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Sample records for accelerates corrosion problems

  1. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  2. Solving A Corrosion Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion problem, it turned out, stemmed from the process called electrolysis. When two different metals are in contact, an electrical potential is set up between them; when the metals are surrounded by an electrolyte, or a conducting medium, the resulting reaction causes corrosion, often very rapid corrosion. In this case the different metals were the copper grounding system and the ferry's aluminum hull; the dockside salt water in which the hull was resting served as the electrolyte. After identifying the source of the trouble, the Ames engineer provided a solution: a new wire-and-rod grounding system made of aluminum like the ferry's hull so there would no longer be dissimilar metals in contact. Ames research on the matter disclosed that the problem was not unique to the Golden Gate ferries. It is being experienced by many pleasure boat operators who are probably as puzzled about it as was the Golden Gate Transit Authority.

  3. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  4. Accelerating Corrosion in Solar-Cell Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H. M.

    1986-01-01

    In simple electrochemical cell, two silicon solar cells serve as anode and cathode, respectively. Electrolytic medium and voltage between them accelerate corrosion and migration interactions between cell metal contacts and plastic encapsulant. Degradation of metal contacts becomes evident in few hours. Although developed specifically for cells with Ti/Pd/Ag contacts, technique readily adapted to other metal combinations.

  5. Corrosion and stress corrosion problems associated with the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The problems encountered and the methods used to prevent corrosion and stress corrosion cracking on current space vehicles and aircraft are discussed. Preventing these problems on the Space Shuttle, in particular, by properly using materials that are highly resistant to this phenomenon, is examined in detail.

  6. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  7. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Down hole corrosion: Problems & possible solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.K.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past several years the industry has encountered many production problems in the Antrim play. Among these are calcium carbonate scale, NORM and C02 removal. One problem, the corrosion of steel within the production system, has developed due to the chemical nature of the Antrim gas and water. This corrosion has become a major problem for NOMECO and other operators. This paper will discuss the problem, its source and effects and some possible solutions.

  9. On the Problem of Stress Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, L.

    1946-01-01

    The object of the present work is first to investigate accurately the processes during stress corrosion, in particular, for light metal alloys and, as the first part of the investigation, to determine its laws; and secondly to explain its causes for various alloys and thereby find means for its partial or complete elimination and thus make possible the production of light metal alloys free from any stress corrosion. In the present paper some of the results of the investigation are given and the fundamental problems of stress corrosion discussed.

  10. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  11. Development and application of an information-analytic system on the problem of flow accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Kiselev, A. N.; Shepelev, S. V.; Galanin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    Specific features relating to development of the information-analytical system on the problem of flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant are considered. The results from a statistical analysis of data on the quantity, location, and operating conditions of the elements and preinserted segments of pipelines used in the condensate-feedwater and wet steam paths are presented. The principles of preparing and using the information-analytical system for determining the lifetime to reaching inadmissible wall thinning in elements of pipelines used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered.

  12. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin II Accelerated Corrosion Tests and the Behavior of High-Strength Aluminum Alloys of Different Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    The permanence, with respect to corrosion, of light aluminum alloy sheets of the duralumin type, that is, heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si is discussed. Alloys of this type are subject to surface corrosion and corrosion of the interior by intercrystalline paths. Results are given of accelerated corrosion tests, tensile tests, the effect on corrosion of various alloying elements and heat treatments, electrical resistance measurements, and X-ray examinations.

  13. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  14. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  15. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  16. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  17. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  18. Accelerated corrosion of steel in dry-cast reinforced concrete pipes after initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Brian William

    Instrumented dry-cast reinforced concrete pipe (DC-RCP) specimens in which corrosion of the reinforcing steel had initiated were selected to accelerate the corrosion. Type C and type F DC-RCP were used. An anodic current density of various magnitudes (0.5 muA/cm2, 1 muA/cm2 and 2.5 muA/cm2) was applied during the corrosion propagation stage. The specimens were placed in high humidity and selected specimens were later covered with wet sand. Selected specimens were terminated for visual examination and gravimetric analysis. Typically, the reinforcement potentials during the accelerated corrosion period were more negative for F specimens compared to C specimens. The C specimens experienced ~2x more corrosion than the F specimens. The accumulated corrosion products did not cause cracks. A method was developed that allows for modest corrosion acceleration during the corrosion propagation stage of DC-RCP.

  19. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  20. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  1. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  2. Control problems in very large accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley-Milling, M. C.

    1985-06-01

    There is no fundamental difference of kind in the control requirements between a small and a large accelerator since they are built of the same types of components, which individually have similar control inputs and outputs. The main difference is one of scale; the large machine has many more components of each type, and the distances involved are much greater. Both of these factors must be taken into account in determining the optimum way of carrying out the control functions. Small machines should use standard equipment and software for control as much as possible, as special developments for small quantities cannot normally be justified if all costs are taken into account. On the other hand, the very great number of devices needed for a large machine means that, if special developments can result in simplification, they may make possible an appreciable reduction in the control equipment costs. It is the purpose of this report to look at the special control problems of large accelerators, which the author shall arbitarily define as those with a length of circumference in excess of 10 km, and point out where special developments, or the adoption of developments from outside the accelerator control field, can be of assistance in minimizing the cost of the control system. Most of the first part of this report was presented as a paper to the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference. It has now been extended to include a discussion on the special case of the controls for the SSC.

  3. Corrosion behavior of modified nano carbon black/epoxy coating in accelerated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior and anticorrosion properties of modified carbon black (CB) nanoparticles in epoxy coatings were investigated in accelerated conditions. Nanoparticles of CB were modified by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Dispersion of nanoparticles into epoxy was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The accelerated condition was prepared at 65 °C. CB nanoparticles improved corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. The optimum concentration of CB in the epoxy coating was 0.75 wt%. Results showed that the CB hinder the corrosion due to its barrier properties. CB can decrease the diffusion coefficient of water in the coating with filling the micropores.

  4. Use of software tools for calculating flow accelerated corrosion of nuclear power plant equipment and pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftal', M. M.; Baranenko, V. I.; Gulina, O. M.

    2014-06-01

    The results obtained from calculations of flow accelerated corrosion of equipment and pipelines operating at nuclear power plants constructed on the basis of PWR, VVER, and RBMK reactors carried out using the EKI-02 and EKI-03 software tools are presented. It is shown that the calculation error does not exceed its value indicated in the qualification certificates for these software tools. It is pointed out that calculations aimed at predicting the service life of pipelines and efficient surveillance of flow accelerated corrosion wear are hardly possible without using the above-mentioned software tools.

  5. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marty, Florence; Gueuné, Hervé; Malard, Emilie; Sánchez-Amaya, José M; Sjögren, Lena; Abbas, Ben; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion and the highest corrosion rates (up to 12-times higher than non-stimulated conditions) in the low water zone, persisting after nine months exposure to natural seawater. Correlations between corrosion severity and the abundance and composition of metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) indicated the importance and persistence of specific bacterial populations in accelerated corrosion. One phylotype related to the electrogenic SRB Desulfopila corrodens appeared as the major causative agent of the accelerated corrosion. The similarity of bacterial populations related to sulfur and iron cycles, mineral and tuberculation with those identified in ALWC support the relevance of experimental simulation of tidal conditions in the management of steel corrosion exposed to harbor environments.

  6. Four steps solve crude-tower overhead corrosion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, N.P. )

    1993-07-05

    Hydrochloric acid attack is one of the oldest and best-understood refinery process problems. This would lead one to think that preventing localized hydrochloric acid attack would also be well-understood. Experience, however, indicates that this is far from true. The problem originates with the presence of salt water in crude oils. Most of the salt content of the brine dispersed in crudes is in the form of sodium chloride (NaCl). About 10% of the salt, however, is present as magnesium chloride (MgCl[sub 2]) and calcium chloride (CaCl[sub 2]). In the presence of water and heat, these chloride salts hydrolyze to form HCI. The two-stage overhead system using the hot and cold drum is a design that, despite its widespread use, does not fulfill its objective of stopping crude-tower overhead corrosion. The following program is, in the opinion of the author, the only way to halt overhead corrosion in a crude tower: effective desalting that removes more than 60% of the MgCl[sub 2]; caustic injection down-stream of the desalter to control chlorides in the reflux-drum water draw-off boot; forced water condensation in the crude-tower overhead vapors; and sufficient addition of neutralizing amine to control water boot at a pH of about 6. Finally, there can never be a truly effective replacement for proper desalting. Process Improvement Engineering's experience has repeatedly proven that desalting is the most cost-effective method of controlling hydroscopic hydrochloric acid corrosion. When downstream resid-hydrotreating processes preclude the use of neutralizing caustic, the importance of the desalter is magnified even further.

  7. Cyclotron accelerated beams applied in wear and corrosion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racolta, P. M.; Popa-Simil, L.; Ivanov, E. A.; Alexandreanu, B.

    1996-05-01

    Wear and corrosion processes are characterized by a loss of material that is, for machine parts and components, usually in a micrometer's range. That is why, in the last two decades, many direct applications in machine construction, petrochemical and metallurgical industries based on the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique have been developed. In this paper general working patterns together with a few examples of TLA applications carried out using our laboratory's U-120 Cyclotron are presented. The relation between the counting rate of the radiation originating from the component's irradiated zone and the loss of the worn material can be determined mainly by two methods: the oil circulation method and the remnant radioactivity measuring method. The first method is illustrated with some typical examples such as the optimization of the running-in program of a diesel engine and anti-wear features certifying of lubricant oils. There is also presented an example where the second method mentioned above has been applied to corrosion rate determinations for different kinds of unoxidable steels used in inert gas generator construction.

  8. Methodology and measures for preventing unacceptable flow-accelerated corrosion thinning of pipelines and equipment of NPP power generating units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.; Lovchev, V. N.; Gutsev, D. F.

    2016-10-01

    Problems of metal flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the pipelines and equipment of the condensate- feeding and wet-steam paths of NPP power-generating units (PGU) are examined. Goals, objectives, and main principles of the methodology for the implementation of an integrated program of AO Concern Rosenergoatom for the prevention of unacceptable FAC thinning and for increasing operational flow-accelerated corrosion resistance of NPP EaP are worded (further the Program). A role is determined and potentialities are shown for the use of Russian software packages in the evaluation and prediction of FAC rate upon solving practical problems for the timely detection of unacceptable FAC thinning in the elements of pipelines and equipment (EaP) of the secondary circuit of NPP PGU. Information is given concerning the structure, properties, and functions of the software systems for plant personnel support in the monitoring and planning of the inservice inspection of FAC thinning elements of pipelines and equipment of the secondary circuit of NPP PGUs, which are created and implemented at some Russian NPPs equipped with VVER-1000, VVER-440, and BN-600 reactors. It is noted that one of the most important practical results of software packages for supporting NPP personnel concerning the issue of flow-accelerated corrosion consists in revealing elements under a hazard of intense local FAC thinning. Examples are given for successful practice at some Russian NPP concerning the use of software systems for supporting the personnel in early detection of secondary-circuit pipeline elements with FAC thinning close to an unacceptable level. Intermediate results of working on the Program are presented and new tasks set in 2012 as a part of the updated program are denoted. The prospects of the developed methods and tools in the scope of the Program measures at the stages of design and construction of NPP PGU are discussed. The main directions of the work on solving the problems of flow-accelerated

  9. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics in accelerator physics: radio frequency pulse compression and power transport; computational methods for the computer analysis of microwave components; persistent wakefields associated with waveguide damping of higher order modes; and photonic band gap cavities.

  10. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  11. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  12. The effects of trace impurities in coal-derived liquid fuels on deposition and accelerated high temperature corrosion of cast superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. J.; Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of trace metal impurities in coal-derived liquids on deposition, high temperature corrosion and fouling were examined. Alloys were burner rig tested from 800 to 1100 C and corrosion was evaluated as a function of potential impurities. Actual and doped fuel test were used to define an empirical life prediction equation. An evaluation of inhibitors to reduce or eliminate accelerated corrosion was made. Barium and strontium were found to limit attack. Intermittent application of the inhibitors or silicon additions were found to be effective techniques for controlling deposition without losing the inhibitor benefits. A computer program was used to predict the dew points and compositions of deposits. These predictions were confirmed in deposition test. The potential for such deposits to plug cooling holes of turbine airfoils was evaluated. Tests indicated that, while a potential problem exists, it strongly depended on minor impurity variations.

  13. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  14. (Advanced accelerator physics featuring the problems of small rings)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1989-10-16

    The traveler attended the CERN Accelerator School and Uppsala University short course on Advanced Accelerator Physics held on the University campus, Uppsala, Sweden, from September 18-29, 1989. The course, attended by 81 people, was well conceived, well presented, and informative. The course was organized and specialized on the problems of small rings. The traveler also visited the CELSIUS ring facility of Uppsala University and the CRYRING ring facility of the Manne Siegbahn Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

  15. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin I Practical Aspects of the Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Since aircraft design is tending toward all-metal construction, the strong heat-treatable light aluminum alloy, duralumin (a generic name for a class of heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si), is finding increasing application. Doubt has been expressed concerning the reliability and permanence of these materials. Information is given on the effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of 14-gauge sheet duralumin, heat treated by quenching in hot water after being heated for 15 minutes in a fused nitrate bath at 500 to 510 C. Intercrystalline corrosion and practical aspects of intercrystalline embrittlement are discussed with respect to duralumin.

  16. UNSOLVED PROBLEMS WITH CORROSION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to both corrosion control issues (lead, copper, iron) and to issues of inorganic contaminants that can form or accumulate in distribution system water, pipe scales and distrib...

  17. Corrosion control programs improve profits. Part 1--how to approach the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Byars, H.G.

    1985-11-01

    Internal corrosion control methods used at Prudhoe Bay are presented and the authors describe several steps toward recognizing and solveing problems. The first step is to define the problem, then to review the possible methods. Examples of simple problems are presented, in particular, a sucker-rod pumping lease where wells were beginning to experience rod breasks and tubing leaks.

  18. Optimized planning of in-service inspections of local flow-accelerated corrosion of pipeline elements used in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based units at the Novovoronezh NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Povarov, V. P.; Shipkov, A. A.; Gromov, A. F.; Budanov, V. A.; Golubeva, T. N.

    2015-03-01

    Matters concerned with making efficient use of the information-analytical system on the flow-accelerated corrosion problem in setting up in-service examination of the metal of pipeline elements operating in the secondary coolant circuit of the VVER-440-based power units at the Novovoronezh NPP are considered. The principles used to select samples of pipeline elements in planning ultrasonic thickness measurements for timely revealing metal thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion along with reducing the total amount of measurements in the condensate-feedwater path are discussed.

  19. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of peripheral stents in an accelerated corrosion model: experimental in vitro study of 28 metallic vascular endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Paprottka, Karolin J.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Waggershauser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinical cases of stent-fractures show that corrosion behavior might play a role in these fractures. Implanted in vivo, especially in combination with other implanted foreign materials, these metallic products are exposed to special conditions, which can cause a process of corrosion. Here, we aimed to test the corrosion potential of stents made of different materials in an in vitro setting. METHODS A total of 28 peripheral stents of different materials (nitinol, cobalt-chromium-nickel, tantalum, V4A) and surface treatments (electropolish, mechanical polish, no polish) were tested in vitro. Corrosion was accelerated by applying a constant voltage of 3.5 V and amperage of 1.16 mA in 0.9% NaCl. RESULTS Nitinol stents showed the lowest susceptibility to corrosion and the longest period without damage. The Memotherm II® (BARD Angiomed®) was the only stent that showed neither macroscopic nor microscopic damages. The worst performing material was cobalt-chromium-nickel, which showed corrosion damages about ten times earlier compared to nitinol. Considering the reasons for termination of the test, nitinol stents primarily showed length deficits, while V4A and tantalum stents showed fractures. Cobalt-chromium-nickel stents had multiple fractures or a complete lysis in equal proportions. When placed in direct contact, nitinol stents showed best corrosion resistance, regardless of what material they were combined with. In terms of polishing treatments, electropolished stents performed the best, mechanical-polished stents and those without polishing treatment followed. CONCLUSION The analysis of corrosion behavior may be useful to select the right stent fulfilling the individual needs of the patient within a large number of different stents. PMID:26268301

  20. Innovative Applications of Genetic Algorithms to Problems in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia; Terzic, Balsa; Kramer, Matthew; Zvezdin, Anton; Morozov, Vasiliy; Roblin, Yves; Lin, Fanglei; Jarvis, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a relatively new technique that implements the principles nature uses in biological evolution in order to optimize a multidimensional nonlinear problem. The GA works especially well for problems with a large number of local extrema, where traditional methods (such as conjugate gradient, steepest descent, and others) fail or, at best, underperform. The field of accelerator physics, among others, abounds with problems which lend themselves to optimization via GAs. In this paper, we report on the successful application of GAs in several problems related to the existing CEBAF facility, the proposed MEIC at Jefferson Lab, and a radio frequency (RF) gun based injector. These encouraging results are a step forward in optimizing accelerator design and provide an impetus for application of GAs to other problems in the field. To that end, we discuss the details of the GAs used, including a newly devised enhancement, which leads to improved convergence to the optimum and make recommendations for future GA developments and accelerator applications.

  1. Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2005-08-29

    The sidewall core samples from well 299-E24-19, which were comprised of a mixture of bentonite and silt lens material, had an average porewater chloride concentration of 376 mg/L. The sidewall core samples collected from well 299-E25-46 had calculated porewater chloride concentrations ranging from 1,200 to more than 10,000 mg/L. Clearly, the sidewall core samples tested were capable of generating porewaters with sufficient chloride concentrations to cause corrosion of the stainless steel well casing. Furthermore, analysis of the sidewall core samples yielded a clear relationship between chloride concentration and well casing corrosion. The sidewall core samples containing the greatest amount of chloride, 3000 {micro}g/g of sediment, came from the well that experienced the longest length of casing failure (4.2 feet in well 299-E25-46). All of the sidewall core samples tested from both decommissioned wells contained more chloride than the Wyoming bentonite test material. However, since chloride was present as a trace constituent in all of the sidewall core samples (less than 0.4 weight percent), it is possible that it could have been introduced to the system as a ''contaminant'' contained in the bentonite backfill material. Therefore, it is likely that chloride leached from the bentonite material and/or chloride carried by/as a constituent of the liquid waste stream caused the advanced well casing corrosion found at wells 299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46 via crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The sample of Enviroplug{trademark} No.8 high swelling Wyoming bentonite was characterized for its potential to generate porewaters of sufficient chlorinity to lead to accelerated corrosion of type 304L stainless steel. Overall, the bentonite sample had considerably high water extractable concentrations of sodium, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and alkalinity (measured as calcium carbonate). Interpretation of the laboratory data indicated that the Wyoming bentonite test

  2. Electron mediators accelerate the microbiologically influenced corrosion of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiyu; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Yang, Ke; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-02-01

    In the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron oxidation happens outside sessile cells while the utilization of the electrons released by the oxidation process for sulfate reduction occurs in the SRB cytoplasm. Thus, cross-cell wall electron transfer is needed. It can only be achieved by electrogenic biofilms. This work hypothesized that the electron transfer is a bottleneck in MIC by SRB. To prove this, MIC tests were carried out using 304 stainless steel coupons covered with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757) biofilm in the ATCC 1249 medium. It was found that both riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), two common electron mediators that enhance electron transfer, accelerated pitting corrosion and weight loss on the coupons when 10ppm (w/w) of either of them was added to the culture medium in 7-day anaerobic lab tests. This finding has important implications in MIC forensics and biofilm synergy in MIC that causes billions of dollars of damages to the US industry each year.

  3. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Duffó, Gustavo; Gaillard, Natalia; Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  4. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  5. Half-range acceleration for one-dimensional transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Larsen, E.W.

    1998-12-31

    Researchers have devoted considerable effort to developing acceleration techniques for transport iterations in highly diffusive problems. The advantages and disadvantages of source iteration, rebalance, diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), transport synthetic acceleration (TSA), and projection acceleration methods are documented in the literature and will not be discussed here except to note that no single method has proven to be applicable to all situations. Here, the authors describe a new acceleration method that is based solely on transport sweeps, is algebraically linear (and is therefore amenable to a Fourier analysis), and yields a theoretical spectral radius bounded by one-third for all cases. This method does not introduce spatial differencing difficulties (as is the case for DSA) nor does its theoretical performance degrade as a function of mesh and material properties (as is the case for TSA). Practical simulations of the new method agree with the theoretical predictions, except for scattering ratios very close to unity. At this time, they believe that the discrepancy is due to the effect of boundary conditions. This is discussed further.

  6. Application of nonlinear Krylov acceleration to radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A. T.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    The iterative solution technique used for radiative transfer is normally nested, with outer thermal iterations and inner transport iterations. We implement a nonlinear Krylov acceleration (NKA) method in the PDT code for radiative transfer problems that breaks nesting, resulting in more thermal iterations but significantly fewer total inner transport iterations. Using the metric of total inner transport iterations, we investigate a crooked-pipe-like problem and a pseudo-shock-tube problem. Using only sweep preconditioning, we compare NKA against a typical inner / outer method employing GMRES / Newton and find NKA to be comparable or superior. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of applying diffusion-based preconditioning to grey problems in conjunction with NKA. (authors)

  7. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  8. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  9. Projected Life of the SLAC Linac Braze Joints: Braze integrity and corrosion of cooling water hardware on accelerator sections

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, W.F.; Garwin, E.L.; /SLAC

    2006-07-17

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the condition of braze joints and cooling water hardware from an accelerator section after prolonged use. Metallographic analysis was used to examine critical sites on an accelerator section that had been in use for more than 30 years. The end flange assembly showed no internal operational damage or external environmental effects. The cavity cylinder stack showed no internal operational damage however the internal surface was highly oxidized. The internal surface of the cooling water tubing was uniformly corroding at a rate of about 1 mil per year and showed no evidence of pitting. Tee fitting internal surfaces are corroding at non-uniform rates due to general corrosion and pitting. Remaining service life of the cooling water jacket is estimated to be about 20 years or year 2027. At this time, water supply pressure will exceed allowable fitting pressure due to corrosion of tubing walls.

  10. Taking Advantage of a Corrosion Problem to Solve a Pollution Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomar-Ramirez, Carlos F.; Bazan-Martinez, Jose A.; Palomar-Pardave, Manuel E.; Romero-Romo, Mario A.; Ramirez-Silva, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Some simple chemistry is used to demonstrate how Fe(II) ions, formed during iron corrosion in acid aqueous solution, can reduce toxic Cr(VI) species, forming soluble Cr(III) and Fe(III) ions. These ions, in turn, can be precipitated by neutralizing the solution. The procedure provides a treatment for industrial wastewaters commonly found in…

  11. Fiber optic approach for detecting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Davis, Claire; McAdam, Grant; Wang, Tianyu; Monro, Tanya M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a multi-billion dollar problem faced by industry. The ability to monitor the hidden metallic structure of an aircraft for corrosion could result in greater availability of existing aircraft fleets. Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fiber sensors are inherently suited towards this application, as they are extremely lightweight, robust, and suitable both for distributed measurements and for embedding in otherwise inaccessible corrosion-prone areas. By functionalizing the fiber with chemosensors sensitive to corrosion by-products, we demonstrate in-situ kinetic measurements of accelerated corrosion in simulated aluminum aircraft joints.

  12. Regional strategies for the accelerating global problem of groundwater depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Gleeson, Tom

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater--the world's largest freshwater resource--is critically important for irrigated agriculture and hence for global food security. Yet depletion is widespread in large groundwater systems in both semi-arid and humid regions of the world. Excessive extraction for irrigation where groundwater is slowly renewed is the main cause of the depletion, and climate change has the potential to exacerbate the problem in some regions. Globally aggregated groundwater depletion contributes to sea-level rise, and has accelerated markedly since the mid-twentieth century. But its impacts on water resources are more obvious at the regional scale, for example in agriculturally important parts of India, China and the United States. Food production in such regions can only be made sustainable in the long term if groundwater levels are stabilized. To this end, a transformation is required in how we value, manage and characterize groundwater systems. Technical approaches--such as water diversion, artificial groundwater recharge and efficient irrigation--have failed to balance regional groundwater budgets. They need to be complemented by more comprehensive strategies that are adapted to the specific social, economic, political and environmental settings of each region.

  13. Corrosion problems in Ti/KC1O/sub 4/ loaded devices when subjected to humid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Massis, T.M.; Healey, J.T.; Huskisson, D.H.; Perkins, W.G.

    1980-01-01

    A piston motor/igniter loaded with a Ti/KClO/sub 4/ pyrotechnic and sealed with a silicone adhesive exhibited serious corrosion problems during aging. Five 24-hour thermal cycles between room temperature and 71/sup 0/C at 90% relative humidity resulted in extensive surface corrosion of the Kovar pins and severe stress corrosion cracking of the Kovar pins in the vicinity of the bridgewire weld. No corrosion or cracking of the Nichrome bridgewire was observed. Similar results were observed after 60 days at 50% and 90% relative humidity at room temperature. Tests at ambient relative humidity and room temperature caused limited surface corrosion and no observable cracking. It was determined that these problems resulted from the combined presence of chlorine containing contaminants and atmospheric moisture. Chlorine was detected in both the surface corrosion product and the corrosion product in the subsurface cracks. The absence of reaction and/or morphological alteration of the Ti/KClO/sub 4/ at the pyrotechnic interface with the Kovar indicated the pyrotechnic was not involved in the corrosion reaction, and, hence, the chlorine was present in the surface contamination on the Kovar pins. The aging tests indicate that external moisture was involved in the corrosion reaction. Calculation and experimentation have shown the silicone adhesive used to seal these devices to be permeable to water vapor, and the moisture conditions inside the devices equilibrated with external conditions within a few hours. Corrosion and cracking could be solved by eliminating the source of moisture by hermetically sealing the devices. Tests of hermetically sealed units have confirmed this conclusion.

  14. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  15. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  16. On some theoretical problems of laser wake-field accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J. K.; Kotaki, H.; Mori, M.; Kando, M.

    2016-06-01

    > Enhancement of the quality of laser wake-field accelerated (LWFA) electron beams implies the improvement and controllability of the properties of the wake waves generated by ultra-short pulse lasers in underdense plasmas. In this work we present a compendium of useful formulas giving relations between the laser and plasma target parameters allowing one to obtain basic dependences, e.g. the energy scaling of the electrons accelerated by the wake field excited in inhomogeneous media including multi-stage LWFA accelerators. Consideration of the effects of using the chirped laser pulse driver allows us to find the regimes where the chirp enhances the wake field amplitude. We present an analysis of the three-dimensional effects on the electron beam loading and on the unlimited LWFA acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas. Using the conditions of electron trapping to the wake-field acceleration phase we analyse the multi-equal stage and multiuneven stage LWFA configurations. In the first configuration the energy of fast electrons is a linear function of the number of stages, and in the second case, the accelerated electron energy grows exponentially with the number of stages. The results of the two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations presented here show the high quality electron acceleration in the triple stage injection-acceleration configuration.

  17. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  18. Electrostatic double layers as auroral particle accelerators - a problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, D. A.; Courtier, G. M.

    2015-04-01

    A search of the Annales Geophysicae database shows that double layers and other quasi-static electric potential structures have been invoked hundreds of times since the year 2000 as being the agents of auroral electron acceleration. This is despite the fact that energy transfer by conservative fields has been known for some 200 years to be impossible. Attention is drawn to a long-standing interpretation of the acceleration process in terms of the dynamic fields of electrostatic waves.

