at a dose of 20 or 100 mg/kg b.wt reduced the period to 14 and 13 days, respectively. A significant increase was observed in the hydroxy proline and hexosamine content in the extract-treated group compared with the untreated animals. The data indicate potent wound healing activity ofC. officinalis extract. PMID:19601397

  7. Attempting primary closure for all open fractures: the effectiveness of an institutional protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moola, Farhad O.; Carli, Alberto; Berry, Gregory K.; Reindl, Rudolf; Jacks, Duncan; Harvey, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate primary closure of open fractures has been historically believed to increase the risk of wound infection and fracture nonunion. Recent literature has challenged this belief, but uncertainty remains as to whether primary closure can be used as routine practice. This study evaluates the impact of an institutional protocol mandating primary closure for all open fractures. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all open fractures treated in a single level 1 trauma centre in a 5-year period. Prior to the study, a protocol was adopted standardizing management of open fractures and advocating primary closure of all wounds as a necessary goal of operative treatment. Patient and fracture characteristics, type of wound closure and development of infectious and bone healing complications were evaluated from time of injury to completion of outpatient follow-up. Results A total of 297 open fractures were treated, 255 (85.8%) of them with immediate primary closure. Type III open injuries accounted for 24% of all injuries. Wounds that were immediately closed had a superficial infection rate of 11% and a deep infection rate of 4.7%. Both proportions are equivalent to or lower than historical controls for delayed closure. Fracture classification, velocity of trauma and time to wound closure did not correlate significantly with infection, delayed union or nonunion. Conclusion Attempting primary closure for all open fractures is a safe and efficient practice that does not increase the postoperative risk of infection and delayed union or nonunion. PMID:24869621

  8. Heparin-Based Coacervate of FGF2 Improves Dermal Regeneration by Asserting a Synergistic Role with Cell Proliferation and Endogenous Facilitated VEGF for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Xiao, Zecong; He, Chaochao; Shi, Hongxue; Wang, Yadong; Lin, Cai; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhao, Yingzheng; Fu, Xiaobing; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaokun; Li, Lin; Zheng, Jie; Xiao, Jian

    2016-06-13

    Effective wound healing requires complicated, coordinated interactions and responses at protein, cellular, and tissue levels involving growth factor expression, cell proliferation, wound closure, granulation tissue formation, and vascularization. In this study, we develop a heparin-based coacervate consisting of poly(ethylene argininylaspartate digylceride) (PEAD) as a storage matrix, heparin as a bridge, and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) as a cargo (namely heparin-FGF2@PEAD) for wound healing. First, in vitro characterization demonstrates the loading efficiency and control release of FGF2 from the heparin-FGF2@PEAD coacervate. The following in vivo studies examine the wound healing efficiency of the heparin-FGF2@PEAD coacervate upon delivering FGF2 to full-thickness excisional skin wounds in vivo, in comparison with the other three control groups with saline, heparin@PEAD as vehicle, and free FGF2. Collective in vivo data show that controlled release of FGF2 to the wounds by the coacervate significantly accelerates the wound healing by promoting cell proliferation, stimulating the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for re-epithelization, collagen deposition, and granulation tissue formation, and enhancing the expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) for blood vessel maturation. In parallel, no obvious wound healing effect is found for the control, vehicle, and free FGF2 groups, indicating the important role of the coavervate in the wound healing process. This work designs a suitable delivery system that can protect and release FGF2 in a sustained and controlled manner, which provides a promising therapeutic potential for topical treatment of wounds.

  9. CLOSURE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Linzell, S.M.; Dorcy, D.J.

    1958-08-26

    A quick opening type of stuffing box employing two banks of rotatable shoes, each of which has a caraming action that forces a neoprene sealing surface against a pipe or rod where it passes through a wall is presented. A ring having a handle or wrench attached is placed eccentric to and between the two banks of shoes. Head bolts from the shoes fit into slots in this ring, which are so arranged that when the ring is rotated a quarter turn in one direction the shoes are thrust inwardly to cramp the neopnrene about the pipe, malting a tight seal. Moving the ring in the reverse direction moves the shoes outwardly and frees the pipe which then may be readily removed from the stuffing box. This device has particular application as a closure for the end of a coolant tube of a neutronic reactor.

  10. Recent advances in topical wound care

    PubMed Central

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ‘magical dressings’. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention. PMID:23162238

  11. Butylcyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for columellar incision closure.

    PubMed

    Ozturan, O; Miman, M C; Aktas, D; Oncel, S

    2001-07-01

    Cosmetic outcome of the columellar incision closure in external rhinoplasty patients has been a subject of discussion. This study was conducted to assess whether tissue adhesives provide an alternative option for sutureless closure of columellar skin incisions for cases utilizing open technique rhinoplastic surgery. One hundred and one patients undergoing external rhinoplasty were randomized to either topical application of butylcyanoacrylate or polypropylene sutures for columellar skin closure. The majority of tension on the wound edges was taken up using 5-0 chromic catgut. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated by two otolaryngologists independently using visual analogue and Hollander wound evaluation scales in a blinded manner. There was no statistically significant difference in cosmesis between the surgeons' evaluation scores for either type or repair of the columellar incision. Since the tissue adhesive forms its own protective barrier, post-operative care is simplified. Closure with adhesives eliminates the need for post-operative suture removal requiring an extra visit that should lead to more efficient use of physician and patient time. Butylcyanoacrylate performs cosmetically as well as standard suture closure of columellar skin incision used for external rhinoplasty.

  12. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  13. TOPICAL APPLICATION OF LAMININ-322 TO DIABETIC MOUSE WOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stephen R.; Underwood, Robert A.; Sigle, Randall O.; Fukano, Yuko; Muffley, Lara A.; Usui, Marcia L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Antezana, Marcos A.; Carter, William G.; Olerud, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Keratinocyte migration is essential for wound healing and diabetic wound keratinocytes migrate poorly. Keratinocyte migration and anchorage appears to be mediated by laminin-332 (LM-332). Impaired diabetic wound healing may be due to defective LM-332 mediated keratinocyte migration. Objective To evaluate LM-332 expression in diabetic (db/db) and control (db/-) mice and to test LM-332 wound healing effects when applied to mouse wounds. Methods LM-332 expression in mouse wounds was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. LM-332 wound healing effects were evaluated by directly applying soluble LM-332, a LM-332 biomaterial, or a control to mouse wounds. Percent wound closure and histology score, based on healing extent, were measured. Results Precursor LM-332 expression was markedly reduced in db/db when compared to db/- mice. In vitro, soluble LM-332 and LM-332 biomaterial demonstrated significant keratinocyte adhesion. In vivo, soluble LM-332 treated wounds had the highest histology score, but significant differences were not found between wound treatments (p>0.05). No differences in percentage wound closure between treatment and control wounds were found (p>0.05). Conclusion The db/db wounds express less precursor LM-332 when compared to db/-. However, LM-332 application did not improve db/db wound healing. LM-332 purified from keratinocytes was primarily physiologically cleaved LM-332 and may not regulate keratinocyte migration. Application of precursor LM-332 rather than cleaved LM-332 may be necessary to improve wound healing, but this isoform is not currently available in quantities sufficient for testing. PMID:17719208

  14. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based guidelines for the Netherlands using the AGREE-II and GRADE instruments. A working group, consisting of 17 representatives from all professional societies involved in wound care, tackled five controversial issues in acute-wound care, as provided by any caregiver throughout the whole chain of care. Critical Issues: The guidelines contain 38 recommendations, based on best available evidence, additional expert considerations, and patient experiences. In summary, primarily closed wounds need no cleansing; acute open wounds are best cleansed with lukewarm (drinkable) water; apply the WHO pain ladder to choose analgesics against continuous wound pain; use lidocaine or prilocaine infiltration anesthesia for wound manipulations or closure; primarily closed wounds may not require coverage with a dressing; use simple dressings for open wounds; and give your patient clear instructions about how to handle the wound. Future Directions: These evidence-based guidelines on acute wound care may help achieve a more uniform policy to treat acute wounds in all settings and an improved effectiveness and quality of wound care. PMID:26005594

  15. Body protective compound-157 enhances alkali-burn wound healing in vivo and promotes proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tonglie; Zhang, Kuo; Sun, Lijuan; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Cun; Shu, Zhen; Mu, Nan; Gu, Jintao; Zhang, Wangqian; Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical burns take up a high proportion of burns admissions and can penetrate deep into tissues. Various reagents have been applied in the treatment of skin chemical burns; however, no optimal reagent for skin chemical burns currently exists. The present study investigated the effect of topical body protective compound (BPC)-157 treatment on skin wound healing, using an alkali burn rat model. Topical treatment with BPC-157 was shown to accelerate wound closure following an alkali burn. Histological examination of skin sections with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining showed better granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and a higher extent of collagen deposition when compared to the model control group on the 18th day postwounding. BPC-157 could promote vascular endothelial growth factor expression in wounded skin tissues. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BPC-157 enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transwell assay and wound healing assay showed that BPC-157 significantly promoted migration of HUVECs. We also observed that BPC-157 upregulated the expression of VEGF-a and accelerated vascular tube formation in vitro. Moreover, further studies suggested that BPC-157 regulated the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) as well as its downstream targets, including c-Fos, c-Jun, and Egr-1, which are key molecules involved in cell growth, migration, and angiogenesis. Altogether, our results indicated that BPC-157 treatment may accelerate wound healing in a model of alkali burn-induced skin injury. The therapeutic mechanism may be associated with accelerated granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and collagen deposition through ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:25995620

  16. Body protective compound-157 enhances alkali-burn wound healing in vivo and promotes proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonglie; Zhang, Kuo; Sun, Lijuan; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Cun; Shu, Zhen; Mu, Nan; Gu, Jintao; Zhang, Wangqian; Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical burns take up a high proportion of burns admissions and can penetrate deep into tissues. Various reagents have been applied in the treatment of skin chemical burns; however, no optimal reagent for skin chemical burns currently exists. The present study investigated the effect of topical body protective compound (BPC)-157 treatment on skin wound healing, using an alkali burn rat model. Topical treatment with BPC-157 was shown to accelerate wound closure following an alkali burn. Histological examination of skin sections with hematoxylin–eosin and Masson staining showed better granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and a higher extent of collagen deposition when compared to the model control group on the 18th day postwounding. BPC-157 could promote vascular endothelial growth factor expression in wounded skin tissues. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BPC-157 enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transwell assay and wound healing assay showed that BPC-157 significantly promoted migration of HUVECs. We also observed that BPC-157 upregulated the expression of VEGF-a and accelerated vascular tube formation in vitro. Moreover, further studies suggested that BPC-157 regulated the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) as well as its downstream targets, including c-Fos, c-Jun, and Egr-1, which are key molecules involved in cell growth, migration, and angiogenesis. Altogether, our results indicated that BPC-157 treatment may accelerate wound healing in a model of alkali burn-induced skin injury. The therapeutic mechanism may be associated with accelerated granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and collagen deposition through ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:25995620

  17. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Jian, Jia; Velasco, Omar; Hsu, Ching-yun; Zhang, Kermit; Levin, Andrew; Murphy, Maxwell; Zhang, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibromodulin (FMOD) plays a critical role in the wound-healing process. Our previous studies revealed that FMOD deficiency led to marked alterations in adult wound healing characterized by delayed dermal cell migration, postponed wound closure, and increased scar formation, all accompanied by impeded angiogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to reveal the effect of FMOD on angiogenesis during the wound-healing process. Methods: In vivo angiogenic effects of FMOD were assessed by a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay, a Matrigel (BD Bioscience, Franklin Lakes, N.J.) plug implant assay, and rodent primary closure wound models. In vitro angiogenic effects of FMOD were recorded by cell invasion and dimensional and topological parameters of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Results: We provided evidence that FMOD significantly enhanced vascularization: first, FMOD boosted blood vessel formation on the chorioallantoic membrane; second, FMOD markedly stimulated capillary infiltration into Matrigel plugs subcutaneously implanted in adult mice; and finally, FMOD robustly promoted angiogenesis in multiple adult rodent cutaneous wound models. Furthermore, FMOD administration restored the vascularity of fmod−/− mouse wounds. In support of this, FMOD endorsed an angiogenesis-favored microenvironment in adult rodent wounds not only by upregulating angiogenic genes but also by downregulating angiostatic genes. In addition, FMOD significantly enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cell invasion and tube-like structure formation in vitro. Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds. PMID:25587509

  18. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    PubMed

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  19. [3-dimensional documentation of wound-healing].

    PubMed

    Körber, A; Grabbe, S; Dissemond, J

    2006-04-01

    The objective evaluation of the course of wound-healing represents a substantial parameter for the quality assurance of a modern wound management in chronic wounds. Established procedures exclusively based on a two-dimensional measurement of the wound surface with planimetry or digital photo documentation in combination with a metric statement of size. Thus so far an objective method is missing for the evaluation of the volumes of chronic wounds. By the linkage of digital photography, optical grid by means of digital scanner and an image processing software in co-operation with the company RSI we were able to do an accurate 3-dimensional documentation of chronic wounds (DigiSkin). The generated scatter-plots allow a visual, computer-assisted 3-dimensional measurement and documentation of chronic wounds. In comparison with available systems it is now possible for the first time to objectify the volume changes of a chronic wound. On the basis of a case report of a female patient with an venous leg ulcer, which has been treated with a vacuum closure therapy before and after performing a mesh-graft transplantation, we would like to describe the advantages and the resulting scientific use of this new, objective wound documentation system in the clinical employment. PMID:16575675

  20. Integration of single and multicellular wound responses

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.; Miller, Ann L.; Vaughan, Emily; Yu, Hoi-Ying E.; Penkert, Rhiannon; Bement, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Single cells and multicellular tissues rapidly heal wounds. These processes are considered distinct, but one mode of healing—Rho GTPase-dependent formation and closure of a purse string of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 around wounds—occurs in single cells (1,2) and in epithelia (3-10). Here we show that wounding of one cell in Xenopus embryos elicits Rho GTPase activation around the wound and at the nearest cell-cell junctions in the neighbor cells. F-actin and myosin-2 accumulate at the junctions as well as around the wound itself, and as the resultant actomyosin array closes over the wound site, junctional F-actin and myosin-2 become mechanically integrated with the actin and myosin-2 around the wound, forming a hybrid purse string. When cells are ablated rather than wounded, Rho GTPase activation and F-actin accumulation occur at cell-cell junctions surrounding the ablated cell, and the purse string closes the hole in the epithelium. Elevation of intracellular free calcium, an essential upstream signal for the single cell wound response (2,11), also occurs at the cell-cell contacts and in neighbor cells. Thus, the single and multicellular purse string wound responses represent points on a signaling and mechanical continuum that are integrated by cell-cell junctions. PMID:19631537

  1. Sustained prolonged topical delivery of bioactive human insulin for potential treatment of cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Hrynyk, Michael; Martins-Green, Manuela; Barron, Annelise E; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2010-10-15

    Skin damaged by heat, radiation, or chemical exposure is difficult to treat and slow to heal. Indeed full restoration of the tissue is difficult to obtain. Sub-dermal insulin injection was recently shown to stimulate wound healing of the skin by accelerating wound closure, stimulating angiogenesis and inducing a regenerative process of healing. We have developed a topical delivery vehicle that is capable of releasing therapeutic levels of bioactive insulin for several weeks with the potential to stimulate and sustain healing. By encapsulating the crystalline form of insulin within poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres, we succeeded in stabilizing and then releasing bioactive insulin for up to 25 days. To measure bioactivity we used Rat L6 myofibroblasts, stimulated them with this slow release insulin and determined activation of the receptors on the cell surface by quantifying AKT phosphorylation. There was only a minor and gradual decrease in AKT phosphorylation over time. To determine whether the slow release insulin could stimulate keratinocyte migration, wounding was simulated by scratching confluent cultures of human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Coverage of the scratch "wounds" was significantly faster in the presence of insulin released from microspheres than in the insulin-free control. Extended and sustained topical delivery of active insulin from a stable protein crystal-based reservoir shows promise in promoting tissue healing.