  19. Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Legore, Virginia L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 3.13 and 3.14. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in August 2005. An overall goal of the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and per guidance in DOE Order 5400.1, includes characterizing and defining trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of the environment. To meet these goals, numerous Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) monitoring wells have been installed throughout the Hanford Site. In 2003, it was determined that two RCRA monitoring wells (299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46) in Waste Management Area (WMA) A-AX failed due to rapid corrosion of the stainless steel casing over a significant length of the wells. Complete casing corrosion occurred between 276.6 and 277.7 feet below ground surface (bgs) in well 299- E24-19 and from 274.4 to 278.6 feet bgs in well 299-E25-46. CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from PNNL to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment samples collected in the vicinity of the WMA A-AX from depths comparable to those where the rapid corrosion occurred in hopes of ascertaining the cause of the rapid corrosion.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Addison, Owen; Baker, Stephen J; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-09-14

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4-7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide inhibits or accelerates biomedical titanium corrosion depending on environmental acidity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Addison, Owen; Baker, Stephen J; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are routinely used as biomedical implants and are usually considered to be corrosion resistant under physiological conditions. However, during inflammation, chemical modifications of the peri-implant environment including acidification occur. In addition certain biomolecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls and driver of inflammation have been shown to interact strongly with Ti and modify its corrosion resistance. Gram-negative microbes are abundant in biofilms which form on dental implants. The objective was to investigate the influence of LPS on the corrosion properties of relevant biomedical Ti substrates as a function of environmental acidity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify Ti dissolution following immersion testing in physiological saline for three common biomedical grades of Ti (ASTM Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 5). Complementary electrochemical tests including anodic and cathodic polarisation experiments and potentiostatic measurements were also conducted. All three Ti alloys were observed to behave similarly and ion release was sensitive to pH of the immersion solution. However, LPS significantly inhibited Ti release under the most acidic conditions (pH 2), which may develop in localized corrosion sites, but promoted dissolution at pH 4–7, which would be more commonly encountered physiologically. The observed pattern of sensitivity to environmental acidity of the effect of LPS on Ti corrosion has not previously been reported. LPS is found extensively on the surfaces of skin and mucosal penetrating Ti implants and the findings are therefore relevant when considering the chemical stability of Ti implant surfaces in vivo. PMID:25634122

  2. Mössbauer Characterization of Rust Obtained in an Accelerated Corrosion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Arroyave, C. E.; Barrero, C. A.; Cook, D. C.

    2003-06-01

    We have performed drying-humectation cyclical processes (CEBELCOR) on eight A36 low carbon steel coupons in NaCl solutions containing 1×10-2 M and 1×10-1 M concentrations. The main purpose of these experiments is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for akaganeite formation. Additionally, and with the idea to perform a complete characterization of the rust, this work also considers the formation of other iron oxide phases. The corrosion products were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gravimetric analysis demonstrates that the coupons presented high corrosion rates. Magnetite/maghemite was common in the rust stuck to the steel surface, whereas akaganeite was present only in traces. In the rust collected from the solutions, i.e., the rust that goes away from the metal surface easily, a magnetite/maghemite was not present and akaganeite showed up in larger quantities. These results support the idea that high concentrations of Cl- ions are required for the akaganeite formation. We concluded that akaganeite is not easily bonded to the rust layer; this may lead to the formation of a less protective rust layer and to higher corrosion rates.

  3. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Jesse

    1999-01-01

    OAK-B135 An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report. This program focuses on understanding the mechanisms causing corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the effects of the proposed remedial measures. The crevice formed by the tube/tube support plate (T/TSP) intersection in a PWR steam generator is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities (referred to as hideout) in the steam generator water. The restricted mass transport in the small crevice volume prevents the species, which concentrate during the generation of steam, from quickly dispersing into the bulk water. The concentrated solutions in crevices have been a contributing cause of several forms of corrosion of steam generator tubes including intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC), pitting, and wastage.

  4. Auger electron spectroscopic study of mechanism of sulfide-accelerated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Malcolm E.

    The mechanism of sulfide-induced accelerated corrosion of 90-10 copper-nickel(iron) alloy is investigated. Samples of the alloy are exposed to flowing (2.4 m/s) seawater, with and without 0 01 mg/l sulfide, for various periods of time. The resulting surfaces are examined by means of Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with inert-ion-homoardment. A detailed depth profile is thereby obtained of concentrations in the surface region of a total of nine elements. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that iron hydroxide segregates at the surface to form a protective gelatinous layer against the normal chloride-induced corrosion process. Trace sulfide interferes with formation of a good protective layer and leaves the iron hydroxide vulnerable to ultimate partial or complete debonding. When the alloy is first exposed to "pure" seawater for a prolonged period of time, however, subsequent exposure to sulfide is no longer deleterious. This is apparently due to a layer of copper-nickel salt that slowly forms over the iron hydroxide.

  5. Corrosion of iron by sulfate-reducing bacteria: new views of an old problem.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-02-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen ("chemical microbially influenced corrosion"; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons ("electrical microbially influenced corrosion"; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments.

  6. Attachment of Listeria monocytogenes to an austenitic stainless steel after welding and accelerated corrosion treatments.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tam L; Sofyan, Nofrijon I; Fergus, Jeffrey W; Gale, William F; Conner, Donald E

    2006-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, widely used in food processing, undergo microstructural changes during welding, resulting in three distinctive zones: weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal. This research was conducted to determine the attachment of Listeria monocytogenes in these three zones before and after exposure to a corrosive environment. All experiments were done with tungsten inert gas welding of type 304 stainless steel. The four welding treatments were large or small beads with high or low heat. After welding, all surfaces were polished to an equivalent surface finish. A 10-microl droplet of an L. monocytogenes suspension was placed on the test surfaces. After 3 h at 23 degrees C, the surfaces were washed and prepared for scanning electron microscopy, which was used to determine attachment of L. monocytogenes by counting cells remaining on each test surface. In general, bacteria were randomly distributed on each surface type. However, differences in surface area of inoculum due to differences in interfacial energy (as manifested by the contact angle) were apparent and required normalization of bacterial count data. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in numbers of bacteria on the three surface zones. However, after exposure to the corrosive medium, numbers of bacteria on the three zones were higher (P < 0.05) than those on the corresponding zones of noncorroded surfaces. For the corroded surfaces, bacterial counts on the base metal were lower (P < 0.05) than those on heat-affected and weld zones. PMID:16865881

  7. Transformation Theory, Accelerating Frames, and Two Simple Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, G. Bruno

    1977-01-01

    Presents an operator which transforms quantum functions to solve problems of the stationary state wave functions for a particle and the motion and spreading of a Gaussian wave packet in uniform gravitational fields. (SL)

  8. Effects of impurities in coal-derived liquids on accelerated hot corrosion of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig was used to determine the effects of potential coal derived liquid fuel impurity combustion of products on hot corrosion in IN-100, IN-792, IN_738, U-700, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. The impurities, added as aqueous solutions to the combustor, were salts of sodium, potassium, vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, phosphorus, and lead. Extent of attack was determined by metal consumption and compared to the effects of sodium alone. Vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, phosphorous, and lead in combination with sodium all resulted in increased attack as compared with sodium alone at some temperatures, apparently due in large part to the extension of the formation of liquid deposits. Varying the sodium-potassium ratio had little effect for ratios less than 1:3 for which reduced, but measurable, attack was observed.

  9. Monitoring power plant fireside corrosion using corrosion probes

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key components in fossil fuel power plants is of utmost importance for Futuregen and ultra-supercritical power plants. Fireside corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Problems occur when equipment designed for either oxidizing or reducing conditions is exposed to alternating oxidizing and reducing conditions. This can happen especially near the burners. The use of low NOx burners is becoming more commonplace and can produce reducing environments that accelerate corrosion. One method of addressing corrosion of these surfaces is the use of corrosion probes to monitor when process changes cause corrosive conditions. In such a case, corrosion rate could become a process control variable that directs the operation of a coal combustion or coal gasification system. Alternatively, corrosion probes could be used to provide an indication of total metal damage and thus a tool to schedule planned maintenance outages.

  10. Corrosion of Iron by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: New Views of an Old Problem

    PubMed Central

    Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-01-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen (“chemical microbially influenced corrosion”; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons (“electrical microbially influenced corrosion”; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments. PMID:24317078

  11. CMFD acceleration of spatial domain-decomposed neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    A significant limitation to parallelizing the solution of neutron transport problems is the need for sweeps across the entirety of the problem domain. Angular domain decomposition is common practice, as the equations for each direction are independent aside from their shared scattering/fission source. Accordingly, spatial domain decomposition does not naturally arise in the transport equations and is therefore less frequent in practice. In this paper, we show that a neutron transport domain can be straightforwardly divided into independent, parallelizable sweep regions, globally linked with the standard CMFD method, with an additional update equation. We verify, theoretically (via Fourier analysis) and computationally, that the convergence properties of this method are stable and nominally as rapid as standard CMFD. (authors)

  12. Solution accelerators for large scale 3D electromagnetic inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2004-04-05

    We provide a framework for preconditioning nonlinear 3D electromagnetic inverse scattering problems using nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) and limited memory (LM) quasi-Newton methods. Key to our approach is the use of an approximate adjoint method that allows for an economical approximation of the Hessian that is updated at each inversion iteration. Using this approximate Hessian as a preconditoner, we show that the preconditioned NLCG iteration converges significantly faster than the non-preconditioned iteration, as well as converging to a data misfit level below that observed for the non-preconditioned method. Similar conclusions are also observed for the LM iteration; preconditioned with the approximate Hessian, the LM iteration converges faster than the non-preconditioned version. At this time, however, we see little difference between the convergence performance of the preconditioned LM scheme and the preconditioned NLCG scheme. A possible reason for this outcome is the behavior of the line search within the LM iteration. It was anticipated that, near convergence, a step size of one would be approached, but what was observed, instead, were step lengths that were nowhere near one. We provide some insights into the reasons for this behavior and suggest further research that may improve the performance of the LM methods.

  13. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D.A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  14. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  15. Solving large-scale sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems of equations for accelerator modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gene Golub; Kwok Ko

    2009-03-30

    The solutions of sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems constitute one of the key computational kernels in the discretization of partial differential equations for the modeling of linear accelerators. The computational challenges faced by existing techniques for solving those sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems call for continuing research to improve on the algorithms so that ever increasing problem size as required by the physics application can be tackled. Under the support of this award, the filter algorithm for solving large sparse eigenvalue problems was developed at Stanford to address the computational difficulties in the previous methods with the goal to enable accelerator simulations on then the world largest unclassified supercomputer at NERSC for this class of problems. Specifically, a new method, the Hemitian skew-Hemitian splitting method, was proposed and researched as an improved method for solving linear systems with non-Hermitian positive definite and semidefinite matrices.

  16. Transport synthetic acceleration for long-characteristics assembly-level transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The authors apply the transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme to the long-characteristics spatial discretization for the two-dimensional assembly-level transport problem. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. Thus, in the acceleration step, the authors take advantage of features of the long-characteristics discretization that make it particularly well suited to assembly-level transport problems. The main contribution is to address difficulties unique to the long-characteristics discretization and produce a computationally efficient acceleration scheme. The combination of the long-characteristics discretization, opposing reflecting boundary conditions (which are present in assembly-level transport problems), and TSA presents several challenges. The authors devise methods for overcoming each of them in a computationally efficient way. Since the boundary angular data exist on different grids in the high- and low-order problems, they define restriction and prolongation operations specific to the method of long characteristics to map between the two grids. They implement the conjugate gradient (CG) method in the presence of opposing reflection boundary conditions to solve the TSA low-order equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices; they prove that the long-characteristics discretization yields an SPD matrix. They present results of the acceleration scheme on a simple test problem, a typical pressurized water reactor assembly, and a typical boiling water reactor assembly.

  17. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Solving corrosion problems at the NEA Bellingham Massachusetts carbon dioxide recovery plant

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, T.R.; Mariz, C.L.; McCullough, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    The Northeast Energy Associates (NEA) carbon dioxide recovery plant at Bellingham, MA utilizes a 30 wt % monoethanol amine (MEA) solution with a proprietary additive to inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel. This plant was the first application of this technology to gas turbine flue gas, which has high concentrations of oxygen (typically 13 vol. %) and low concentrations of carbon dioxide (typically 3 vol. %). Prior to the operation of the Bellingham plant, the technology had been applied to boiler flue gas streams, which typically contain more than 8 vol. % carbon dioxide and 2--4 vol. % oxygen. In this first application of the technology to gas turbine flue gas, unexpected corrosion occurred in both the absorber and stripper towers. The causes of the corrosion and its successful elimination are the subject of this paper.

  19. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  20. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  1. System modeling for the longitudinal beam dynamics control problem in heavy ion induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.N.

    1993-05-17

    We address the problem of developing system models that are suitable for studying the control of the longitudinal beam dynamics in induction accelerators for heavy ions. In particular, we present the preliminary results of our efforts to devise a general framework for building detailed, integrated models of accelerator systems consisting of pulsed power modular circuits, induction cells, beam dynamics, and control system elements. Such a framework will permit us to analyze and design the pulsed power modulators and the control systems required to effect precise control over the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  2. How copper corrosion can be retarded--New ways investigating a chronic problem for cellulose in paper.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyujin; Hofmann, Christa; Horsky, Monika; Potthast, Antje

    2015-12-10

    To better assess the stabilization effects of chemical treatments on Cu(II)-catalyzed cellulose degradation, we developed Cu(II)-containing model rag paper with typical copper corrosion characteristics using e-beam radiation. The paper can be prepared homogeneously and quickly compared to tedious pre-aging methods. Using the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper, the stabilization effects of various chemicals on Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose were tested. Benzotriazol was highly effective in retarding the degradation of the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper under hot and humid aging condition, as well as under photo-oxidative stress. Tetrabutylammonium bromide reduced Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose, but its efficacy was dependent on the accelerated aging conditions. The results with the alkaline treatments and gelatin treatment suggested that their roles in the degradation mechanisms of cellulose in the presence of Cu(II) differ from those of benzotriazol and tetrabutylammonium bromide.

  3. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  4. Solving Large Scale Nonlinear Eigenvalue Problem in Next-Generation Accelerator Design

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ben-Shan; Bai, Zhaojun; Lee, Lie-Quan; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    A number of numerical methods, including inverse iteration, method of successive linear problem and nonlinear Arnoldi algorithm, are studied in this paper to solve a large scale nonlinear eigenvalue problem arising from finite element analysis of resonant frequencies and external Q{sub e} values of a waveguide loaded cavity in the next-generation accelerator design. They present a nonlinear Rayleigh-Ritz iterative projection algorithm, NRRIT in short and demonstrate that it is the most promising approach for a model scale cavity design. The NRRIT algorithm is an extension of the nonlinear Arnoldi algorithm due to Voss. Computational challenges of solving such a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for a full scale cavity design are outlined.

  5. A review of vector convergence acceleration methods, with applications to linear algebra problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezinski, C.; Redivo-Zaglia, M.

    In this article, in a few pages, we will try to give an idea of convergence acceleration methods and extrapolation procedures for vector sequences, and to present some applications to linear algebra problems and to the treatment of the Gibbs phenomenon for Fourier series in order to show their effectiveness. The interested reader is referred to the literature for more details. In the bibliography, due to space limitation, we will only give the more recent items, and, for older ones, we refer to Brezinski and Redivo-Zaglia, Extrapolation methods. (Extrapolation Methods. Theory and Practice, North-Holland, 1991). This book also contains, on a magnetic support, a library (in Fortran 77 language) for convergence acceleration algorithms and extrapolation methods.

  6. Metric-Field Approach to Gravitation and the Problem of the Universe Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verozub, Leonid V.

    2002-07-01

    A metric-field approach to gravitation is presented. It is based on an idea of dependency of space-time properties on measuring instruments. Some bimetric equations that realize this idea are considered. They were tested by the binary pulsar PSR1913+16. The spherically - symmetric solution of the equations has no event horizon and no physical singularity in the center. The proper energy of a point particle is finite. There can exist supermassive compact configurations of the degenerated Fermi-gas which can be identified with observed objects in galactic centers. The problem of the Universe acceleration has a natural explanation.

  7. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  8. Accelerated solution of non-linear flow problems using Chebyshev iteration polynomial based RK recursions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorber, A.A.; Carey, G.F.; Bova, S.W.; Harle, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    The connection between the solution of linear systems of equations by iterative methods and explicit time stepping techniques is used to accelerate to steady state the solution of ODE systems arising from discretized PDEs which may involve either physical or artificial transient terms. Specifically, a class of Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration schemes with extended stability domains has been used to develop recursion formulas which lead to accelerated iterative performance. The coefficients for the RK schemes are chosen based on the theory of Chebyshev iteration polynomials in conjunction with a local linear stability analysis. We refer to these schemes as Chebyshev Parameterized Runge Kutta (CPRK) methods. CPRK methods of one to four stages are derived as functions of the parameters which describe an ellipse {Epsilon} which the stability domain of the methods is known to contain. Of particular interest are two-stage, first-order CPRK and four-stage, first-order methods. It is found that the former method can be identified with any two-stage RK method through the correct choice of parameters. The latter method is found to have a wide range of stability domains, with a maximum extension of 32 along the real axis. Recursion performance results are presented below for a model linear convection-diffusion problem as well as non-linear fluid flow problems discretized by both finite-difference and finite-element methods.

  9. GPU accelerated solver for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Application to the electrophysiology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Andres; Ferrero, Jose M.; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.

    2015-11-01

    Solving the electric activity of the heart possess a big challenge, not only because of the structural complexities inherent to the heart tissue, but also because of the complex electric behaviour of the cardiac cells. The multi-scale nature of the electrophysiology problem makes difficult its numerical solution, requiring temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.1 ms and 0.2 mm respectively for accurate simulations, leading to models with millions degrees of freedom that need to be solved for thousand time steps. Solution of this problem requires the use of algorithms with higher level of parallelism in multi-core platforms. In this regard the newer programmable graphic processing units (GPU) has become a valid alternative due to their tremendous computational horsepower. This paper presents results obtained with a novel electrophysiology simulation software entirely developed in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The software implements fully explicit and semi-implicit solvers for the monodomain model, using operator splitting. Performance is compared with classical multi-core MPI based solvers operating on dedicated high-performance computer clusters. Results obtained with the GPU based solver show enormous potential for this technology with accelerations over 50 × for three-dimensional problems.

  10. GPU accelerated solver for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Application to the electrophysiology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Andres; Ferrero, Jose M.; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.

    2015-11-01

    Solving the electric activity of the heart possess a big challenge, not only because of the structural complexities inherent to the heart tissue, but also because of the complex electric behaviour of the cardiac cells. The multi-scale nature of the electrophysiology problem makes difficult its numerical solution, requiring temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.1 ms and 0.2 mm respectively for accurate simulations, leading to models with millions degrees of freedom that need to be solved for thousand time steps. Solution of this problem requires the use of algorithms with higher level of parallelism in multi-core platforms. In this regard the newer programmable graphic processing units (GPU) has become a valid alternative due to their tremendous computational horsepower. This paper presents results obtained with a novel electrophysiology simulation software entirely developed in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The software implements fully explicit and semi-implicit solvers for the monodomain model, using operator splitting. Performance is compared with classical multi-core MPI based solvers operating on dedicated high-performance computer clusters. Results obtained with the GPU based solver show enormous potential for this technology with accelerations over 50 × for three-dimensional problems.

  11. Acceleration of multiple solution of a boundary value problem involving a linear algebraic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, Talgat R.; Kuksenko, Sergey P.; Surovtsev, Roman S.

    2016-06-01

    Multiple solution of a boundary value problem that involves a linear algebraic system is considered. New approach to acceleration of the solution is proposed. The approach uses the structure of the linear system matrix. Particularly, location of entries in the right columns and low rows of the matrix, which undergo variation due to the computing in the range of parameters, is used to apply block LU decomposition. Application of the approach is considered on the example of multiple computing of the capacitance matrix by method of moments used in numerical electromagnetics. Expressions for analytic estimation of the acceleration are presented. Results of the numerical experiments for solution of 100 linear systems with matrix orders of 1000, 2000, 3000 and different relations of variated and constant entries of the matrix show that block LU decomposition can be effective for multiple solution of linear systems. The speed up compared to pointwise LU factorization increases (up to 15) for larger number and order of considered systems with lower number of variated entries.

  12. SOLVING A COPPER CORROSION PROBLEM WITH ORTHOPHOSPHATE: INDIAN HILL, OHIO CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many small and medium-sized water systems have troublt complying with the copper Action Level (of the Lead and Copper Rule), sometimes concurrently with meeting the lead Action level. The problem is especially troubling and widespread with ground water supplies having high alkali...

  13. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems: high-temperature erosion-corrosion by high-velocity (200ms/s) particles

    SciTech Connect

    Barkalow, R.H.; Goebel, J.A.; Pettit, F.S.

    1980-05-01

    The response of nickel- and cobalt base superalloys, aluminide coatings for these alloys, and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ to erosion-oxidation and erosion-hot corrosion conditions has been studied at 871/sup 0/C (1600/sup 0/F) in a high velocity gas stream 200 m/sec (656 ft/sec). The experiments were performed in a dynamic combustor (burner rig) operated on aircraft-grade jet fuel and compressed air. Erosive conditions were achieved by injecting abrasive powder into the burner rig. Alumina powders with average particle sizes of 20, 2.5, and 0.3 ..mu..m MgO were used as abrasive media. In the erosion-oxidation experiments, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ was much more resistant to degradation than all the metallic systems. For all the metallic systems it was found that: with 20 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles, material loss occurred because of mechanical erosion; with 2 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles, the materials degradation involved an interaction between oxidation and erosion such that the formation of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ scales inhibited erosion; deposition of 0.3 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles occurred on specimens and these particles did not establish an erosive component; and the magnitude of the erosive component increased as the hardness of the abrasive increased. Silicon nitride was much more resistant than the metallic systems in the erosion-hot corrosion test; erosion-hot corrosion using 2 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ occurred at rates greater than the sum of the rates of erosion and hot corrosion acting independent of one another; the interaction between hot corrosion and erosion was not affected by the particle hardness; and deposition of 0.3 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ during hot corrosion caused the degradation rates to decrease. The erosion-oxidation behavior of the metallic systems was consistent with the theory for ductile erosion. The synergism between erosion and hot corrosion occurs because each process establishes conditions that accelerate the other.

  14. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments - Topical Report Phase I 8/18/1999 - 8/31/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jesse Lumsden

    2000-11-01

    The crevice formed by the tube/tube support plate (T/TSP) intersection in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities (referred to as hideout) in the steam generator water. The restricted mass transport in the small crevice volume prevents the species, which concentrate by a thermal/hydraulic mechanism during the generation of steam, from quickly dispersing into the bulk water. The presence of a porous scale corrosion product on the surface of the tube and deposits of corrosion products in the crevice further restrict mass transport. The concentrated solutions and deposits in T/TSP crevices have been correlated with several forms of corrosion on the OD of steam generator tubes including intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC), pitting, and wastage. The rate and type of corrosion are dependent on pH, specific anions, and the electrochemical potential. Careful water chemistry control and other remedial measures have essentially stopped all forms of secondary side corrosion except IGA/SCC. Crevice chemistries in an operating steam generator cannot be measured directly because of their inaccessibility. In practice, computer codes (MULTEQ, Molar Ratio Index, etc.) based upon hypothesized chemical reactions and thermal hydraulic mechanisms are used to predict crevice chemistry. The Rockwell program provides an experimental base to benchmark crevice chemistry models and to benchmark crevice chemistry control measures designed to mitigate IGA/SCC. The objective of this program is to develop an understanding of the corrosion accelerating mechanisms, particularly IGA/SCC, in steam generator crevices. The important variables will be identified, including the relationship between bulk water chemistry and corrosion accelerating chemistries in a crevice. An important result will be the identification of water chemistry control measures needed to mitigate secondary side IGA/SCC in steam generator tubes. The

  15. Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) considerations for secondary side piping in the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhoff, J. F.; Rao, G. V.; Stein, A.

    2012-07-01

    The issue of Flow Accelerated Erosion-Corrosion (FAC) in power plant piping is a known phenomenon that has resulted in material replacements and plant accidents in operating power plants. Therefore, it is important for FAC resistance to be considered in the design of new nuclear power plants. This paper describes the design considerations related to FAC that were used to develop a safe and robust AP1000{sup R} plant secondary side piping design. The primary FAC influencing factors include: - Fluid Temperature - Pipe Geometry/layout - Fluid Chemistry - Fluid Velocity - Pipe Material Composition - Moisture Content (in steam lines) Due to the unknowns related to the relative impact of the influencing factors and the complexities of the interactions between these factors, it is difficult to accurately predict the expected wear rate in a given piping segment in a new plant. This paper provides: - a description of FAC and the factors that influence the FAC degradation rate, - an assessment of the level of FAC resistance of AP1000{sup R} secondary side system piping, - an explanation of options to increase FAC resistance and associated benefits/cost, - discussion of development of a tool for predicting FAC degradation rate in new nuclear power plants. (authors)

  16. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  17. Accelerated forgetting? An evaluation on the use of long-term forgetting rates in patients with memory problems

    PubMed Central

    Geurts, Sofie; van der Werf, Sieberen P.; Kessels, Roy P. C.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of this review was to evaluate whether long-term forgetting rates (delayed tests, days, to weeks, after initial learning) are more sensitive measures than standard delayed recall measures to detect memory problems in various patient groups. It has been suggested that accelerated forgetting might be characteristic for epilepsy patients, but little research has been performed in other populations. Here, we identified eleven studies in a wide range of brain injured patient groups, whose long-term forgetting patterns were compared to those of healthy controls. Signs of accelerated forgetting were found in three studies. The results of eight studies showed normal forgetting over time for the patient groups. However, most of the studies used only a recognition procedure, after optimizing initial learning. Based on these results, we recommend the use of a combined recall and recognition procedure to examine accelerated forgetting and we discuss the relevance of standard and optimized learning procedures in clinical practice. PMID:26106343

  18. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  19. Study on the radiation problem caused by electron beam loss in accelerator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan-Feng; Guo, Bing-Qi; Zhang, Jie-Xi; Chen, Huai-Bi

    2008-07-01

    The beam dynamic code PARMELA was used to simulate the transportation process of accelerating electrons in S-band SW linacs with different energies of 2.5, 6 and 20 MeV. The results indicated that in the ideal condition, the percentage of electron beam loss was 50% in accelerator tubes. Also we calculated the spectrum, the location and angular distribution of the lost electrons. Calculation performed by Monte Carlo code MCNP demonstrated that the radiation distribution of lost electrons was nearly uniform along the tube axis, the angular distributions of the radiation dose rates of the three tubes were similar, and the highest leaking dose was at the angle of 160° with respect to the axis. The lower the energy of the accelerator, the higher the radiation relative leakage. For the 2.5 MeV accelerator, the maximum dose rate reached 5% of the main dose and the one on the head of the electron gun was 1%, both of which did not meet the eligible protection requirement for accelerators. We adopted different shielding designs for different accelerators. The simulated result showed that the shielded radiation leaking dose rates fulfilled the requirement. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10135040)

  20. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  1. CORROSION PROCESS IN REINFORCED CONCRETE IDENTIFIED BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Yuma; Kitaura, Misuzu; Tomoda, Yuichi; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete (RC) due to salt attack is known as one of serious problems. Thus, development of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques is important to assess the corrosion process. Reinforcement in concrete normally does not corrode because of a passive film on the surface of reinforcement. When chloride concentration at reinfo rcement exceeds the threshold level, the passive film is destroyed. Thus maintenance is desirable at an early stage. In this study, to identify the onset of corrosion and the nucleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete due to expansion of corrosion products, continuous acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is applied. Accelerated corrosion and cyclic wet and dry tests are performed in a laboratory. The SiGMA (Simplified Green's functions for Moment tensor Analysis) proce dure is applied to AE waveforms to clarify source kinematics of micro-cracks locations, types and orientations. Results show that the onset of corrosion and the nu cleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete are successfully identified. Additionally, cross-sections inside the reinforcement are observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). From these results, a great promise for AE techniques to monitor salt damage at an early stage in RC structures is demonstrated.