  2. Sustained prolonged topical delivery of bioactive human insulin for potential treatment of cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Hrynyk, Michael; Martins-Green, Manuela; Barron, Annelise E; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2010-10-15

    Skin damaged by heat, radiation, or chemical exposure is difficult to treat and slow to heal. Indeed full restoration of the tissue is difficult to obtain. Sub-dermal insulin injection was recently shown to stimulate wound healing of the skin by accelerating wound closure, stimulating angiogenesis and inducing a regenerative process of healing. We have developed a topical delivery vehicle that is capable of releasing therapeutic levels of bioactive insulin for several weeks with the potential to stimulate and sustain healing. By encapsulating the crystalline form of insulin within poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres, we succeeded in stabilizing and then releasing bioactive insulin for up to 25 days. To measure bioactivity we used Rat L6 myofibroblasts, stimulated them with this slow release insulin and determined activation of the receptors on the cell surface by quantifying AKT phosphorylation. There was only a minor and gradual decrease in AKT phosphorylation over time. To determine whether the slow release insulin could stimulate keratinocyte migration, wounding was simulated by scratching confluent cultures of human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Coverage of the scratch "wounds" was significantly faster in the presence of insulin released from microspheres than in the insulin-free control. Extended and sustained topical delivery of active insulin from a stable protein crystal-based reservoir shows promise in promoting tissue healing. PMID:20691251

  3. Silibinin regulates matrix metalloproteinase 3 (stromelysine1) gene expression, hexoseamines and collagen production during rat skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahamd; Mohhammad-Alipour, Adel; Tabatabaei-Naieni, Abotorab

    2013-08-01

    Silibinin (SB), a flavonoid isolated from the milk thistle, Silybum marianum, has been shown to exhibit protective effects against skin damage. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of topical application of SB on levels of stromelysine 1 (STM1) gene expression, acetyl hexoseamines and collagen production during skin wound healing. Full-thickness skin wounds were topically treated with 10% and 20% SB extract in acetonitril:olive oil (AOO) (4:1) for 30 days, and expression level of STM1 transcript, n-acetyl glucoseamine (NAGLA), n-acetyl galactoseamine (NAGAA) and collagen contents were analyzed on the 10th, 20th and 30th days post wounding. SB in dose- and time-dependent manner accelerated wound closure time and increased levels of STM1 mRNA, hydroxyproline, NAGLA and NAGAA compared to the untreated and vehicle (AOO)-treated rats. The current study provides evidence that SB, by increasing STM1 gene expression and extracellular matrix constituents including glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents, promotes a faster wound healing process and can be used as a healing agent in future.

  4. PLAN FOR CLOSURE OF HANFORDS CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    AUSTIN, B.A.

    2004-12-15

    This paper summarizes an approach to reduce risk to the public and environment through accelerated closure of Hanford's Central Plateau, based on a plan developed by Fluor Hanford and submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE)-Richland Office, for consideration, in September, 2004. This plan provides a framework and starting point for discussions with regulators and further planning for closure activities on the Plateau. The closure strategy and approach required developing a full inventory of items needing closure as well as identifying and defining technical and regulatory approaches that were compatible with current regulatory processes, reduce risks, and met DOE objectives. This effort, and the paper that follows, integrates closure activities among several contractors and two DOE field offices.

  5. Ghrelin accelerates wound healing through GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways in combined radiation and burn injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Jing; Hao, Yuhui; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of ghrelin on wound healing was assessed using a rat model of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI). Rat ghrelin, anti-rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α polyclonal antibody (PcAb), or selective antagonists of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a (SB203580, SP600125, and [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, respectively), were administered for seven consecutive days. Levels of various signaling molecules were assessed in isolated rat peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that serum ghrelin levels and levels of macrophage glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased, while phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65 nuclear factor (NF) κB increased. Ghrelin inhibited the serum induction of proinflammatory mediators, especially TNF-α, and promoted wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. Ghrelin treatment decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65NF-κB, and increased GR levels in the presence of GHS-R1a. SB203580 or co-administration of SB203580 and SP600125 decreased TNF-α level, which may have contributed to the inactivation of p65NF-κB and increase in GR expression, as confirmed by western blotting. In conclusion, ghrelin enhances wound recovery in CRBI rats, possibly by decreasing the induction of TNF-α or other proinflammatory mediators that are involved in the regulation of GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways. PMID:27271793

  6. Propolis Induces Chondroitin/Dermatan Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid Accumulation in the Skin of Burned Wound

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Kozma, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans during the wound repair allowed us to apply the burn model in which therapeutic efficacy of propolis and silver sulfadiazine was compared. Burns were inflicted on four pigs. Glycosaminoglycans isolated from healthy and burned skin were quantified using a hexuronic acid assay, electrophoretic fractionation, and densitometric analyses. Using the reverse-phase HPLC the profile of sulfated disaccharides released by chondroitinase ABC from chondroitin/dermatan sulfates was estimated. Chondroitin/dermatan sulfates and hyaluronic acid were found in all samples. Propolis stimulated significant changes in the content of particular glycosaminoglycan types during burn healing. Glycosaminoglycans alterations after silver sulfadiazine application were less expressed. Propolis maintained high contribution of 4-O-sulfated disaccharides to chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure and low level of 6-O-sulfated ones throughout the observed period of healing. Propolis led to preservation of significant contribution of disulfated disaccharides especially 2,4-O-disulfated ones to chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates structure throughout the observed period of healing. Our findings demonstrate that propolis accelerates the burned tissue repair by stimulation of the wound bed glycosaminoglycan accumulation needed for granulation, tissue growth, and wound closure. Moreover, propolis accelerates chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure modification responsible for binding growth factors playing the crucial role in the tissue repair. PMID:23533471

  7. Propolis induces chondroitin/dermatan sulphate and hyaluronic Acid accumulation in the skin of burned wound.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Kozma, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    Changes in extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans during the wound repair allowed us to apply the burn model in which therapeutic efficacy of propolis and silver sulfadiazine was compared. Burns were inflicted on four pigs. Glycosaminoglycans isolated from healthy and burned skin were quantified using a hexuronic acid assay, electrophoretic fractionation, and densitometric analyses. Using the reverse-phase HPLC the profile of sulfated disaccharides released by chondroitinase ABC from chondroitin/dermatan sulfates was estimated. Chondroitin/dermatan sulfates and hyaluronic acid were found in all samples. Propolis stimulated significant changes in the content of particular glycosaminoglycan types during burn healing. Glycosaminoglycans alterations after silver sulfadiazine application were less expressed. Propolis maintained high contribution of 4-O-sulfated disaccharides to chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure and low level of 6-O-sulfated ones throughout the observed period of healing. Propolis led to preservation of significant contribution of disulfated disaccharides especially 2,4-O-disulfated ones to chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates structure throughout the observed period of healing. Our findings demonstrate that propolis accelerates the burned tissue repair by stimulation of the wound bed glycosaminoglycan accumulation needed for granulation, tissue growth, and wound closure. Moreover, propolis accelerates chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure modification responsible for binding growth factors playing the crucial role in the tissue repair.

  8. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Miranda V; Lee, Donghoon M; Harris, Tony J C; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2015-08-31

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

  9. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Miranda V.; Lee, Donghoon M.; Harris, Tony J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair. PMID:26304727

  10. Heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres enhance large-wound healing by delivering growth factors in platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    La, Wan-Geun; Yang, Hee Seok

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains many growth factors that are involved in tissue regeneration processes. For successful tissue regeneration, protein growth factors require a delivery vehicle for long-term and sustained release to a defect site in order to maintain their bioactivity. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres (HCPNs) can provide long-term delivery of growth factors with affinity for heparin. In this study, we hypothesize that treatment of a skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCPNs would provide long-term delivery of several growth factors contained in PRP to promote the skin wound healing process with preservation of bioactivity. The release of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), contained in PRP, from HCPN with fibrin gel (FG) showed a prolonged release period versus a PRP mixture with FG alone (FG-PRP). Also, growth factors released from PRP with HCPN and FG showed sustained human dermal fibroblast growth for 12 days. Full-thickness skin wound treatment in mice with FG-HCPN-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 9 compared with treatment with FG-HCPN or FG-PRP. The enhanced wound healing using FG-HCPN-PRP may be due to the prolonged release not only of PDGF-BB but also of other growth factors in the PRP. The delivered growth factors accelerated angiogenesis at the wound site. PMID:25284020

  11. Heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres enhance large-wound healing by delivering growth factors in platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    La, Wan-Geun; Yang, Hee Seok

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains many growth factors that are involved in tissue regeneration processes. For successful tissue regeneration, protein growth factors require a delivery vehicle for long-term and sustained release to a defect site in order to maintain their bioactivity. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres (HCPNs) can provide long-term delivery of growth factors with affinity for heparin. In this study, we hypothesize that treatment of a skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCPNs would provide long-term delivery of several growth factors contained in PRP to promote the skin wound healing process with preservation of bioactivity. The release of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), contained in PRP, from HCPN with fibrin gel (FG) showed a prolonged release period versus a PRP mixture with FG alone (FG-PRP). Also, growth factors released from PRP with HCPN and FG showed sustained human dermal fibroblast growth for 12 days. Full-thickness skin wound treatment in mice with FG-HCPN-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 9 compared with treatment with FG-HCPN or FG-PRP. The enhanced wound healing using FG-HCPN-PRP may be due to the prolonged release not only of PDGF-BB but also of other growth factors in the PRP. The delivered growth factors accelerated angiogenesis at the wound site.

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy promotes vessel destabilization and maturation at various stages of wound healing and thus influences wound prognosis

    PubMed Central

    MA, ZHANJUN; SHOU, KANGQUAN; LI, ZONGHUAN; JIAN, CHAO; QI, BAIWEN; YU, AIXI

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been observed to accelerate the wound healing process in humans through promoting angiogenesis. However, the potential biological effect and relevant molecular mechanisms, including microvessel destabilization, regression and endothelial cell proliferation in the early stage (1–3 days), and the neovascular stabilization and maturation in the later stage (7–15 days), have yet to be fully elucidated. The current study aimed to research the potential effect of NPWT on angiogenesis and vessel maturation, and investigate relevant association between mature microvessels and wound prognosis, as well as the regulatory mechanisms in human wound healing. Patients in the present study (n=48) were treated with NPWT or a petrolatum gauze, and relevant growth factors and vessel changes were detected using various experimental methods. NPWT increased the expression levels of angiogenin-2 (Ang-2), and decreased the expression levels of Ang-1 and ratios of Ang-1/Ang-2 in the initial stages of wound healing. However, in the latter stages of wound healing, NPWT increased the expression levels of Ang-1 and ratios of Ang-1/Ang-2, as well as the phosphorylation level of tyrosine kinase receptor-2. Consequently, microvessel pericyte coverage was gradually elevated, and the basement membrane was gradually supplied with new blood at the later stage of wound healing. In conclusion, NPWT may preferentially stimulate microvessel destabilization and regression in the early stage of wound healing, and as a consequence, increase angiogenesis. Subsequently, in the later stage of wound healing, NPWT may preferentially promote microvessel stabilization, thereby promoting microvessel maturation in human wounds through the angiogenin/tyrosine kinase receptor-2 signaling pathway. The results of the present study results demonstrated that NPWT was able to accelerate wound healing speed, and thus influence wound prognosis, as a result of an abundance of

  14. Epidermal closure regulates histolysis during mammalian (Mus) digit regeneration.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C; Dawson, Lindsay A; Tucker, Catherine; Taylor, Louis J; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Mammalian digit regeneration progresses through consistent stages: histolysis, inflammation, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and finally redifferentiation. What we do not yet know is how each stage can affect others. Questions of stage timing, tissue interactions, and microenvironmental states are becoming increasingly important as we look toward solutions for whole limb regeneration. This study focuses on the timing of epidermal closure which, in mammals, is delayed compared to more regenerative animals like the axolotl. We use a standard wound closure device, Dermabond (2-octyl cyanoacrylate), to induce earlier epidermal closure, and we evaluate the effect of fast epidermal closure on histolysis, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. We find that fast epidermal closure is reliant upon a hypoxic microenvironment. Additionally, early epidermal closure eliminates the histolysis stage and results in a regenerate that more closely replicates the amputated structure. We show that tools like Dermabond and oxygen are able to independently influence the various stages of regeneration enabling us to uncouple histolysis, wound closure, and other regenerative events. With this study, we start to understand how each stage of mammalian digit regeneration is controlled. PMID:27499872

  15. Epidermal closure regulates histolysis during mammalian (Mus) digit regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Tucker, Catherine; Taylor, Louis J.; Van Meter, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian digit regeneration progresses through consistent stages: histolysis, inflammation, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and finally redifferentiation. What we do not yet know is how each stage can affect others. Questions of stage timing, tissue interactions, and microenvironmental states are becoming increasingly important as we look toward solutions for whole limb regeneration. This study focuses on the timing of epidermal closure which, in mammals, is delayed compared to more regenerative animals like the axolotl. We use a standard wound closure device, Dermabond (2‐octyl cyanoacrylate), to induce earlier epidermal closure, and we evaluate the effect of fast epidermal closure on histolysis, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. We find that fast epidermal closure is reliant upon a hypoxic microenvironment. Additionally, early epidermal closure eliminates the histolysis stage and results in a regenerate that more closely replicates the amputated structure. We show that tools like Dermabond and oxygen are able to independently influence the various stages of regeneration enabling us to uncouple histolysis, wound closure, and other regenerative events. With this study, we start to understand how each stage of mammalian digit regeneration is controlled. PMID:27499872

  16. The Effect of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution on the Epithelialization of Partial-Thickness Donor Site Wounds in Normal and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Juri; Hackl, Florian; Koyama, Taro; Aflaki, Pejman; Smith, Charlotte A.; Robson, Martin C.; Eriksson, Elof

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution (ACCS) could improve the quality of epithelialization and accelerate closure of dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic pigs. Methods: Dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds were sealed with wound chambers in healthy and diabetic pigs and were injected with ACCS. Wound fluid was exchanged daily for total protein concentration, and biopsies were taken on days 6, 8, 10, and 12. Epithelialization, thickness of epidermis, number of epidermal cell layers, and rete ridges were evaluated. Results: The macroscopic appearance of the wounds and speed of healing was similar in all groups at each time point. All wounds were healed by day 6. The epidermis was thicker in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds than in the controls (140.6 μm vs 82.7 μm on day 12 in diabetic pigs). There were more cell layers (13 vs 7.7) in ACCS-treated diabetic pigs on day 12. The number of rete ridges per 2.5 mm was greater on day 12 in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds (13 vs 8). There was also a significant increase in the number of rete ridges in ACCS-treated nondiabetic pigs but no difference in epidermal thickness or number of cell layers. Conclusion: In diabetic pigs, we found a significantly thicker epidermis and more cell layers and rete ridges in the ACCS-treated wounds. Healthy pigs showed more rete ridges but no difference in thickness of epidermis or number of cell layers on day 12. PMID:19936023

  17. Intralesional epidermal growth factor for diabetic foot wounds: the first cases in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Bulent M.; Buke, Cagri; Ersoy, Ozlem Saylak; Ay, Bengisu; Demirez, Dilek Senen; Savk, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Background Intralesional recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) was produced in the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Cuba, in 1988 and licensed in 2006. Because it may accelerate wound healing, it is a potential new treatment option in patients with a diabetic foot wound (whether infected or not) as an adjunct to standard treatment (i.e. debridement, antibiotics). We conducted the initial evaluation of EGF for diabetic foot wounds in Turkey. Methods We enrolled 17 patients who were hospitalized in various medical centers for a foot ulcer and/or infection and for whom below the knee amputation was suggested to all except one. All patients received 75 μg intralesional EGF three times per week on alternate days. Results The appearance of new granulation tissue on the wound site (≥75%) was observed in 13 patients (76%), and complete wound closure was observed in 3 patients (18%), yielding a ‘complete recovery’ rate of 94%. The most common side effects were tremor (n=10, 59%) and nausea (n=6, 35%). In only one case,a serious side effect requiring cessation of EGF treatment was noted. That patient experienced severe hypotension at the 16th application session, and treatment was discontinued. At baseline, a total of 21 causative bacteria were isolated from 15 patients, whereascultures were sterile in two patients. The most frequently isolated species was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion Thus, this preliminary study suggests that EGF seems to be a potential adjunctive treatment option in patients with limb-threatening diabetic foot wounds. PMID:26268583

  18. The science of wound bed preparation.

    PubMed

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2007-10-01

    The concept of wound bed preparation (WBP) heralded a new era in terms of how we treat wounds. It emphasized the difference between acute and chronic wounds, and it cemented the idea that the processes involved in the healing of acute wounds do not apply completely to the healing of chronic wounds. The arbitrary division of the normal healing process into the phases of hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation addresses the events in acute wound healing. We have realized that the impediments to healing in chronic wounds lead to a failure to progress through these phases and are independent factors that make the chronic wound a much more complex condition. A major advance in resolving or addressing the chronic wound has been the concept of WBP. WBP allows us to address the problems of wound healing individually-the presence of necrotic tissue, hypoxia, high bacterial burden, corrupt matrix, and senescent cells within the wound bed. In WBP we can optimize our therapeutic agents to accelerate endogenous healing or to increase the effectiveness of advanced therapies.