  2. Some problems on rf breakdown in room temperature accelerator structure, a possible criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    The discussion is confined to high gradient, room-temperature accelerators which have clean well-finished cavity surfaces and good vacuum conditions. Breakdown-initiating mechanisms due to ''cold'' field electron emission occurring at isolated sites on broad-area cavity surfaces, where the field is enhanced, are described. The influences of an alternating field and transition time tunneling are taken into account. The thermal instability resulting in vacuum voltage breakdown is hypothesized to derive a new criterion for room-temperature accelerator structure. 18 refs., 5 figs. (DWL)

  3. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Jessee

    1999-11-01

    This program focuses on understanding mechanisms causing corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The crevice formed by the tube/tube support plate (T/TSP) intersection in a PWR steam generator is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities (referred to as hideout) in the steam generator water. The restricted mass transport in the small crevice volume prevents the species, which concentrate during the generation of steam, from quickly dispersing into the bulk water. The concentrated solutions in crevices have been a contributing cause of several forms of corrosion of steam generator tubes including intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC), pitting, and wastage.

  4. Accelerated Cartesian expansions for the rapid solution of periodic multiscale problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Dault, Daniel L.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-07-03

    We present an algorithm for the fast and efficient solution of integral equations that arise in the analysis of scattering from periodic arrays of PEC objects, such as multiband frequency selective surfaces (FSS) or metamaterial structures. Our approach relies upon the method of Accelerated Cartesian Expansions (ACE) to rapidly evaluate the requisite potential integrals. ACE is analogous to FMM in that it can be used to accelerate the matrix vector product used in the solution of systems discretized using MoM. Here, ACE provides linear scaling in both CPU time and memory. Details regarding the implementation of this method within the context of periodic systems are provided, as well as results that establish error convergence and scalability. In addition, we also demonstrate the applicability of this algorithm by studying several exemplary electrically dense systems.

  5. Accelerated Cartesian expansions for the rapid solution of periodic multiscale problems

    DOE PAGES

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Dault, Daniel L.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-07-03

    We present an algorithm for the fast and efficient solution of integral equations that arise in the analysis of scattering from periodic arrays of PEC objects, such as multiband frequency selective surfaces (FSS) or metamaterial structures. Our approach relies upon the method of Accelerated Cartesian Expansions (ACE) to rapidly evaluate the requisite potential integrals. ACE is analogous to FMM in that it can be used to accelerate the matrix vector product used in the solution of systems discretized using MoM. Here, ACE provides linear scaling in both CPU time and memory. Details regarding the implementation of this method within themore » context of periodic systems are provided, as well as results that establish error convergence and scalability. In addition, we also demonstrate the applicability of this algorithm by studying several exemplary electrically dense systems.« less

  6. Embeddable sensor for corrosion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Robert G.; Yuan, J.; Jones, Stephen H.; Wang, W.; Hudson, K.; Sime, A.; Schneider, O.; Clemena, Gerardo G.

    1999-02-01

    The design of a microinstrument for corrosion monitoring in reinforced concrete is presented and the performance of the prototype device discussed. Sensors for the measurement of corrosion rate, corrosion potential, chloride concentration, and concrete conductivity have been developed and tested inside of model concrete slabs. The tests include electrochemical chloride driving as a method for test acceleration and wet/dry cycling. The corrosion rate and conductivity sensors perform very well, as do all aspects of the electronics. Work continues on the chloride sensor and reference electrode.

  7. A solution to the accelerated-predator-satiety Lotka-Volterra predator-prey problem using Boubaker polynomial expansion scheme.

    PubMed

    Dubey, B; Zhao, T G; Jonsson, M; Rahmanov, H

    2010-05-01

    In this study, an analytical method is introduced for the identification of predator-prey populations time-dependent evolution in a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model which takes into account the concept of accelerated-predator-satiety. Oppositely to most of the predator-prey problem models, the actual model does not suppose that the predation is strictly proportional to the prey density. In reference to some recent experimental results and particularly to the conclusions of May (1973) about predators which are 'never not hungry', an accelerated satiety function is matched with the initial conventional equations. Solutions are plotted and compared to some relevant ones. The obtained trends are in good agreement with many standard Lotka-Volterra solutions except for the asymptotic behaviour.

  8. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  9. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  10. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  11. LCODE: A parallel quasistatic code for computationally heavy problems of plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosedkin, A. P.; Lotov, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    LCODE is a freely distributed quasistatic 2D3V code for simulating plasma wakefield acceleration, mainly specialized at resource-efficient studies of long-term propagation of ultrarelativistic particle beams in plasmas. The beam is modeled with fully relativistic macro-particles in a simulation window copropagating with the light velocity; the plasma can be simulated with either kinetic or fluid model. Several techniques are used to obtain exceptional numerical stability and precision while maintaining high resource efficiency, enabling LCODE to simulate the evolution of long particle beams over long propagation distances even on a laptop. A recent upgrade enabled LCODE to perform the calculations in parallel. A pipeline of several LCODE processes communicating via MPI (Message-Passing Interface) is capable of executing multiple consecutive time steps of the simulation in a single pass. This approach can speed up the calculations by hundreds of times.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  13. Mixed-norm estimates for the M/EEG inverse problem using accelerated gradient methods

    PubMed Central

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Kowalski, Matthieu; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic fields produced by the neural electrical currents. Given a conductor model for the head, and the distribution of source currents in the brain, Maxwell’s equations allow one to compute the ensuing M/EEG signals. Given the actual M/EEG measurements and the solution of this forward problem, one can localize, in space and in time, the brain regions than have produced the recorded data. However, due to the physics of the problem, the limited number of sensors compared to the number of possible source locations, and measurement noise, this inverse problem is ill-posed. Consequently, additional constraints are needed. Classical inverse solvers, often called Minimum Norm Estimates (MNE), promote source estimates with a small ℓ2 norm. Here, we consider a more general class of priors based on mixed-norms. Such norms have the ability to structure the prior in order to incorporate some additional assumptions about the sources. We refer to such solvers as Mixed-Norm Estimates (MxNE). In the context of M/EEG, MxNE can promote spatially focal sources with smooth temporal estimates with a two-level ℓ1/ℓ2 mixed-norm, while a three-level mixed-norm can be used to promote spatially non-overlapping sources between different experimental conditions. In order to efficiently solve the optimization problems of MxNE, we introduce fast first-order iterative schemes that for the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm give solutions in a few seconds making such a prior as convenient as the simple MNE. Furhermore, thanks to the convexity of the optimization problem, we can provide optimality conditions that guarantee global convergence. The utility of the methods is demonstrated both with simulations and experimental MEG data. PMID:22421459

  14. Mixed-norm estimates for the M/EEG inverse problem using accelerated gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramfort, Alexandre; Kowalski, Matthieu; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2012-04-01

    Magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic fields produced by the neural electrical currents. Given a conductor model for the head, and the distribution of source currents in the brain, Maxwell's equations allow one to compute the ensuing M/EEG signals. Given the actual M/EEG measurements and the solution of this forward problem, one can localize, in space and in time, the brain regions that have produced the recorded data. However, due to the physics of the problem, the limited number of sensors compared to the number of possible source locations, and measurement noise, this inverse problem is ill-posed. Consequently, additional constraints are needed. Classical inverse solvers, often called minimum norm estimates (MNE), promote source estimates with a small ℓ2 norm. Here, we consider a more general class of priors based on mixed norms. Such norms have the ability to structure the prior in order to incorporate some additional assumptions about the sources. We refer to such solvers as mixed-norm estimates (MxNE). In the context of M/EEG, MxNE can promote spatially focal sources with smooth temporal estimates with a two-level ℓ1/ℓ2 mixed-norm, while a three-level mixed-norm can be used to promote spatially non-overlapping sources between different experimental conditions. In order to efficiently solve the optimization problems of MxNE, we introduce fast first-order iterative schemes that for the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm give solutions in a few seconds making such a prior as convenient as the simple MNE. Furthermore, thanks to the convexity of the optimization problem, we can provide optimality conditions that guarantee global convergence. The utility of the methods is demonstrated both with simulations and experimental MEG data.

  15. Solving the Accelerator-Condenser Coupling Problem in a Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; LaGrange, T; Shuttlesworth, R M; Gibson, D J; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D

    2009-12-29

    We describe a modification to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) that allows it to briefly (using a pulsed-laser-driven photocathode) operate at currents in excess of 10 mA while keeping the effects of condenser lens aberrations to a minimum. This modification allows real-space imaging of material microstructure with a resolution of order 10 nm over regions several {micro}m across with an exposure time of 15 ns. This is more than 6 orders of magnitude faster than typical video-rate TEM imaging. The key is the addition of a weak magnetic lens to couple the large-diameter high-current beam exiting the accelerator into the acceptance aperture of a conventional TEM condenser lens system. We show that the performance of the system is essentially consistent with models derived from ray tracing and finite element simulations. The instrument can also be operated as a conventional TEM by using the electron gun in a thermionic mode. The modification enables very high electron current densities in {micro}m-sized areas and could also be used in a non-pulsed system for high-throughput imaging and analytical TEM.

  16. Moment-Based Accelerators for Kinetic Problems with Application to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitano, William Tsubasa-Tsutsui

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the kinetic ion and charge separation field effects may play a significant role in the difference between the measured neutron yield in experiments and the predicted yield from fluid codes. Two distinct of approaches exists in modeling plasma physics phenomena: fluid and kinetic approaches. While the fluid approach is computationally less expensive, robust closures are difficult to obtain for a wide separation in temperature and density. While the kinetic approach is a closed system, it resolves the full 6D phase space and classic explicit numerical schemes restrict both the spatial and time-step size to a point where the method becomes intractable. Classic implicit system require the storage and inversion of a very large linear system which also becomes intractable. This dissertation will develop a new implicit method based on an emerging moment-based accelerator which allows one to step over stiff kinetic time-scales. The new method converges the solution per time-step stably and efficiently compared to a standard Picard iteration. This new algorithm will be used to investigate mixing in Omega ICF fuel-pusher interface at early time of the implosion process, fully kinetically.

  17. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  18. A QR accelerated volume-to-surface boundary condition for finite element solution of eddy current problems

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Fasenfest, B; Rieben, R; Stowell, M

    2006-09-08

    We are concerned with the solution of time-dependent electromagnetic eddy current problems using a finite element formulation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes. We allow for multiple conducting regions, and our goal is to develop an efficient computational method that does not require a computational mesh of the air/vacuum regions. This requires a sophisticated global boundary condition specifying the total fields on the conductor boundaries. We propose a Biot-Savart law based volume-to-surface boundary condition to meet this requirement. This Biot-Savart approach is demonstrated to be very accurate. In addition, this approach can be accelerated via a low-rank QR approximation of the discretized Biot-Savart law.

  19. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What`s All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  20. Evaluating Heat Pipe Performance in 1/6 g Acceleration: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; McCollum, Timothy A.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James L.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Heat pipes composed of titanium and water are being considered for use in the heat rejection system of a fission power system option for lunar exploration. Placed vertically on the lunar surface, the heat pipes would operate as thermosyphons in the 1/6 g environment. The design of thermosyphons for such an application is determined, in part, by the flooding limit. Flooding is composed of two components, the thickness of the fluid film on the walls of the thermosyphon and the interaction of the fluid flow with the concurrent vapor counter flow. Both the fluid thickness contribution and interfacial shear contribution are inversely proportional to gravity. Hence, evaluating the performance of a thermosyphon in a 1 g environment on Earth may inadvertently lead to overestimating the performance of the same thermosyphon as experienced in the 1/6 g environment on the moon. Several concepts of varying complexity have been proposed for evaluating thermosyphon performance in reduced gravity, ranging from tilting the thermosyphons on Earth based on a cosine function, to flying heat pipes on a low-g aircraft. This paper summarizes the problems and prospects for evaluating thermosyphon performance in 1/6 g.

  1. Reduced quality and accelerated follicle loss with female reproductive aging - does decline in theca dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) underlie the problem?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infertility, spontaneous abortion and conception of trisomic offspring increase exponentially with age in mammals but in women there is an apparent acceleration in the rate from about age 37. The problems mostly commonly occur when the ovarian pool of follicles is depleted to a critical level with age but are also found in low follicular reserve of other etiologies. Since recent clinical studies have indicated that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplementation may reverse the problem of oocyte quality, this review of the literature was undertaken in an attempt to find an explanation of why this is effective? In affected ovaries, oxygenation of follicular fluid is low, ultrastructural disturbances especially of mitochondria, occur in granulosa cells and oocytes, and considerable disturbances of meiosis occur. There is, however, no evidence to date that primordial follicles are compromised. In females with normal fertility, pre-antral ovarian theca cells respond to stimulation by inhibin B to provide androgen-based support for the developing follicle. With depletion of follicle numbers, inhibin B is reduced with consequent reduction in theca DHEA. Theca cells are the sole ovarian site of synthesis of DHEA, which is both a precursor of androstenedione and an essential ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), the key promoter of genes affecting fatty acid metabolism and fat transport and genes critical to mitochondrial function. As well as inducing a plethora of deleterious changes in follicular cytoplasmic structure and function, the omega 9 palmitate/oleate ratio is increased by lowered activity of PPARα. This provides conditions for increased ceramide synthesis and follicular loss through ceramide-induced apoptosis is accelerated. In humans critical theca DHEA synthesis occurs at about 70 days prior to ovulation thus effective supplementation needs to be undertaken about four months prior to intended conception; timing which is also

  2. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  3. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  4. A pseudo-spectral collocation method applied to the problem of convective diffusive transport in fluids subject to unsteady residual accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan; Ouazzani, Jalil

    1989-01-01

    The problem of determining the sensitivity of Bridgman-Stockbarger directional solidification experiments to residual accelerations of the type associated with spacecraft in low earth orbit is analyzed numerically using a pseudo-spectral collocation method. The approach employs a novel iterative scheme combining the method of artificial compressibility and a generalized ADI method. The results emphasize the importance of the consideration of residual accelerations and careful selection of the operating conditions in order to take full advantages of the low gravity conditions.

  5. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  6. Corrosion beneath disbonded coatings: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbandment and CP current flow within the disbanded region. This paper addresses these issues but also considers corrosion associated with disbanded areas that are distant from holidays.

  7. Mechanism of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Na2SO4 - induced hot corrosion of IN-738 in the temperature range 900 C to 1000 C is characterized by an initiation stage during which the corrosion rate is slow followed by a propagation stage during which the corrosion rate is markedly accelerated. In the second stage, corrosion is accelerated due essentially to a sulfidation/oxidation mechanism; in the third stage, the rate becomes catastrophic due to acid fluxing induced by an accumulation of refractory metal oxides (particularly MoO3) in the Na2SO4. The sequential stages in the corrosion process are described and a mechanism proposed. The influence of alloy microstructure on the corrosion mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Terahertz NDE for Under Paint Corrosion Detection and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion under paint is not visible until it has caused paint to blister, crack, or chip. If corrosion is allowed to continue then structural problems may develop. Identifying corrosion before it becomes visible would minimize repairs and costs and potential structural problems. Terahertz NDE imaging under paint for corrosion is being examined as a method to inspect for corrosion by examining the terahertz response to paint thickness and to surface roughness.

  9. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  10. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  11. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  12. High-temperature corrosion in halogen environments

    SciTech Connect

    McNallan, M. )

    1994-09-01

    Halogen contaminants, particularly chlorine and fluorine, cause accelerated corrosion in such high-temperature systems as waste incinerators and waste heat recuperators on metallurgical furnaces. The mechanisms by which these phenomena occur are reviewed and discussed with the goal of identifying appropriate corrosion control strategies for materials that operate in these environments.

  13. Corrosion behavior of 8090 Al-Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.L. . Inst. of Metal Research); Zhu, Z.Y. . Inst. of Corrosion and Protection of Metals)

    1993-06-01

    An evaluation was conducted of the corrosion behavior of 8090 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy (UNS A98090), when aged under various conditions and subjected to corrosion in a solution of 3.5% NaCl + 1% H[sub 2]O[sub 2]. Susceptibility to pitting, intergranular corrosion, and exfoliation corrosion was shown to be influenced by heat treatment, which reduced from natural aging, through overaging to peak aging, Materials with peak aging showed low corrosion resistance. The decreased corrosion resistance corresponded to decreased corrosion potential of the alloy. Insoluble constituents were susceptible to corrosion. The corrosion extended along grain boundaries. Al-Li alloys showed mismatched tensile strength and stress corrosion resistance. The growth rate of stress corrosion cracks was large in the peak-aged state. The growth rate was strengthened by overaging, but tensile strength was reduced. That problem was solved by retrogression and reaging processing.

  14. Elephant butte powerplant investigation of permanent magnet generator corrosion and bearing failures. Project notes 8450-97-07. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.; Atwater, P.

    1997-04-01

    This investigation and report were initiated in response to a request to determine causes for excessive corrosion and premature bearing failures on the Woodward Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) on the three main generating units at Elephant Butte. All three main generating units were rewound using epoxy-type insulating materials between 1989 and 1991. Plant personnel reported that corrosion and failure rates seemed to accelerate after the new stator windings were installed. This report documents field testing conducted the week of March 10, 1997, to determine if stray electrical currents/voltages were causing the problems. Electrical field test results indicate that accelerated PMG bearing failure and corrosion were not caused by stray voltages or current. Tests were conducted on the main shaft in the turbine pit and on the PMG shaft and housing located atop the exciter shaft.

  15. Investigation of corrosion experienced in a spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Dierks, R.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; Miller, F.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    After periodic testing of a large-scale spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system over a 2-yr period, sufficient corrosion was noted on various parts of the vitrification system to warrant its disassembly and inspection. A majority of the 316 SS sintered metal filters on the spray calciner were damaged by chemical corrosion and/or high temperature oxidation. Inconel-601 portions of the melter lid were attacked by chlorides and sulfates which volatilized from the molten glass. The refractory blocks, making up the walls of the melter, were attacked by the waste glass. This attack was occurring when operating temperatures were >1200/sup 0/C. The melter floor was protected by a sludge layer and showed no corrosion. Corrosion to the Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal, and no corrosion was noted in the offgas treatment system downstream of the sintered metal filters. It is believed that most of the melter corrosion occurred during one specific operating period when the melter was operated at high temperatures in an attempt to overcome glass foaming behavior. These high temperatures resulted in a significant release of volatile elements from the molten glass, and also created a situation where the glass was very fluid and convective, which increased the corrosion rate of the refractories. Specific corrosion to the calciner components cannot be proven to have occurred during a specific time period, but the mechanisms of attack were all accelerated under the high-temperature conditions that were experienced with the melter. A review of the materials of construction has been made, and it is concluded that with controlled operating conditions and better protection of some materials of construction corrosion of these systems will not cause problems. Other melter systems operating under similar strenuous conditions have shown a service life of 3 yr.

  16. Research on heat-exchanger corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razgaitis, R.; Payer, J. H.; Stickford, G. H.; White, E. L.; Talbert, S. G.; Cudnick, R. A.; Locklin, D. W.; Farnsworth, C. A.

    1984-09-01

    Research conducted to develop technology for selecting corrosion resistant materials in high efficiency, gas fired, residential space heating equipment is reported. The methodology and results of sampling in over 500 homes to statistically characterize the corrosivity of flue gas condensate are described. The corrosion resistance of over 40 metal alloys was evaluated in accelerated laboratory tests with specimens exposed to an alternate wet/dry environment using chloride spiked condensate. A wide range of corrosion was observed, fron no corrosion to severe attack. Some stainless steels exhibited essentially complete resistance to attack in all corrosion modes evaluated. The results to date provide interim guidance to equipment manufacturers in the selection of materials for condensing equipment.

  17. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment.

    PubMed

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    PubMed Central

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust. PMID:26217736

  19. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  20. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  1. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  2. Accelerated Weathering of Waste Glass at 90°C with the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) Apparatus: Implications for Predicting Glass Corrosion with a Reactive Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2009-09-21

    The interest in the long-term durability of waste glass stems from the need to predict radionuclide release rates from the corroding glass over geologic time-scales. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test-B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)]. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that can mimic the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitor the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. One dimensional reactive chemical transport simulations of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year long PUF experiment was conducted with the subsurface transport over reactive multi-phases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over geologic-time scales.

  3. The 43rd annual corrosion survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Applying the science of corrosion prevention to energy (petroleums, oil, LNG) pipelines in actual field operating conditions is a vital aspect of safely and efficiently operating a pipeline system. Ignoring corrosion prevention will allow this never-sleeping enemy to steal the strength from steel pipelines, turning them into dangerous junk. Various methods, techniques and technologies are available to the corrosion control department of cross-country pipelines and gas distribution utilities around the world. Every year, billions of dollars on corrosion control, including everything from coatings to cathodic protection facilities to pigging, are spent to keep these energy pipeline systems in peak operational efficiency. This paper reports that for more than 4 decades, this corrosion survey has sought out the opinions of corrosion control experts, asking them what are the problems they face daily and innovative solutions they have tried to help solve these problems.

  4. Biofouling and microbial corrosion problem in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger and cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Chandramohan, P; Panigrahi, B S; Narasimhan, S V

    2009-10-01

    This article discusses aspects of biofouling and corrosion in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger (TFHX) and in the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor. During inspection, it was observed that >90% of the TFHX tube bundle was clogged with thick fouling deposits. Both X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer analyses of the fouling deposit demonstrated iron corrosion products. The exterior of the tubercle showed the presence of a calcium and magnesium carbonate mixture along with iron oxides. Raman spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of calcium carbonate scale in the calcite phase. The interior of the tubercle contained significant iron sulphide, magnetite and iron-oxy-hydroxide. A microbiological assay showed a considerable population of iron oxidizing bacteria and sulphate reducing bacteria (10(5) to 10(6) cfu g(-1) of deposit). As the temperature of the TFHX is in the range of 45-50 degrees C, the microbiota isolated/assayed from the fouling deposit are designated as thermo-tolerant bacteria. The mean corrosion rate of the CS coupons exposed online was approximately 2.0 mpy and the microbial counts of various corrosion causing bacteria were in the range 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1) in the cooling water and 10(6) to 10(8) cfu ml(-1) in the biofilm.

  5. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  6. Evaluation of alkali metal sulfate dew point measurement for detection of hot corrosion conditions in PFBC flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Helt, J.E.

    1980-11-01

    Hot corrosion in combustion systems is, in general, the accelerated oxidation of nickel, cobalt, and iron-base alloys which occurs in the presence of small amounts of impurities - notably, sodium, sulfur, chlorine, and vanadium. There is no real consensus on which mechanisms are primarily responsible for high-temperature corrosion. One point generally accepted, however, is that corrosion reactions take place at an appreciable rate only in the presence of a liquid phase. When coal is the fuel for combustion, hot corrosion may occur in the form of accelerated sulfidation. It is generally agreed by investigators that molten alkali metal sulfates (Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) are the principal agents responsible for the occurrence of sulfidation. Although molten sodium sulfate by itself appears to have little or no effect on the corrosion of metal alloys, its presence may increase the accessibility of the bare metal surface to the external atmosphere. If this atmosphere contains either a reductant and/or an oxide such as SiO/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/, or NaOH(Na/sub 2/O), corrosion is likely to occur. Alkali metal sulfate dew point measurement was evaluated as a means of anticipating hot corrosion in the gas turbine of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. The hot corrosion mechanism and deposition rate theory were reviewed. Two methods of dew point measurement, electrical conductivity and remote optical techniques, were identified as having a potential for this application. Both techniques are outlined; practical measurement systems are suggested; and potential problem areas are identified.

  7. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  8. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  9. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  10. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  11. Drywell corrosion stopped at Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Lipford, B.L. ); Flynn, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    This article describes the detection of corrosion on the drywell containment vessel of Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant and the application of a protective coating to repair the drywell. The topics of the article include drywell design features, identification of the problem, initial action, drywell corrosion, failure of cathodic protection, long-term repair, and repair results.

  12. Biobased polymers for corrosion protection of metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anticorrosive biobased polymers were developed in our lab. We isolated an exopolysaccharide produced by a microbe that, when coated on metal substrates, exhibited unique corrosion inhibition. Corrosion is a worldwide problem and impacts the economy, jeopardizes human health and safety, and impedes t...

  13. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  14. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  15. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  16. Quick-hardening problems are eliminated with spray gun modification which mixes resin and accelerator liquids during application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, O. W.

    1964-01-01

    A modified spray gun, with separate containers for resin and additive components, solves the problems of quick hardening and nozzle clogging. At application, separate atomizers spray the liquids in front of the nozzle face where they blend.

  17. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  18. Corrosion of stainless steel during acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Lester, G.C.

    1996-07-01

    Corrosion of types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L stainless steel (SS) during the esterification of acetic acid and alcohol or glycol ether was investigated. The catalyst for this reaction, sulfuric acid or para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), was shown to cause more corrosion on reactor equipment than CH{sub 3}COOH under the process conditions commonly practiced in industry. The corrosive action of the catalyst occurred only in the presence of water. Thus, for the batch processes, corrosion occurred mostly during the initial stage of esterification, where water produced by the reaction created an aqueous environment. After water was distilled off, the corrosion rate declined to a negligible value. The corrosion inhibitor copper sulfate, often used in industrial acetate processes, was found to work well for a low-temperature process (< 95 C) such as in production of butyl acetate, but it accelerated corrosion in the glycol ether acetate processes where temperatures were > 108 C. Process conditions that imparted low corrosion rates were determined.

  19. Corrosion in coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Vausher, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The corrosive effect of the flue gas and the fly ash from burning coal on combustion and pollution control equipment has led to extensive research efforts aimed at solving this problem. A wide variety of chemical additives are offered by suppliers to perform corrosion reduction functions when added to the solid or liquid fuel. Protection of equipment by the use of corrosion resistant coatings and improved designs to prevent or reduce slag formation are also well known corrosion reduction techniques. However, the problem facing management is to evaluate the many different alternatives and to define the most effective one for their particular facility. Information gained from previous corrosion reduction attempts, and knowledge of factors which increase the SO/sub 3//SO/sub 2/ ratio in the flue gas have resulted in the investigation of methods of controlling the dew point and therefore, reducing the condensation of sulfuric acid. Various methods of avoiding the formation of acid are being evaluated.

  20. Corrosion in coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Vausher, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The corrosive effect of the flue gas and the fly ash from burning coal on combustion and pollution control equipment has led to extensive research efforts aimed at solving this problem. A wide variety of chemical additives are offered by suppliers to perform corrosion reduction functions when added to the solid or liquid fuel. Protection of equipment by the use of corrosion resistant coatings and improved designs to prevent or reduce slag formation are also well known corrosion reduction techniques. However, the problem facing management is to evaluated the many different alternatives and to define the most effective one for their particular facility. Information gained from previous corrosion reduction attempts, and knowledge of factors which increase the SO/sub 3//SO/sub 2/ ratio in the flue gas have resulted in the investigation of methods of controlling the dew point and therefore, reducing the condensation of sulfuric acid. Various methods of avoiding the formation of acid are being evaluated.

  1. Initial Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Industrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Pan, Chen; Wang, Zhenyao; Yu, Guocai

    2015-02-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of carbon steel subjected to Shenyang industrial atmosphere has been investigated by weight-loss measurement, scanning electron microscopy observation, x-ray diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. The experimental results reveal that the corrosion kinetics of the initial corrosion of carbon steel in industrial atmosphere follows empirical equation D = At n , and there is a corrosion rate transition from corrosion acceleration to deceleration; the corrosion products are composed of γ-FeOOH, α-FeOOH, Fe3O4, as well as FeS which is related to the existence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the rust layers. The effect of dust particles on the corrosion evolution of carbon steel has also been discussed.

  2. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  3. Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Base Alloys in Biomass-Derived Fuel Simulated Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Leyens, C.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-02-28

    Biomass fuels are considered to be a promising renewable source of energy. However, impurities present in the fuel may cause corrosion problems with the materials used in the hot sections of gas turbines and only limited data are available so far. As part of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy, the present study provides initial data on the hot corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys against sodium sulfate-induced corrosion as a baseline, and against salt compositions simulating biomass-derived fuel deposits. Single crystal nickel-superalloy Rene N5, a cast NiCrAlY alloy, a NiCoCrAlY alloy representing industrially used overlay compositions, and a model {beta}NiAl+Hf alloy were tested in 1h thermal cycles at 950 C with different salt coatings deposited onto the surfaces. Whereas the NiCoCrAlY alloy exhibited reasonable resistance against pure sodium sulfate deposits, the NiCrAiY alloy and Rene N5 were attacked severely. Although considered to be an ideal alumina former in air and oxygen at higher temperatures, {beta}NiAl+Hf also suffered from rapid corrosion attack at 950 C when coated with sodium sulfate. The higher level of potassium present in biomass fuels compared with conventional fuels was addressed by testing a NiCoCrAlY alloy coated with salts of different K/Na atomic ratios. Starting at zero Na, the corrosion rate increased considerably when sodium was added to potassium sulfate. In an intermediate region the corrosion rate was initially insensitive to the K/Na ratio but accelerated when very Na-rich compositions were deposited. The key driver for corrosion of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was sodium sulfate rather than potassium sulfate, and no simple additive or synergistic effect of combining sodium and potassium was found.

  4. Research on a new type of fiber Bragg grating based corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Song, Shide; Wang, Xiaona; Zhou, Weijie; Zhang, Zuocai

    2015-08-01

    Investigations of the corrosion of rebars in concrete structures are widely studied because of the serious damage to concrete caused by rebar corrosion. The rebar corrosion products in reinforced concrete take up 2~6 times the volume of the rebar. Based on this principle, a new type of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) corrosion sensor is proposed in this paper, which consists of two sensors, an FBG corrosion measurement sensor to measure the expansion strain caused by rebar corrosion, and a temperature compensation sensor to eliminate the cross-sensitivity of FBG corrosion sensor. The corrosion rate is derived by the wavelength shift of FBG corrosion sensor, so rebar corrosion can be monitored and assessed by the FBG wavelength shift. A customized rebar with epoxy fixing groove is designed to install a corrosion sensor on its surface and an embedded temperature compensation sensor. The corrosion sensor is embedded in cement mortar and subsequently casted in concrete. The performance of the corrosion sensor is studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that the new type of corrosion sensor has advantage of relatively large measurement range of corrosion rate. The corrosion sensor is suitable to monitor slightly and moderately corroded rebars.

  5. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  6. THE CANADIAN PERSPECTIVE ON CORROSION CONTROL: HEALTH CANADA'S CORROSION CONTROL GUIDELINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Canada has proposed a Corrosion Control Guideline, based on lead, which is undergoing public consultation and expected to be finalized in 2007. In Canada, there are no regulations and little guidance to address corrosion problems and existing sampling methods are inappropr...

  7. In-situ corrosion sensor for coating, testing and screening

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Dacres, C.M.; Krebs, L.A.

    2000-02-01

    An in-situ corrosion censor facilitates coating development and screening by detecting the early stages of corrosion well before degradation is visible. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), the sensor extends the use of this established laboratory technique from immersion only to different accelerated test conditions (such as salt fog or humidity) and ambient service environments. By enabling a direct quantitative comparison of the early stages of coating deterioration and substrate corrosion that occur in laboratory accelerated tests and service or field conditions, the laboratory tests can be validated and coatings screened more quickly.

  8. Hot corrosion of S-57, 1 cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    A cobalt base alloy, S-57, was hot corrosion tested in Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 ppm synthetic sea salt and 4 ppm sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). S-57 underwent accelerated corrosion only under the most severe test conditions, for example, 4 ppm Na2SO4 at 900 C. The process of the accelerated corrosion was primarily sulfidation.

  9. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Method for monitoring environmental and corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1995-08-01

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figs.

  11. Method for monitoring environmental and corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1995-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  12. Improve corrosion control in refining processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    New guidelines show how to control corrosion and environmental cracking of process equipment when processing feedstocks containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acids. To be cost competitive refiners must be able to process crudes of opportunity. These feedstocks when processed under high temperatures and pressures and alkaline conditions can cause brittle cracks and blisters in susceptible steel-fabricated equipment. Even with advances in steel metallurgy, wet H{sub 2}S cracking continues to be a problem. New research data shows that process conditions such as temperature, pH and flowrate are key factors in the corrosion process. Before selecting equipment material, operators must understand the corrosion mechanisms present within process conditions. Several case histories investigate the corrosion reactions found when refining naphthenic crudes and operating amine gas-sweetening systems. These examples show how to use process controls, inhibitors and/or metallurgy to control corrosion and environmental cracking, to improve material selection and to extend equipment service life.

  13. Sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting natural corrosion deposits from marine steel structures.

    PubMed

    Païssé, Sandrine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Marty, Florence; Abbas, Ben; Gueuné, Hervé; Amaya, José Maria Sanchez; Muyzer, Gerard; Quillet, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, investigations were conducted on natural corrosion deposits to better understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the accelerated corrosion process of carbon steel sheet piles in port environments. We describe the abundance and diversity of total and metabolically active SRB within five natural corrosion deposits located within tidal or low water zone and showing either normal or accelerated corrosion. By using molecular techniques, such as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, and sequence cloning based on 16S rRNA, dsrB genes, and their transcripts, we demonstrated a clear distinction between SRB population structure inhabiting normal or accelerated low-water corrosion deposits. Although SRB were present in both normal and accelerated low-water corrosion deposits, they dominated and were exclusively active in the inner and intermediate layers of accelerated corrosion deposits. We also highlighted that some of these SRB populations are specific to the accelerated low-water corrosion deposit environment in which they probably play a dominant role in the sulfured corrosion product enrichment.

  14. Microbial iron respiration can protect steel from corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, M; Hsu, C H; Chien, C C; Mansfeld, F; Newman, D K

    2002-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration.

  15. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  16. A corrosion control manual for rail rapid transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. O.; Fitzgerald, J. F., II; Menke, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, during the planning stage of the Metropolitan Dade County Transit System, the need was expressed for a corrosion control manual oriented to urban rapid transit system use. This manual responds to that need. The objective of the manual is to aid rail rapid transit agencies by providing practical solutions to selected corrosion problems. The scope of the manual encompasses corrosion problems of the facilities of rapid transit systems: structures and tracks, platforms and stations, power and signals, and cars. It also discusses stray electric current corrosion. Both design and maintenance solutions are provided for each problem. Also included are descriptions of the types of corrosion and their causes, descriptions of rapid transit properties, a list of corrosion control committees and NASA, DOD, and ASTM specifications and design criteria to which reference is made in the manual. A bibliography of papers and excerpts of reports and a glossary of frequency used terms are provided.

  17. Nickel-base alloys combat corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.

    1995-06-01

    The modern chemical process industry must increase production efficiency to remain competitive. Manufacturers typically meet this challenge by utilizing higher temperatures and pressures, and more-corrosive catalysts. At the same time, the industry has to solve the technical and commercial problems resulting from rigid environmental regulations. To overcome these obstacles, new alloys having higher levels of corrosion resistance have been developed. These materials are based on increased understanding of the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys, especially the role of alloying elements. Results of many studies have led to innovations in nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys containing both high and low amounts of nickel. Higher molybdenum and chromium contents, together with nitrogen additions, have opened up an entirely new class of alloys having unique properties. In addition, a new chromium-base, fully wrought super stainless steel shows excellent promise in solving many corrosion problems. These newer alloys have the ability to combat uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress-corrosion cracking in the harsh halogenic environment of the chemical process industry. This article briefly lists some of the major highlights and corrosion data on recent nickel-chromium-molybdenum and nickel-molybdenum alloys, and the development of a chromium-base, wrought super-austenitic alloy known as Nicrofer 3033 (Alloy 33). Some comparisons with existing alloys are presented, along with a few commercial applications.

  18. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  19. Multiphysics modeling of two-phase film boiling within porous corrosion deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaomiao; Short, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Porous corrosion deposits on nuclear fuel cladding, known as CRUD, can cause multiple operational problems in light water reactors (LWRs). CRUD can cause accelerated corrosion of the fuel cladding, increase radiation fields and hence greater exposure risk to plant workers once activated, and induce a downward axial power shift causing an imbalance in core power distribution. In order to facilitate a better understanding of CRUD's effects, such as localized high cladding surface temperatures related to accelerated corrosion rates, we describe an improved, fully-coupled, multiphysics model to simulate heat transfer, chemical reactions and transport, and two-phase fluid flow within these deposits. Our new model features a reformed assumption of 2D, two-phase film boiling within the CRUD, correcting earlier models' assumptions of single-phase coolant flow with wick boiling under high heat fluxes. This model helps to better explain observed experimental values of the effective CRUD thermal conductivity. Finally, we propose a more complete set of boiling regimes, or a more detailed mechanism, to explain recent CRUD deposition experiments by suggesting the new concept of double dryout specifically in thick porous media with boiling chimneys.

  20. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  1. Duralumin and Its Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    The types of corrosion and factors of corrosion of duralumin are investigated. Salt water is the most common of the corroding media with which designers have to contend in using duralumin in aircraft and ships.

  2. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  3. Erosion-Corrosion Property of CeO2-Modified HVOF WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hang, Zongqiu; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Tu, Mingjing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth elements have been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this work, conventional, nanostructured, and CeO2-modified WC-12Co powders were sprayed using high-velocity oxygen flame spraying. The erosion-corrosion behavior and interaction of erosion and corrosion of the coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated. In situ observation was employed to analyze the failure mechanism. The results showed that the CeO2-modified WC-12Co coating possessed the best erosion-corrosion resistance, while the lowest corrosion resistance was exhibited by the conventional WC-12Co coating. The results also suggested that the erosion-corrosion mechanism in the three coatings was dominated by corrosion-accelerated erosion. However, the extent of acceleration of erosion by corrosion differed.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Problems dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. A test program was conducted to find suitable and effective corrosion inhibitors for systems employing either water or antifreeze solutions for heat transfer and storage. Aluminum-mild-steel-copper-stainless steel assemblies in electrical contact were used to simulate a multimetallic system which is the type most likely to be employed. Several inhibitors show promise for this application.

  7. Measurement of steel corrosion in concrete by impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul; Sumsion, Eric; Guthrie, Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Steel corrosion is a major problem for aging bridge structures. The steel corrodes as chloride ions migrate to the buried steel. The properties of the corroded steel-concrete interface change due to the corrosion and can be measured by impedance spectroscopy. A new spectrometer was built to measure concrete slabs. A fitting function to the impedance spectra was used to determine relevant parameters correlated with corrosion. Data from the laboratory and the field demonstrate the utility of this technique.

  8. Rebar corrosion monitoring in concrete structure under salt water enviroment using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuheng; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; He, Pan; Yan, Jinlin

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is critical for the durability and safety of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion sensors based on fiber optic have proved to exhibit meaningful benefits compared with the conventional electric ones. In recent years, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been used as a new kind of sensing element in an attempt to directly monitor the corrosion in concrete structure due to its remarkable advantages. In this paper, we present a novel kind of FBG based rebar corrosion monitoring sensor. The rebar corrosion is detected by volume expansion of the corroded rebar by transferring it to the axial strain of FBG when concrete structure is soaked in salt water. An accelerated salt water corrosion test was performed. The experiment results showed the corrosion can be monitored effectively and the corrosion rate is obtained by volume loss rate of rebar.

  9. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  11. Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William; Singbeil, Douglas; Keiser, James R

    2012-01-01

    About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

  12. Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, B.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Ramanathan, S.

    2011-06-21

    Corrosion is a fundamental problem in electrochemistry and represents a mode of failure of technologically important materials. Understanding the basic mechanism of aqueous corrosion of metals such as Cu in presence of halide ions is hence essential. Using molecular dynamics simulations incorporating reactive force-field (ReaxFF), the interaction of copper substrates and chlorine under aqueous conditions has been investigated. These simulations incorporate effects of proton transfer in the aqueous media and are suitable for modeling the bond formation and bond breakage phenomenon that is associated with complex aqueous corrosion phenomena. Systematic investigation of the corrosion process has been carried out by simulating different chlorine concentration and solution states. The structural and morphological differences associated with metal dissolution in the presence of chloride ions are evaluated using dynamical correlation functions. The simulated atomic trajectories are used to analyze the charged states, molecular structure and ion density distribution which are utilized to understand the atomic scale mechanism of corrosion of copper substrates under aqueous conditions. Increased concentration of chlorine and higher ambient temperature were found to expedite the corrosion of copper. In order to study the effect of solution states on the corrosion resistance of Cu, partial fractions of proton or hydroxide in water were configured, and higher corrosion rate at partial fraction hydroxide environment was observed. When the Cl{sup -} concentration is low, oxygen or hydroxide ion adsorption onto Cu surface has been confirmed in partial fraction hydroxide environment. Our study provides new atomic scale insights into the early stages of aqueous corrosion of metals such as copper.

  13. Cause of stress-corrosion cracking in pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, T.K.; Beavers, J.A.

    1987-01-05

    Carbonate-bicarbonate has been identified as the environmental species responsible for stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in the majority of studied field failures of natural-gas pipelines. Battelle Columbus Division, Columbus, Ohio, studied approximately 30 SCC field failures of natural-gas pipelines form a 20-year period beginning in 1965. The results of the study also reject hydroxide (caustic) as a significant factor in these failures. Stress-corrosion cracking in natural-gas transmission pipelines has been recognized as a serious problem for a number of years. But there remains considerable controversy concerning the environmental species responsible for the cracking. One opinion has held that carbonate-bicarbonate promotes cracking, while another attributes the cracking to hydroxide (caustic). This issue is important because the feasibility of mitigation procedures based on potential control depend upon the chemical species responsible for the cracking. Moreover, it is important for the laboratory studies aimed at SCC mitigation to simulate closely the field failures. Both carbonate/bicarbonate and caustic environments can result from application of cathodic protection to a pipeline. The cathodic current applied to the pipeline accelerates the rate of the reduction reactions occurring on the pipe surface, promoting generation of hydroxide.

  14. High temperature alkali corrosion in high velocity gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of potential impurities in coal derived liquids such as Na, K, Mg, Ca and Cl on the accelerated corrosion of IN-100, U-700, IN-792 and Mar-M509 were investigated using a Mach 0.3 burner rig for times to 1000 hours in one hour cycles. These impurities were injected in combination as aqueous solutions into the combustor of the burner rig. The experimental matrix utilized was designed statistically. The extent of corrosion was determined by metal recession. The metal recession data were fitted by linear regression to a polynomial expression which allows both interpolation and extrapolation of the data. As anticipated, corrosion increased rapidly with Na and K, and a marked maximum in the temperature response was noted for many conditions. In contrast, corrosion decreased somewhat as the Ca, Mg and Cl contents increased. Extensive corrosion was observed at concentrations of Na and K as low as 0.1 PPM at long times.

  15. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed.

  16. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  17. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  18. Computer aided corrosion surveillance using electrochemical noise techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Quirk, G.P.; Hadfield, M.

    1999-11-01

    Real-time mechanistic analysis of electrochemical noise data is essential for rapid identification of localized corrosion by plant operators. Recent developments towards this goal include: Intelligent Noise Data Reduction techniques to eliminate uninformative data; neural nets which learn how to categorize corrosion mechanisms from data patterns; multivariate analysis which allows the identification of combinations of plant process parameters that cause damage. These techniques can be combined to facilitate pro-active management of the corrosion problem, including consideration of corrosion mechanisms within the plant optimization process.

  19. Downhole corrosion inhibition in CO{sub 2} floods

    SciTech Connect

    Bartrip, K.A.

    2000-04-01

    While a few CO{sub 2} floods operate without special attention to corrosion inhibition, most will experience corrosion problems and failures without special programs. This article discusses the chemical and physical forces at work in CO{sub 2}-flood downhole corrosion, the type of testing needed to identify effective inhibitors for this environment, the improvements offered by newer chemistries, and the importance of application techniques. The change in corrosive tendencies that occurs over time as a CO{sub 2}-flood well is produced also is discussed.

  20. Corrosion of SiC by Molten Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced ceramic materials considered for wide range of applications as in gas turbine engines and heat exchangers. In such applications, materials may be in corrosive environments that include molten salts. Very corrosive to alloys. In order to determine extent of problem for ceramic materials, corrosion of SiC by molten salts studied in both jet fuel burners and laboratory furnaces. Surface of silicon carbide corroded by exposure to flame seeded with 4 parts per million of sodium. Strength of silicon carbide decreased by corrosion in flame and tube-furnace tests.

  1. Corrosion on steam-side heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, A.; Esparza, P.; Bas, C.G.; Morales, J.; Gonzalez, S.; Sanchez, S.R. de

    1996-01-01

    Two corrosion cases occurred on the steam side of tubes in a heat exchanger in a central power station which used seawater as a coolant. The first case is stress corrosion cracking in the presence of oxygen and ammonia with through-wall cracks that originated in dealloyed cavities. The second case describes high-pressure, high-temperature steam impinging the tubes, leading to deep erosion on the tube`s external side. Erosion-corrosion accelerated on the seawater side because heating decreased the critical flow rate and enhanced formation of deposits which were obstacles to the flow.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Passivated Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Son, K.A.; Sullivan, J.P.; Missert, N,; Sorensen, N.R.

    1999-07-09

    A new approach is being pursued to study corrosion in Cu alloy systems by using combinatorial analysis combined with microscopic experimentation (the Combinatorial Microlab) to determine mechanisms for copper corrosion in air. Corrosion studies are inherently difficult because of complex interactions between materials and environment, forming a multidimensional phase space of corrosion variables. The Combinatorial Microlab was specifically developed to address the mechanism of Cu sulfidation, which is an important reliability issue for electronic components. This approach differs from convention by focusing on microscopic length scales, the relevant scale for corrosion. During accelerated aging, copper is exposed to a variety of corrosive environments containing sulfidizing species that cause corrosion. A matrix experiment was done to determine independent and synergistic effects of initial Cu oxide thickness and point defect density. The CuO{sub x} was controlled by oxidizing Cu in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) O{sub 2} plasma, and the point defect density was modified by Cu ion irradiation. The matrix was exposed to 600 ppb H{sub 2}S in 65% relative humidity air atmosphere. This combination revealed the importance of oxide quality in passivating Cu and prevention of the sulfidizing reaction. A native oxide and a defect-laden ECR oxide both react at 20 C to form a thick Cu{sub 2}S layer after exposure to H{sub 2}S, while different thicknesses of as-grown ECR oxide stop the formation of Cu{sub 2}S. The species present in the ECR oxide will be compared to that of an air oxide, and the sulfide layer growth rate will be presented.

  3. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  4. Effective corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.F.; Tofield, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    The results of two surveys (conducted in 1981 and 1984) of users of corrosion monitoring equipment are described. The benefits to be obtained from a well-designed corrosion monitoring system, especially if a corrosion control program is used, are outlined together with the difficulties and barriers that can obstruct successful application. Developing methods such as AC impedance, electrochemical noise, and thin layer activation are discussed in view of the comments received from the surveys.

  5. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  6. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcing steel in concrete by electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Guofu; Hong, Yi; Ou, Jinping

    2010-04-01

    Health degradation by corrosion of steel in civil engineering, especially in rough environment, is a persistent problem. Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques can lead to improved estimates of structural safety and serviceability. A novel all solid state-current confined corrosion sensor has been developed to provide the platform for corrosion monitoring of the steel bar in concrete beam by electrochemical method. Finite element method has been used to certify the current confined effect of the sensor. The sensors have been used in concrete beams to monitor the corrosion of the steel bar. Also, half-cell potential of the beam has obtained. The results shows that the corrosion sensor can effectively confine the current in the fixed area which is 45mm×π×Dsteel bar and the monitoring results of the corrosion sensor are accurate.

  7. Corrosion Detection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.

    2003-12-01

    Nondestructive Examination Systems' (NDE) specialists at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have unique, remotely controllable, corrosion detection capabilities. The corrosion detection devices most frequently used are automated ultrasonic mapping systems, digital radiography imaging devices, infrared imaging, and eddy current mapping systems. These devices have been successfully used in a variety of applications, some of which involve high levels of background radiation. Not only is corrosion located and mapped but other types of anomalies such as cracks have been detected and characterized. Examples of actual corrosion that has been detected will be discussed along with the NDE systems that were used.

  8. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  9. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  10. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  11. Environmental factors affecting corrosion of munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.; Bricka, M.; Morales, A.

    1995-12-31

    Spent small arms munitions have accumulated for years at outdoor firing ranges operated by the DoD and other groups. Used bullets are often subjected to moisture sources. There is increasing concern that accumulations of lead-based munitions represent potential sources of water and soil pollution. To understand both the severity of and solutions to this problem, it is necessary to measure how rapidly bullets corrode and to determine the soil variables affecting the process. In this study M16 bullets were buried in samples of soil taken from Louisiana army firing ranges. Four environmental conditions were simulated; rain water, acid rain, sea water, and 50% sea water/50% acid rain. The three electrode technique was used to measure the bullet corrosion. Graphite rods served as counter electrodes. A saturated calomel reference electrode was used along with a specially constructed salt bridge. Electrochemical measurements were conducted using a computer-controlled potentiostat to determine corrosion potential, soil resistance, and corrosion current. The rate of corrosion was found to markedly increase with decreasing soil pH and increasing chloride and moisture contents, with the chloride content being the most influential variable. High soil resistance and noble corrosion potential were found to be associated with low corrosion rates. This is important since both parameters can be readily measured in the field.

  12. Eddy current detection of pitting corrosion around fastener holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, J. H.; Thart, W. G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the eddy current technique for the detection and depth assessment of corrosion around fastener holes in F-16 lower wing skins is described. The corrosion type in this structure is pitting corrosion at the countersink edge of the fastener holes. Due to a corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent, a maximum thickness reduction in the range of 0.08 - 0.32 mm is allowed (depending on local skin thickness). This specifies the needed sensitivity for in-service corrosion inspection. In the evaluation use was made of specimens cut out of the F-16 lower wing skin structure. In total twelve specimens were exposed to an accelerated corrosion test (EXCO-test). Eddy current inspection of the specimens with installed fasteners was performed with a standard eddy scope and four different eddy current probes. After the eddy current inspection cross-sections of the twelve-specimens were made to determine the extent of pitting corrosion at the countersink edges. After evaluation of the inspection results the following conclusions can be drawn: for in-service detection of countersink edge corrosion standard visual inspection is the preferred technique regarding the simplicity, sensitivity and reliability of inspection; and for the purpose of depth assessment the eddy current technique is capable of detecting countersink edge corrosion with a depth from about 0.1 mm. Due to the corrosion clean-up limit of only 1.5 - 2.5 percent (0.08 - 0.32 mm), however, the eddy current technique is considered not applicable for in-service depth assessment of countersink edge corrosion in F-16 lower wing skins.

  13. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  14. Corrosion testing of carbon steel in aereated geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

    1981-02-01

    Two major problems are associated with the use of cooled geothermal water as coolant for the 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. They are: (1) a scaling potential owing to the chemical species present in solution, and (2) the corrosive nature of the geothermal water on carbon steel. A water treatment test program was established to reduce or eliminate these problems. Data show that scale can be prevented by a combination of dispersants and controlling the concentration of scaling species in the circulating water. Corrosion cannot be controlled without a pretreatment of tubing material. With the pretreatment, a protective gamma iron oxide film is laid down on the tube surface, that with proper corrosion inhibitor additives, significantly reduces both general and pitting corrosion. However, longer term testing is required to determine protection of pitting corrosion.

  15. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  16. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-01-01

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices. PMID:27683978

  17. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  18. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-09-04

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices.

  19. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  20. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  1. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Corrosion in methylphosphonic difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M. )

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization studies were conducted for a variety of ferrous and nonferrous metals in methylphosphonic difluoride. Studies were also made of the effects of organic inhibitors on the corrosion rates of 1,020 steel, type 316L, and type 304 stainless steel, and magnesium in methylphosphonic difluoride. Chemical weapons in the US include binary munitions in which two components are kept in separate compartments until activation. These munitions must be stockpiled for long periods of time (up to 30 years) and then must operate reliably when the need arises. The principal cause of failure will be corrosion of the storage container by the highly corrosive methylphosphonic difluoride (DF). The objectives of this study were to: investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion of Al 6061-T6 and candidate metal alloys in DF; establish effective corrosion inhibitors; and ultimately incorporate or immobilize inhibitors into coatings that provide protection above the liquid line.

  3. Corrosion detection in reinforced concrete roadways and bridges via embedded fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.

    1998-04-01

    The problems associated with the application of chloride-based deicing agents to roadways and specifically bridges include chemical pollution and accelerated corrosion of strength members (especially the rebar) within the structure. In many instances, local ordnances are attempting to force state agencies to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of these chlorides (typically at the cost of increased driving hazards). With respect to the corrosion aspects of chloride application, cracks that occur in the roadway/bridge pavement allow water to seep into the pavement carrying the chloride to the rebar with the resultant increase in corrosion. In tandem with these efforts has been the continuing use of embedded fiber optic sensors for identification of faults or cracks within a highway structure - i.e., structural health monitoring. In this paper, we present multiple-parameter sensing fiber optic sensors which may be embedded into roadway and bridge structures to provide an internal measurement and assessment of its health. Such issues are paramount in determining if remedial or preventative maintenance should be performed on such structures. Laboratory results, comparisons with conventional sensing methods as well as a review of real-world issues in highway sensing are presented.

  4. Ultrasonic Measurement of Erosion/corrosion Rates in Industrial Piping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, A. N.; Safavi, V.; Honarvar, F.

    2011-06-01

    Industrial piping systems that carry aggressive corrosion or erosion agents may suffer from a gradual wall thickness reduction that eventually threatens pipe integrity. Thinning rates could be estimated from the very small change in wall thickness values measured by conventional ultrasound over a time span of at least a few months. However, measurements performed over shorter time spans would yield no useful information—minor signal distortions originating from grain noise and ultrasonic equipment imperfections prevent a meaningful estimate of the minuscule reduction in echo travel time. Using a Model-Based Estimation (MBE) technique, a signal processing scheme has been developed that enables the echo signals from the pipe wall to be separated from the noise. This was implemented in a laboratory experimental program, featuring accelerated erosion/corrosion on the inner wall of a test pipe. The result was a reduction in the uncertainty in the wall thinning rate by a factor of four. This improvement enables a more rapid response by system operators to a change in plant conditions that could pose a pipe integrity problem. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of new corrosion inhibiting agents under plant operating conditions.