  19. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  20. Wound healing potential of methanol extract of Spathodea campanulata stem bark formulated into a topical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Kwakye, Kwabena; Kwapong, Awo Afi; Bayor, Marcel Tunkumgnen

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing potential of Spathodea campanulata stem bark in Sprague Dawley rats using the excision wound model. The methanol extract contained glycosides, flavonoids and tannins, and was relatively stable when stored at the room temperature for six (6) months. Solvent-free, semi-solid extract of S. campanulata was incorporated into an aqueous cream and applied (10 % w/w and 20 % w/w) on excision wounds of thirty two (32) rats. Cicatrin(®) cream was used as a standard wound healing agent. Prior to the remedial cream application, done later on twice daily, sixteen (16) rats had their wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus, while in the remaining sixteen the wounds were kept clean. The surface area of the excision wounds was monitored planimetrically every four (4) days until a complete wound closure or healing took place. Excision wounds treated with 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream showed a rapid and comparable decrease (p > 0.05) in wound size. In uninfected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream application resulted in ∼ 95 %-wound closure seen on Day 20, and a complete closure seen on Day 24. In infected wounds, both 20 % w/w Spathodea cream and Cicatrin(®) cream administration led to ∼ 91 %-wound closure on Day 24 and a complete wound contraction on Day 28. The results of this study justify the folkloric use of S. campanulata stem bark to the effect of wound treatment.

  1. Reducing Wound Tension with Undermining or Imbrication—Do They Work?

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Naveen M.; Brown, Benjamin J.; Davison, Steven P.; Mauskar, Neil; Mino, Matthew; Jordan, Marion H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: For the noncolonized wound, achieving tension-free, primary wound closure is ideal. Some surgeons advocate imbrication of deeper tissues rather than undermining, posing that imbrication preserves more dermal perfusion while still reducing tension at the wound edge. We sought to determine which technique most reliably reduced wound tension while preserving dermal wound perfusion. Methods: A total of 5 standardized, symmetrical pairs of full thickness wounds were created on Duroc swine. Wound tension was measured with a Tyrolean tensiometer before and after either method of closure, whereas a speckle contrast imager was used to assess dermal edge perfusion. Skin tension and dermal perfusion were evaluated for statistical significance via paired t tests and a multivariate analysis of variance. Results: There was a significant reduction in wound tension with undermining and imbrication relative to the raw wound tension (5 and 5.9 vs 7.1 N; P < 0.05) yet no significant difference between methods of closure (P > 0.05). There was a significant reduction in dermal perfusion between unwounded skin and the imbricated wound (222 perfusion units [PU] vs 48 PU; P < 0.05) and between the unwounded skin and the undermined wound (205 vs 63 PU; P < 0.05). Conclusions: We found no significant difference in wound tension between wound undermining or imbrication and a significant decrease in dermal perfusion after imbrication and undermining although the relative decrease in perfusion was greater with imbrication. Wound undermining reduces skin tension with greater relative dermal perfusion to the skin and should be selected over wound imbrication in standard primary wound closure. PMID:27536478

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor (BB homodimer), transforming growth factor-beta 1, and basic fibroblast growth factor in dermal wound healing. Neovessel and matrix formation and cessation of repair.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, G. F.; Tarpley, J. E.; Yanagihara, D.; Mustoe, T. A.; Fox, G. M.; Thomason, A.

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (BB homodimer, rPDGF-BB), transforming growth factor beta 1 (rTGF-beta 1), and basic fibroblast growth factor (rbFGF) can accelerate healing of soft tissues. However, little information is available characterizing the components of wound matrix induced by these growth factors and the molecular mechanisms underlying accelerated repair and wound maturation. In this study, the composition, quantity, and rate of extracellular matrix deposition within growth factor-treated lapine ear excisional wounds were analyzed at different stages of healing using specific histochemical and immunohistochemical stains, coupled with image analysis techniques. Single application of optimal concentrations of each growth factor accelerated normal healing by 30% (P less than 0.0003); rPDGF-BB markedly augmented early glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and fibronectin deposition, but induced significantly greater levels of collagen later in the repair process, compared with untreated wounds rTGF-beta 1 treatment led to rapidly enhanced collagen synthesis and maturation, without increased GAG deposition. In contrast, rbFGF treatment induced a predominantly angiogenic response in wounds, with a marked increase in endothelia and neovessels (P less than 0.0001), and increased wound collagenolytic activity (P less than 0.03). rbFGF-treated wounds did not evolve into collagen-containing scars and continued to accumulate only provisional matrix well past wound closure. These results provide new evidence that growth factors influence wound repair via different mechanisms: 1) rPDGF-BB accelerates deposition of provisional wound matrix; 2) rTGF-beta 1 accelerates deposition and maturation of collagen; and 3) rbFGF induces a profound monocellular angiogenic response which may lead to a marked delay in wound maturation, and the possible loss of the normal signal(s) required to stop repair. These results suggest that specific growth factors may selectively regulate

  3. YAP and TAZ regulate skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Jung; Ran Byun, Mi; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-02-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates organ size, tissue regeneration, and stem cell self-renewal. The two key downstream transcription coactivators in this pathway, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), mediate the major gene regulation and biological functions of the Hippo pathway. The biological functions of YAP and TAZ in many tissues are known; however, their roles in skin wound healing remain unclear. To analyze whether YAP and/or TAZ are required for cutaneous wound healing, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of YAP/TAZ in full-thickness skin wounds. YAP is strongly expressed in the nucleus and cytoplasm in the epidermis and hair follicle. Interestingly, YAP is expressed in the nucleus in the dermis at 2 and 7 days after wounding. TAZ normally localizes to the cytoplasm in the dermis but is distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm at 1 day after wounding. The knockdown of YAP and TAZ markedly delayed the rate of wound closure and reduced the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression in the wound. YAP and TAZ also modulate the expression of TGF-β1 signaling pathway components such as Smad-2, p21, and Smad-7. These results suggest that YAP and TAZ localization to the nucleus is required for skin wound healing.

  4. Stress-relaxation and tension relief system for immediate primary closure of large and huge soft tissue defects: an old-new concept: new concept for direct closure of large defects.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin Nard; Topaz, Guy; Li, Mingsen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2014-12-01

    Stress-relaxation is a well-established mechanism for laboratory skin stretching, with limited clinical application in conventional suturing techniques due to the inherent, concomitant induction of ischemia, necrosis and subsequent suture failure. Skin defects that cannot be primarily closed are a common difficulty during reconstructive surgery. The TopClosure tension-relief system (TRS) is a novel device for wound closure closure, providing secured attachment to the skin through a wide area of attachment, in an adjustable manner, enabling primary closure of medium to large skin defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the TopClosure TRS as a substitute for skin grafting and flaps for primary closure of large soft tissue defects by stress-relaxation. We present three demonstrative cases requiring resection of large to huge tumors customarily requiring closure by skin graft or flaps. TRS was applied during surgery serving as a tension-relief platform for tension sutures, to enable primary skin-defect closure by cycling of stress-relaxation, and following surgery as skin-secure system until complete wound closure. All skin defects ranging from 7 to 26 cm in width were manipulated by the TRS through stress-relaxation, without undermining of skin, enabling primary skin closure and eliminating the need for skin grafts and flaps. Immediate wound closure ranged 26 to 135 min. TRS was applied for 3 to 4 weeks. Complications were minimal and donor site morbidity was eliminated. Surgical time, hospital stay and costs were reduced and wound aesthetics were improved. In this case series we present a novel technology that enables the utilization of the viscoelastic properties of the skin to an extreme level, extending the limits of primary wound closure by the stress-relaxation principle. This is achieved via a simple device application that may aid immediate primary wound closure and downgrade the complexity of surgical procedures for a wide range

  5. Management of open wounds: lessons from orthopedic oncology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Herrick J

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex wounds remains a challenge, and although there have been many promising advances, patients often undergo a morbid and lengthy process to obtain sufficient, satisfactory healing. Sarcoma patients are especially vulnerable to soft tissue wound-healing complications. These patients are often treated with neoadjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy and have compromised local vascularity to healing tissue. The advent and refinement of wound vacuum-assisted closure technology have been shown to have a tremendous impact. This article reviews the benefits of some novel technologies currently undergoing investigation in orthopedic oncology that will likely have applications in wound management from other causes.

  6. Evaluation of wound healing property of Terminalia catappa on excision wound models in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, A A; Kumar, V; Singh, B K; Singh, R

    2014-05-01

    Wound is defined as the loss of breaking cellular and functional continuity of the living tissues. Management of wounds is frequently encountered with different problems. Drug resistance and toxicity hindered the development of synthetic antimicrobial agents with wound healing activity. Many plants with potent pharmacological activities may offer better treatment options viz. Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellirica and Phyllanthus emblica formulations have shown healing activities on wounds.The present study was planned to investigate the wound healing activity of Terminalia catappa on excision wound model in rats. Ointment was prepared by using bark extract of Terminalia catappa in soft paraffin and preservative. Wistar albino rats (200-250 gm) of either sex were used in the present study. A circular wound of 2 cm in diameter was made on the depilated dorsal thoracic region of the rats under ether anesthesia in aseptic conditions. The ointment was applied for 18 days and percent wound closure observed along with the parameters viz. Epithelization, granuloma weight and scar formation. Animals were observed on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th and 18th post-wounding day.Wound healing activity was compared with that of control and Betadine ointment as standard drug. Animals treated with Terminalia catappa ointment exhibited 97% reduction in wound area as compared to the control animals (81%). Ointment treated wounds were found to induce epithelization faster compared to the control. In conclusion, Terminalia catappa ointment promotes significant wound healing in rats and further evaluation of this activity in humans is suggested.

  7. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of

  8. Silver-based wound dressings reduce bacterial burden and promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Hsu, Wei-Shan; Chung, Wan-Yu; Ko, Tse-Hao; Lin, Jui-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Various types of wound dressings have been designed for different purposes and functions. Controlling bacterial burden in a wound during the early phase is important for successful wound repair. Once bacterial burden is under control, the active promotion of wound healing is another important factor for efficient wound healing. This study investigated the potential of three silver-containing dressings, namely KoCarbonAg(®) , Aquacel(®) Ag and Acticoat 7, in reducing bacterial survival and promoting wound healing. The ability of these dressings to block the entry of bacteria from external environment and retain intrinsic bacteria was studied in vitro. In addition, the study used a rat model to compare the healing efficiencies of the three dressings and investigate the quantity of collagen synthesis in vivo. In vitro results indicated that the silver-containing dressings prevented bacterial growth in wounds by blocking the entry of external bacteria and by retaining the bacteria in the dressing. In vivo study indicated that reduction in bacterial burden accelerated wound healing. Wounds treated by the silver-containing dressings showed better healing than those treated with gauze. Moreover, KoCarbonAg(®) further accelerated wound healing by promoting collagen synthesis and arrangement.

  9. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta Gaertn. f. resin.

    PubMed

    Wani, T A; Chandrashekara, H H; Kumar, D; Prasad, R; Gopal, A; Sardar, K K; Tandan, S K; Kumar, D

    2012-04-01

    The ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (10 and 30 % w/w applied locally in excised and incised wounds) produced a dose-dependent acceleration in wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content and tensile strength of wounds in rats. The results demonstrate wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin.

  10. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore

  11. Amino acids from Mytilus galloprovincialis (L.) and Rapana venosa molluscs accelerate skin wounds healing via enhancement of dermal and epidermal neoformation.

    PubMed

    Badiu, Diana L; Luque, Rafael; Dumitrescu, Elena; Craciun, Anca; Dinca, Danut

    2010-02-01

    Wound healing consists of re-epithelialization, contraction and formation of granulation and scar tissue. Amino acids from proteins are involved in these events, but their exact roles are not well understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of some amino acids from two molluscs, Mytilus galloprovincialis (L.) (Mediterranean mussel) and Rapana venosa (hard shell-clam) employed in induced skin burn injuries in Wistar rats. The treatment was evaluated in terms of essential amino acids composition which rendered the extracts very efficient in healing skin burns. The healing process was examined by periodic acid Schiff's, Verhoeff's Van Gieson and immunohistochemistry stains for collagen IV, CD 34 and CD 117 antibodies. According to the obtained results, as expressed by histological studies, the most abundant blood vessels, collagen fibres, basal and stem cells were found only for treated animals with amino acids from Rapana venosa extracts. The rich composition of amino acids from the two molluscs merits consideration as therapeutic agents in the treatment of skin burns.

  12. Closure Issues with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Steven E.; Bischof, Gary H.

    Closure of the counseling relationship constitutes both an ending and a beginning. Although closure signifies the ending of the present counseling relationship, many family counselors conceptualize closure as the start of a working relationship between counselor and family that may be summoned in future times of crisis or during a difficult life…

  13. Boundary crossing in epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Eileen; Tzlil, Shelly; Tirrell, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The processes of wound healing and collective cell migration have been studied for decades. Intensive research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms involved in wound healing, but the role of cell-substrate interactions is still not thoroughly understood. Here we probe the role of cell-substrate interactions by examining in vitro the healing of monolayers of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells cultured on artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins. We find that the rate of wound healing is dependent on the concentration of fibronectin-derived (RGD) cell-adhesion ligands in the aECM substrate. The wound closure rate varies nearly sixfold on the substrates examined, despite the fact that the rates of migration and proliferation of individual cells show little sensitivity to the RGD concentration (which varies 40-fold). To explain this apparent contradiction, we study collective migration by means of a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. The cells in the simulation spread, retract, and proliferate with probabilities obtained from a simple phenomenological model. The results indicate that the overall wound closure rate is determined primarily by the rate at which cells cross the boundary between the aECM protein and the matrix deposited under the cell sheet. PMID:20974917

  14. The Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media Topically Delivered in Fibrin Glue on Chronic Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Radwa A; Nabil, Iman; Attia, Noha; Bary, Amany A; Razek, Khalid A; Ahmed, Tamer A E; Elsayed, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a modern approach for management of chronic skin injuries. In this work, we describe BM-MSCs application versus their conditioned media (CM) when delivered topically admixed with fibrin glue to enhance the healing of chronic excisional wounds in rats. Fifty-two adult male rats were classified into four groups after induction of large-sized full-thickness skin wound: control group (CG), fibrin only group (FG), fibrin + MSCs group (FG + SCs), and fibrin + CM group (FG + CM). Healing wounds were evaluated functionally and microscopically. Eight days after injury, number of CD68+ macrophages infiltrating granulation tissue was considerably higher in the latter two groups. Although--later--none of the groups depicted a substantially different healing rate, the quality of regenerated skin was significantly boosted by the application of either BM-MSCs or their CM both (1) structurally as demonstrated by the obviously increased mean area percent of collagen fibers in Masson's trichrome-stained skin biopsies and (2) functionally as supported by the interestingly improved epidermal barrier as well as dermal tensile strength. Thus, we conclude that topically applied BM-MSCs and their CM-via fibrin vehicle--could effectively improve the quality of healed skin in chronic excisional wounds in rats, albeit without true acceleration of wound closure.

  15. The Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media Topically Delivered in Fibrin Glue on Chronic Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Radwa A.; Nabil, Iman; Attia, Noha; Bary, Amany A.; Razek, Khalid A.; Ahmed, Tamer A. E.; Elsayed, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a modern approach for management of chronic skin injuries. In this work, we describe BM-MSCs application versus their conditioned media (CM) when delivered topically admixed with fibrin glue to enhance the healing of chronic excisional wounds in rats. Fifty-two adult male rats were classified into four groups after induction of large-sized full-thickness skin wound: control group (CG), fibrin only group (FG), fibrin + MSCs group (FG + SCs), and fibrin + CM group (FG + CM). Healing wounds were evaluated functionally and microscopically. Eight days after injury, number of CD68+ macrophages infiltrating granulation tissue was considerably higher in the latter two groups. Although—later—none of the groups depicted a substantially different healing rate, the quality of regenerated skin was significantly boosted by the application of either BM-MSCs or their CM both (1) structurally as demonstrated by the obviously increased mean area percent of collagen fibers in Masson's trichrome-stained skin biopsies and (2) functionally as supported by the interestingly improved epidermal barrier as well as dermal tensile strength. Thus, we conclude that topically applied BM-MSCs and their CM—via fibrin vehicle—could effectively improve the quality of healed skin in chronic excisional wounds in rats, albeit without true acceleration of wound closure. PMID:26236740

  16. Influence of naproxen on the healing of open excision wound in rats.

    PubMed

    Margaret, I; Jamil, K

    1997-01-01

    Excision wounds were made on the paravertebral area on the dorsal side of rat under light ether anaesthesia. The wound was a full thickness wound with removal of the skin upto the fascia. Animals were fed the drug naproxen in a gum acacia suspension with low, median and high doses based on the LD50 value of the drug. The animals were dosed upto the time eschar separated and no raw wound was left. Healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound, periodically, thereby following wound closure by contraction. Granulation tissue formation and wound strength was assessed by using the granuloma model. Epithelialization was also determined. The cellular activity was assessed histologically and the biochemical indices on day of wounding and after the complete healing of the wound. Granulation tissue was used in assessing tensile strength and contraction. Histological sections of the wound on different days were assessed for connective tissue formation by the Mallory-Heidenhan stain. The closure of wounds were represented as percent contraction of original wound size and epithelialization as complete formation of epithelial layer with no rawness of the wound. The scar shape was noted and measured. The results of this study will be discussed.

  17. Effects of epidermal growth factor-loaded mucoadhesive films on wounded oral tissue rafts.

    PubMed

    Ramineni, Sandeep K; Fowler, Craig B; Fisher, Paul D; Cunningham, Larry L; Puleo, David A

    2015-03-02

    Current treatments for traumatic oral mucosal wounds include the gold standard of autologous tissue and alternative tissue-engineered grafts. While use of autografts has disadvantages of minimal availability of oral keratinized tissue, second surgery, and donor site discomfort, tissue-engineered grafts are limited by their unavailability as off-the-shelf products owing to their fabrication time of 4-8 weeks. Hence, the current work aimed to develop a potentially cost-effective, readily available device capable of enhancing native mucosal regeneration. Considering the key role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in promoting mucosal wound regeneration and the advantages of mucoadhesive delivery systems, mucoadhesive films composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone and carboxymethylcellulose were developed to provide sustained release of EGF for a minimum of 6 h. Bioactivity of released EGF supernatants was then confirmed by its ability to promote proliferation of BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Efficacy of the developed system was then investigated in vitro using buccal tissues (ORL 300-FT) as a potential replacement for small animal studies. Although the mucoadhesive films achieved their desired role of delivering bioactive EGF in a sustained manner, treatment with EGF, irrespective of its release from the films or solubilized in medium, caused a hyperparakeratotic response from in vitro tissues with distinguishable histological features including thickening of the spinous layer, intra- and intercellular edema, and pyknotic nuclei. These significant morphological changes were associated with no improvements in wound closure. These observations raise questions about the potential of using in vitro tissues as a wound healing model and substitute for small animal studies. The mucoadhesive delivery system developed, however, with its potential for sustained release of bioactive growth factors and small molecules, may be loaded with other desired compounds, with or without EGF, to accelerate

  18. Effects of epidermal growth factor-loaded mucoadhesive films on wounded oral tissue rafts.

    PubMed

    Ramineni, Sandeep K; Fowler, Craig B; Fisher, Paul D; Cunningham, Larry L; Puleo, David A

    2015-02-01

    Current treatments for traumatic oral mucosal wounds include the gold standard of autologous tissue and alternative tissue-engineered grafts. While use of autografts has disadvantages of minimal availability of oral keratinized tissue, second surgery, and donor site discomfort, tissue-engineered grafts are limited by their unavailability as off-the-shelf products owing to their fabrication time of 4-8 weeks. Hence, the current work aimed to develop a potentially cost-effective, readily available device capable of enhancing native mucosal regeneration. Considering the key role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in promoting mucosal wound regeneration and the advantages of mucoadhesive delivery systems, mucoadhesive films composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone and carboxymethylcellulose were developed to provide sustained release of EGF for a minimum of 6 h. Bioactivity of released EGF supernatants was then confirmed by its ability to promote proliferation of BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Efficacy of the developed system was then investigated in vitro using buccal tissues (ORL 300-FT) as a potential replacement for small animal studies. Although the mucoadhesive films achieved their desired role of delivering bioactive EGF in a sustained manner, treatment with EGF, irrespective of its release from the films or solubilized in medium, caused a hyperparakeratotic response from in vitro tissues with distinguishable histological features including thickening of the spinous layer, intra- and intercellular edema, and pyknotic nuclei. These significant morphological changes were associated with no improvements in wound closure. These observations raise questions about the potential of using in vitro tissues as a wound healing model and substitute for small animal studies. The mucoadhesive delivery system developed, however, with its potential for sustained release of bioactive growth factors and small molecules, may be loaded with other desired compounds, with or without EGF, to accelerate

  19. Molecular mechanisms of enhanced wound healing by copper oxide-impregnated dressings.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey; Dardik, Rima; Eidelman, Arthur I; Lavie, Yossi; Grunfeld, Yona; Ikher, Sergey; Huszar, Monica; Zatcoff, Richard C; Marikovsky, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Copper plays a key role in angiogenesis and in the synthesis and stabilization of extracellular matrix skin proteins, which are critical processes of skin formation. We hypothesized that introducing copper into wound dressings would enhance wound repair. Application of wound dressings containing copper oxide to wounds inflicted in genetically engineered diabetic mice (C57BL/KsOlaHsd-Lepr(db)) resulted in increased gene and in situ up-regulation of proangiogenic factors (e.g., placental growth factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, and vascular endothelial growth factor), increased blood vessel formation (p<0.05), and enhanced wound closure (p<0.01) as compared with control dressings (without copper) or commercial wound dressings containing silver. This study proves the capacity of copper oxide-containing wound dressings to enhance wound healing and sheds light onto the molecular mechanisms by which copper oxide-impregnated dressings stimulate wound healing. PMID:20409151

  20. Investigation of wound healing activity of methanolic extract of stem bark of Mimusops elengi Linn.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Jain, U K

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the wound healing activity of extract of bark part of Mimusops elengi. It is well-known plant in Indian traditional medicines. On the basis of traditional use and literature references, this plant was selected for wound healing potential. A methanolic extract of bark parts of Mimusops elengi was examined for wound healing activity in the form of ointment in three types of wound models on mice: the excision, the incision and dead space wound model. The extract ointments showed considerable response in all the above said wound models as comparable to those of a standard drug Betadine ointment in terms of wound contracting ability, wound closure time, tensile strength and dry granuloma weight. Histological analysis was also consistent with the proposal that Mimusops elengi bark extract exhibits significant wound healing.

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in Diabetic, Healing Corneal Epithelial Cells: Hyperglycemia-Suppressed TGFβ3 Expression Contributes to the Delay of Epithelial Wound Healing in Diabetic Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Bettahi, Ilham; Sun, Haijing; Gao, Nan; Wang, Feng; Mi, Xiaofan; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Zuguo; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may develop corneal complications and delayed wound healing. The aims of this study are to characterize the molecular signatures and biological pathways leading to delayed epithelial wound healing and to delineate the involvement of TGFβ3 therein. Genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis revealed 1,888 differentially expressed genes in the healing epithelia of normal (NL) versus type 1 DM rat corneas. Gene ontology and enrichment analyses indicated TGFβ signaling as a major altered pathway. Among three TGFβ isoforms, TGF-β1 and β3 were upregulated in response to wounding in NL corneal epithelial cells (CECs), whereas the latter was greatly suppressed by hyperglycemia in rat type 1 and 2 and mouse type 1 DM models. Functional analysis indicated that TGF-β3 contributed to wound healing in NL corneas. Moreover, exogenously added TGF-β3 accelerated epithelial wound closure in type 2 rat and type 1 mouse DM corneas via Smad and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways, autoregulation, and/or upregulation of Serpine1, a well-known TGFβ target gene. Taken together, our study for the first time provides a comprehensive list of genes differentially expressed in the healing CECs of NL versus diabetic corneas and suggests the therapeutic potential of TGF-β3 for treating corneal and skin wounds in diabetic patients. PMID:24306208

  2. Wound-healing effect of micronized sacchachitin (mSC) nanogel on corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ray-Neng; Lee, Lin-Wen; Chen, Ling-Chun; Ho, Hsiu-O; Lui, Shiao-Chuan; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Su, Ching-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The extraction residue of the Ganoderma fruiting body, named sacchachitin, has been demonstrated to have the potential to enhance cutaneous wound healing by inducing cell proliferation. In this study, a nanogel formed from micronized sacchachitin (mSC) was investigated for the potential treatment of superficial chemical corneal burns. Reportedly, mSC has been produced successfully and its chemical properties confirmed, and physical and rheological properties characterized. An in vitro cell proliferation study has revealed that at the concentrations of 200, 300, and 400 μg/mL, mSC nanogel significantly increased Statens Seruminstitut rabbit corneal (SIRC) cell proliferation after 24 hours of incubation. In cell migration assay, migration of SIRC cell to wound closure was observed after 24 hours of incubation with the addition of 200 μg/mL mSC of nanogel. In an animal study, acceleration of corneal wound healing was probably due to the inhibition of proteolysis. In conclusion, the findings of this study substantiate the potential application of sacchachitin in the form of mSC nanogel for the treatment of superficial corneal injuries. PMID:22956870

  3. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... How scrapes heal; How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... from germs. Not all wounds bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores do not ...

  4. Practices in wound healing studies of plants.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  5. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  6. Cutaneous wound healing in aging small mammals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Joo; Mustoe, Thomas; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-01-01

    As the elderly population grows, so do the clinical and socioeconomic burdens of nonhealing cutaneous wounds, the majority of which are seen among persons over 60 years of age. Human studies on how aging effects wound healing will always be the gold standard, but studies have ethical and practical hurdles. Choosing an animal model is dictated by costs and animal lifespan that preclude large animal use. Here, we review the current literature on how aging effects cutaneous wound healing in small animal models and, when possible, compare healing across studies. Using a literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed databases, studies were limited to those that utilized full-thickness wounds and compared the wound-healing parameters of wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue fill, and tensile strength between young and aged cohorts. Overall, wound closure, reepithelialization, and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased with aging across different strains of mice and rats. Aging in mice was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but greater tensile strength later in the wound healing process. Similarly, aging in rats was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but no significant tensile strength difference between young and old rats later in healing wounds. From studies in New Zealand White rabbits, we found that reepithelialization and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased overall with aging. While similarities and differences in key wound healing parameters were noted between different strains and species, the comparability across the studies was highly questionable, highlighted by wide variability in experimental design and reporting. In future studies, standardized experimental design and reporting would help to establish comparable study groups, and advance the overall knowledge base, facilitating the translatability of animal data to the human clinical condition.

  7. Sustained release of stromal cell derived factor-1 from an antioxidant thermoresponsive hydrogel enhances dermal wound healing in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunxiao; Hoshi, Ryan; Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Duan, Chongwen; Galiano, Robert D; Zhang, Hao F; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2016-09-28

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Altered cell migration due to microcirculatory deficiencies as well as excessive and prolonged reactive oxygen species production are implicated in the delayed healing of DFUs. The goal of this research was to assess whether sustained release of SDF-1, a chemokine that promotes endothelial progenitor cell homing and angiogenesis, from a citrate-based antioxidant thermoresponsive polymer would significantly improve impaired dermal wound healing in diabetes. Poly (polyethylene glycol citrate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PPCN) was synthesized via sequential polycondensation and free radical polymerization reactions. SDF-1 was entrapped via gelation of the PPCN+SDF-1 solution above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and its release and bioactivity was measured. The effect of sustained release of SDF-1 from PPCN (PPCN+SDF-1) versus a bolus application of SDF-1 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) on wound healing was evaluated in a diabetic murine splinted excisional dermal wound model using gross observation, histology, immunohistochemistry, and optical coherence tomography microangiography. Increasing PPCN concentration decreased SDF-1 release rate. The time to 50% wound closure was 11days, 16days, 14days, and 17days for wounds treated with PPCN+SDF-1, SDF-1 only, PPCN only, and PBS, respectively. Wounds treated with PPCN+SDF-1 had the shortest time for complete healing (24days) and exhibited accelerated granulation tissue production, epithelial maturation, and the highest density of perfused blood vessels. In conclusion, sustained release of SDF-1 from PPCN is a promising and easy to use therapeutic strategy to improve the treatment of chronic non-healing DFUs. PMID:27473766

  8. Two-photon fluorescence imaging and femtosecond laser microsurgery to study drosophila dorsal closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayil K. N., Anisha; Pereira, Andrea; Mathew, Manoj; Artigas, David; Martín Blanco, Enrique; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    Dorsal closure is a key morphogenic process that occurs at the last stages of Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. It involves a well coordinated rearrangement and movement of tissues that resemble epithelial wound healing in mammals. The cell dynamics and intracellular signaling pathways that accompany hole closure are expected to be similar during would healing providing a model system to study epithelial healing. Here we demonstrate the use of two-photon fluorescence microscope together with femtosecond laser ablation to examine the epithelial wound healing during embryonic dorsal closure. By using tightly focused NIR femtosecond pulses of subnanojoule energy we are able to produce highly confined microsurgery on the epithelial cells of a developing embryo. We observed that drosophila epidermis heals from the laser wounds with increased activity of actin near the wound edges.

  9. Post-surgical wound management of pilonidal cysts with a haemoglobin spray: a case series.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, N; Engels, P

    2016-04-01

    Painful acute cysts in the natal cleft or lower back, known as pilonidal sinus disease, are a severe burden to many younger patients. Although surgical intervention is the preferred first line treatment, postsurgical wound healing disturbances are frequently reported due to infection or other complications. Different treatment options of pilonidal cysts have been discussed in the literature, however, no standardised guideline for the postsurgical wound treatment is available. After surgery, a common recommended treatment to patients is rinsing the wound with clean water and dressing with a sterile compress. We present a case series of seven patients with wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical intervention of a pilonidal cyst. The average age of the patients was 40 years old. Of the seven patients, three had developed a wound healing disturbance, one wound had started to develop a fibrin coating and three were in a good condition. The applied wound care regimens comprised appropriate mechanical or autolytic debridement, rinsing with an antimicrobial solution, haemoglobin application, and primary and secondary dressings. In all seven cases a complete wound closure was achieved within an average of 76 days with six out of seven wounds achieving wound closure within 23-98 days. Aesthetic appearance was deemed excellent in five out of seven cases excellent and acceptable in one. Treatment of one case with a sustained healing disturbance did result in wound closure but with a poor aesthetic outcome and an extensive cicatrisation of the new tissue. Based on these results we recommend that to avoid healing disturbances of wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical pilonidal cyst intervention, an adequate wound care regime comprising appropriate wound debridement, rinsing, topically applied haemoglobin and adequate wound dressing is recommendable as early as possible after surgery. PMID:27064368

  10. Post-surgical wound management of pilonidal cysts with a haemoglobin spray: a case series.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, N; Engels, P

    2016-04-01

    Painful acute cysts in the natal cleft or lower back, known as pilonidal sinus disease, are a severe burden to many younger patients. Although surgical intervention is the preferred first line treatment, postsurgical wound healing disturbances are frequently reported due to infection or other complications. Different treatment options of pilonidal cysts have been discussed in the literature, however, no standardised guideline for the postsurgical wound treatment is available. After surgery, a common recommended treatment to patients is rinsing the wound with clean water and dressing with a sterile compress. We present a case series of seven patients with wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical intervention of a pilonidal cyst. The average age of the patients was 40 years old. Of the seven patients, three had developed a wound healing disturbance, one wound had started to develop a fibrin coating and three were in a good condition. The applied wound care regimens comprised appropriate mechanical or autolytic debridement, rinsing with an antimicrobial solution, haemoglobin application, and primary and secondary dressings. In all seven cases a complete wound closure was achieved within an average of 76 days with six out of seven wounds achieving wound closure within 23-98 days. Aesthetic appearance was deemed excellent in five out of seven cases excellent and acceptable in one. Treatment of one case with a sustained healing disturbance did result in wound closure but with a poor aesthetic outcome and an extensive cicatrisation of the new tissue. Based on these results we recommend that to avoid healing disturbances of wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical pilonidal cyst intervention, an adequate wound care regime comprising appropriate wound debridement, rinsing, topically applied haemoglobin and adequate wound dressing is recommendable as early as possible after surgery.