  5. Corrosion control and disinfection studies in spacecraft water systems. [considering Saturn 5 orbital workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    Disinfection and corrosion control in the water systems of the Saturn 5 Orbital Workshop Program are considered. Within this framework, the problem areas of concern are classified into four general areas: disinfection; corrosion; membrane-associated problems of disinfectant uptake and diffusion; and taste and odor problems arising from membrane-disinfectant interaction.

  6. COPPER PITTING CORROSION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  7. Agricultural Polymers for Corrosion Protection of Metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. When metals come in contact with different environments such as air, water, chemical products and pollutants, they begin to degrade as the metal interacts with its environment. This research investigates the...

  8. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  9. A Corrosion Control Manual for Rail Rapid Transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. O.; Fitzgerald, J. H., III; Menke, J. T.; Lizak, R. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    This manual addresses corrosion problems in the design, contruction, and maintenance of rapid transit systems. Design and maintenance solutions are provided for each problem covered. The scope encompasses all facilities of urban rapid transit systems: structures and tracks, platforms and stations, power and signals, and cars. The types of corrosion and their causes as well as rapid transit properties are described. Corrosion control committees, and NASA, DOD, and ASTM specifications and design criteria to which reference is made in the manual are listed. A bibliography of papers and excerpts of reports is provided and a glossary of frequently used terms is included.

  10. Characterization of corrosion damage in prestressed concrete using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The corrosion of reinforced concrete structures is a major issue from both a structural safety and maintenance management point of view. Early detection of the internal degradation process provides the owner with sufficient options to develop a plan of action. An accelerated corrosion test was conducted in a small scale concrete specimen reinforced with a 0.5 inch (13 mm) diameter prestressing strand to investigate the correlation between corrosion rate and acoustic emission (AE). Corrosion was accelerated in the laboratory by supplying anodic current via a rectifier while continuously monitoring acoustic emission activity. Results were correlated with traditional electrochemical techniques such as half-cell potential and linear polarization. The location of the active corrosion activity was found through a location algorithm based on time of flight of the stress waves. Intensity analysis was used to plot the relative significance of the damage states present in the specimen and a preliminary grading chart is presented. Results indicate that AE may be a useful non-intrusive technique for the detection and quantification of corrosion damage.

  11. Protection of offshore structures against corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, M.F.; Smith, H.M.; Bowley, C.V. Ltd., Denso House, Chapel Road, London SE27 OTR )

    1989-09-01

    Maintaining protection of metal structures against corrosion in marine environments presents problems of surface preparation, accessibility and the limitations of various coating systems. Cathodic protection may be utilized underwater but its effectiveness is severely limited in the splash zone. Hence, reliable coatings are required. Petrolatum tapes have special virtues under these conditions. Following years of experience of the use of petrolatum tapes in difficult environments a comprehensive corrosion protection system was developed for piles, offshore platforms, risers etc. The paper covers both laboratory and field experience leading to commercially viable coatings.

  12. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  13. The role of iron in sulfide induced corrosion of sewer concrete.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Wightman, Elaine; Donose, Bogdan C; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete sewer is a widespread and expensive problem for water utilities worldwide. Fundamental knowledge of the initiation and propagation of sewer corrosion, especially the interactions between chemical reactions and physical structure changes, is still largely unknown. Advanced mineral analytical techniques were applied to identify the distribution of corrosion products and the micro-cracking that developed along the corrosion boundary. It was found that sewer concrete corrosion caused by reactions with sulfuric acid progressed uniformly in the cement of concrete. In contrast to conventional knowledge, iron rust rather than gypsum and ettringite was likely the factor responsible for cracking ahead of the corrosion front. The analysis also allowed quantitative determination of the major corrosion products, i.e., gypsum and ettringite, with the latter found closer to the corrosion front. The conceptual model based on these findings clearly demonstrated the complex interactions among different chemical reactions, diffusion, and micro-structure changes. PMID:24326021

  14. The role of iron in sulfide induced corrosion of sewer concrete.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Wightman, Elaine; Donose, Bogdan C; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete sewer is a widespread and expensive problem for water utilities worldwide. Fundamental knowledge of the initiation and propagation of sewer corrosion, especially the interactions between chemical reactions and physical structure changes, is still largely unknown. Advanced mineral analytical techniques were applied to identify the distribution of corrosion products and the micro-cracking that developed along the corrosion boundary. It was found that sewer concrete corrosion caused by reactions with sulfuric acid progressed uniformly in the cement of concrete. In contrast to conventional knowledge, iron rust rather than gypsum and ettringite was likely the factor responsible for cracking ahead of the corrosion front. The analysis also allowed quantitative determination of the major corrosion products, i.e., gypsum and ettringite, with the latter found closer to the corrosion front. The conceptual model based on these findings clearly demonstrated the complex interactions among different chemical reactions, diffusion, and micro-structure changes.

  15. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  16. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  17. Liquid-metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; DeVan, J.H.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    A review of corrosion and environmental effects on the mechanical properties of candidate structural alloys for use with liquid metals in fusion reactors is presented. The corrosion/mass transfer behavior of austenitic and ferritic steels and vanadium-base alloys is evaluated to determine the preliminary operating temperature limits for circulating and static liquid-lithium and Pb-17Li systems. The influence of liquid-metal environment on the mechanical properties of structural materials is discussed. Corrosion effects of nitrate and fluoride salts are presented. Requirements for additional data are identified.

  18. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R. . Energy Systems Business Unit)

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 {mu}m to 53 {mu}m, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor.

  19. Research needs for corrosion control and prevention in energy conservation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brooman, E.W.; Hurwitch, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A group of 28 electrochemists, materials scientists and corrosion engineers was brought together to determine if the government could have a role as a focal point for corrosion R and D, discuss opportunities in fundamental research and solving corrosion problems, and develop a research agenda. Participants from government, industry and academia assembled into four technical discussion groups: localized corrosion, general corrosion, high temperature corrosion, and corrosion control and prevention. Research needs were identified, discussed, then assigned a figure of merit. Some 44 corrosion control and prevention topics were identified as having a high priority for consideration for funding. Another 35 topics were identified as having a medium priority for funding. When classified according to corrosion phenomenon, the areas which should receive the most attention are molten salt attack, crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, erosion-corrosion, pitting attack, intergranular attack and corrosion fatigue. When classified according to the sector or system involved, those which should receive the most attention are chemical processes, transportation, buildings and structures, electric power generation, and batteries and fuel cells.

  20. Review of critical factors affecting crude corrosivity

    SciTech Connect

    Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    Lower quality opportunity crudes are now processed in most refineries and the source of the crudes may vary daily. These feedstocks, if not properly handled, can result in reduction in service life of equipment as well as costly failure and downtime. Analytical tools are needed to predict their high temperature corrosivity toward distillation units. Threshold in total sulfur and total acid number (TAN) have been used for many years as rules of thumb for predicting crude corrosivity, However, it is now realized that they are not accurate in their predictive ability. Crudes with similar composition and comparable with respect to process considerations have been found to be entirely different in their impact on corrosion. Naphthenic acid content, sulfur content, velocity, temperature, and materials of construction are the main factors affecting the corrosion process, Despite progress made in elucidating the role of the different parameters on the crude corrosivity process, the main problem is in calculating their combined effect, especially when the corroding stream is such a complex mixture. The TAN is usually related directly to naphthenic acid content. However, discrepancies between analytical methods and interference of numerous components of the crude itself lead to unreliable reported content of naphthenic acid. The sulfur compounds, with respect to corrosivity, appear to relate more to their decomposition at elevated temperature to form hydrogen sulfide than to their total content in crude. This paper reviews the present situation regarding crude corrosivity in distillation units, with the aim of indicating the extent of available information, and areas where further research is necessary.

  1. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  2. Steel reinforcement corrosion detection with coaxial cable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchaidze, Iana; Pommerenke, David; Chen, Genda

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion processes in the steel reinforced structures can result in structural deficiency and with time create a threat to human lives. Millions of dollars are lost each year because of corrosion. According to the U. S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the average annual cost of corrosion in the infrastructure sector by the end of 2002 was estimated to be $22.6 billion. Timely remediation/retrofit and effective maintenance can extend the structure's live span for much less expense. Thus the considerable effort should be done to deploy corrosion monitoring techniques to have realistic information on the location and the severity of damage. Nowadays commercially available techniques for corrosion monitoring require costly equipment and certain interpretational skills. In addition, none of them is designed for the real time quality assessment. In this study the crack sensor developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology is proposed as a distributed sensor for real time corrosion monitoring. Implementation of this technology may ease the pressure on the bridge owners restrained with the federal budget by allowing the timely remediation with the minimal financial and labor expenses. The sensor is instrumented in such a way that the location of any discontinuity developed along its length can be easily detected. When the sensor is placed in immediate vicinity to the steel reinforcement it is subjected to the same chemical process as the steel reinforcement. And corrosion pitting is expected to develop on the sensor exactly at the same location as in the rebar. Thus it is expected to be an effective tool for active corrosion zones detection within reinforced concrete (RC) members. A series of laboratory tests were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Nine sensors were manufactured and placed in the artificially created corrosive environment and observed over the time. To induce accelerated corrosion 3% and 5% Na

  3. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors Containing Microparticles for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Calle, Luz M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the results obtained from experiments designed to evaluate the release properties, as well as the corrosion inhibition effectiveness, of several encapsulated corrosion inhibitors. Microencapsulation has been used in the development of environmentally friendly multifunctional smart coatings. This technique enables the incorporation of autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition and self-healing functionalities into many commercially available coating systems. Select environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic and inorganic pH-sensitive microparticles and their release in basic solutions was studied. The release rate results showed that the encapsulation can be tailored from fast, for immediate corrosion protection, to slow, which will provide continued long-term corrosion protection. The incorporation of several corrosion inhibitor release profiles into a coating provides effective corrosion protection properties. To investigate the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the encapsulated inhibitors, electrochemical techniques were used to obtain corrosion potential, polarization curve and polarization resistance data. These measurements were performed using the free as well as the encapsulated inhibitors singly or in combinations. Results from these electrochemical tests will be compared to those obtained from weight loss and other accelerated corrosion experiments.

  4. Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Hechanova

    2007-07-25

    Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability.

  5. Current and potential distributions in corrosion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Current and potential distribution calculations in corrosion are reviewed. The mathematical methods used, and the specific results for galvanic corrosion, cathodic protection, and localized corrosion are described.

  6. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  7. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-07-14

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure.

  8. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure. PMID:27428972

  9. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure. PMID:27428972

  10. Fracture of concrete caused by the reinforcement corrosion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Millard, A.; Caré, S.; L'Hostis, V.; Berthaud, Y.

    2006-11-01

    One of the most current degradations in reinforced concrete structures is related to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The corrosion products during active corrosion induce a mechanical pressure on the surrounding concrete that leads to cover cracking along the rebar. The objective of this work is to study the cracking of concrete due to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The phenomenon of corrosion/cracking is studied in experiments through tests of accelerated corrosion on plate and cylindrical specimens. A CCD camera is used to take images every hour and the pictures are analyzed by using the intercorrelation image technique (Correli^LMT) to derive the displacement and strain field. Thus the date of appearance of the first through crack is detected and the cinematic crack initiations are observed during the test. A finite element model that allows prediction of the mechanical consequences of the corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete structures is proposed. From the comparison between the test results and numerical simulations, it may be concluded that the model is validated in term of strains up to the moment when the crack becomes visible, and in terms of crack pattern.

  11. A laboratory study on metal corrosion by ammonia gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Riskowski, G.L.; Mackie, R.I.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of aerial ammonia on metal corrosion was examined in this study. Tests were conducted using three environmentally controlled chambers at three different ammonia levels (0 ppm, 100 ppm, and 200 ppm). Four types of metal products (uncoated 1010 carbon steel, galvanized steel, Galvalume, and pure zinc) were evaluated for weight losses and corrosion rates over a two-month test period. The test results showed that aerial ammonia, instead of accelerating metal corrosion, reduced the corrosion rates for steel. Weight losses for uncoated 1010 carbon steel samples in the chamber without ammonia were three and six times higher than those in chambers with ammonia levels of 100 ppm and 200 ppm, respectively. The corrosion rates were greatly reduced from 7.3 {micro}m/year to 1.2 {micro}m/year over the two-month period when ammonia level increased from 0 ppm to 200 ppm. For galvanized steel and pure zinc samples, the influence of ammonia on the corrosion processes was not apparent; however, there was a slight increase in corrosion rate for Galvalume samples with the increase of aerial ammonia concentrations.

  12. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  13. Corrosion of beryllium exposed to celotex and water

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-12-01

    Celotex is a commercial rigid cellulose fiberboard product primarily used in the building construction industry. Currently celotex is being used as a packing material in AL-R8 containers. Ion chromatography of celotex packing material at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has indicated that this material contains aggressive anions, including chloride, which may accelerate corrosion. It is well known that beryllium is susceptible to pitting corrosion when exposed to chloride containing environments. Levy noted pitting in beryllium at the open circuit potential when exposed to 0.1 M NaCl solution. This investigation attempts to evaluate the potential risk of accelerated beryllium corrosion from celotex and water which may occur naturally when celotex dust comes into contact with moisture from the atmosphere.

  14. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  15. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  16. Corrosion of a-Si cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Wen, L.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report on corrosion/erosion phonemena observed in exposing a-Si cells, modules, and specially designed test structures to natural and accelerated test environments. Relevant cell and module I-V curve data used for monitoring degradation are presented. The causes of the observed degradation, methods of mitigation, and consequences for fielded modules are discussed.

  17. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  18. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  19. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

  20. In-vitro corrosion and wear of titanium alloys in the biological environment.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1996-11-01

    Cyclic anodic polarization studies were undertaken for several titanium alloys of varying composition and phase structures. All materials were exposed to an accelerated corrosion test using a potentiostat and their electrochemical behaviour was analysed within a potential range of 0 to 5000 mV. The electrolyte used was a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution at pH = 5, 7.4 and 9. The polarization curves obtained represented both the passive and active regions of the materials and these curves were used to compare the resistance to pitting corrosion of each material. The sliding-wear of these materials was studied in both non-corrosive and corrosive environments. A simple pin-on-disc type wear apparatus was designed and built to simulate the co-joint action of corrosion and sliding-wear. Using this apparatus, it was also possible to evaluate the effect of wear-accelerated corrosion, which was also evaluated by wearing the surface of the specimens prior to corrosion. It was evident that the mixed phase alpha-beta alloys (Ti-6AI-4V and Ti-6AI-7Nb) possessed the best combination of both corrosion and wear resistance, although commercially pure titanium and the near-beta (Ti-13Nb-13Zr) and beta (Ti-15Mo) alloys displayed the best corrosion resistant properties.

  1. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together.

  2. Corrosion behaviour and biocorrosion of galvanized steel water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Delaunois, F; Tosar, F; Vitry, V

    2014-06-01

    Galvanized steel tubes are a popular mean for water distribution systems but suffer from corrosion despite their zinc or zinc alloy coatings. First, the quality of hot-dip galvanized (HDG) coatings was studied. Their microstructure, defects, and common types of corrosion were observed. It was shown that many manufactured tubes do not reach European standard (NBN EN 10240), which is the cause of several corrosion problems. The average thickness of zinc layer was found at 41μm against 55μm prescribed by the European standard. However, lack of quality, together with the usual corrosion types known for HDG steel tubes was not sufficient to explain the high corrosion rate (reaching 20μm per year versus 10μm/y for common corrosion types). Electrochemical tests were also performed to understand the corrosion behaviours occurring in galvanized steel tubes. Results have shown that the limiting step was oxygen diffusion, favouring the growth of anaerobic bacteria in steel tubes. EDS analysis was carried out on corroded coatings and has shown the presence of sulphur inside deposits, suggesting the likely bacterial activity. Therefore biocorrosion effects have been investigated. Actually sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce sulphate contained in water to hydrogen sulphide (H2S), causing the formation of metal sulphides. Although microbial corrosion is well-known in sea water, it is less investigated in supply water. Thus, an experimental water main was kept in operation for 6months. SRB were detected by BART tests in the test water main.

  3. Treatment Prevents Corrosion in Steel and Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, to protect rebar from corrosion, NASA developed an electromigration technique that sends corrosion-inhibiting ions into rebar to prevent rust, corrosion, and separation from the surrounding concrete. Kennedy Space Center worked with Surtreat Holding LLC, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a company that had developed a chemical option to fight structural corrosion, combining Surtreat's TPS-II anti-corrosive solution and electromigration. Kennedy's materials scientists reviewed the applicability of the chemical treatment to the electromigration process and determined that it was an effective and environmentally friendly match. Ten years later, NASA is still using this approach to fight concrete corrosion, and it has also developed a new technology that will further advance these efforts-a liquid galvanic coating applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete to protect the embedded rebar from corrosion. Surtreat licensed this new coating technology and put it to use at the U.S. Army Naha Port, in Okinawa, Japan. The new coating prevents corrosion of steel in concrete in several applications, including highway and bridge infrastructures, piers and docks, concrete balconies and ceilings, parking garages, cooling towers, and pipelines. A natural compliment to the new coating, Surtreat's Total Performance System provides diagnostic testing and site analysis to identify the scope of problems for each project, manufactures and prescribes site-specific solutions, controls material application, and verifies performance through follow-up testing and analysis.

  4. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Bilski, P; Blomgren, J; d'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2007-01-01

    The European Commission is funding within its Sixth Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organisational framework for this project is provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. One task within the CONRAD project, Work Package 6 (WP6), was to provide a report outlining research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterisation of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators, but also at the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities. The paper provides an overview of the report, which will be available as CERN Yellow Report.

  5. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  6. Pore corrosion model for gold-plated copper contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Glauner, Carly S.; Enos, David George

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10ppb H2S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to close the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  7. Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

    1986-03-01

    Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

  8. Preliminary observations on corrosion of carbon steel in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.E.; Coulson, K.E.W.; King, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    The anticipated development of Canada's northern territorieshas led to the assessment of new technological problems associated with living and working in arctic and subarctic climates. The nature and potential problems of corrosive attack on pipeline materials for oil and gas transmission and distribution under these conditions has been given little previous attention; therefore, practical information is not readily available. The research described to investigate the corrosion characteristics of pipeline steels buried in permafrost. The influence of ice temperature and resistivity are reported. Corrosion resistance of steel in contact with an ice/melt interface is discussed. Estimates are given for corrosion rates and potentials in ice at different temperatures. It was observed that corrosion rates decreased with decreasing temperature, but corrosion potentials increased with decreasing temperature. The ionic rejection and solution concentration effects promoted by an advancing ice face were examined experimentally and the Workman-Reynolds Effect is postulated as an explanation for enhanced corrosion of steels in soils at temperatures near the freezing point.

  9. A new probe for on-line corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Quale, J.C.; Richardson, J.A.; Strutt, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A new design of corrosion probe, suitable for use with all types of electrochemical techniques, is described. Annular flush mounted electrodes have been used to avoid disadvantages inherent in other designs. Characteristic flow conditions were established readily at the electrode surface. In addition, corrosion rates in two phase flows may be more reliably monitored. The probe incorporated a reference electrode limb which allowed potential measurements to be made at typical plant operating temperatures and pressures. The techniques used for plant corrosion measurements are described, and the problem areas in probe manufacture are discussed.

  10. Corrosion consequences of microfouling in water reclamation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Tim; Mitchell, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the potential fouling and corrosion problems associated with microbial film formation throughout the water reclamation system (WRS) designed for the Space Station Freedom. It is shown that the use of advanced metal sputtering techiques combined with image analysis and FTIR spectroscopy will present realistic solutions for investigating the formation and function of biofilm on different alloys, the subsequent corrosion, and the efficiency of different treatments. These techniques, used in combination with electrochemical measurements of corrosion, will provide a powerful approach to examinations of materials considered for use in the WRS.

  11. Sprayed superamphiphobic coatings on copper substrate with enhanced corrosive resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Bo; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Men, Xuehu; Zhu, Xiaotao; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    The oil fouling and limited corrosion resistance problem severely hindered the use of copper, one of important engineering materials, in practical applications. Herein to address this problem, we fabricated a superamphiphobic coating on copper substrate by spray coating. The resulting superamphiphobic surface supports the Cassie-Baxter regime with apparent contact angles of more than 150° and low contact angle hysteresis to water and organic liquids with low surface tension. The resulting superamphiphobic surface also possesses enhanced corrosion resistance, allowing it to exhibit a more positive corrosion potential and a more negative corrosion current density than pristine copper substrate. Moreover, the surface wettability can be tuning by varying the surface composition of the coating. This study represents a key addition to functional superamphiphobic materials.

  12. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations.

  13. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  14. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  15. Chemical Corrosion of Liquid-Phase Sintered SiC in Acidic/Alkaline Solutions Part 1. Corrosion in HNO3 Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ming; He, Xinnong; Tang, Wenming

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion behavior of the liquid-phase sintered SiC (LPS-SiC) was studied by dipping in 3.53 mol/L HNO3 aqueous solution at room temperature and 70 °C, respectively. The weight loss, strength reduction and morphology evolution of the SiC specimens during corroding were revealed and also the chemical corrosion process and mechanism of the SiC specimens in the acidic solution were clarified. The results show that the corrosion of the LPS-SiC specimens in the HNO3 solution is selective. The SiC particles are almost free from corrosion, but the secondary phases of BaAl2Si2O8 (BAS) and Y2Si2O7 are corroded via an acid-alkali neutralization reaction. BAS has a higher corrosion rate than Y2Si2O7, resulting in the formation of the bamboo-leaf-like corrosion pits. As the SiC specimens etched in the HNO3 solution at room temperature for 75 days, about 80 μm thickness corrosion layer forms. The weight loss and bending strength reduction of the etched SiC specimens are 2.6 mg/cm2 and 52%, respectively. The corrosion of the SiC specimens is accelerated in the 70 °C HNO3 solution with a rate about five times bigger than that in the same corrosion medium at room temperature.

  16. Testing and analysis of photovoltaic modules for electrochemical corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Michael; Mon, Gordon R.; Whitla, Guy; Ross, Russ, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the testing and evaluation used to characterize the mechanisms of electrochemical corrosion of photovoltaic modules - encapsulated solar cells. Accelerated exposure testing was performed on a sample matrix of cell/encapsulant combinations, and microanalytical failure analysis was performed on selected samples to confirm the correlation between the accelerated test data and the life prediction model. A quantitative correlation between field exposure time and exposure time in the accelerated multistress tests was obtained based upon the observation that equal quantities of interelectrode charge transfer resulted in equivalent degrees of electrochemical charge.

  17. Anti-Corrosive Powder Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald; MacDowell, Louis, III

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partners for a new approach in protecting embedded steel surfaces from corrosion. Corrosion of reinforced steel in concrete structures is a significant problem for NASA structures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) because of the close proximity of the structures to salt spray from the nearby Atlantic Ocean. In an effort to minimize the damage to such structures, coatings were developed that could be applied as liquids to the external surfaces of a substrate in which the metal structures were embedded. The Metallic Pigment Powder Particle technology was developed by NASA at KSC. This technology combines the metallic materials into a uniform particle. The resultant powder can be sprayed simultaneously with a liquid binder onto the surface of concrete structures with a uniform distribution of the metallic pigment for optimum cathodic protection of the underlying steel in the concrete. Metallic Pigment Powder Particle technology improves upon the performance of an earlier NASA technology Liquid Galvanic Coating (U.S. Patent No. 6,627,065).

  18. FPGA Verification Accelerator (FVAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Jane; Burke, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Is Verification Acceleration Possible? - Increasing the visibility of the internal nodes of the FPGA results in much faster debug time - Forcing internal signals directly allows a problem condition to be setup very quickly center dot Is this all? - No, this is part of a comprehensive effort to improve the JPL FPGA design and V&V process.

  19. CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-12-09

    Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel

  20. Practical aspects of corrosion fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.

    1994-08-01

    Aspects important in corrosion have been introduced. They are: (a) ``Pourbaix Diagrams`` which consider thermodynamic stability of metals as a function of electrical potential and water pH; (b) the anodic interfacial reaction rates which depend on potential and accumulation of reaction products; (c) the prediction of polarization curves based on the kinetics and thermodynamics; and (d) localized corrosion models, as this form of corrosion is a major cause of corrosion failures.

  1. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  2. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  3. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  5. Corrosion of NiTi Wires with Cracked Oxide Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racek, Jan; Šittner, Petr; Heller, Luděk; Pilch, Jan; Petrenec, Martin; Sedlák, Petr

    2014-07-01

    Corrosion behavior of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloy wires with cracked TiO2 surface oxide layers was investigated by electrochemical corrosion tests (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Open Circuit Potential, and Potentiodynamic Polarization) on wires bent into U-shapes of various bending radii. Cracks within the oxide on the surface of the bent wires were observed by FIB-SEM and TEM methods. The density and width of the surface oxide cracks dramatically increase with decreasing bending radius. The results of electrochemical experiments consistently show that corrosion properties of NiTi wires with cracked oxide layers (static load keeps the cracks opened) are inferior compared to the corrosion properties of the straight NiTi wires covered by virgin uncracked oxides. Out of the three methods employed, the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy seems to be the most appropriate test for the electrochemical characterization of the cracked oxide layers, since the impedance curves (Nyquist plot) of differently bent NiTi wires can be associated with increasing state of the surface cracking and since the NiTi wires are exposed to similar conditions as the surfaces of NiTi implants in human body. On the other hand, the potentiodynamic polarization test accelerates the corrosion processes and provides clear evidence that the corrosion resistance of bent superelastic NiTi wires degrades with oxide cracking.

  6. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  7. Fiber optic corrosion sensing for bridges and roadway surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Ambrose, Timothy P.; Huston, Dryver R.; McPadden, Adam P.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper we report the development of a fiber optic corrosion sensing system that complements and/or surpasses the capabilities of conventional corrosion sensing techniques. The sensing system is based on evanescent wave phenomena and in the configured sensor allows for the detection of general corrosion on and within materials. Based on the authors' experience installing may kilometers of fiberoptic sensors into large civil structures such as multistory buildings, hydroelectric dams, and railway/roadway bridges, we are (currently) embedding these sensors into bridge test members -- limited structures that are being subjected to accelerated corrosion testing conditions. Three Vermont Agency of Transportation bridges, one in a low salt use region, one in a medium salt use region, and the third in a high salt use region, are being selected and will be instrumented with these embedded fiber optic corrosion sensors. Monitoring of chloride penetration and rebar corrosion status will be measured during the course of a longitudinal study. The specific sensing mechanism and design for robustness (to allow survival of the embedding process during repaving of the bridges) are discussed and laboratory and initial field results are presented.

  8. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K. NY); Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  9. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  10. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  11. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin III Effect of the Previous Treatment of Sheet Material on the Susceptibility to This Type of Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    As a result of testing, it was determined that control of the rate of quenching and the avoidance of accelerated aging by heating are the only means of modifying duralumin itself so as to minimize the intercrystalline form of corrosive attack. It is so simple a means that it should be adopted even though it may not completely prevent, but only reduce, this form of corrosive attack. By so doing, the need for protection of the surface is less urgent.

  12. Galvanic corrosion of an aluminum O-ring

    SciTech Connect

    Truhan, J.J.; Chen, C.

    1984-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the extent of galvanic corrosion occurring between the components of a metal O-ring. The O-ring consists of a split toroid composed of 1050 Al and the internal component, which is a 750X Inconel spring that provides the elasticity. The galvanic measurements were made in deionized water to simulate humid conditions and in a 1% NaCl aqueous solution to simulate the acceleration in corrosion that may occur if surface contamination due to handling or inadequate cleaning is present on the surface.