  11. Notoginsenoside Ft1 Promotes Fibroblast Proliferation via PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway and Benefits Wound Healing in Genetically Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Eryun; Gao, Bo; Yang, Li; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing requires the essential participation of fibroblasts, which is impaired in diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Notoginsenoside Ft1 (Ft1), a saponin from Panax notoginseng, can enhance platelet aggregation by activating signaling network mediated through P2Y12 and induce proliferation, migration, and tube formation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. However, whether it can accelerate fibroblast proliferation and benefit wound healing, especially DFU, has not been elucidated. In the present study on human dermal fibroblast HDF-a, Ft1 increased cell proliferation and collagen production via PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. On the excisional wound splinting model established on db/db diabetic mouse, topical application of Ft1 significantly shortened the wound closure time by 5.1 days in contrast with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treatment (15.8 versus 20.9 days). Meanwhile, Ft1 increased the rate of re-epithelialization and the amount of granulation tissue at day 7 and day 14. The molecule also enhanced mRNA expressions of COL1A1, COL3A1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β3 and fibronectin, the genes that contributed to collagen expression, fibroblast proliferation, and consequent scar formation. Moreover, Ft1 facilitated the neovascularization accompanied with elevated vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibroblast growth factor at either mRNA or protein levels and alleviated the inflammation of infiltrated monocytes indicated by reduced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 mRNA expressions in the diabetic wounds. Altogether, these results indicated that Ft1 might accelerate diabetic wound healing by orchestrating multiple processes, including promoting fibroblast proliferation, enhancing angiogenesis, and attenuating inflammatory response, which provided a great potential application of it in clinics for patients with DFU. PMID:26567319

  12. Laparoscopic Peptic Ulcer Perforation Closure: the Preferred Choice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Franal H; Mehta, Sudhir G; Gandhi, Mona D; Saraj

    2015-12-01

    Peptic ulcer perforation is a common life-threatening emergency needing immediate intervention. Laparoscopic closure of perforation is now widely practiced over conventional open closure. This study aimed to compare laparoscopic peptic ulcer perforation closure with conventional open closure in terms of operative time, postoperative analgesia, complications, hospital stay, and return to routine activities. This unicentric, nonblinded, prospective, randomized study was carried out in 50 patients with peptic ulcer perforation who were randomly allocated to undergo either laparoscopic closure or open closure surgery with 25 patients in each group. The mean operative time (60 vs 90 min) was less in the laparoscopic group (p < 0.05). Postoperative analgesia requirements (1 vs 6 days) were also less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Complications (nil vs 6; p < 0.05) and hospital stay (3 vs 8 days) were less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Patients return to normal activities (5 vs 10 days; p < 0.05) earlier in laparoscopic perforation closure than in open closure. Our study has shown better outcomes and lesser morbidities with laparoscopic approach in terms of shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, less analgesic requirements, and less wound infections. Patients also return to routine activities earlier with the laparoscopic approach. It is a safe alternative to open surgery and should be a preferred choice when there are no contraindications to laparoscopy.

  13. [Wound management for cuts and lacerations].

    PubMed

    Kluwe, Wolfram

    2015-02-01

    Skin cuts and lacerations are frequent injuries. A perfect result of the treatment is going without saying for the patient and its relatives. But there are some aspects to note for an adequate wound management. The main aims of wound management are clear: assist in hemostasis, to avoid infection and pain, and to ensure an esthetically pleasing scar. For these we have to treat not only the wound. Taking care for the hole patient and treating the sore pain and preventing painfull manipulations is the goal for the patients satisfaction. The basic aspects of wound healing and wound management will be described. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be also more cost-effective. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. Please do not forget in every case to ask for the tetanus immunization and to think about an antibiotic therapy in case of human or animal bites and for wounds in risk areas and with contamination.

  14. Novel silk fibroin/elastin wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-08-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) and elastin (EL) scaffolds were successfully produced for the first time for the treatment of burn wounds. The self-assembly properties of SF, together with the excellent chemical and mechanical stability and biocompatibility, were combined with elastin protein to produce scaffolds with the ability to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Porous scaffolds were obtained by lyophilization and were further crosslinked with genipin (GE). Genipin crosslinking induces the conformational transition from random coil to β-sheet of SF chains, yielding scaffolds with smaller pore size and reduced swelling ratios, degradation and release rates. All results indicated that the composition of the scaffolds had a significant effect on their physical properties, and that can easily be tuned to obtain scaffolds suitable for biological applications. Wound healing was assessed through the use of human full-thickness skin equivalents (EpidermFT). Standardized burn wounds were induced by a cautery and the best re-epithelialization and the fastest wound closure was obtained in wounds treated with 50SF scaffolds; these contain the highest amount of elastin after 6 days of healing in comparison with other dressings and controls. The cytocompatibility demonstrated with human skin fibroblasts together with the healing improvement make these SF/EL scaffolds suitable for wound dressing applications.

  15. Fundulus deep cells: directional migration in response to epithelial wounding.

    PubMed

    Fink, R D; Trinkaus, J P

    1988-09-01

    During the normal embryogenesis of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus deep cells migrate in an apparently random fashion throughout the subepithelial space of the yolk sac. These cells migrate by blebbing locomotion, and individual cells show tendencies for persistence in the directionality of their movement. Immediately after the wounding of the yolk sac epithelium (the enveloping layer), these deep cells reorient and migrate directionally toward the site of wound closure. This directional migration results in the aggregation of a large number of cells at the wound site. The response is both rapid and widespread; cells as far away as 800 micron respond as quickly as those nearby, and by 100 min after wounding up to 90% of the blebbing deep cells within this radius have clustered about the wound site. Then, cells begin to disperse, and by 150 min after wounding, it is almost impossible to tell where the wound had been made. Because of the transparency of the Fundulus yolk sac, this phenomenon can be utilized as a model system for observing details of in vivo directional cell movements. Time-lapse video micrography has revealed that the modes, rates, and overall cell morphologies during locomotion are identical for cells migrating in both unwounded and wounded embryos. What is different in the wounded embryos is that a single directionality is imposed upon a large population of cells, resulting in aggregation. Several aspects of the aggregation phenomenon suggest that a possible attractant originating at the wound site may travel through the subepithelial space by diffusion.

  16. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  17. Raman spectroscopy and the spectral correlation index for predicting wound healing outcome: towards in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Adam G.; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2016-03-01

    Combat wounds are sometimes confounded by healing complications that are not as prevalent in civilian wounds due to their high energy etiology. One complication of wound healing is dehiscence, where a surgically closed wound reopens after closure. This complication can have serious consequences for the patient, but knowledge about the molecular composition of the wound bed beyond what is readily visible may help clinicians mitigate these complications. It is necessary to develop techniques that can be used in vivo to assess and predict wound healing pointof- care so that care-takers can decide the best way to make informed clinical decisions regarding their patient's healing. Raman spectroscopy is a perfect candidate for predicting wound healing due to its ability to provide a detailed molecular fingerprint of the wound bed noninvasively. Here, we study the spectral correlation index, a measure of orthogonality, with ten reference tissue components to stratify wounds based on how they heal. We analyze these indexes over time to show the modulation of these tissue components over the wound healing process. Results show that qualitative observation of the spectra cannot reveal major differences between the dehisced and normal healing wounds, but the spectral correlation index can. Analysis of the spectral correlations across the wound healing process demonstrates the changes throughout the wound healing process, showing that early differences in tissue components may portend wound healing. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy coupled with the spectral correlation index presents as a possible point-of-care tool for enabling discrimination of wounds with impaired healing.

  18. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Knackstedt, R. W.; Dixon, J. A.; O'Neill, P. J.; Herrera, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may be apparent. PMID

  19. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, R W; Dixon, J A; O'Neill, P J; Herrera, F A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may be apparent.

  20. Gap geometry dictates epithelial closure efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Cheddadi, Ibrahim; Chen, Tianchi; Pereira, Telmo; Ong, Hui Ting; Bertocchi, Cristina; Brugues, Agusti; Jacinto, Antonio; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Gov, Nir; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Ladoux, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Closure of wounds and gaps in tissues is fundamental for the correct development and physiology of multicellular organisms and, when misregulated, may lead to inflammation and tumorigenesis. To re-establish tissue integrity, epithelial cells exhibit coordinated motion into the void by active crawling on the substrate and by constricting a supracellular actomyosin cable. Coexistence of these two mechanisms strongly depends on the environment. However, the nature of their coupling remains elusive because of the complexity of the overall process. Here we demonstrate that epithelial gap geometry in both in vitro and in vivo regulates these collective mechanisms. In addition, the mechanical coupling between actomyosin cable contraction and cell crawling acts as a large-scale regulator to control the dynamics of gap closure. Finally, our computational modelling clarifies the respective roles of the two mechanisms during this process, providing a robust and universal mechanism to explain how epithelial tissues restore their integrity. PMID:26158873

  1. Gap geometry dictates epithelial closure efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Andrea; Cheddadi, Ibrahim; Chen, Tianchi; Pereira, Telmo; Ong, Hui Ting; Bertocchi, Cristina; Brugues, Agusti; Jacinto, Antonio; Kabla, Alexandre J; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Gov, Nir; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Ladoux, Benoit

    2015-07-09

    Closure of wounds and gaps in tissues is fundamental for the correct development and physiology of multicellular organisms and, when misregulated, may lead to inflammation and tumorigenesis. To re-establish tissue integrity, epithelial cells exhibit coordinated motion into the void by active crawling on the substrate and by constricting a supracellular actomyosin cable. Coexistence of these two mechanisms strongly depends on the environment. However, the nature of their coupling remains elusive because of the complexity of the overall process. Here we demonstrate that epithelial gap geometry in both in vitro and in vivo regulates these collective mechanisms. In addition, the mechanical coupling between actomyosin cable contraction and cell crawling acts as a large-scale regulator to control the dynamics of gap closure. Finally, our computational modelling clarifies the respective roles of the two mechanisms during this process, providing a robust and universal mechanism to explain how epithelial tissues restore their integrity.

  2. Complement deficiency promotes cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Rafail, Stavros; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Foukas, Periklis G; Markiewski, Maciej M; DeAngelis, Robert A; Guariento, Mara; Ricklin, Daniel; Grice, Elizabeth A; Lambris, John D

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex homeostatic response to injury that engages numerous cellular activities, processes, and cell-to-cell interactions. The complement system, an intricate network of proteins with important roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, has been implicated in many physiological processes; however, its role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employ a murine model of excisional cutaneous wound healing and show that C3(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated early stages of wound healing. Reconstitution of C3(-/-) mice with serum from C3(+/+) mice or purified human C3 abrogated the accelerated wound-healing phenotype. Wound histology of C3(-/-) mice revealed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate compared with C3(+/+) mice. C3 deficiency also resulted in increased accumulation of mast cells and advanced angiogenesis. We further show that mice deficient in the downstream complement effector C5 exhibit a similar wound-healing phenotype, which is recapitulated in C5aR1(-/-) mice, but not C3aR(-/-) or C5aR2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that C5a signaling through C5aR may in part play a pivotal role in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells to the wound environment, which in turn could delay the early stages of cutaneous wound healing. These findings also suggest a previously underappreciated role for complement in wound healing, and may have therapeutic implications for conditions of delayed wound healing.

  3. [Advances in the effects of pH value of micro-environment on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruirui; Li, Na; Wei, Li

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is affected by lots of endogenous and exogenous factors. Researches have confirmed that acid environment could prevent wound infection and accelerate wound healing by inhibiting bacteria proliferation, promoting oxygen release, affecting keratinocyte proliferation and migration, etc. In this article, we review the literature to identify the potential relationship between the pH value of wound micro-environment and the progress of wound healing, and summarize the clinical application of variation of pH value of micro-environment in wound healing, thereby to provide new treatment strategy for wound healing.

  4. An overview of factors maximizing successful split-thickness skin grafting in diabetic wounds

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, Ryan J.; Schmidt, Brian M.; Blume, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Open wounds, from ulcerations or slow healing, are one of the comorbidities in diabetic patients that can lead to amputation. Therefore, an optimal way to close and heal wounds quickly in diabetic patients is required. Split-thickness skin grafts (STSG) offer a quick method of wound closure for diabetic patients. This article review will look at causes of failure in STSG, and ways to optimize success.

  5. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) modulates wound healing through regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Isabel; Diez-Marques, Maria L.; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada; Garcia del Moral, Raimundo; Dedhar, Shoukat; Ruiz-Torres, Maria P.; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego

    2012-11-15

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an intracellular effector of cell-matrix interactions and regulates many cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The present work analyzes the role of ILK in wound healing in adult animals using a conditional knock-out of the ILK gene generated with the tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox system (CRE-LOX mice). Results show that ILK deficiency leads to retarded wound closure in skin. Intracellular mechanisms involved in this process were analyzed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) isolated from CRE-LOX mice and revealed that wounding promotes rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ILK. Knockdown of ILK resulted in a retarded wound closure due to a decrease in cellular proliferation and loss of HGF protein expression during the healing process, in vitro and in vivo. Alterations in cell proliferation and wound closure in ILK-deficient MEF or mice could be rescued by exogenous administration of human HGF. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the activation of PI3K and ILK after skin wounding are critical for HGF-dependent tissue repair and wound healing. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK deletion results in decreased HGF expression and delayed scratch wound repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/ILK/AKT pathway signals through HGF to regulate wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An ILK-dependent increase in HGF expression is responsible for wound healing in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK-KO mice are used to confirm the requirement for ILK function in wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human HGF treatment restores delayed wound closure in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Effective management of major lower extremity wounds using an acellular regenerative tissue matrix: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Boc, Steven F; Lopez, Ramon C

    2004-01-01

    Wound healing is a significant problem in orthopedics. Graftjacket tissue matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Arlington, Tenn), a novel acellular regenerative tissue matrix, has been designed to aid wound closure. A prospective, randomized study was initiated to determine the efficacy of this tissue product in wound repair compared with conventional treatment. Lower extremity wounds are refractile to healing in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therefore, researchers used diabetic foot ulcers to evaluate the efficacy of GraftJacket tissue matrix in wound repair. Only a single administration of the tissue matrix was required. After 1 month of treatment, preliminary results demonstrate that this novel tissue matrix promotes faster healing at a statistically significant rate over conventional treatment. Because wounds in this series of patients are deep and circulation around the wound is poor, the preliminary results suggest that this tissue matrix will be applicable to other types of orthopedic wounds.