  13. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  14. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  15. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  16. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  17. The Performance Analysis of Distributed Brillouin Corrosion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2014-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  18. Electrochemical noise measurements of sustained microbially influenced pitting corrosion in a laboratory flow loop system.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. J.

    1999-01-13

    Because of the chaotic nature of the corrosion process and the complexity of the electrochemical noise signals that are generated, there is no generally accepted method of measuring and interpreting these signals that allows the consistent detection and identification of sustained localized pitting (SLP) as compared to general corrosion. We have reexamined electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) of localized corrosion using different hardware, signal collection, and signal processing designs than those used in conventional ENA techniques. The new data acquisition system was designed to identify and monitor the progress of SLP by analyzing the power spectral density (PSD) of the trend of the corrosion current noise level (CNL) and potential noise level (PNL). Each CNL and PNL data point was calculated from the root-mean- square value of the ac components of current and potential fluctuation signals, which were measured simultaneously during a short time period. The PSD analysis results consistently demonstrated that the trends of PNL and CNL contain information that can be used to differentiate between SLP and general corrosion mechanisms. The degree of linear slope in the low-frequency portion of the PSD analysis was correlated with the SLP process. Laboratory metal coupons as well as commercial corrosion probes were tested to ensure the reproducibility and consistency of the results. The on-line monitoring capability of this new ENA method was evaluated in a bench-scale flow-loop system, which simulated microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) activity. The conditions in the test flow-loop system were controlled by the addition of microbes and different substrates to favor accelerated corrosion. The ENA results demonstrated that this in-situ corrosion monitoring system could effectively identify SLP corrosion associated with MIC, compared to a more uniform general corrosion mechanism. A reduction in SLP activity could be clearly detected by the ENA monitoring system

  19. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  20. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  1. Current techniques in acid-chloride corrosion control and monitoring at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Hirtz, Paul; Buck, Cliff; Kunzman, Russell

    1991-01-01

    Acid chloride corrosion of geothermal well casings, production piping and power plant equipment has resulted in costly corrosion damage, frequent curtailments of power plants and the permanent shut-in of wells in certain areas of The Geysers. Techniques have been developed to mitigate these corrosion problems, allowing continued production of steam from high chloride wells with minimal impact on production and power generation facilities.The optimization of water and caustic steam scrubbing, steam/liquid separation and process fluid chemistry has led to effective and reliable corrosion mitigation systems currently in routine use at The Geysers. When properly operated, these systems can yield steam purities equal to or greater than those encountered in areas of The Geysers where chloride corrosion is not a problem. Developments in corrosion monitoring techniques, steam sampling and analytical methodologies for trace impurities, and computer modeling of the fluid chemistry has been instrumental in the success of this technology.

  2. Automated corrosion system in a moist environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, R.L. Jr.; Calhoun, C.L.

    1999-03-19

    In an effort to assist researchers investigating the moisture-generated corrosion of metals and ceramics, a unique exposure system was developed. The initial goal of this system was to monitor corrosion ranging from a few monolayers at the outset of the corrosion process to high mass gains in more extensively corroded material. The new system uses a small robot arm for sample manipulation; gravimetric and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for corrosion-product determination; and a gas blending system to control the moisture content of the glove box in which the system is housed. The system's computer control can be configured to coordinate the examination of as many as 20 samples by periodic weighing and FTIR scanning. The computer also performs such functions as data logging of the temperature and pressure of the system and of the flow rate and moisture content of the purge gas. One main benefit of the computer-controlled robotic system is its ability to monitor samples 2 4 hours a day with precision control; this reduces problems stemming from human error or inconsistency of human technique.

  3. Status of EPRI's waterside corrosion activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, V.K.; Torok, R.C. ); Shevde, V.C.; Randall, G.A. ); Horowitz, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has instituted a program in the area of waterside corrosion. This program is designed to develop methodologies to: identify the specific corrosion problem, and then analyze the situation to help utility personnel develop a cost- effective inspection and remedial action program. To do this, there is an overview program - CHEXPERT - which identifies the types of corrosion which are likely to occur in a given situation. CHEXPERT is an expert system providing advisory and diagnostic services in this area. A number of analytical modules under CHEXPERT have been and are continuing to be developed. These modules are designed to enable utility personnel to perform the quantitative evaluations necessary in order to develop an optimum inspection program. CHEC, CHECMATE, and CHEC-CAV are inspection planning tools for single phase erosion corrosion, two-phase erosion, and cavitation, respectively. CHEC-NDE and CHEC-THK facilitate management of inspection data and assessment of worn component adequacy. CHEC and CHECMATE are currently complete and in wide use; the other modules are at various stages of development. The status, technical basis and use of all the analytical models are presented.

  4. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  5. The effect of surface roughness on the fretting corrosion of 316L stainless steel biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Aarti

    The medical device industry is still seeking answers to the mechanically-assisted corrosion (MAC) problem, which becomes increasingly important due to modularity in design. MAC manifests in various forms, some of which are fretting corrosion, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion. Several studies have been conducted to understand the causes and the factors that affect fretting corrosion. Some of the factors are the applied load, surface potential, oxide film characteristics and solution chemistry near the interface. Surface properties such as surface roughness determine the topography of the surface and the nature of asperity-asperity contact, which is a factor that would determine the mechanically assisted corrosion behavior of the interface, like the stem-neck and head-neck taper junctions in modular hip replacement devices. This study aims to understand the correlation between surface roughness of 316L stainless steel samples and fretting corrosion behavior using a variable load pin-on-disc test. It was found that the smoother surfaces are associated with lower fretting currents. However, smoother surfaces also created the conditions for fretting initiated crevice corrosion to occur more readily. Fretting corrosion regimes and the severity are thus dependent upon the surface roughness. A possible explanation could be due to the inverse relationship between the interasperity distance parameter, Delta, and fretting currents. The coefficient of friction between the two surfaces in contact however remained unaffected by surface roughness, but decreased with increasing load. Smoother surfaces, while lowering fretting corrosion reactions can enhance crevice corrosion reactions in 316L stainless steel interfaces.

  6. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Bastida, C; Martínez-Miranda, V; Vázquez-Mejía, G; Solache-Ríos, M; Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G; Trujillo-Flores, E

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems.

  7. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium.

  8. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Bastida, C; Martínez-Miranda, V; Vázquez-Mejía, G; Solache-Ríos, M; Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G; Trujillo-Flores, E

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. PMID:23376288

  9. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  10. Hot corrosivity of coal conversion product on high temperature alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.H.

    1984-08-29

    This report describes research begun under Contract AS01-76-ET-10577, most of which was continued when the same project was continued under a new number, Contract AC01-79-ET-13547. The areas studied are thermochemistry of high temperature corrosion, hot corrosion of turbine alloys and coatings, and electrochemistry of sulfate melts. A background to the problem of hot corrosion is presented first followed by a description of results obtained in the three areas of this project.

  11. Corrosion Engineers and Nuclear Waste Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-07-13

    More and more articles appear in the press daily about the renaissance of nuclear energy. Even many former opponents of nuclear energy are now convinced that nuclear energy is more environmentally friendly than burning fossil fuels. Nuclear energy does not release carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and therefore does not contribute to the global warming problem. But nuclear energy produces spent fuel or nuclear waste. Spent fuel is radioactive and requires thousands of years of isolation from plants, animals and humans. Every country currently studying the option for disposing of high-level nuclear waste has selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. It is postulated that by the very nature of these geological sites, they will contain the waste for long time, limiting the spread of radionuclides, for example, through water flow. The release of radionuclides to the environment can also be delayed by the construction of engineered barrier systems between the waste and the geologic formation. Corrosion engineers are participating in the design and the performance prediction of the engineered barriers. The principal engineered component in this multibarrier approach is the container for the waste. Beyond the metallic containers, other engineered barriers could be added to attenuate the impact of the emplacement environment on the containers. The containers will probably be concentric double walled vessels of dissimilar metals. Each vessel would have a specific function. For example, the inner container may be designed to shield radiation and provide structural support to facilitate the safe handling and emplacement operations. This inner container may be over-packed with a corrosion-resistant outer layer. The design of the different containers for nuclear waste would vary according to the nature of the geologic formation at the site of the repository. The most common host rocks for nuclear waste repositories in the world

  12. The influence of temperature on the corrosion resistance of 10# carbon steel for refinery heat exchanger tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-qing, Xu; Zhen-quan, Bai; Yao-rong, Feng; Qiu-rong, Ma; Wen-zhen, Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Based on the corrosion problem of refinery heat exchanger tubes (10# carbon steel) in the course of using, the corrosion and electrochemical behaviors of 10# carbon steel in saline wastewater were investigated by means of autoclave test and electrochemical methods, respectively. The experiment results explained the formation mechanism of corrosion products film and indicated that the corrosion process of 10# steel in the corrosion medium with different temperature was divided into two parts: one was the formation of corrosion products below 50 ̊C, the other was the formation and dissolution of corrosion products film. The corrosion rate reached the maximum of 0.195 mm/a when the medium temperature was 60 ̊C.

  13. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  14. Corrosion of rock anchors in US coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylapudi, Gopi

    anchors installed in the mines with respect to corrosion potential and corrosion current measured. The results of this research were statistically validated. This research will have direct consequence to the rock related safety. The results of this research indicate that certain corrosive conditions are commonly found in mines but uniform corrosion (around 0.01-0.03mm loss per year across the diameter) is generally not considered a serious issue. From this study, longer term research for longterm excavation support is recommended that could quantify the problem depending on the rock anchor used and specific strata conditions.

  15. Corrosion performance of alumina scales in coal gasification environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1997-02-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S and Cl as HCl. This paper examines the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys during exposure to O/S mixed-gas environments. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the pack-diffusion process, by the electrospark deposition process, or by weld overlay techniques.

  16. Behavior of aspartic acid as a corrosion inhibitor for steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kalota, D.J.; Silverman, D.C. )

    1994-02-01

    Corrosion inhibition of steel by aspartic acid (C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4]), an amino acid of low molecular weight, was found to depend strongly on pH. At a pH less than the ionization constant at [approximately]9.5 to 10 (measured at 25 C), C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] appeared to accelerate corrosion. Above the pH, it acted as a corrosion inhibitor for steel. A specially constructed potential-pH diagram for iron (Fe) that incorporated C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] showed the change in behavior was accompanied by the most stable thermodynamic state changing from an iron aspartate complex to iron oxide. Polymerized C[sub 4]H[sub 7]NO[sub 4] (polyaspartic acid) behaved in a similar manner. Some other amino acids of low molecular weight behaved similarly.

  17. Stress-corrosion cracking and surface-pitting tests of NiCrFe alloy bolts (LWBR development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, K.L.

    1983-02-01

    Accelerated corrosion tests confirmed the adequate resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the specific heats of NiCrFe X-750 and NiCrFe 600 used as bolts in the LWBR. SCC acceleration was achieved by running autoclave corrosion tests at 680/sup 0/F (well above the LWBR core operating temperatures of approximately 525/sup 0/F to 560/sup 0/F). Component stress levels were representative of maximum service stresses. No specimens from heats of either alloy suffered SCC.

  18. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  19. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  20. The Examination of Afyonkarahisar's Geothermal System Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuksagis, A.; Erol, S.

    2013-02-01

    Corrosion and scaling of metal surfaces are the major problems caused by geothermal fluids when metallic structures are used. This article describes a study of corrosion and scaling problems in the Afyonkarahisar Geothermal Heating System (AFJET) in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. Water analysis, XRD, SEM, EDX, IC, ICP-OES analyses, and electrochemical methods were used in this study. Pentasodium triphosphate (Na5P3O10), maleic anhydride (C4H2O3), and 1,3-benzendisulfonic acid disodium salt (C6H4Na2O6S2) were used as corrosion inhibitors. Tests were carried out using geothermal water from AF11 well. The experimental temperatures were chosen as 298, 333, and 358 K. Inhibitor concentrations were chosen as 1 × 10-1, 1 × 10-2, 1 × 10-3, and 1 × 10-4 mol/dm3. Moreover, mixed inhibitor solutions were prepared using the inhibitor concentrations that showed the best inhibition. The first mixed inhibitor solution showed 96% inhibition. The second mixed inhibitor solution showed 90% inhibition. The tested inhibitors act as anodic inhibitors. XRD analysis shows that there is CaCO3 aragonite scaling in the system. Increasing TDS, alkalinity, and hardness all promote scale formation. The photomicrographs from SEM-EDX and the metallographic microscope show that the tested inhibitors form a protective film on the surface. IC and ICP-OES analyses show that the concentration of Ca2+ is very high, which supports scale formation.

  1. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  2. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  3. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. Statistical modeling of corrosion-induced wirebond failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the initial results of one portion of a project to develop effective analytical tools for predicting the effect of atmospheric corrosion on the reliability of electronic devices. The specific objectives of this work were to experimentally characterize the atmospheric corrosion of aluminum-gold wirebonds and to develop a statistical-based model that describes the effect of the resulting stochastic process on the reliability of a selected electronic assembly. The experimental characterization included an attempt at accelerated aging. Modeling involved: (1) the development and validation of empirical models that describe the effects of environmental parameters on corrosion rate, and (2) the formulation and validation of a reliability-prediction model using the accelerated aging data and long-term field information as it becomes available. A preliminary assessment of the effect of three environmental factors on wirebond failure rate was performed and an empirical rate model defined. Subsequently, a statistical treatment of the rate information was used in a Monte Carlo simulation technique to determine the service life of a hypothetical electronic assembly. This work demonstrated that stochastic, corrosion-induced degradation can be successfully incorporated in classical techniques to analyze component reliability. 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine gamma-rays and calcium gamma-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine gamma-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples. PMID:16129605

  7. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  8. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  9. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  10. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  11. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  12. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  13. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  14. Corrosion protection of steel by thin coatings of starch-oil dry lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced 3 worldwide by industry. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior a 4 dry lubricant formulation consisting of jet-cooked corn starch and soybean oil on SAE 5 1010 steel. Electrochemical Impedance ...

  15. Copper and Lead Corrosion in a Full Scale Home Plumbning system Simulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The corrosion of household or premise plumbing materials (such as copper, brass, and solder) and the metal release that results from that corrosion can cause numerous problems, ranging from elevated lead and copper levels to blue water and copper pinhole leaks. If left untreate...

  16. A Comprehensive Investigation of Copper Pitting Corrosion in a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper pipe pitting is a complicated corrosion process for which exact causes and solutions are uncertain. This paper presents the findings of a comprehensive investigation of a cold water copper pitting corrosion problem in a drinking water distribution system, including a refi...

  17. Corrosion protection of steel by thin coatings of starch-oil dry lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. Dry lubricants reduce friction between two metal surfaces. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior a dry lubricant formulation consisting of jet-cooked corn starch and soyb...

  18. Corrosion Protection of Steel by Thin Coatings of Starch-oil Emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior by jet-cooked starch-soybean oil composites on SAE 1010 steel. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate t...

  19. A SIMPLE APPROACH TO ASSESSING COPPER PITTING CORROSION TENDENCIES AND DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion of copper premise plumbing in drinking water distribution systems can lead to pinhole leaks, which are a growing problem for many homeowners. Despite the fact that water quality is an important factor associated with localized copper corrosion, definitive appr...

  20. A SIMPLE APPROACH TO ASSESSING COPPER PITTING CORROSION TENDENCIES AND DEVELOPING CONTROL STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion of copper plumbing in drinking water distribution systems can lead to pinhole leaks, which are a growing problem for many homeowners. Although water quality is one factor that can be responsible for localized copper corrosion, there is not a good approach to ...

  1. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  2. Corrosion detection by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddenberry, Joshua L.

    Bridges in Florida are exposed to high amounts of humidity due to the state's geography. This excess moisture results in a high incidence of corrosion on the bridge's steel support cables. Also, the inclusion of ineffective waterproofing has resulted in additional corrosion. As this corrosion increases, the steel cables, responsible for maintaining bridge integrity, deteriorate and eventually break. If enough of these cables break, the bridge will experience a catastrophic failure resulting in collapse. Repairing and replacing these cables is very expensive and only increases with further damage. As each of the cables is steel, they have strong conductive properties. By inducing a current along each group of cables and measuring its dissipation over distance, a picture of structural integrity can be determined. The purpose of this thesis is to prove the effectiveness of using electromagnetic techniques to determine cable integrity. By comparing known conductive values (determined in a lab setting) to actual bridge values, the tester will be able to determine the location and severity of any damage, if present.

  3. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  4. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  5. Evaluation of passivation method and corrosion inhibitors for steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lee, K. Wayne; Cao, Yong

    1999-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel due to the ingression of chloride ions from deicing salt and/or seawater has been a major cause of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Typically reinforcing steel is protected from corrosion by the formation of passive film because of highly alkaline concrete environment. The film can be damaged with the introduction of chloride ions to concrete, then corrosion occurs. There are mainly three approaches to tackle this problem, i.e., protective coating, cathodic protection and corrosion inhibitors.

  6. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of biologically active solutions: The effects of anodizing and welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1991-01-01

    An understanding of fabrication processes, metallurgy, electrochemistry, and microbiology is crucial to the resolution of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) problems. The object of this effort was to use AC impedance spectroscopy to characterize the corrosion resistance of Type II anodized aluminum alloy 2219-T87 in sterile and biologically active media and to examine the corrosion resistance of 316L, alloy 2219-T87, and titanium alloy 6-4 in the welded and unwelded conditions. The latter materials were immersed in sterile and biologically active media and corrosion currents were measured using the polarization resistance (DC) technique.

  7. Influence of chromium on the initial corrosion behavior of low alloy steels in the CO2-O2-H2S-SO2 wet-dry corrosion environment of cargo oil tankers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing-he; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Peng-cheng; Lu, Min-xu

    2015-08-01

    The influence of Cr on the initial corrosion behavior of low-alloy steels exposed to a CO2-O2-H2S-SO2 wet-dry corrosion environment was investigated using weight-loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the corrosion rate increases with increasing Cr content in samples subjected to corrosion for 21 d. However, the rust grain size decreases, its specific surface area increases, and it becomes more compact and denser with increasing Cr content, which indicates the enhanced protectivity of the rust. The results of charge transfer resistance ( R ct) calculations indicate that higher Cr contents can accelerate the corrosion during the first 7 d and promote the formation of the enhanced protective inner rust after 14 d; the formed protective inner rust is responsible for the greater corrosion resistance during long-term exposure.

  8. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  9. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  10. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  11. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  12. Assessment of corrosion rate in prestressed concrete with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) sensing was employed to assess the rate of corrosion of steel strands in small scale concrete block specimens. The corrosion process was accelerated in a laboratory environment using a potentiostat to supply a constant potential difference with a 3% NaCl solution as the electrolyte. The embedded prestressing steel strand served as the anode, and a copper plate served as the cathode. Corrosion rate, half-cell potential measurements, and AE activity were recorded continuously throughout each test and examined to assess the development of corrosion and its rate. At the end of each test the steel strands were cleaned and re-weighed to determine the mass loss and evaluate it vis-á-vis the AE data. The initiation and propagation phases of corrosion were correlated with the percentage mass loss of steel and the acquired AE signals. Results indicate that AE monitoring may be a useful aid in the detection and differentiation of the steel deterioration phases, and estimation of the locations of corroded areas.

  13. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  14. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Han Byul; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Chen Guang; Paik, Jeom Kee

    2014-09-01

    In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR), Common Structural Rules (CSR), and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH) are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS), and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM). To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  15. Tuning the Internet for corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cottis, R.A.; Bogaerts, W.; Diamantidis, Z.

    1999-11-01

    The Internet provides a powerful, content-neutral mechanism for the presentation and delivery of information, but it has limitations for corrosion applications. These include the difficulty of defining corrosion specific information and the inability to accommodate commercial information. The Thematic Network described here is an open group project that aims to establish mechanisms for the indexing and exchange of corrosion information over the Internet.

  16. The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for Developing Durable Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Kou, Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-03

    Studying the corrosion behavior of catalyst support materials is of great significance for understanding the degradation of PEM fuel cell performance and developing durable catalysts. The oxidation of Vulcan carbon black (the most widely-used catalyst support for PEM fuel cells) was investigated using various electrochemical stressing methods (fixed-potential holding vs. potential step cycling), among which the potential step cycling was considered to mimic more closely the real drive cycle operation of vehicle PEM fuel cells. The oxidation of carbon was accelerated under potential step conditions as compared with the fixed-potential holding condition. Increasing potential step frequency or decreasing the lower potential limit in the potential step can further accelerate the corrosion of carbon. The accelerated corrosion of carbon black was attributed to the cycle of consumption/regeneration of some easily oxidized species. These findings are being employed to develop a test protocol for fast screening durable catalyst support.

  17. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential. PMID:21290167

  18. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential.

  19. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  20. Electrochemical Apparatus Simulates Corrosion In Crevices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshbin, S. Rachel; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Lumsden, Jesse B.

    1996-01-01

    Method of testing metal specimens for susceptibility to galvanic corrosion in crevices involves use of relatively simple electrochemical apparatus. By following method, one quantifies rates of corrosion of dissimilar-metal couples exposed to various etchants or other corrosive solutions.

  1. Home Plumbing Simulator for the Study of Copper and Lead Corrosion and Release, Disinfectant Demand, and Biofilm Activity - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    The corrosion of household or premise plumbing materials (such as copper, brass, and solder) and the metal release that results from that corrosion can cause numerous problems, ranging from “blue” water to copper pinhole leaks. If left untreated, these problems can lead to health...

  2. Positive grid corrosion elongation analysis using CAE with corrosion deformation transformed into thermal phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaitani, Ichiroh; Hayashi, Koji; Shimoura, Ichiro; Takemasa, Arihiko; Takahashi, Isamu; Tsubakino, Harushige

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries have been commercially available for more than 20 years and have been enthusiastically embraced by users of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) because of the anticipated reduction in installation and operating costs, smaller footprint and fewer environmental concerns. In Japan, communication networks are demanding reduced costs and longer life from their batteries. Among the factors limiting the life of VRLA batteries, the corrosion of positive grid material has been proven to cause elongation of the plates, loss of electrical contact and shorter lifetime. The content of Sn is also a key factor and addition of Sn in the grid alloy results in better performance in creep resistance, tensile strength and corrosion resistance [R. David Prenagaman, The Battery Man, vol. 39, September 1997, p. 16. I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. A key point is what the ratio of Sn to Ca should be, since too much Sn may lead to even worse elongation of the plates [I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. We have determined that microstructure control with a composition of lead-calcium-tin (Pb-Ca-Sn) alloy is optimal for better performance of the plates [I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. We developed a "simulation of current collector corrosion elongation" which is a technique of estimating corrosion elongation from the current collector design [I. Mukaitani, K. Hayashi, I. Shimoura, H. Takabayashi, M. Terada, A. Takemasa, I. Takahashi, K. Okamoto, Proceedings of the 44th Battery Symposium in Japan, 2003, p. 652]. Corrosion elongation occurs as the corrosion material layer grows out of the current collector metal. We resolved this problem using generally CAD

  3. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  4. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    the agitated and non-agitated solution were 2 mils/day and 1 mil/day, respectively. A mechanism by which the mercury interacts with the aluminum and silicon oxides in this simulant to accelerate corrosion was proposed.

  5. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  6. Control of fractionation-area corrosion at SRC pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Judkins, R.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Canfield, D.R.; Barnett, W.P.

    1981-10-01

    Fractionating columns at the Fort Lewis, Washington, and Wilsonville, Alabama, Solvent Refined Coal pilot plants have experienced severe corrosion. This corrosion is most serious for materials exposed in the 230 to 250/sup 0/C (446 to 482/sup 0/F) range. Corrosion rates as high as 25 mm/year (1000 mils/year) on carbon steel and 6.4 mm/year (250 mils/year) on type 18-8 stainless steels have been observed. This corrosion problem has been studied at ORNL through exposure of coupons in the columns, analysis of failed components from the pilot plants, chemical analysis of liquids from the pilot plants, and operation of laboratory experiments. The in-plant exposure of coupons has shown that certain nickel-base alloys have adequate corrosion resistance for the environment. Chemical analyses of pilot plant liquids have shown that the presence of appreciable levels of water-soluble chloride is a necessary but not sufficient condition for these oils to be corrosive. By analysis of Fort Lewis and Wilpaw Shale (Kb), Fox Hills Sandstone (Kfh), and the Hell Creek formation (Khc). Anomaly No. 31 is over an area underlain by Recent alluvium (Qal).

  7. Microencapsulation of Self Healing Agents for Corrosion Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolley, S. T.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, is a very costly problem that has a major impact on the global economy. Results from a 2-year breakthrough study released in 2002 by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) showed that the total annual estimated direct cost associated with metallic corrosion in nearly every U.S. industry sector was a staggering $276 billion, approximately 3.1% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GOP). Corrosion protective coatings are widely used to protect metallic structures from the detrimental effects of corrosion but their effectiveness can be seriously compromised by mechanical damage, such as a scratch, that exposes the metallic substrate. The incorporation of a self healing mechanism into a corrosion control coating would have the potential to significantly increase its effectiveness and useful lifetime. This paper describes work performed to incorporate a number of microcapsule-based self healing systems into corrosion control coatings. The work includes the preparation and evaluation of self-healing systems based on curable epoxy, acrylate, and siloxane resins, as well as, microencapsulated systems based on passive, solvent born, healing agent delivery. The synthesis and optimization of microcapsule-based self healing systems for thin coating (less than 100 micron) will be presented.

  8. Quantitative corrosion monitoring and detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Grant A.; Braunling, Russ

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion is a major problem for airframe operators. For the aircraft industry in general, the direct costs of corrosion are estimated at $2.2 billion. As part of their strategy to control corrosion, airframe operators constantly seek to improve their ability to anticipate, manage and identify corrosion activity. Motivated by the need for an on-line real-time corrosion-monitoring tool for industry and aircraft a prototype system and analysis approach is presented. The tool employs ultrasonic Lamb waves along with a dispersion compensated synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to detect emerging pitting damage. In order to develop an automated detection approach the noise sources of the SAFT processed defect maps were examined and modeled. The random noise was found to be neither stationary nor normally distributed. Locally varying Weibull distribution parameters are used to characterize the image noise. An algorithm is developed to quantify the uncertainty in the corrosion detection and to allow assignment of a constant false alarm probability to any region of the monitored area.

  9. Corrosion control in alkanolamine gas treating: Absorber corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, H.P.E.

    1995-12-01

    Even in 1980, when corrosion in alkanolamine units was rampant, over 50% of all acid gas purification systems was based on alkanolamine absorbents. Over the years the control of corrosion has gradually become firmer. This paper examines the reasons for corrosion and provides insight in one particular aspect of corrosion in alkanolamine units, absorber corrosion. Three factors are identified, solvent degradation, local stagnancy and exceeding the units capacity. Solvent degradation increases the corrosivity of the solvent proper by the formation of complexing compounds such as diamines. Local stagnancy allows the solvent loading level to approach equilibrium which creates a corrosive environment. Exceeding the unit`s capacity will achieve essentially the same but on a larger scale. The corrosion enhancement by interaction of a total of 12 factors is made visual and clarified. The paper examines step by step the means to prevent a number of the factors arising. Guidelines are given for design of the absorber and absorber internals, the molarity of the solvent, inhibition and the benefits and handicaps of filming inhibitors.

  10. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  11. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-30

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  12. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  13. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  14. Experimental Design for the Evaluation of Detection Techniques of Hidden Corrosion Beneath the Thermal Protective System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.; Jacoby, Joseph A.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Space Operational Space Shuttle Fleet Consists of three shuttles with an average age of 19.7 years. Shuttles are exposed to corrosive conditions while undergoing final closeout for missions at the launch pad and extreme conditions during ascent, orbit, and descent that may accelerate the corrosion process. Structural corrosion under TPS could progress undetected (without tile removal) and eventually result in reduction in structural capability sufficient to create negative margins of . safety and ultimate loss of local structural capability.