  7. Effects of Topically Applied Vitamin D during Corneal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Reins, Rose Y.; Hanlon, Samuel D.; Magadi, Sri; McDermott, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important regulator of immune function and largely acts to dampen chronic inflammatory events in a variety of tissues. There is also accumulating evidence that vitamin D acts to enhance initial inflammation, beneficial during both infection and wound healing, and then promotes resolution and prevention of chronic, damaging inflammation. The current study examines the effect of topical vitamin D in a mouse of model of corneal epithelial wound healing, where acute inflammation is necessary for efficient wound closure. At 12 and 18 hours post-wounding, vitamin D treatment significantly delayed wound closure by ~17% and increased infiltration of neutrophils into the central cornea. Basal epithelial cell division, corneal nerve density, and levels of VEGF, TGFβ, IL-1β, and TNFα were unchanged. However, vitamin D increased the production of the anti-microbial peptide CRAMP 12 hours after wounding. These data suggest a possible role for vitamin D in modulating corneal wound healing and have important implications for therapeutic use of vitamin D at the ocular surface. PMID:27035345

  8. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  9. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, A.-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  10. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  11. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds. PMID:24008263

  12. Fully automated algorithm for wound surface area assessment.

    PubMed

    Deana, Alessandro Melo; de Jesus, Sérgio Henrique Costa; Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi Azevedo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Silva, Daniela Fátima Teixeira; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, clinicians, dentists, nurses, researchers, and other health professionals need to monitor the wound healing progress and to quantify the rate of wound closure. The aim of this study is to demonstrate, step by step, a fully automated numerical method to estimate the size of the wound and the percentage damaged relative to the body surface area (BSA) in images, without the requirement for human intervention. We included the formula for BSA in rats in the algorithm. The methodology was validated in experimental wounds and human ulcers and was compared with the analysis of an experienced pathologist, with good agreement. Therefore, this algorithm is suitable for experimental wounds and burns and human ulcers, as they have a high contrast with adjacent normal skin.

  13. Postoperative radiation of open head and neck wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.H. Jr.; Thompson, W.B.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1987-03-01

    Complication rates are lower using postoperative radiation therapy and cure rates at least compatible to preoperative radiation therapy. However, one of the concerns with postoperative radiation treatment is the possibility of delay in beginning the treatment because of an unhealed surgical wound. A delay of more than 6 weeks is detrimental. In order to study the effect of radiation therapy on incompletely healed wounds, a retrospective chart review of such cases during the period 1977 to 1984 was undertaken. One hundred and eighty-five patients had planned postoperative radiation therapy, and 13 of these began radiation therapy with an unhealed wound or fistula. Six of 10 wounds closed spontaneously, 4 required surgical closure, and 3 failed to heal. Seven patients in this study died with cancer, 2 died of other causes, 3 are alive without disease, and 1 patient remains alive with disease. We conclude that giving radiation therapy to an open wound with appropriate precaution can be done without serious complications.

  14. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review.

  15. Orientation and shape dependence of embryonic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Holley; Ma, Xiaoyan; Hutson, M. Shane

    2007-11-01

    Wounds in embryonic epithelia heal without scarring. They do so via the combined action of two cytoskeletal structures: an actin-rich supracellular purse-string at the wound margin; and actin-based projections like filopodia. Neither structure is absolutely required for wound closure and their relative importance depends strongly on wound shape. To further investigate this dependence, we have followed the healing process in fruit fly embryos using confocal microscopy after precise laser incisions. The wound shape and rate of healing depend on the orientation of the incision. Cuts along the long axis of the embryo initially expand to greater areas and round up. Cuts along the short axis expand less and remain elliptical. These short-axis wounds heal more quickly and in a different manner. For such cuts, cellular projections tend to bridge across the ends of the wound. After such bridges are formed, the smaller holes (towards the ends of the wound) close quickly. On the other hand, for cuts along the long axis, the cellular projections tend to bridge across the middle of the wound -- often leaving two to three holes of similar size that then close independently at similar rates.

  16. Delayed Wound Healing in CXCR2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Devalaraja, Radhika M.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Qian, Qinghua; Du, Jianguo; Yu, Yingchun; Devalaraja, Madhav N.; Richmond, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the CXC chemokine, MGSA/GRO-α and its receptor, CXCR2, are expressed during wound healing by keratinocytes and endothelial cells at areas where epithelialization and neovascularization occur. The process of wound healing is dependent on leukocyte recruitment, keratinocyte proliferation and migration, and angiogenesis. These processes may be mediated in part by CXC chemokines, such as interleukin-8 and MGSA/GRO-α. To examine further the significance of CXC chemokines in wound healing, full excisional wounds were created on CXCR2 wild-type (+/+), heterozygous (+/−), or knockout (−/−) mice. Wounds were histologically analyzed for neutrophil and monocyte infiltration, neovascularization and epithelialization at days 3, 5, 7, and 10 postwounding. The CXCR2−/− mice exhibited defective neutrophil recruitment, an altered temporal pattern of monocyte recruitment, and altered secretion of interleukin-1β. Significant delays in wound healing parameters, including epithelialization and decreased neovascularization, were also observed in CXCR2−/− mice. In vitro wounding experiments with cultures of keratinocytes established from −/− and +/+ mice revealed a retardation in wound closure in CXCR2−/− keratinocytes, suggesting a role for this receptor on keratinocytes in epithelial resurfacing that is independent of neutrophil recruitment. These in vitro and in vivo studies further establish a pathophysiologic role for CXCR2 during cutaneous wound repair. PMID:10951241

  17. Clinical Effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Complex Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Opasanon, Supaporn; Pongsapich, Warut; Taweepraditpol, Sitthichoke; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Chuangsuwanich, Apirag

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO, HBO2) Therapy is a non-invasive therapy. It has been applied as adjuvant treatment in many medical conditions over the past 50 years. Different treatment protocols have been proven effective for specifically indicated conditions. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) Therapy as an adjunctive treatment for patients with complex wounds. In this prospective cohort study, 40 patients with complex wounds were included. All patients received HBO. HBO was delivered with 100% oxygen for 90 min at 2.0–2.4 ATA. Wound sizes were assessed by one wound surgeon before, during, and every 2 weeks for a total of 12 months after HBO. An analysis of demographic data, wound size and wound photography was performed. Over the 22-month period ending October 31, 2013, 40 patients (21 men and 19 women) with a mean age of 59.73 (range, 29–88) with complex wounds were included. All complex wounds studied were at least 6 months old. The mean wound size was 16.72 cm2 in diameter. Thirty-one patients with complex wounds healed after the completion of a series of HBO treatments (77.5%). Two orocutaneous fistulas were completely closed without further surgery. After 5 HBO treatments, the wound size reduced by 29.7% on average (p = 1.24 × 10−6). After 10 HBO treatments, the wound size statistically significantly reduced by an additional 16.9% (p = 0.0002). There were no complications in this study. Wound healing process was accelerated by HBO. Significant wound size reduction was noted after 5 HBO treatments. Because the biggest reduction in wound size occurred within the first 10 HBO treatments, it is important to conduct these first treatments without interruption. HBO is an effective and safe treatment modality for complex wounds. PMID:26442206

  18. [Wound healing after laser and red light irradiation].

    PubMed

    Hutschenreiter, G; Haina, D; Paulini, K; Schumacher, G

    1980-04-01

    Laser irradiation and red light irradiation, daily 2 respectively 4 J/cm2, do not bring any acceleration of wound healing in rats. No significant effect was evident in the cell pattern of wounds during various phases of healing through the irradiation. The tensile strength of cicatrices increased by laser irradiation, but not by red light irradiation (monochromatic lambda = 633 nm).

  19. Release of insulin from PLGA-alginate dressing stimulates regenerative healing of burn wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sandeep; Silva, João P; Liu, Yan; Hrynyk, Michael; Garcia, Monika; Chan, Alex; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Neufeld, Ronald J; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex set of overlapping processes in an environment conducive to ischaemia, inflammation and infection costing $7.5 billion/year in the U.S.A. alone, in addition to the morbidity and mortality that occur when the burns are extensive. We previously showed that insulin, when topically applied to skin excision wounds, accelerates re-epithelialization and stimulates angiogenesis. More recently, we developed an alginate sponge dressing (ASD) containing insulin encapsulated in PLGA [poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microparticles that provides a sustained release of bioactive insulin for >20 days in a moist and protective environment. We hypothesized that insulin-containing ASD accelerates burn healing and stimulates a more regenerative, less scarring healing. Using heat-induced burn injury in rats, we show that burns treated with dressings containing 0.04 mg insulin/cm(2) every 3 days for 9 days have faster closure, a higher rate of disintegration of dead tissue and decreased oxidative stress. In addition, in insulin-treated wounds, the pattern of neutrophil inflammatory response suggests faster clearing of the burned dead tissue. We also observe faster resolution of the pro-inflammatory macrophages. We also found that insulin stimulates collagen deposition and maturation with the fibres organized more like a basket weave (normal skin) than aligned and cross-linked (scar tissue). In summary, application of ASD-containing insulin-loaded PLGA particles on burns every 3 days stimulates faster and more regenerative healing. These results suggest insulin as a potential therapeutic agent in burn healing and, because of its long history of safe use in humans, insulin could become one of the treatments of choice when repair and regeneration are critical for proper tissue function. PMID:26310669

  20. Release of insulin from PLGA-alginate dressing stimulates regenerative healing of burn wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sandeep; Silva, João P; Liu, Yan; Hrynyk, Michael; Garcia, Monika; Chan, Alex; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Neufeld, Ronald J; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex set of overlapping processes in an environment conducive to ischaemia, inflammation and infection costing $7.5 billion/year in the U.S.A. alone, in addition to the morbidity and mortality that occur when the burns are extensive. We previously showed that insulin, when topically applied to skin excision wounds, accelerates re-epithelialization and stimulates angiogenesis. More recently, we developed an alginate sponge dressing (ASD) containing insulin encapsulated in PLGA [poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microparticles that provides a sustained release of bioactive insulin for >20 days in a moist and protective environment. We hypothesized that insulin-containing ASD accelerates burn healing and stimulates a more regenerative, less scarring healing. Using heat-induced burn injury in rats, we show that burns treated with dressings containing 0.04 mg insulin/cm(2) every 3 days for 9 days have faster closure, a higher rate of disintegration of dead tissue and decreased oxidative stress. In addition, in insulin-treated wounds, the pattern of neutrophil inflammatory response suggests faster clearing of the burned dead tissue. We also observe faster resolution of the pro-inflammatory macrophages. We also found that insulin stimulates collagen deposition and maturation with the fibres organized more like a basket weave (normal skin) than aligned and cross-linked (scar tissue). In summary, application of ASD-containing insulin-loaded PLGA particles on burns every 3 days stimulates faster and more regenerative healing. These results suggest insulin as a potential therapeutic agent in burn healing and, because of its long history of safe use in humans, insulin could become one of the treatments of choice when repair and regeneration are critical for proper tissue function.

  1. Hypoxia pretreatment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen-chitosan sponge scaffold promotes skin wound healing in diabetic rats with hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chuan; Hao, Haojie; Xia, Lei; Liu, Jiejie; Ti, Dongdong; Dong, Liang; Hou, Qian; Song, Haijing; Liu, Huiling; Zhao, Yali; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have properties that make them promising for the treatment of chronic nonhealing wounds. The major challenge is ensuring an efficient, safe, and painless delivery of BM-MSCs. Tissue-engineered skin substitutes have considerable benefits in skin damage resulting from chronic nonhealing wounds. Here, we have constructed a three-dimensional biomimetic scaffold known as collagen-chitosan sponge scaffolds (CCSS) using the cross-linking and freeze-drying method. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that CCSS had an interconnected network pore configuration about 100 μm and exhibited a suitable swelling ratio for maintaining morphological stability and appropriate biodegradability to improve biostability using swelling and degradation assays. Furthermore, BM-MSCs were seeded in CCSS using the two-step seeding method to construct tissue-engineered skin substitutes. In addition, in this three-dimensional biomimetic CCSS, BM-MSCs secreted their own collagen and maintain favorable survival ability and viability. Importantly, BM-MSCs exhibited a significant upregulated expression of proangiogenesis factors, including HIF-1α, VEGF, and PDGF following hypoxia pretreatment. In vivo, hypoxia pretreatment of the skin substitute observably accelerated wound closure via the reduction of inflammation and enhanced angiogenesis in diabetic rats with hindlimb ischemia. Thus, hypoxia pretreatment of the skin substitutes can serve as ideal bioengineering skin substitutes to promote optimal diabetic skin wound healing. PMID:26463737

  2. PPARdelta promotes wound healing by up-regulating TGF-beta1-dependent or -independent expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sun Ah; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Eun Sil; Eun, So Young; Kim, Gil Hyeong; Park, Myung Hyun; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl; Lee, Jae Heun; Seo, Han Geuk

    2010-06-01

    Although the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta has been implicated in the wound healing process, its exact role and mechanism of action have not been fully elucidated. Our previous findings showed that PPARdelta induces the expression of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, which has been implicated in the deposit of extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we demonstrate that administration of GW501516, a specific PPARdelta ligand, significantly promoted wound closure in the experimental mouse and had a profound effect on the expression of collagen types I and III, alpha-smooth muscle actin, pSmad3 and TGF-beta1, which play a pivotal role in wound healing processes. Activation of PPARdelta increased migration of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts in in vitro scrape-wounding assays. Addition of a specific ALK5 receptor inhibitor SB431542 significantly suppressed GW501516-induced migration of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In these cells, activated PPARdelta also induced the expression of collagen types I and III and fibronectin in a TGF-beta1-dependent or -independent manner. The effect of PPARdelta on the expression of type III collagen was dually regulated by the direct binding of PPARdelta and Smad3 to a direct repeat-1 site and a Smad-binding element, respectively, of the type III gene promoter. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PPARdelta plays an important role in skin wound healing in vivo and that it functions by accelerating extracellular matrix-mediated cellular interactions in a process mediated by the TGF-beta1/Smad3 signaling-dependent or - independent pathway.

  3. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  4. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  5. Self-Assembled Wound Dressings Silence MMP-9 and Improve Diabetic Wound Healing In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Steven A; Almquist, Benjamin D; Li, Wei; Reis, Tiago; Chow, John; Mayner, Sarah; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-03-01

    The direct local delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) into target tissues presents a real solution to several complex medical conditions that today lack efficacious therapies. The development of an ultrathin polymer coating is described to sustain the delivery of siRNA for up to 2 weeks in vitro and in vivo. This technology successfully reduces the expression of MMP-9 within the wounds of diabetic mice, significantly accelerating the wound healing process and improving the quality of tissue formed.

  6. Tissue loads applied by a novel medical device for closing large wounds.

    PubMed

    Katzengold, Rona; Topaz, Moris; Gefen, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Closure of large soft tissue defects following surgery or trauma as well as closure of large chronic wounds constitutes substantial but common reconstructive challenges. In such cases, an attempt to use conventional suturing will result in high-tension closure, therefore alternative external skin stretching systems were developed. These types of devices were meant to reduce local mechanical loads in the skin and the underlying tissues, taking advantage of the viscoelastic properties of the skin, especially mechanical creep, for primary wound closure. Studies have shown the clinical advantages of skin stretching systems, however, quantitative bioengineering models, demonstrating closure of large wounds, are lacking. Here we present finite element (FE) modeling of the TopClosure(®) tension relief system (TRS) and its biomechanical efficacy in three (real) wound cases, compared with the alternative of a conventional surgical suturing closure technique. Our simulations showed that peak effective stresses on the skin were at least an order of magnitude greater (and sometimes nearly 2 orders-of-magnitude greater) when tension sutures were used with respect to the corresponding TRS data. For the tension suture simulations, the tensile stress was in the range of 415-648 MPa and in the TRS simulations, it was 16-30 MPa. Based on the present computational FE modeling, the TRS reduces localized tissue deformations and stress concentrations in skin and underlying tissues while closing large wounds, compared to the deformations and stresses that are inflicted during the process of suturing. This substantial reduction of loads allows surgeons to better employ the viscoelastic properties of the skin for primary wound closure.

  7. Tissue loads applied by a novel medical device for closing large wounds.

    PubMed

    Katzengold, Rona; Topaz, Moris; Gefen, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Closure of large soft tissue defects following surgery or trauma as well as closure of large chronic wounds constitutes substantial but common reconstructive challenges. In such cases, an attempt to use conventional suturing will result in high-tension closure, therefore alternative external skin stretching systems were developed. These types of devices were meant to reduce local mechanical loads in the skin and the underlying tissues, taking advantage of the viscoelastic properties of the skin, especially mechanical creep, for primary wound closure. Studies have shown the clinical advantages of skin stretching systems, however, quantitative bioengineering models, demonstrating closure of large wounds, are lacking. Here we present finite element (FE) modeling of the TopClosure(®) tension relief system (TRS) and its biomechanical efficacy in three (real) wound cases, compared with the alternative of a conventional surgical suturing closure technique. Our simulations showed that peak effective stresses on the skin were at least an order of magnitude greater (and sometimes nearly 2 orders-of-magnitude greater) when tension sutures were used with respect to the corresponding TRS data. For the tension suture simulations, the tensile stress was in the range of 415-648 MPa and in the TRS simulations, it was 16-30 MPa. Based on the present computational FE modeling, the TRS reduces localized tissue deformations and stress concentrations in skin and underlying tissues while closing large wounds, compared to the deformations and stresses that are inflicted during the process of suturing. This substantial reduction of loads allows surgeons to better employ the viscoelastic properties of the skin for primary wound closure. PMID:26750452

  8. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure system (E-VAC): case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Bobkiewicz, Adam; Malinger, Stanisław; Świrkowicz, Józef; Hermann, Jacek; Drews, Michał; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a standard in the treatment of chronic and difficult healing wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy is applied to the wound via a special vacuum-sealed sponge. Nowadays, the endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system (E-VAC) has been proven to be an important alternative in patients with upper and lower intestinal leakage not responding to standard endoscopic and/or surgical treatment procedures. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system provides perfect wound drainage and closure of various kinds of defect and promotes tissue granulation. Our experience has shown that E-VAC may significantly improve the morbidity and mortality rate. Moreover, E-VAC may be useful in a multidisciplinary approach – from upper gastrointestinal to rectal surgery complications. On the other hand, major limitations of the E-VAC system are the necessity of repeated endoscopic interventions and constant presence of well-trained staff. Further, large-cohort studies need to be performed to establish the applicability and effectiveness of E-VAC before routine widespread use can be recommended. PMID:26240633

  9. Generation of a Functional Non-Shedding Collagen XVII Mouse Model: Relevance of Collagen XVII Shedding in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Schlosser, Andreas; Sormunen, Raija; Nyström, Alexander; Sitaru, Cassian; Tasanen, Kaisa; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Collagen XVII is a hemidesmosomal anchorage molecule of basal keratinocytes that promotes stable epidermal-dermal adhesion. One unique feature of collagen XVII is that its collagenous ectodomain is constitutively released from the cell surface by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) through cleavage within its juxtamembranous linker domain. The responsivity of shedding to environmental stimuli and the high stability of the released ectodomain in several tissues suggests functions in cell detachment during epidermal morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration, but its physiologic relevance remained elusive. To investigate this, we generated knock-in mice, which express a functional non-sheddable collagen XVII mutant, with a 41 amino acid deletion in the linker domain spanning all ADAM cleavage sites. These mice showed no macroscopic phenotypic changes, were fertile, and had a normal lifespan. Prevention of collagen XVII shedding interfered neither with skin development nor with epidermal adhesion and differentiation. However, it led to faster wound closure due to accelerated re-epithelialization at the wound edges where shedding of wild-type collagen XVII was strongly induced. Taken together, we have successfully generated a functional non-shedding collagen XVII mouse model, which represents a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiologic relevance of ectodomain shedding during wound regeneration and cancer invasion. PMID:26967482

  10. Generation of a Functional Non-Shedding Collagen XVII Mouse Model: Relevance of Collagen XVII Shedding in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Schlosser, Andreas; Sormunen, Raija; Nyström, Alexander; Sitaru, Cassian; Tasanen, Kaisa; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Collagen XVII is a hemidesmosomal anchorage molecule of basal keratinocytes that promotes stable epidermal-dermal adhesion. One unique feature of collagen XVII is that its collagenous ectodomain is constitutively released from the cell surface by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) through cleavage within its juxtamembranous linker domain. The responsivity of shedding to environmental stimuli and the high stability of the released ectodomain in several tissues suggests functions in cell detachment during epidermal morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration, but its physiologic relevance remained elusive. To investigate this, we generated knock-in mice, which express a functional non-sheddable collagen XVII mutant, with a 41 amino acid deletion in the linker domain spanning all ADAM cleavage sites. These mice showed no macroscopic phenotypic changes, were fertile, and had a normal lifespan. Prevention of collagen XVII shedding interfered neither with skin development nor with epidermal adhesion and differentiation. However, it led to faster wound closure due to accelerated re-epithelialization at the wound edges where shedding of wild-type collagen XVII was strongly induced. Taken together, we have successfully generated a functional non-shedding collagen XVII mouse model, which represents a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiologic relevance of ectodomain shedding during wound regeneration and cancer invasion.

  11. Evaluation of human amniotic membrane as a wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft donor sites.

    PubMed

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Rohleder, Nils H; Eddicks, Matthias; Baumann, Claudia M; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Wolff, Klaus-D; Drecoll, Enken; Steinstraesser, Lars; Hennerbichler, Simone; Kesting, Marco R

    2014-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has been used as a biomaterial in various surgical procedures and exceeds some qualities of common materials. We evaluated HAM as wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft (STSG) donor sites in a swine model (Part A) and a clinical trial (Part B). Part A: STSG donor sites in 4 piglets were treated with HAM or a clinically used conventional polyurethane (PU) foil (n = 8 each). Biopsies were taken on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 and investigated immunohistochemically for alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA: wound contraction marker), von Willebrand factor (vWF: angiogenesis), Ki-67 (cell proliferation), and laminin (basement membrane integrity). Part B: STSG donor sites in 45 adult patients (16 female/29 male) were treated with HAM covered by PU foam, solely by PU foam, or PU foil/paraffin gauze (n = 15 each). Part A revealed no difference in the rate of wound closure between groups. HAM showed improved esthetic results and inhibitory effects on cicatrization. Angioneogenesis was reduced, and basement membrane formation was accelerated in HAM group. Part B: no difference in re-epithelialization/infection rate was found. HAM caused less ichor exudation and less pruritus. HAM has no relevant advantage over conventional dressings but might be a cost-effective alternative.

  12. The use of bioactive wound dressing, stimulating epithelial regeneration of IIIa-degree burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Ermolov, A S; Smirnov, S V; Khvatov, V B; Istranov, L P; Koniushko, O I; Kolokolchikova, E G; Sychevsky, M V; Bocharova, V S

    2008-07-01

    Clinical and morphological comparison of wound healing after transplantation of living cultured allofibroblast on days 1-2 after the injury, collagen-1-based dressing with PDGF-BB, and traditional dressing with levomecol ointment showed that bioactive dressing accelerated wound epithelialization (5-7 days vs. 20-22 days with gauze dressing); the incidence of suppurative complications decreased, no crust formed, and epithelialization was not associated with the formation of a hypertrophic cicatrix. Biological dressing based on living cultured allofibroblasts and collagen-1 with PDGF-BB exhibited equal stimulatory effects on burn wound healing.

  13. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  14. Tools for Closure Project and Contract Management: Development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, C. M.; Sheppard, F. R.

    2002-02-26

    This paper details the development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline - an innovative project management effort undertaken to ensure proactive management of the Rocky Flats Closure Contract in support of the Department's goal for achieving the safe closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in December 2006. The accelerated closure of RFETS is one of the most prominent projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management program. As the first major former weapons plant to be remediated and closed, it is a first-of-kind effort requiring the resolution of multiple complex technical and institutional challenges. Most significantly, the closure of RFETS is dependent upon the shipment of all special nuclear material and wastes to other DOE sites. The Department is actively working to strengthen project management across programs, and there is increasing external interest in this progress. The development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline represents a groundbreaking and cooperative effort to formalize the management of such a complex project across multiple sites and organizations. It is original in both scope and process, however it provides a useful precedent for the other ongoing project management efforts within the Environmental Management program.

  15. The effects of caffeine on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Sawaya, Andrew; Yin, Natalie; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-10-01

    The purine alkaloid caffeine is a major component of many beverages such as coffee and tea. Caffeine and its metabolites theobromine and xanthine have been shown to have antioxidant properties. Caffeine can also act as adenosine-receptor antagonist. Although it has been shown that adenosine and antioxidants promote wound healing, the effect of caffeine on wound healing is currently unknown. To investigate the effects of caffeine on processes involved in epithelialisation, we used primary human keratinocytes, HaCaT cell line and ex vivo model of human skin. First, we tested the effects of caffeine on cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration, processes essential for normal wound epithelialisation and closure. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) proliferation assay to test the effects of seven different caffeine doses ranging from 0·1 to 5 mM. We found that caffeine restricted cell proliferation of keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, scratch wound assays performed on keratinocyte monolayers indicated dose-dependent delays in cell migration. Interestingly, adhesion and differentiation remained unaffected in monolayer cultures treated with various doses of caffeine. Using a human ex vivo wound healing model, we tested topical application of caffeine and found that it impedes epithelialisation, confirming in vitro data. We conclude that caffeine, which is known to have antioxidant properties, impedes keratinocyte proliferation and migration, suggesting that it may have an inhibitory effect on wound healing and epithelialisation. Therefore, our findings are more in support of a role for caffeine as adenosine-receptor antagonist that would negate the effect of adenosine in promoting wound healing.

  16. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 μg) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production. PMID:25879627

  17. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-04-14

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 μg) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production.

  18. Epithelial gap closure governed by forces and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladoux, Benoit

    The closure of gaps within epithelia is crucial to maintain the integrity and the homeostasis of the tissue during wound healing or cell extrusion processes. Cells mediate gap closure through either the assembly of multicellular actin-based contractile cables (purse-string contraction) or the protrusive activity of border cells into the gap (cell crawling). I will present experimental data and numerical modeling that show how these mechanisms can mutually interact to promote efficient epithelial gap closure and how mechanical constraints can regulate these mechanisms. I will first present how geometrical constraints dictate mechanisms of epithelial gap closure. We determine the importance of tissue shape during closure and the role of curvature of cell boundaries in this process. An essential difference between the two closure mechanisms is that cell crawling always pulls the edge of the tissue forward (i.e. towards the gap) while purse string pulls the edge forward or backwards depending on the local geometry. Our study demonstrates how the interplay between these two mechanisms is crucial for closing gaps and wounds, which naturally come in arbitrary shapes. Then I will focus on epithelial closure mechanism during cell extrusion. Within confluent cell layers, cellular motions coupled between neighbors are tightly regulated by the packing density of the epithelium inducing drastic changes in the dynamics of these tissues. I will show how cell density and tissue mechanics regulate the extrusion of cells within a confluent epithelial cell sheet, simultaneously measuring collective movements and traction forces. Epithelial packing and collective cell dynamics dictate the modes of cellular extrusions from lamellipodia crawling of the neighboring cells at low densities to coordinated actin-based contractile purse-string mechanism at higher density.

  19. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  1. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Darabadi, Siamak; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Farshid, Amir-Abbas; Baradar-Jalili, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg(-1), IV) was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05). Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05). We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  2. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing.

  3. [Standardized wound documentation of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Deutschle, G; Coerper, S; Witte, M; Becker, H D

    1999-01-01

    Owing to the long periods of treatment and multi-factoral etiology of chronic wounds, standardized wound documentation is necessary to enable judgement of the course of healing. We have developed a documentation system which permits a standardized assessment of chronic wounds by means of defined parameters and graded divisions. Besides containing the diagnostic and therapeutic measures which have been carried out, the documentation should also contain parameters of wound healing. These are the following: wound localisation, size of wound, degree of injury, infection, and wound morphology. Planimetry and photographic documentation complete the documentation. Thus a documented course of healing can be presented, which enables rapid retrospective analysis and, if needed, a change in therapeutic approach at an early stage. This complete, exact documentation is required by modern administration of justice and is a protection against the reversal of the onus of proof in lawsuits. The extent of documentation can be adapted to the individual needs of the institution responsible for treatment. However, a minimal amount of documentation should always include localisation of the wound, size, the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, and complications if any. PMID:10436529

  4. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  5. A potential wound-healing-promoting peptide from salamander skin.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Liu, Han; Shen, Chuanbin; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Lai, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Although it is well known that wound healing proceeds incredibly quickly in urodele amphibians, such as newts and salamanders, little is known about skin-wound healing, and no bioactive/effector substance that contributes to wound healing has been identified from these animals. As a step toward understanding salamander wound healing and skin regeneration, a potential wound-healing-promoting peptide (tylotoin; KCVRQNNKRVCK) was identified from salamander skin of Tylototriton verrucosus. It shows comparable wound-healing-promoting ability (EC50=11.14 μg/ml) with epidermal growth factor (EGF; NSDSECPLSHDGYCLHDGVCMYIEALDKYACNCVVGYIGERCQYRDLKWWELR) in a murine model of full-thickness dermal wound. Tylotoin directly enhances the motility and proliferation of keratinocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, resulting in accelerated reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation in the wound site. Tylotoin also promotes the release of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), which are essential in the wound healing response. Gene-encoded tylotoin secreted in salamander skin is possibly an effector molecule for skin wound healing. This study may facilitate understanding of the cellular and molecular events that underlie quick wound healing in salamanders.

  6. An Assessment of Wound Healing Potential of Argyreia speciosa Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Rawat, Bindu; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Venkateswara Rao, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    In North India, poultice of young unfolded leaves of Argyreia speciosa Linn. (Convolvulaceae) is used for healing wounds. In order to find scientific evidence for the traditional utilization of leaves of A. speciosa in wound healing, this investigation was carried out. A linear incision wound of about 3 cm in length and 2 mm in depth and circular excision wound of 177 mm2 full thickness were made on the dorsal region of separate groups (n = 5) of anesthetized Swiss albino mice. A simple ointment, developed by including ethanol, ethanol-water, and water extracts (10% each, separately) of A. speciosa, was applied topically to mice once daily for 14 days after wounding. To evaluate the effect of each extract, wound contraction, epithelization period, wound breaking strength, and hydroxyproline content were determined. The water extract of A. speciosa showed accelerated wound healing activity as evidenced by fast wound contraction (96.30 ± 0.52%; P < 0.01), rapid epithelization period (11.40 ± 0.60 days; P < 0.001), greater wound breaking strength (376.56 ± 21.16 g; P < 0.001), and higher hydroxyproline content (16.49 ± 1.12 mg/g; P < 0.05) of granulation tissue. The present report supports the traditional use of Argyreia speciosa leaves for wound healing and signify its relevant therapeutic potential. PMID:24688387

  7. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  8. Evaluation of Topical Tocopherol Cream on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Teoh Seong; Abd Latiff, Azian; Abd Hamid, Noor Aini; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah bt; Mazlan, Musalmah

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common cause of delayed wound healing. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of topical administration of tocopherol cream on the wound healing process in diabetic rats. The study was conducted using 18 male Sprague Dawley rats which were divided into three groups: (I) diabetic rats receiving control cream (n = 6), (II) diabetic rats receiving 0.06% tocopherol cream (n = 6), and (III) diabetic rats receiving 0.29% tocopherol cream (n = 6). Four cutaneous wounds were created at the dorsal region of the rats. Wound healing was assessed by total protein content, rate of wound closure estimation, and histological studies on the tenth day after wounding. Tocopherol treatment enhanced the wound healing process by increasing rate of wound closure and total protein content significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. Histological observation also showed better organized epithelium and more collagen fibers in the tocopherol treated groups. Application of tocopherol cream enhances wound healing process in diabetic condition which is known to cause delay in wound healing. PMID:23097676

  9. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Wound Healing in Mice in Relation to Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rongjian; Wasser, Martin; Du, Tiehua; Ng, Wee Thong; Halliwell, Barry

    2012-01-01

    It has been established that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are produced in wounds and is required for optimal healing. Yet at the same time, there is evidence that excessive oxidative damage is correlated with poor-healing wounds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether topical application of H2O2 can modulate wound healing and if its effects are related to oxidative damage. Using a C57BL/6 mice excision wound model, H2O2 was found to enhance angiogenesis and wound closure at 10 mM but retarded wound closure at 166 mM. The delay in closure was also associated with decreased connective tissue formation, increased MMP-8 and persistent neutrophil infiltration. Wounding was found to increase oxidative lipid damage, as measured by F2-isoprostanes, and nitrative protein damage, as measured by 3-nitrotyrosine. However H2O2 treatment did not significantly increase oxidative and nitrative damage even at concentrations that delay wound healing. Hence the detrimental effects of H2O2 may not involve oxidative damage to the target molecules studied. PMID:23152875

  10. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is involved in airway epithelial wound repair.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Katherine R; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2010-11-01

    The role of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial wound repair was investigated using normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and a human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) of serous gland origin. Measurements of wound repair were performed using continuous impedance sensing to determine the time course for wound closure. Control experiments showed that the increase in impedance corresponding to cell migration into the wound was blocked by treatment with the actin polymerization inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Time lapse imaging revealed that NHBE and Calu-3 cell wound closure was dependent on cell migration, and that movement occurred as a collective sheet of cells. Selective inhibition of CFTR activity with CFTR(inh)-172 or short hairpin RNA silencing of CFTR expression produced a significant delay in wound repair. The CF cell line UNCCF1T also exhibited significantly slower migration than comparable normal airway epithelial cells. Inhibition of CFTR-dependent anion transport by treatment with CFTR(inh)-172 slowed wound closure to the same extent as silencing CFTR protein expression, indicating that ion transport by CFTR plays a critical role in migration. Moreover, morphologic analysis of migrating cells revealed that CFTR inhibition or silencing significantly reduced lamellipodia protrusion. These findings support the conclusion that CFTR participates in airway epithelial wound repair by a mechanism involving anion transport that is coupled to the regulation of lamellipodia protrusion at the leading edge of the cell.