  15. Control and reduction of post-metal etch corrosion effects due to airborne molecular contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morilla, Carmen; Prieto, Pilar; Barbado, Francisco

    2001-04-01

    Ionic contamination in microelectronic circuitry can have a detrimental effect on device reliability and yield. Post- aluminum etch corrosion has been considered a critical issue in dry plasma etching of aluminum. In this work, we review the actions taken to reduce the amount of defects due to Cl- induced corrosion in the metal lines at our manufacturing line in Lucent Technologies Madrid. Two approaches were followed in a parallel way: on one side manufacturing procedures were modified to reduce at the minimum the exposure of the unprotected metal lines to the clean room environment thus it is avoided any metal corrosion caused by a possible environmental contamination. The second working line was to improve the resistance to corrosion of the post-etched metal. With this aim, our efforts were focused on the passivation step just after the metal etch and prior the photoresist strip. The influence of several parameter settings of the passivation plasma on the resistance of the etched metal to corrosion has been studied. Accelerated corrosion tests were used to monitor the intrinsic metallization susceptibility of corrosion and chlorine and fluorine residuals content in the wafer were measured using ion-chromatography. It was found that a modification in the pressure, plasma power or duration of the passivation step could have a beneficial impact on the amount of chlorine residues left on the metal lines after etch and consequently an enhancement of their resistance to corrosion.

  16. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou; Rink, David L.

    2016-09-01

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 °C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 °C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate were also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.

  17. [Microorganisms in heat supply lines and internal corrosion of steel pipes].

    PubMed

    Rozanova, E P; Dubinina, G A; Lebedeva, E V; Suntsova, L A; Lipovskikh, V M; Tsvetkov, N N

    2003-01-01

    In laboratory experiments with batch cultures of thermophilic microorganisms isolated from urban heat supply systems, the growth of sulfate-reducing, iron-oxidizing, and iron-reducing bacteria was found to accelerate the corrosion rate of the steel-3 plates used in the pipelines. In the absence of bacteria and dissolved oxygen, minimal, corrosion was determined. The aforementioned microorganisms, as well as sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, were found to be widespread in water and corrosion deposits in low-alloy steel pipelines (both delivery and return) of the Moscow heat networks, as well as in the corrosion deposits on the steel-3 plates in a testing unit supplied with the network water. The microorganisms were found in samples with water pH ranging from 8.1 to 9.6 and a temperature lower than 90 degrees C. Magnetite, lepidocrocite, goethite, X-ray amorphous ferric oxide were the corrosion products identified on the steel-3 plates, as well as siderite, aragonite, and S0. The effect of microbiological processes on the rate of electrochemical corrosion was evaluated from the accumulation of corrosion deposits and from variation in total and local corrosion of the steel plates in a testing unit.

  18. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  19. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  20. Further Analysis of Accelerated Exposure Testing of Thin-Glass Mirror Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.; Terwilliger, K.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) companies have deployed thin-glass mirrors produced by wet-silver processes on {approx}1-mmthick, relatively lightweight glass. These mirrors are bonded to metal substrates in commercial installations and have the confidence of the CSP industry. Initial hemispherical reflectance is {approx}93%-96%, and the cost is {approx}$16.1/m{sup 2}-$43.0/m{sup 2}. However, corrosion was observed in mirror elements of operational solar systems deployed outdoors for 2 years. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Advanced Materials Team has been investigating this problem. First, it was noted that this corrosion is very similar to the corrosion bands and spots observed on small (45 mm x 67 mm) thin-glass mirrors laminated to metal substrates with several different types of adhesives and subjected to accelerated exposure testing (AET) at NREL. The corrosion appears as dark splotches in the center of the mirror, with a corresponding 5%-20% loss in reflectivity. Secondly, two significant changes in mirror manufacture have occurred in the wet-chemistry process because of environmental concerns. The first is the method of forming a copper-free reflective mirror, and the second is the use of lead-free paints. However, the copper-free process requires stringent quality control and the lead-free paints were developed for interior applications. A test matrix of 84 combinations of sample constructions (mirror type/backprotective paint/adhesive/substrate) was devised for AET as a designed experiment to identify the most-promising mirrors, paints, and adhesives for use with concentrator designs. Two types of accelerated exposure were used: an Atlas Ci5000 WeatherOmeter (CI5000) and a BlueM damp-heat chamber. Based on an analysis of variance (ANOVA), the various factors and interactions were modeled. These samples now have more than 36 months of accelerated exposure, and most samples have completed their test cycle. We will discuss the results of the

  1. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  2. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  3. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  4. Aircraft crash caused by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kolkman, H.J.; Kool, G.A.; Wanhill, R.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An aircraft crash in the Netherlands was caused by disintegration of a jet engine. Fractography showed that the chain of events started with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a pin attached to a lever arm of the compressor variable vane system. Such a lever arm-pin assembly costs only a few dollars. Investigation of hundreds of pins from the accident and a number of identical engines revealed that this was not an isolated case. Many pins exhibited various amounts of SCC. The failed pin in the accident engine happened to be the first fractured one. SCC requires the simultaneous presence of tensile stress, a corrosive environment, and a susceptible material. In this case the stress was a residual stress arising from the production method. There was a clear correlation between the presence of salt deposits on the levers and SCC of the pins. It was shown that these deposits were able to reach the internal space between the pin and lever arm, thereby initiating SCC in this space. The corrosive environment in Western Europe explains why the problem manifested itself in the Netherlands at a relatively early stage in engine life. The main point is, however, that the manufacturer selected an SCC-prone material in the design stage. The solution has been to change the pin material.

  5. Combat incinerator offgas corrosion; Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal oxidation in sophisticated incineration systems has become the technically preferred method for permanent disposal of chemical wastes, medical wastes, and hazardous wastes. The waste streams processed in these incineration systems contain sulfur, chlorine, fluorine, bromine, iodine, nitrogen, and phosphorus compounds. After combustion, they all form corrosive acidic liquids when absorbed in water. The resulting solutions can cause severe corrosion problems with most common metals. Upon initial gas contact with the scrubbing liquid, the pH can precipitously drop to less than zero, simultaneously with alternate high and low temperature swings. The combination of thermal shock and severely corrosive conditions can destroy improperly selected materials in minutes or hours to result in catastrophic system failures. After the gas stream has been quenched, materials selection, while still critical, becomes somewhat simpler. In general, nonmetallic materials are used where mechanical stress levels allow their use. However, when mechanical strength becomes a major concern, the high nickel alloys must be used. This article discusses the operating conditions which scrubbing systems are subjected to in incinerator applications, and materials selection for various component parts of the scrubbing system. The use of refractories, high nickel alloys, thermoplastics, fiber reinforced plastics, and rubber coatings will be reviewed.

  6. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  7. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  8. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  9. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  10. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  11. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  12. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  13. Careful procedure cuts corrosion in CO/sub 2/ injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, T.S.

    1988-09-19

    In one West Texas CO/sub 2/ injection project, Unocal Corp., using state-of-the-art connection and testing procedures, has developed a method of installing downhole CO/sub 2/ injection equipment that virtually eliminates tubing-casing communication and its resulting downhole corrosion. In addition, the internal plastic coating of the tubulars is monitored and protected during field handing procedures. The system involves the use of a helium connection test combined with meticuluous attention to detail in the field handling and connection of the tubulars. Corrosion of injection equipment is a common problem in CO/sub 2/-miscible injection operations. The two basic mechanisms by which this corrosion occurs are from internal corrosion caused by holidays in the injection tubing coating as well as from external corrosion caused by CO/sub 2/ invading the tubing-casing annulus through minute seepages in the downhole injection equipment. This article is a discussion of the development and implementation of the procedures that led to the solution of this problem.

  14. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  15. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  16. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  17. Superheater Corrosion In Biomass Boilers: Today's Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William

    2011-12-01

    This report broadens a previous review of published literature on corrosion of recovery boiler superheater tube materials to consider the performance of candidate materials at temperatures near the deposit melting temperature in advanced boilers firing coal, wood-based fuels, and waste materials as well as in gas turbine environments. Discussions of corrosion mechanisms focus on the reactions in fly ash deposits and combustion gases that can give corrosive materials access to the surface of a superheater tube. Setting the steam temperature of a biomass boiler is a compromise between wasting fuel energy, risking pluggage that will shut the unit down, and creating conditions that will cause rapid corrosion on the superheater tubes and replacement expenses. The most important corrosive species in biomass superheater corrosion are chlorine compounds and the most corrosion resistant alloys are typically FeCrNi alloys containing 20-28% Cr. Although most of these materials contain many other additional additions, there is no coherent theory of the alloying required to resist the combination of high temperature salt deposits and flue gases that are found in biomass boiler superheaters that may cause degradation of superheater tubes. After depletion of chromium by chromate formation or chromic acid volatilization exceeds a critical amount, the protective scale gives way to a thick layer of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} over an unprotective (FeCrNi){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel. This oxide is not protective and can be penetrated by chlorine species that cause further acceleration of the corrosion rate by a mechanism called active oxidation. Active oxidation, cited as the cause of most biomass superheater corrosion under chloride ash deposits, does not occur in the absence of these alkali salts when the chloride is present as HCl gas. Although a deposit is more corrosive at temperatures where it is molten than at temperatures where it is frozen, increasing superheater tube temperatures through

  18. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  19. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products Formed in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  20. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  1. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  2. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This is the second progress report submitted under the author`s current grant and covers progress made since the submission of the first progress report in August 1993. During this period the author has continued to spend approximately one half of his time at SLAC and most of the projects reported here were carried out in collaboration with individuals and groups at SLAC. Except where otherwise noted, reference numbers in the text refer to the attached list of current contract publications. Copies of the publications, numbered in agreement with the publication list, are included with this report.

  3. THE IMPACT OF PHOSPHATE ON COPPER PITTING CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pinhole leaks caused by extensive localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes is a problem for many homeowners. Pinhole water leaks may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. A large water system in Florida has been addressing a widespread pinhole leak proble...

  4. COPPER PITTING CORROSION AND PINHOLE LEAKS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion, or "pitting", of copper drinking water pipe continues is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack leads to pinhole leaks that can potentially lead to water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs for the homeowners, as well as th...

  5. Monitoring of corrosion in ORGDP cylinder yards

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, H.M.; Frazier, J.L.; Barlow, C.R.; Ziehlke, K.T.

    1988-01-01

    Process tailings from US uranium isotope enrichment activities are stored in mild steel cylinders designed and manufactured according to ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria. Most storage facilities are open areas adjacent to the enrichment plants where the cylinders are exposed to weather; approximately 5000 cylinders are in several cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Since mild steel will corrode under these storage conditions, significant work is being done to determine general corrosion behavior of tails cylinders and to estimate anticipated lifetimes. The program under way at the ORGDP is targeted at conditions specific to the Oak Ridge cylinder yards. The work includes (1) determination of the current conditions of cylinders stored in these yards, (2) description of rusting behavior in regions of the cylinders showing accelerated attack, (3) the monitoring of corrosion rates through periodic measurement of test coupons placed within the cylinder yards, and (4) establishment of a computer base to incorporate and retain these data. The information obtained will enhance planning for continuing safe storage of the tails materials. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Higher temperature coal tar enamel fights corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Henegar, S.; Roder, B.

    1996-10-01

    High temperatures create new challenges for pipeline coatings. Cracking, adhesion breakdown and electrochemical corrosion are accelerated by higher service temperatures. A new epoxy primer/coal tar pipeline coating system utilizes the latent heat of the coal tar application to fully cure the newly developed primer to achieve outstanding bonding integrity and high temperature cathodic disbondment resistance. A key reason for this overall high performance is the marriage of a newly developed epoxy primer that provides outstanding adhesion with coal tar enamel, which provides excellent long-term water resistance. The paper describes experimental studies, pilot plant application, cathodic disbondment testing, and results from hot water soak tests and the low temperature cracking test.

  7. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment. PMID:26652422

  8. Thermally oxidized titania nanotubes enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, John; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Butt, Arman; Patel, Sweetu; Royhman, Dmitry; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T

    2016-02-01

    The negative impact of in vivo corrosion of metallic biomedical implants remains a complex problem in the medical field. We aimed to determine the effects of electrochemical anodization (60V, 2h) and thermal oxidation (600°C) on the corrosive behavior of Ti-6Al-4V, with serum proteins, at physiological temperature. Anodization produced a mixture of anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes, while the annealing process yielded an anatase/rutile mixture of TiO2 nanopores and nanotubes. The surface area was analyzed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and was estimated to be 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polished control samples. Corrosion resistance was evaluated on the parameters of open circuit potential, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, passivation current density, polarization resistance and equivalent circuit modeling. Samples both anodized and thermally oxidized exhibited shifts of open circuit potential and corrosion potential in the noble direction, indicating a more stable nanoporous/nanotube layer, as well as lower corrosion current densities and passivation current densities than the smooth control. They also showed increased polarization resistance and diffusion limited charge transfer within the bulk oxide layer. The treatment groups studied can be ordered from greatest corrosion resistance to least as Anodized+Thermally Oxidized > Anodized > Smooth > Thermally Oxidized for the conditions investigated. This study concludes that anodized surface has a potential to prevent long term implant failure due to corrosion in a complex in-vivo environment.

  9. Molten salt corrosion of SiC and Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Smialek, J. L.; Fox, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The most severe type of corrosion encountered in heat engines is corrosion by molten sodium sulfate, formed by the reaction of ingested sodium chloride and sulfur impurities in the fuel. This problem was studied extensively for superalloys, but only recently examined for ceramics. This problem is addressed with laboratory studies to understand the fundamental reaction mechanisms and with burner studies to provide a more realistic simulation of the conditions encountered in a heat engine. In addition the effect of corrosion on the strengths of these materials was assessed. Each of these aspects will be reviewed and some ideas toward possible solutions will be discussed.

  10. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-01-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  13. Acoustic emission characterization of the onset of corrosion in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetti, M.; De Cais, E.; Karim, Z.; Loreto, G.; Presuel, F.; Nanni, A.

    2012-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) is instrumental to the advancement of the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. Among nondestructive methods, acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. Results from small-scale pre-notched RC specimens aim to isolate the frequency spectrum where the corrosion first takes place. Waveform analysis critical in the definition of a prognosis model will extend the AE dataset for the onset of corrosion.

  14. Effect of macrophages on in vitro corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hiromoto, Sachiko; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Niu, Jialin; Huang, Hua; Jia, Gaozhi; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Wenjiang; Yuan, Guangyin

    2016-10-01

    The influence of cells on the corrosion behavior of biomedical magnesium alloy is an important but less studied topic, which is helpful for understanding the inconsistent corrosion rates between in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this work, macrophages were directly cultured on Mg-2.1Nd-0.2Zn-0.5Zr (wt %, abbreviated as JDBM) alloy surface for 72 or 168 hours. Macrophages retained good viability and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was greatly promoted on the alloy. Weight loss, Mg(2+) concentration, and cross-section observation results demonstrated that macrophages accelerated the in vitro corrosion of JDBM. The coverage of cell body did not affect the local thickness of corrosion product layer. The corrosion product layer had a porous inner Mg(OH)2 layer and a dense outer layer mainly composed of O, P, Mg, and Ca. The uniform acceleration of JDBM corrosion was attributed to the omnidirection diffusion of ROS from macrophages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2476-2487, 2016. PMID:27223576

  15. Effect of macrophages on in vitro corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hiromoto, Sachiko; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Niu, Jialin; Huang, Hua; Jia, Gaozhi; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Wenjiang; Yuan, Guangyin

    2016-10-01

    The influence of cells on the corrosion behavior of biomedical magnesium alloy is an important but less studied topic, which is helpful for understanding the inconsistent corrosion rates between in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this work, macrophages were directly cultured on Mg-2.1Nd-0.2Zn-0.5Zr (wt %, abbreviated as JDBM) alloy surface for 72 or 168 hours. Macrophages retained good viability and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was greatly promoted on the alloy. Weight loss, Mg(2+) concentration, and cross-section observation results demonstrated that macrophages accelerated the in vitro corrosion of JDBM. The coverage of cell body did not affect the local thickness of corrosion product layer. The corrosion product layer had a porous inner Mg(OH)2 layer and a dense outer layer mainly composed of O, P, Mg, and Ca. The uniform acceleration of JDBM corrosion was attributed to the omnidirection diffusion of ROS from macrophages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2476-2487, 2016.

  16. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  17. Suppressing Parasitic Effects in a Long Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Jing, Chunguang; Li, Chen; Zholents, Alexander A.; Power, John G.

    2014-08-27

    Dielectric wakefield acceleration is a promising concept for increasing the accelerating gradient above the limits of conventional accelerators. Although superior gradients are reported in short dielectric wakefield accelerator tubes, problems arise when it comes to efficiency and multi-meter long interaction lengths. Here we discuss possible issues and provide some solutions backed by simulations.

  18. Effect of debonded interfaces on corrosion of mild steel composites in supercritical CO2-saturated brines

    SciTech Connect

    John, Han; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2010-10-07

    The geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} is a proposed method to limit greenhouse gas emissions and has been the subject of many studies in the last decade. Wellbore systems achieve isolation of the storage reservoir through a combination of steel (generally carbon steel) and Portland cement. CO{sub 2} leakage along the steel-cement interface has the potential to accelerate corrosion. We conduct experiments to assess the corrosion risk at cement-steel interface under in situ wellbore conditions. Wellbore interfaces were simulated by assemblies constructed of J55 mild steel and Portland class G (Epoxy was used in this study to separate) cement and corrosion was investigated in supercritical CO{sub 2} saturated brines, (NaCl = 1 wt%) at T = 50 C, pCO{sub 2} = 1200 psi with interface gap size = 100 {micro}m and {infinity} (open surface). The experiments were carried out in a high-pressure, 1.8 L autoclave. The corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion scales were analyzed using secondary electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Corrosion rates decreased as time with or without interface gap. In this case corrosion rates are controlled by scale protectivity through the interface gap. Scaled steel corrosion rates were two orders of magnitude less compared with fresh steel. The corrosion scale is pseudo crystalline at the open interface. Well-crystallized scale was observed at interface gap sizes 100 {micro}m. All corrosion scales were composed of iron carbonates.

  19. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Dirk; P. A. Anderson

    1999-11-01

    ). For purposes of waste storage, this is a negligible amount of metal loss. Localized corrosion such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack is not expected to be a materials problem in the tank.

  20. Topics in Cosmic Acceleration and Braneworlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Eric J.

    Cosmic acceleration has come to be a standard, and perhaps required, ingredient in our current understanding of the universe. In the early universe, under the name of inflation, a phase of accelerated expansion is used to solve many problems with the standard Hot Big Bang cosmology. In the late universe, cosmic acceleration seems to best explain a wide variety of observations. In both cases, we lack a complete theory of what drives cosmic acceleration. In this thesis I discuss some open issues in our understanding of cosmic acceleration, both in the early and late universe.

  1. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  2. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  3. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  4. Corrosion manual for internal corrosion of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singley, J.E.; Beaudet, B.A.; Markey, P.H.

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion of distribution piping and of home plumbing and fixtures has been estimated to cost the public water supply industry more than $700 million per year. Two toxic metals that occur in tap water, almost entirely because of corrosion, are lead and cadmium. Three other metals, usually present because of corrosion, cause staining of fixtures, or metallic taste, or both. These are copper (blue stains and metallic taste), iron (red-brown stains and metallic taste), and zinc (metallic taste). Since the Safe Drinking Water Act (P.L. 93-523) makes the supplying utility responsible for the water quality at the customer's tap, it is necessary to prevent these metals from getting into the water on the way to the tap. This manual was written to give the operators of potable water treatment plants and distribution systems an understanding of the causes and control of corrosion.

  5. First stages of siderite crystallisation during CO2 corrosion of steel evaluated using in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Bridget; Ko, Monika; Laycock, Nick; Kirby, Nigel M; Williams, David E

    2015-01-01

    We use in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) to demonstrate that the formation of crystalline siderite (FeCO(3)) during the corrosion of steel in CO(2)-saturated brine - a problem of practical interest relating to the growth of protective scales on the interior surface of oil and gas production pipelines - is preceded by the formation of a colloidal precipitate in the solution and an amorphous surface layer, both assumed to be amorphous ferrous carbonate. Grazing incidence SAXS shows instantaneous film formation upon the application of an anodic potential, followed by development of a separate population of particles at later times, then by the formation of crystalline species, observed by WAXS. These observations can be interpreted in terms of crystal nucleation within the amorphous surface layer. Traces of Cr(3+) in the solution significantly accelerate the precipitation rate of the colloidal precursor and accelerate the appearance of the crystalline scale. We speculate on the significance of these observations for the nucleation, growth and morphology of the corrosion scale and hence its protectiveness.

  6. Corrosion detection in multi-layered rotocraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    ROACH,DENNIS P.; WALKINGTON,PHILLIP D.; HOHMAN,ED; MARSHALL,GREG

    2000-04-25

    Rotorcraft structures do not readily lend themselves to quantifiable inspection methods due to airframe construction techniques. Periodic visual inspections are a common practice for detecting corrosion. Unfortunately, when the telltale signs of corrosion appear visually, extensive repair or refurbishment is required. There is a need to nondestructively evaluate airframe structures in order to recognize and quantify corrosion before visual indications are present. Nondestructive evaluations of rotorcraft airframes face inherent problems different from those of the fixed wing industry. Most rotorcraft lap joints are very narrow, contain raised fastener heads, may possess distortion, and consist of thinner gage materials ({approximately}0.012--0.125 inches). In addition the structures involve stack-ups of two and three layers of thin gage skins that are separated by sealant of varying thickness. Industry lacks the necessary data techniques, and experience to adequately perform routine corrosion inspection of rotorcraft. In order to address these problems, a program is currently underway to validate the use of eddy current inspection on specific rotorcraft lap joints. Probability of detection (POD) specimens have been produced that simulate two lap joint configurations on a model TH-57/206 helicopter. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) at Sandia Labs and Bell Helicopter have applied single and dual frequency eddy current (EC) techniques to these test specimens. The test results showed enough promise to justify beta site testing of the eddy current methods evolved in this study. The technique allows users to distinguish between corrosion signals and those caused by varying gaps between the assembly of skins. Specific structural joints were defined as prime corrosion areas and a series of corrosion specimens were produced with 5--20% corrosion distributed among the layers of each joint. Complete helicopter test beds were used to validate the laboratory

  7. Alloying of metals for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hubler, G.K.; Natishan, P.M.

    1989-09-29

    The corrosion resistance of bulk metals is improved by implanting a corrosion-resistant species into the surface of the bulk metal in a layer beginning at the surface and extending to a depth of at least about 50 angstroms. An amount of corrosion-resistant species is deposited so that the oxide layer that forms on the corrosion-resistant species implanted bulk metal is composed of at least about three percent of the oxide of the corrosion-resistant species.

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  9. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  10. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  11. Environmentally friendly corrosion preventive compounds for ground support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Eliza; Curran, Jerome; Calle, Luz Marina; Kolody, Mark

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based corrosion preventive compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  13. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds for Ground Support Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery Eliza L.; Calle, Luz, Marina; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  14. Durability tests of a fiber optic corrosion sensor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K Y

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  15. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  16. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  17. Accelerating the life of transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochun, Qi; Changzhi, Lü; Xiaoling, Zhang; Xuesong, Xie

    2013-06-01

    Choosing small and medium power switching transistors of the NPN type in a 3DK set as the study object, the test of accelerating life is conducted in constant temperature and humidity, and then the data are statistically analyzed with software developed by ourselves. According to degradations of such sensitive parameters as the reverse leakage current of transistors, the lifetime order of transistors is about more than 104 at 100 °C and 100% relative humidity (RH) conditions. By corrosion fracture of transistor outer leads and other failure modes, with the failure truncated testing, the average lifetime rank of transistors in different distributions is extrapolated about 103. Failure mechanism analyses of degradation of electrical parameters, outer lead fracture and other reasons that affect transistor lifetime are conducted. The findings show that the impact of external stress of outer leads on transistor reliability is more serious than that of parameter degradation.

  18. Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-01-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  19. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  20. Sodium and hydrogen analysis of room temperature glass corrosion using low energy Cs SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearn, S.; McPhail, D. S.; Morris, R. J. H.; Dowsett, M. G.

    2006-07-01

    Corrosion affects commercial float glass production and glasses used to contain high level nuclear waste. In order to prevent the corrosion it is necessary to understand the composition of the corroded glass and the corrosion mechanism taking place. SIMS depth profiling lends itself well to monitoring the compositional changes that occur during the corrosion process. However, most studies have analysed glass that has been corroded using accelerated ageing conditions. In this work a soda-lime glass has been aged at room temperature under known atmospheric humidity for increasing periods of time. The aged glass has then been depth profiled using a low energy (1 keV) Cs beam monitoring both the sodium and hydrogen signals concurrently. The depth profiles show that in the region directly below the glass surface that is severely depleted in sodium, there is an increased level of hydrogen compared to the bulk glass indicating an increase in the water content within this region.

  1. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  2. Corrosion of metal particle and metal evaporated tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speliotis, Dennis E.

    1991-01-01

    Very high coercivity metal particle (MP) and metal evaporated (ME) tapes are being used in 8mm video and digital audio tape applications, and more recently in digital data recording applications. In view of the inherent susceptibility of such media to environmental corrosion, a number of recent studies have addressed their long term stability and archivability. These studies have used an accelerated corrosion test based either on elevated temperature-humidity or polluting gas atmospheres known as Battelle tests. A comparison of the Battelle test results performed at different laboratories reveals a large variation from one location to another, presumably due to incorrect replication of the Battelle condition. Furthermore, when the Battelle tests are performed on enclosed cartridges, it is quite possible that diffusion limits the penetration of the extremely low concentration polluting gaseous species to the inner layers of the tapes during the short time of the accelerated test, whereas in real life these diffusion limitations may not apply. To avoid this uncertainty, the corrosion behavior of commercial 8mm MP and ME tapes when cassettes without their external plastic cases were exposed to 50 deg C and 80 percent RH for 7.5 weeks is investigated.

  3. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  4. Surface- and microanalysis as a tool for studying the corrosion of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van craen, M. J. A.; Adams, F. C.; Van Beek, L. J. A.; Vanden Berghe, R. A. L.

    Corrosion phenomena of Al-1 % Si bond wires, observed after life testing of certain transistors, are studied. The following information is derived from laboratory simulation tests: the kinetics of the corrosion process, information about the corrosion mechanism and critical parameters, especially the influence of the environmental gas and Si content and finally the identification of the corrosion products and their comparison with those found for the transistor. It is demonstrated, using a combination of several surface analytical techniques, that the A1 pitting corrosion is induced and enhanced by the presence of water as a transport medium and surface electrolyte in an oxygen-rich atmosphere, with chloride ions as a stimulating and activating species. The effect of 1 % Si in the wire consists in acceleration of the corrosion rate, and is probably due to grain boundary effects. All critical corrosion parameters could be traced in the transistor system by electron microscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis and residual gas (and moisture) analysis by mass spectrometry.