  11. Sternal exploration or closure

    MedlinePlus

    ... M, Austin K, Coulen C, Boyle D. Implementing evidence-based practice findings to decrease postoperative sternal wound infections following open heart surgery. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. October 2005; 20(5): ...

  12. Surgical adhesives for laser-assisted wound closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Diane E.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2001-10-01

    Solid protein solder-doped polymer membranes were developed for laser-assisted tissue repair. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and salt particles, using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The membranes provided a porous scaffold that readily absorbed the traditional protein solder composed of serum albumin, indocyanine green dye, and de-ionized water. In vitro investigations were conducted to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the new membranes. These parameters included PLGA copolymer and PLGA/PEG blend ratios, membrane pore size, initial albumin weight fraction, and laser irradiance used to denature the solder. Altering the PLGA copolymer ratio had little effect on repair strength, however such variations are known to influence the degradation rate of the membranes. The repair strength increased with increased membrane pore size and bovine serum albumin concentration. The addition of PEG during the membrane casting stage increased the flexibility of the membranes but not necessarily the repair strength. Typically, the repair strength increased with increasing irradiance from 12 to 18 W/cm2. The new solder-doped polymer membranes provided all of the benefits associated with solid protein solders including high repair strength and improved edge coaptation. In addition, the flexible, moldable nature of the new membranes offers the capability of tailoring the membranes to a wide range of clinically relevant geometries.

  13. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  14. Blue light does not impair wound healing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Masson-Meyers, Daniela Santos; Bumah, Violet Vakunseh; Enwemeka, Chukuka Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Irradiation with red or near infrared light promotes tissue repair, while treatment with blue light is known to be antimicrobial. Consequently, it is thought that infected wounds could benefit more from combined blue and red/infrared light therapy; but there is a concern that blue light may slow healing. We investigated the effect of blue 470nm light on wound healing, in terms of wound closure, total protein and collagen synthesis, growth factor and cytokines expression, in an in vitro scratch wound model. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured for 48h until confluent. Then a linear scratch wound was created and irradiated with 3, 5, 10 or 55J/cm(2). Control plates were not irradiated. Following 24h of incubation, cells were fixed and stained for migration and fluorescence analyses and the supernatant collected for quantification of total protein, hydroxyproline, bFGF, IL-6 and IL-10. The results showed that wound closure was similar for groups treated with 3, 5 and 10J/cm(2), with a slight improvement with the 5J/cm(2) dose, and slower closure with 55J/cm(2) p<0.001). Total protein concentration increased after irradiation with 3, 5 and 10J/cm(2), reaching statistical significance at 5J/cm(2) compared to control (p<0.0001). However, hydroxyproline levels did not differ between groups. Similarly, bFGF and IL-10 concentrations did not differ between groups, but IL-6 concentration decreased progressively as fluence increased (p<0.0001). Fluorescence analysis showed viable cells regardless of irradiation fluence. We conclude that irradiation with blue light at low fluence does not impair in vitro wound healing. The significant decrease in IL-6 suggests that 470nm light is anti-inflammatory.

  15. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Niels A J; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M; Wong, Ronald J; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Brouwer, Katrien M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E L; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  16. New Guar Biopolymer Silver Nanocomposites for Wound Healing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Md Farooque; Das, Suvadra; Roy, Partha; Datta, Sriparna; Mukherjee, Arup

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is an innate physiological response that helps restore cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Selective biodegradable and biocompatible polymer materials have provided useful scaffolds for wound healing and assisted cellular messaging. In the present study, guar gum, a polymeric galactomannan, was intrinsically modified to a new cationic biopolymer guar gum alkylamine (GGAA) for wound healing applications. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agnp) were further impregnated in GGAA for extended evaluations in punch wound models in rodents. SEM studies showed silver nanoparticles well dispersed in the new guar matrix with a particle size of ~18 nm. In wound healing experiments, faster healing and improved cosmetic appearance were observed in the new nanobiomaterial treated group compared to commercially available silver alginate cream. The total protein, DNA, and hydroxyproline contents of the wound tissues were also significantly higher in the treated group as compared with the silver alginate cream (P < 0.05). Silver nanoparticles exerted positive effects because of their antimicrobial properties. The nanobiomaterial was observed to promote wound closure by inducing proliferation and migration of the keratinocytes at the wound site. The derivatized guar gum matrix additionally provided a hydrated surface necessary for cell proliferation. PMID:24175306

  17. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Mughal, Mohamed R; Okun, Eitan; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; McCaffery, Michael; Seal, Sudipta; Mattson, Mark P

    2013-03-01

    Rapid and effective wound healing requires a coordinated cellular response involving fibroblasts, keratinocytes and vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Impaired wound healing can result in multiple adverse health outcomes and, although antibiotics can forestall infection, treatments that accelerate wound healing are lacking. We now report that topical application of water soluble cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nanoceria) accelerates the healing of full-thickness dermal wounds in mice by a mechanism that involves enhancement of the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts, keratinocytes and VECs. The Nanoceria penetrated into the wound tissue and reduced oxidative damage to cellular membranes and proteins, suggesting a therapeutic potential for topical treatment of wounds with antioxidant nanoparticles.

  18. Wound healing in porcine skin following low-output carbon dioxide laser irradiation of the incision

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.K.; Garden, J.M.; Taute, P.M.; Leibovich, S.J.; Lautenschlager, E.P.; Hartz, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Wound healing of scalpel incisions to the depth of adipose tissue closed with conventional methods was compared with closure by low-output carbon dioxide laser irradiation. In 3 Pitman-Moore minipigs wound healing was evaluated at intervals from 1 to 90 days by the following methods: clinical variables of wound healing; formation of the basement membrane components bullous pemphigoid antigen, laminin, and fibronectin; and histological evaluation of the regeneration of the epidermis, neovascularization, and elastin and collagen formation. There was no significant difference in healing between wounds closed by the various conventional methods and by the low-output carbon dioxide laser.

  19. The electric field near human skin wounds declines with age and provides a non-invasive indicator of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Li, Changyi; Narsing, Suman; Pariser, David M.; Lui, Kaying

    2011-01-01

    Due to the transepidermal potential of 15-50 mV, inside positive, an injury current is driven out of all human skin wounds. The flow of this current generates a lateral electric field within the epidermis that is more negative at the wound edge than at regions more lateral from the wound edge1. Electric fields in this region could be as large as 40 mV/mm2, and electric fields of this magnitude have been shown to stimulate human keratinocyte migration toward the wounded region3. After flowing out of the wound, the current returns through the space between the epidermis and stratum corneum, generating a lateral field above the epidermis in the opposite direction. Here we report the results from the first clinical trial designed to measure this lateral electric field adjacent to human skin wounds non-invasively. Using a new instrument, the Dermacorder®, we found that the mean lateral electric field in the space between the epidermis and stratum corneum adjacent to a lancet wound in 18-25 year olds is 107-148 mV/mm, 48% larger on average than that in 65-80 year olds. We also conducted extensive measurements of the lateral electric field adjacent to mouse wounds as they healed and compared this field with histological sections through the wound to determine the correlation between the electric field and the rate of epithelial wound closure. Immediately after wounding the average lateral electric field was 122 ± 9 mV/mm. When the wound is filled in with a thick, disorganized epidermal layer, the mean field falls to 79 ± 4 mV/mm. Once this epidermis forms a compact structure with only three cell layers, the mean field is 59 ± 5 mV/mm. Thus, the peak-to-peak spatial variation in surface potential is largest in fresh wounds and slowly declines as the wound closes. The rate of wound healing is slightly greater when wounds are kept moist as expected but we could find no correlation between the amplitude of the electric field and the rate of wound healing. PMID:22092802

  20. Wound care: biofilm and its impact on the latest treatment modalities for ulcerations of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2012-06-01

    Biofilm is an increasingly important topic of discussion in the care of the chronic diabetic foot wound. Treatment modalities have focused on biofilm reduction or eradication through debridement techniques, topical therapies, negative pressure therapy, and ultrasound. In addition, advanced wound healing modalities, such as bioengineered alternative tissues, require optimal wound bed preparation with specific consideration of biofilm reduction before their application. Although fundamental principles of diabetic wound care still apply, critical thought must be given to biofilm before implementing a treatment plan for the closure of these complex wounds.

  1. Central Forehead Reconstruction with a Simple Primary Vertical Linear Closure

    PubMed Central

    Tajirian, Ani; Tsui, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Following Mohs surgery, medium-to-large defects on the central forehead can often be complicated to surgically reconstruct. In this paper, the authors discuss possible central forehead reconstructions and report their successful experience employing a simple primary vertical linear closure with a special technique to demarcate forehead rhytides rather than performing an overly complicated flap or graft. Case report: The patient was a 57-year-old man who presented with a broad superficial basal cell carcinoma that required treatment with Mohs surgery. For the resulting defect, the authors elected to perform a complex linear repair taking advantage of substantial side-to-side laxity in the supraperiosteal plane and carefully labeling and matching each forehead rhytide across the defect as the wound was sutured. Conclusion: The findings of this case demonstrate that medium-to-large wounds of the central forehead can be aesthetically repaired with a simple primary vertical linear closure. Carefully mapping and labeling horizontal forehead rhytides with a sterile surgical marking pen prior to anesthesia ensures accurate approximation during wound closure. PMID:27672419

  2. Comparison of Subcuticular Suture Materials in Cesarean Skin Closure

    PubMed Central

    Hasdemir, Pınar Solmaz; Guvenal, Tevfik; Ozcakir, Hasan Tayfun; Koyuncu, Faik Mumtaz; Dinc Horasan, Gonul; Erkan, Mustafa; Oruc Koltan, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Comparison of the rate of wound complications, pain, and patient satisfaction based on used subcuticular suture material. Methods. A total of 250 consecutive women undergoing primary and repeat cesarean section with low transverse incision were prospectively included. The primary outcome was wound complication rate including infection, dehiscence, hematoma, and hypertrophic scar formation within a 6-week period after operation. Secondary outcomes were skin closure time, the need for use of additional analgesic agent, pain score on numeric rating scale, cosmetic score, and patient scar satisfaction scale. Results. Absorbable polyglactin was used in 108 patients and nonabsorbable polypropylene was used in 142 patients. Wound complication rates were similar in primary and repeat cesarean groups based on the type of suture material. Skin closure time is longer in nonabsorbable suture material group in both primary and repeat cesarean groups. There was no difference between groups in terms of postoperative pain, need for additional analgesic use, late phase pain, and itching at the scar. Although the cosmetic results tended to be better in the nonabsorbable group in primary surgery patients, there was no significant difference in the visual satisfaction of the patients. Conclusions. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture materials are comparable in cesarean section operation skin closure. PMID:26413566

  3. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans.

    PubMed

    Aljehani, Yasser; Al-Matar, Zahra; Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space. PMID:27660730

  4. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space.

  5. The Application of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device in the Management of Empyema Necessitans

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is gaining popularity in the management of many types of acute and chronic wounds. The use of VAC devices in thoracic surgery is limited, but it appears to be promising in complex cases of empyema thoraces. We report a case of empyema necessitans, in which VAC was used to achieve complete wound healing after open drainage which was communicating with the pleural space. PMID:27660730

  6. Radiation combined injury models to study the effects of interventions and wound biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zawaski, Janice A; Yates, Charles R; Miller, Duane D; Kaffes, Caterina C; Sabek, Omaima M; Afshar, Solmaz F; Young, Daniel A; Yang, Yunzhi; Gaber, M Waleed

    2014-12-01

    In the event of a nuclear detonation, a considerable number of projected casualties will suffer from combined radiation exposure and burn and/or wound injury. Countermeasure assessment in the setting of radiation exposure combined with dermal injury is hampered by a lack of animal models in which the effects of interventions have been characterized. To address this need, we used two separate models to characterize wound closure. The first was an open wound model in mice to study the effect of wound size in combination with whole-body 6 Gy irradiation on the rate of wound closure, animal weight and survival (morbidity). In this model the addition of interventions, wound closure, subcutaneous vehicle injection, topical antiseptic and topical antibiotics were studied to measure their effect on healing and survival. The second was a rat closed wound model to study the biomechanical properties of a healed wound at 10 days postirradiation (irradiated with 6 or 7.5 Gy). In addition, complete blood counts were performed and wound pathology by staining with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, CD68 and Ki67. In the mouse open wound model, we found that wound size and morbidity were positively correlated, while wound size and survival were negatively correlated. Regardless of the wound size, the addition of radiation exposure delayed the healing of the wound by approximately 5-6 days. The addition of interventions caused, at a minimum, a 30% increase in survival and improved mean survival by ∼9 days. In the rat closed wound model we found that radiation exposure significantly decreased all wound biomechanical measurements as well as white blood cell, platelet and red blood cell counts at 10 days post wounding. Also, pathological changes showed a loss of dermal structure, thickening of dermis, loss of collagen/epithelial hyperplasia and an increased density of macrophages. In conclusion, we have characterized the effect of a changing wound size in combination with radiation

  7. Optimizing Wound Bed Preparation With Collagenase Enzymatic Debridement

    PubMed Central

    McCallon, Stanley K.; Weir, Dorothy; Lantis, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Difficult-to-heal and chronic wounds affect tens of millions of people worldwide. In the U.S. alone, the direct cost for their treatment exceeds $25 billion. Yet despite advances in wound research and treatment that have markedly improved patient care, wound healing is often delayed for weeks or months. For venous and diabetic ulcers, complete wound closure is achieved in as few as 25%–50% of chronic or hard-to-heal wounds. Wound bed preparation and the consistent application of appropriate and effective debridement techniques are recommended for the optimized treatment of chronic wounds. The TIME paradigm (Tissue, Inflammation/infection, Moisture balance and Edge of wound) provides a model to remove barriers to healing and optimize the healing process. While we often think of debridement as an episodic event that occurs in specific care giver/patient interface. There is the possibility of a maintenance debridement in which the chronic application of a medication can assist in both the macroscopic and microscopic debridement of a wound. We review the various debridement therapies available to clinicians in the United States, and explore the characteristics and capabilities of clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO), a type of enzymatic debridement, that potentially allows for epithelialization while debriding. It appears that in the case of CCO it may exert this influences by removal of the necrotic plug while promoting granulation and sustaining epithelialization. It is also easily combined with other methods of debridement, is selective to necrotic tissue, and has been safely used in various populations. We review the body of evidence has indicated that this concept of maintenance debridement, especially when combined episodic debridement may add a cost an efficacious, safe and cost-effective choice for debridement of cutaneous ulcers and burn wounds and it will likely play an expanding role in all phases of wound bed preparation. PMID:26442207

  8. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and