  5. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  6. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  7. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  8. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  9. Al/Al2O3 Composite Coating Deposited by Flame Spraying for Marine Applications: Alumina Skeleton Enhances Anti-Corrosion and Wear Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Jianhui; Li, Hua

    2014-04-01

    Here we report aluminum-alumina composite coatings fabricated by flame spraying for potential marine applications against both corrosion and wear. Microstructure examination suggested dense coating structures and the evenly distributed alumina splats formed hard skeleton connecting individual Al splats. The anti-corrosion and wear performance of the coatings were enhanced significantly by the addition of alumina. Failure analyses of the coatings after accelerated corrosion testing disclosed the intact alumina skeleton, which prevented further advancement of the corrosion. The results suggest that there is great potential for the cost-effective Al-Al2O3 coatings with tailorable alumina contents for application in the marine environment.

  10. Prevention of corrosion-related failures in condensers and feedwater heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Agrawal, A.K.; Berry, W.E.

    1982-12-01

    The common alloys used for tubing in power plant feedwater heaters and condensers are identified and the major corrosion problems encountered in these components are described. The frequency of failure and failure modes in both components are shown to be alloy specific. Some corrosion problems are shown to be controllable through minor design modifications in the equipment and others through judicious selection of alloys. In condensers, alloy selection is most effective when based on tube location. In feedwater heaters, strict control of water quality is shown to be necessary with most alloys to minimize corrosion problems. Benefits of some auxiliary techniques for preventing corrosion attack include coating and cathodic protection of the tube sheet and cooling water intake screens.

  11. Tank 241-AY-102 Secondary Liner Corrosion Evaluation - 14191

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of 241-AY-102 (AY-102) was leaking. A number of evaluations were performed after discovery of the leak which identified corrosion from storage of waste at the high waste temperatures as one of the major contributing factors in the failure of the tank. The propensity for corrosion of the waste on the annulus floor will be investigated to determine if it is corrosive and must be promptly removed or if it is benign and may remain in the annulus. The chemical composition of waste, the temperature and the character of the steel are important factors in assessing the propensity for corrosion. Unfortunately, the temperatures of the wastes in contact with the secondary steel liner are not known; they are estimated to range from 45 deg C to 60 deg C. It is also notable that most corrosion tests have been carried out with un-welded, stress-relieved steels, but the secondary liner in tank AY-102 was not stress-relieved. In addition, the cold weather fabrication and welding led to many problems, which required repeated softening of the metal to flatten secondary bottom during its construction. This flame treatment may have altered the microstructure of the steel.

  12. HIGH-TEMPEPATURE OXIDATION AND CORROSION OF MATERIALS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this program is to gain an understanding of the corrosion chemistry and materials behavior in high temperature environments. Of particular interest are the mechanisms of attack in environments containing more than one reactive species, for example sulfur and oxygen. Sulfur is a critical impurity in almost all energy sources and leads to accelerated, and often unacceptable rates of metal degradation. In addition, the competitive formation of potentially more than one phase as a reaction product is an important fundamental problem, and can only be truly understood if the underlying thermodynamic and transport properties of the systems, and their interrelation, are identified. Sulfur can appear in a number of forms. In entirely gaseous environments it can appear as H{sub Z}S when the oxidizing potential of the atmosphere is low, such as might exist in energy conversion systems, or as SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} at higher oxygen potentials, such as those produced by fuel combustion. It may also appear in sulfatic deposits, either as a solid, such as CaSO{sub 4} in fluidized bed combustion systems, as inorganic and organic sulfur compounds in coal char, or as a liquid alkali-metal sulfate in coal-ash, or turbine-blade deposits. This last year has been spent primarily in establishing the typical behavioral patterns of common materials in these types of environments, and identifying the common mechanisms. In addition, development of definitive models of alloy reactions with single oxidants has continued. The individual projects are described.

  13. Argentinean map of atmospheric corrosivities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, B.M.; Ayllon, E.S.; Leiro, M.C.; Fernandez, A.; Moriena, G.; Varela, F.; Codaro, E.N.; Vilche, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    In the present paper the results obtained by the Argentinean research groups integrated in the MICAT (Iberoamerican Map of Atmospheric Corrosion) Project are given. Outdoor exposure in 6 test situations of different environmental conditions were performed by quadruplicate, on plain carbon steel and pure zinc, copper and aluminium, during yearly periods from 1 to 4 years. Three samples were used for the weight loss determinations while the fourth one was used to characterize the corrosion products formed through electrochemical d.c. and a.c. techniques and SEM-EDAX surface analysis. Good correlations were observed among the corrosion rates, the environmental conditions, both electrochemical techniques and the morphology of the rusts in plant and in polished cross sections. The techniques applied allowed to evidence the different protectiveness of the rusts formed on the metals, according to the solubility, morphology, hygroscopic power and pollutants content of the corrosion products` components.

  14. The corrosive well waters of Egypt's western desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge

    1979-01-01

    The discovery that ground waters of Egypt's Western Desert are highly corrosive is lost in antiquity. Inhabitants of the oases have been aware of the troublesome property for many decades and early investigators mention it in their reports concerning the area. Introduction of modern well-drilling techniques and replacements of native wood casing with steel during the 20th century increased corrosion problems and, in what is called the New Valley Project, led to an intense search for causes and corrective treatments. This revealed that extreme corrosiveness results from combined effects of relatively acidic waters with significant concentrations of destructive sulfide ion; unfavorable ratios of sulfate and chloride to less aggressive ions; mineral equilibria and electrode potential which hinder formation of protective films; relative high chemical reaction rates because of abnormal temperatures, and high surface velocities related to well design. There is general agreement among investigators that conventional corrosion control methods such as coating metal surfaces, chemical treatment of the water, and electrolytic protection with impressed current and sacrificial electrodes are ineffective or impracticable for wells in the Western Desert's New Valley. Thus, control must be sought through the use of materials more resistant to corrosion than plain carbon steel wherever well screens and casings are necessary. Of the alternatives considered, stainless steel appears to. be the most promising where high strength and long-term services are required and the alloy's relatively high cost is acceptable. Epoxy resin-bonded fiberglass and wood appear to be practicable, relatively inexpensive alternatives for installations which do. not exceed their strength limitations. Other materials such as high strength aluminum and Monel Metal have shown sufficient promise to. merit their consideration in particular locations and uses. The limited experience with pumping in these desert

  15. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  16. Determining the long-term effects of H₂S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature on concrete sewer corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L

    2014-11-15

    Many studies of sewer corrosion are performed in accelerated conditions that are not representing the actual corrosion processes. This study investigated the effects of various factors over 3.5 years under controlled conditions simulating the sewer environment. Concrete coupons prepared from precorroded sewers were exposed, both in the gas phase and partially submerged in wastewater, in laboratory controlled corrosion chambers. Over the 45 month exposure period, three environmental factors of H2S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature were controlled at different levels in the corrosion chambers. A total of 36 exposure conditions were investigated to determine the long term effects of these factors by regular retrieval of concrete coupons for detailed analysis of surface pH, corrosion layer sulfate levels and concrete loss. Corrosion rates were also determined for different exposure periods. It was found that the corrosion rate of both gas-phase and partially-submerged coupons was positively correlated with the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Relative humidity played also a role for the corrosion activity of the gas-phase coupons. However, the partially-submerged coupons were not affected by humidity as the surfaces of these coupons were saturated due to capillary suction of sewage on the coupon surface. The effect of temperature on corrosion activity varied and possibly the acclimation of corrosion-inducing microbes to temperature mitigated effects of that factor. It was apparent that biological sulfide oxidation was not the limiting step of the overall corrosion process. These findings provide real insights into the long-term effects of these key environmental factors on the sewer corrosion processes.

  17. Determining the long-term effects of H₂S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature on concrete sewer corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L

    2014-11-15

    Many studies of sewer corrosion are performed in accelerated conditions that are not representing the actual corrosion processes. This study investigated the effects of various factors over 3.5 years under controlled conditions simulating the sewer environment. Concrete coupons prepared from precorroded sewers were exposed, both in the gas phase and partially submerged in wastewater, in laboratory controlled corrosion chambers. Over the 45 month exposure period, three environmental factors of H2S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature were controlled at different levels in the corrosion chambers. A total of 36 exposure conditions were investigated to determine the long term effects of these factors by regular retrieval of concrete coupons for detailed analysis of surface pH, corrosion layer sulfate levels and concrete loss. Corrosion rates were also determined for different exposure periods. It was found that the corrosion rate of both gas-phase and partially-submerged coupons was positively correlated with the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Relative humidity played also a role for the corrosion activity of the gas-phase coupons. However, the partially-submerged coupons were not affected by humidity as the surfaces of these coupons were saturated due to capillary suction of sewage on the coupon surface. The effect of temperature on corrosion activity varied and possibly the acclimation of corrosion-inducing microbes to temperature mitigated effects of that factor. It was apparent that biological sulfide oxidation was not the limiting step of the overall corrosion process. These findings provide real insights into the long-term effects of these key environmental factors on the sewer corrosion processes. PMID:25108169

  18. Accelerated aging of polymer composite bridge materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Nancy M.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Torres, Lucinda L.; Rodriguez, Julio G.; Yoder, Timothy S.

    1999-05-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite materials and candidate UV protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Durability results and sensor data form test with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  19. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  20. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  1. A new localized corrosion monitoring technique for the evaluation of oilfield inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.L.; Griffin, A.M.; Garcia, J.G. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    Flow induced localized corrosion (FILC) is one of the major problems in the oilfield. Presently very few effective techniques are available for monitoring localized corrosion in oilfields. A new electrochemical technique was developed to provide a simple and effective way to monitor localized corrosion. The technique requires a potentiostat and a ZRA (zero resistance ammeter) as the measurement instrument. A special setup was designed to create a small anode and a large cathode. The technique was tested in a recirculating flow loop simulating FILC conditions. This technique was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor in mitigating localized corrosion. It can be further applied, both in the laboratory and in the field, to other areas where FILC is severe. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.A.

    1986-11-01

    Biological attack of metallic systems is a longstanding problem that affects all structural materials in a variety of environment and systems. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, back-flushing, organic coatings, or thermal shock. The objective was to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, it has been recognized that corrosion caused by micro-organisms can occur even in very clean systems. This article gives guidelines for the identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems.

  3. External corrosion of line pipe -- A summary of research activities performed since 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, T.R.; Wilmott, M.J.; Sutherby, R.L.; Worthington, R.G.

    1995-11-01

    External corrosion is a major threat to the integrity of gas transmission systems. This paper reviews corrosion and environmental cracking problems and their control based on more than twelve years of field and laboratory research work performed by a major Canadian gas transmission company. To protect against corrosion the company uses a dual system consisting of protective coatings and cathodic protection. Either of these systems operating properly can provide the protection necessary to prevent leaks and ruptures in line pipe. In some situations however coatings can fail in such a way as to shield a corrosion cell on the pipe surface under degraded coating from cathodic protection. Where the protective systems are thwarted, a variety of corrosion and cracking scenarios can lead to leaks and ruptures. These scenarios will be identified and assessed in terms of where they occur as well as their frequency and seriousness.

  4. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  5. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  6. Effect of mechanical cleaning on seawater corrosion of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials. Part 2. Tests with Amertap sponge rubber balls

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1981-06-01

    Corrosion evaluations were conducted on 3003 Alclad, C70600 copper-nickel, and commercially-pure titanium in natural seawater under simulated OTEC heat exchanger conditions to investigate the erosion-corrosion effects of mechanical tube cleaning under aggressive over-cleaning conditions. Test conditions for 3003 Alclad included Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination. Amertap abrasive sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination, and no mechanical cleaning as a control. C70600 was exposed to Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning with and without chlorination and with no mechanical cleaning as a control. Titanium was cleaned by abrasive Amertap sponge balls with and without chlorination and compared to no mechanical cleaning as a control. Test exposures of 8, 16, 30, 60, 90 and 180 days were made. The sequence of Amertap sponge ball cleaning utilized in the present tests significantly accelerated corrosion of 3003 Alclad. Chlorination brought about a further acceleration of erosion-corrosion of Alclad. Amertap soft sponge ball cleaning of C70600 caused significant acceleration of corrosion under these over-cleaning conditions. Chlorination somewhat decreased erosion corrosion of C70600. Titanium showed no substantial effect of Amertap abrasive sponge ball cleaning on corrosion, although measurable weight losses were incurred. Chlorination had no measurable effect on erosion-corrosion of titanium.

  7. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  8. Corrosion Protection of Launch Infrastructure and Hardware Through the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, has been a challenging and costly problem that has affected NASA's launch operations since the inception of the Space Program. Corrosion studies began at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. NASA's KSC Beachside Corrosion Test Site, which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive natural conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous efforts at KSC identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosiye environment at the launch pads. Knowledge on materials degradation, obtained by facing the highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment, as well as limitations imposed by the environmental impact of corrosion control, have led researchers at NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory to establish a new technology development capability in the area of corrosion prevention, detection, and mitigation at KSC that is included as one of the "highest priority" technologies identified by NASA's integrated technology roadmap. A historical perspective highlighting the challenges encountered in protecting launch infrastructure and hardware from corrosion during the life of the Space Shuttle program and the new technological advances that have resulted from facing the unique and highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment will be presented.

  9. Effects of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and ferric ions on the corrosion of mild steel in concentrated sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Terrell N.; Vanorden, Naola; Schlitt, W. Joseph

    1980-08-01

    Effects of nitrate ions, nitrous acid, sulfur dioxide, and ferric ions on the corrosion of mild steel in unstirred, concentrated sulfuric acid were determined in laboratory tests. Nitrate and nitrous acid at levels up to 1000 ppm accelerate corrosion. At concentrations greater than 1000 ppm nitrate passivates the steel. Sulfur dioxide and ferric ions have no detectable influence on the corrosion. Reaction mechanisms are presented to explain the observed effects. The impact of nitrogen oxides on the storage and handling of sulfide smelter by-product acid is discussed.

  10. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ALUMINA REFRACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    2001-09-30

    The initial objective of this project was to do a literature search to define the problems of refractory selection in the metals and glass industries. The problems fall into three categories: Economic--What do the major problems cost the industries financially? Operational--How do the major problems affect production efficiency and impact the environment? and Scientific--What are the chemical and physical mechanisms that cause the problems to occur? This report presents a summary of these problems. It was used to determine the areas in which the EERC can provide the most assistance through bench-scale and laboratory testing. The final objective of this project was to design and build a bench-scale high-temperature controlled atmosphere dynamic corrosion application furnace (CADCAF). The furnace will be used to evaluate refractory test samples in the presence of flowing corrodents for extended periods, to temperatures of 1600 C under controlled atmospheres. Corrodents will include molten slag, steel, and glass. This test should prove useful for the glass and steel industries when faced with the decision of choosing the best refractory for flowing corrodent conditions.

  11. [The Research on Optic Fiber FBG Corrosion Sensor Based on the Analysis of the Spectral Characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zeng, Jie; Wang, Bo; Wang, Wen-juan; Liang, Da-kai; Liu, Xiao-ying

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at meeting the need of aluminum corrosion monitoring in aerospace field, a pre-load type fiber grating corrosion sensor based on an aluminum thin tube structure is proposed. The corrosion sensor of aluminum alloy structure in-service monitoring mechanism is studied, a theoretical model about the relation of FBG reflection spectral characteristics and aluminum thickness variation is also obtained. Optical fiber grating corrosion monitoring test system based on the capillary structure of aluminum alloy is constructed by acid-base environment. The problem of cross sensitivity of temperature and strain is solved by configuring an optical fiber grating which is not affected by strain and only sensitive to temperature inside the aluminum alloy tube. The results shows that he aluminum tube packaging design not only can sense the effects of corrosion on the mechanical properties, but also can interference shielding effect of corrosion on the tube optical fiber sensing device. With the deepening of the metal tube corrosion and aluminum alloy tube thickness gradually thinning, fiber grating reflective spectrum gradually shift to the short wavelength and the wall thickness and the grating center wavelength offset has a good monotonic relation. These characteristics can provide useful help to further research corrosion online monitoring based on optic fiber sensor. PMID:27400537

  12. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Chem I Supplement: Corrosion: A Waste of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article, intended for secondary school chemistry students, discusses the corrosion of metals. The discussion includes: (1) thermodynamic aspects of corrosion; (2) electrochemical aspects of corrosion; and (3) inhibition of corrosion processes. (HM)

  14. Corrosion inhibitor mechanisms on reinforcing steel in Portland cement pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Farrel James

    2001-07-01

    The mechanisms of corrosion inhibitor interaction with reinforcing steel are investigated in the present work, with particular emphasis on effects associated with corrosion inhibitors admixed into Portland cement paste. The principal objective in reinforcing steel corrosion inhibition for Portland cement concrete is observed to be preservation of the naturally passive steel surface condition established by the alkaline environment. Introduction of chloride ions to the steel surface accelerates damage to the passive film. Excessive damage to the passive film leads to loss of passivity and a destabilization of conditions that facilitate repair of the passive film. Passive film preservation in presence of chloride ions is achieved either through stabilization of the passive film or by modification of the chemical environment near the steel surface. Availability of inhibitors to the steel surface and their tendency to stabilize passive film defects are observed to be of critical importance. Availability of admixed corrosion inhibitors to the passive film is affected by binding of inhibitors during cement paste hydration. It is determined that pore solution concentrations of inorganic admixed inhibitors tend to be lower than the admixed concentration, while pore solution concentrations of organic admixed inhibitors tend to be higher than the admixed concentration. A fundamental difference of inhibitor function is observed between film-forming and defect stabilizing corrosion inhibitors. Experiments are conducted using coupons of reinforcing steel that are exposed to environments simulating chloride-contaminated Portland cement concrete. A study of the steel/cement paste interface is also performed, and compounds forming at this interface are identified using X-Ray diffraction.

  15. Corrosion and embrittlement of high-strength steel bridge wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaas, Garry Wayne

    Suspension bridge cable inspections have revealed severely corroded and broken wires in some main cables. Accelerated cyclic corrosion studies were conducted to assess the relative effect of corrosion on high-strength steel bridge wire. Galvanized and ungalvanized wire samples were corroded under various levels of sustained loads in a cabinet that cyclically applied an acidic salt spray, dry conditions, and 100% relative humidity at elevated temperature. Mass loss, hydrogen concentration, ultimate load, and elongation at failure were measured for corroded and uncorroded samples. Elongation measurements indicated a significant embrittlement of the wires that could not be explained only by the presence of absorbed hydrogen (hydrogen embrittlement). The main cause of reduction of wire elongation was found to be the surface irregularities induced by the corrosion process. The corrosion process in a high-strength steel wire was modeled and analyzed using finite element methods. Forty-one separate FEM tests were run and this data was compared to the experimental data. In addition, for the purpose of comparison, a previously developed hydrogen embrittlement model was analyzed and its validity was discussed in detail. SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces were taken and possible causes and mechanisms of fracture were suggested by observations of the fracture morphology. It was shown through this experimental and numerical research work that the geometry of the wire, determined by the amount of corrosion, pitting, and surface irregularities, controls the ultimate elongation of the wire sample, as also confirmed by the SEM analysis of the fracture surfaces. It was also shown that, using a generally accepted hydrogen embrittlement model, there is no evidence that hydrogen embrittlement is occurring, or at least that hydrogen evolution is not the controlling factor in the loss of wire's ductility.

  16. Laboratory stress corrosion cracking studies in polythionic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Newsome, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Stress corrosion cracking caused by polythionic acid and/or chlorides is a problem in coal liquefaction pilot plants. This problem is also common in refineries and has been the subject of extensive research. This study examines (1) the relationship of the ASTM standard ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test for determining sensitization to resistance to polythionic stress corrosion cracking, (2) the cracking resistance of higher-alloy Fe-Ni-Cr materials in addition to the common austenitic stainless steels, and (3) the effect of chloride concentrations up to 1% in polythionic acid solutions on cracking behavior. We found that the ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test can be used as an acceptance test for materials resistant to polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking because of its severity. The more highly alloyed materials were more resistant to sensitization than most of the austenitic stainless steels and were virtually unattacked in polythionic acid solutions containing up to 1% chloride. Chloride increased the corrosion rate and caused localized pitting, but it did not affect significantly the number of failures or the failure mode.

  17. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  18. Materials corrosion and mitigation strategies for APT: End of year report, FY `96

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-10-30

    The authors major accomplishment in FY96 was the design and fabrication of the corrosion probes to be used ``In Beam`` during the FY97 irradiation period to begin on February 1, 1997. Never before have corrosion rate measurements been made on-line in such a high radiation environment. To measure corrosion rate as a function of beam time, it is necessary to electrical isolate the corrosion electrode to be examined form the plumbing system. Conventionally, this is accomplished with glass seals. Here irradiation of the glass may cause it to become conductive, rendering the seal useless. To overcome this problem, the corrosion probes to be used in-beam at the spallation neutron cooling water loop at the LANSCE A6 target station were fabricated with ceramic inserts which act as electrical feed-throughs. The corrosion sample is joined to the ceramic by means of a compression seal. The corrosion samples are closed end cylinders, 0.5 inches diameter x 6.25 inch length, that are constructed from Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 316L, Inconel 718, Tungsten, HT-9, and Tantalum. Because of their specialized nature, InTa Corporation, of Santa Clara, CA was contracted to manufacture these problems. As of November 1, 1996 delivery of these probes has begun and the authors anticipate having all of the probes in hand by Nov. 25.

  19. Accelerated Stress Testing of Thin-Film Modules with SnO2:F Transparent Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J. A.; Adelstein, J.; Puett, J.

    2003-05-01

    This paper reviews a testing program conducted at NREL for the past two years that applied voltage, water vapor, and light stresses to thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules with SnO2:F transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) deposited on soda-lime glass superstrates. Electrochemical corrosion at the glass-TCO interface was observed to result in delamination of the thin-film layers. Experimental testing was directed toward accelerating the corrosion and understanding the nature of the resulting damage.

  20. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  1. Anderson Acceleration for Fixed-Point Iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Homer F.

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to support research on acceleration methods for fixed-point iterations, with applications to computational frameworks and simulation problems that are of interest to DOE.

  2. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions (for example, separating the layers of barrels with slats of wood instead of sheets of plywood).

  3. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  4. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  5. Inhibition of heavy metal ion corrosion on aluminum in fresh water cooling systems using propylene glycol anti-freeze

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Corbett, R.; Krantz, B.

    1998-12-31

    Electronics cooling and environmental control systems are required in enclosed manned spaces such as the inside of spacecraft or submersibles. Because egress from such spaces may not be possible in a short time frame, coolant leaks must have minimum toxicity. For this reason, propylene glycol coolants are preferred over the traditional ethylene glycol coolants. Corrosion inhibitor formulations are well developed for ethylene glycol coolants, but there is concern that the inhibitor suite for propylene glycol systems may not be as mature. In particular, coolant systems with a mixture of aluminum and copper can develop heavy metal ion corrosion of the aluminum due to precipitation of copper ions from solution onto the aluminum. This type of accelerated corrosion of aluminum does not require electrical contact with copper, as is the case for galvanic corrosion, nor is significant coolant conductivity required for corrosion to occur. This paper presents a study of the ability of a commercial inhibited propylene glycol coolant to prevent heavy metal ion corrosion of aluminum when copper is also present in the coolant system. The inhibited propylene glycol`s performance is compared to that of reagent propylene glycol without inhibitors, a mature ethylene glycol inhibited coolant, and to tap water. The inhibitor suite in the inhibited propylene glycol was found to be as effective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion as that of the inhibited ethylene glycol coolant, while uninhibited reagent propylene glycol was ineffective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion.

  6. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  7. Accelerating optimization by tracing valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Xiao; He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose an algorithm to accelerate optimization when an objective function locally resembles a long narrow valley. In such a case, a conventional optimization algorithm usually wanders with too many tiny steps in the valley. The new algorithm approximates the valley bottom locally by a parabola that is obtained by fitting a set of successive points generated recently by a conventional optimization method. Then large steps are taken along the parabola, accompanied by fine adjustment to trace the valley bottom. The effectiveness of the new algorithm has been demonstrated by accelerating the Newton trust-region minimization method and the Levenberg-Marquardt method on the nonlinear fitting problem in exact diagonalization dynamical mean-field theory and on the classic minimization problem of the Rosenbrock's function. Many times speedup has been achieved for both problems, showing the high efficiency of the new algorithm.

  8. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31

    coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism,” has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism,” has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 “acidic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by “basic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

  9. Steam generator degradation: Current mitigation strategies for controlling corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P.

    1997-02-01

    Steam Generator degradation has caused substantial losses of power generation, resulted in large repair and maintenance costs, and contributed to significant personnel radiation exposures in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating throughout the world. EPRI has just published the revised Steam Generator Reference Book, which reviews all of the major forms of SG degradation. This paper discusses the types of SG degradation that have been experienced with emphasis on the mitigation strategies that have been developed and implemented in the field. SG degradation is presented from a world wide perspective as all countries operating PWRs have been effected to one degree or another. The paper is written from a US. perspective where the utility industry is currently undergoing tremendous change as a result of deregulation of the electricity marketplace. Competitive pressures are causing utilities to strive to reduce Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and capital costs. SG corrosion is a major contributor to the O&M costs of PWR plants, and therefore US utilities are evaluating and implementing the most cost effective solutions to their corrosion problems. Mitigation strategies developed over the past few years reflect a trend towards plant specific solutions to SG corrosion problems. Since SG degradation is in most cases an economic problem and not a safety problem, utilities can focus their mitigation strategies on their unique financial situation. Accordingly, the focus of R&D has shifted from the development of more expensive, prescriptive solutions (e.g. reduced impurity limits) to corrosion problems to providing the utilities with a number of cost effective mitigation options (e.g. molar ratio control, boric acid treatment).

  10. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  11. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  12. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  13. A cooling water system copper corrosion study

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkrabek, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    The plant has four units that have been operating normally for 12--33 years. Two of the units are 70 MW sister units that have copper alloy once-through condensers. The other two units are 350 MW and 500 MW units with copper alloy condensers and cooling towers. No cooling water related tube leaks had been experienced. Until 1993, the only chemicals used were sulfuric acid for pH control of the cooling tower systems and chlorine for biological control. The units were chlorinated for one hour per day per condenser. In early July 1992, their copper grab sample at the plant discharge to the river exceeded the weekly environmental limit. In fact, it was so high that there was a slim chance of coming in under their monthly average copper limit unless something was done quickly. The result of this incident was an extensive study of their plant wastewater and cooling systems. The study revealed that the elevated copper problem had existed sporadically for several years. Initially, copper control was achieved by altering the wastewater treatment processes and cooling tower blowdown flow path. Two extended trials, one with tolyltriazole (TTA) and one with a chemically modified benzotriazole (BZT) were performed. Optimal control of copper corrosion was eventually achieved by the application of a TTA treatment program in which the feed rates are adjusted based on on-line corrosion monitoring measurements. This report documents experiences and results over the past six years.

  14. Thermodynamics of Accelerating Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; KubizÅák, David

    2016-09-01

    We address a long-standing problem of describing the thermodynamics of an accelerating black hole. We derive a standard first law of black hole thermodynamics, with the usual identification of entropy proportional to the area of the event horizon—even though the event horizon contains a conical singularity. This result not only extends the applicability of black hole thermodynamics to realms previously not anticipated, it also opens a possibility for studying novel properties of an important class of exact radiative solutions of Einstein equations describing accelerated objects. We discuss the thermodynamic volume, stability, and phase structure of these black holes.

  15. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  19. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  20. Naphthenic acid corrosion in the refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, H.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Field tests and laboratory studies of refinery process streams are presented. The effects of temperature, velocity and physical state were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is the dominant factor in conferring corrosion resistance. The Naphthenic Acid Corrosion Index (NACI) is useful in assessing the severity of corrosion under a variety of circumstances.